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In the late 1800s, the journey to the Central Oregon Coast city of Newport, named for the city in Rhode Island, was much more difficult than it is today. People had to arrive by railroad to a destination several miles up the Yaquina River from the coast and take a boat the rest of the way. Nonetheless, the journey didn’t deter tourists determined to enjoy a stay at the beach. In fact, Newport’s first hotel welcomed guests as early as 1868. Later, the New Cliff House opened in 1913 and is on the National Register of Historic Places; it operates today as the Sylvia Beach Hotel.

A look around Newport reveals hints of its past, but much has happened in Newport since its early years. Today’s beachgoers find a city with distinct historic districts, modern additions, plenty of attractions and great seafood dining. But the fundamental reason people travel to this part of the Oregon Coast hasn’t changed: the rich ecosystem created by the Yaquina River as it meets the Pacific.

Newport is only a 2.5-hour drive from Portland, Oregon, making it an easy-to-reach getaway from just about anywhere along the I-5 corridor.

Day 1

Arrive and check in at your beachfront home away from home, the Best Western Plus Agate Beach Inn. This dog-friendly hotel has been newly renovated and offers one of the best guest experiences in Newport. Get settled, take a relaxing stroll on the beach, and then head to the hotel lobby in time for the wine reception, hosted daily. Afterward, dine in the hotel’s restaurant, Sea Glass, which features fresh-caught local seafood (start with the Dungeness crab beignets and salmon cake sliders from the lounge menu). Turn in early. You’ve got a big day tomorrow.

Day 2

You’re here because of the ocean, right? There’s no better way to experience it than riding a wave. This morning, after breakfast, check in at Ossie’s Surf Shop about a mile north of your hotel on Highway 101 (reserve your lesson and gear in advance online). You can join a group lesson or schedule a private lesson, including gear and surfboard, with an experienced, certified instructor; you get to keep the gear and board for 24 hours in case you’ve been bitten by the surf bug. If you’re a novice, you’ll be in good hands; lessons start with the fundamentals, giving you just enough exposure to surfing to venture out safely on your own.

If learning to ride a wave is not your idea of a fun morning, Ossie’s also rents kayaks and gives kayaking lessons.

You’ve no doubt worked up an appetite during your morning on the water, so grab a bite nearby at Szabo’s, an Agate Beach dining institution. (Zero in on a seafood choice, like Yaquina Bay oysters and chips or the Cajun BBQ prawns.)

After lunch, spend the afternoon exploring Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area, located nearby in Agate Beach. This Bureau of Land Management natural area occupies a narrow headland extending one mile into the Pacific Ocean. The 100-acre basalt headland was formed by ancient lava flows 14 million years ago; today it’s home to a visitor center, interpretive trails, the Yaquina Head Lighthouse (which you can tour), the tide pools and black cobblestones of Cobble Beach and abundant wildlife, including whales, harbor seals and seabirds.

Beer aficionados should check out two notable breweries. Rogue Ales Brewery is the big kid in Newport. Their brewpub, Brewers on the Bay, is in the brewery with scenic bay views; their vast tap lineup and pub-grub menu makes for the perfect pre-dinner repast.

(Don’t spoil your dinner; go for a few shared plates.) The other is Wolf Tree Brewery, a nanobrewery with a tap room just south of town in South Beach. (If you’re a sour beer fan—and who isn’t—you can taste the coastal forest in their Rake the Forest Barrel Aged Sour with Spruce Tips.)

End the day with a relaxing dinner in the historic Bayfront district at Local Ocean Dockside Grill and Fish Market. Seafood doesn’t get any fresher than at this lively and popular eatery. (The choices are plentiful, but go for one of their seafood stews, like the Fishwives Stew or the Brazilian stew called Moqueca de Piexe. The classic Niçoise salad with fresh, seared tuna is a winner as well.)

After dinner, take a bayfront stroll along the boardwalk and watch the sea lions settle in for the night, a teaser for tomorrow’s outings.

To read more find this issue at your local Albertsons, Safeway, Fred Meyer or Barnes & Noble.

The post 3 Beachy Days in Newport, Oregon appeared first on Northwest Travel Magazine.

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In March 1778, about 1,500 Natives were living in a summer village at Yuquot on the west side of Vancouver Island. Can you imagine their surprise when two sailing ships, the Resolution and Discovery with enormous white sails and manned by people with pale skins, entered the cove? This was the historic first encounter of Northwest-Coast Indigenous people with white men.

Captain James Cook had pulled in to make repairs. For a month the two parties engaged in trade with the natives providing sea otter pelts and the visitors supplying knives and metal goods. Yuquot, which means “where winds blow from many directions”, was later renamed Friendly Cove due to the welcoming natives. Today, the Mowachaht/Muchalaht First Nation, whose territory it is, is reviving the name Yuquot.

Already living in a bountiful region, the tribes were further enriched by the European goods they received in exchange for sea-otter pelts. The 13 Nootka tribes became the wealthiest in Canada, and Yuquot became known as the Center of the World

The late 1700s and early 1800s were glory years for the indigenous peoples. However, traumatic times lurked around the corner. First, the hunger for furs petered out. Then European diseases struck and, combined with cultural turmoil, by 1830 more than 90 percent of the local indigenous population had died. The federal Indian Act and residential schools followed.

Today, the Mowachaht/Muchalaht First Nation consider Yuquot, which was declared a National Historic Site in 1923, a crucial part of their heritage and are striving to make it a tourist destination.

Wanting to see this historic site, I head to Gold River, B.C., and board the Uchuck III, a converted mine sweeper, which carries freight and people. The cruise, through a landscape of inlets, islands and mountains, is stunningly beautiful.

We dock under the shadow of the lighthouse, built in 1911. With only a handful of permanent residents, Yuquot is still and peaceful, with a haunting feel of times past.

On a low ridge, a ten-foot-tall carved wooden welcome figure with outstretched arms, invites us to come ashore, and is a reminder of the past when longhouses fronted by totems lined the shore.

A church, built in 1954 after the original (1889) burned down, is now a Cultural Centre, with the interior alive with totems and colourful carvings.

While exploring, I found a totem pole lying abandoned in the undergrowth.

At his carving shed, Sanford Williams, a master carver and residential-school survivor, explains how he uses handmade tools in the traditional way. William’s artwork reminds me of Yuquot’s glorious past, and is a sign that recovery is underway.

Book your own day cruise from Gold River to Friendly Cove on the MV Uchuck III with Get West Adventure Cruises at getwest.ca/cruises/friendly-cove-cruise. Gold River is about a five-hour scenic drive from Victoria. A good hotel choice in Gold River is the Lodge at Gold River (thelodgeatgoldriver.ca).

The post THE CENTER OF THE WORLD appeared first on Northwest Travel Magazine.

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Summer Events Abound

Idaho Craft Spirits Festival

This Thursday, June 27, the Idaho Craft Spirits Festival will feature Idaho distilleries and their small-batch brews throughout restaurants and bars in Downtown Coeur d’Alene from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Downtown Coeur d’Alene Brew Fest

If you can’t make it this Thursday, mark your calendar on Saturday, July 6, for the Downtown Coeur d’Alene Brew Fest. Tickets are on sale now and include six 5oz pours, a commemorative pint glass, and the ability to purchase extra pints for just $2.

Kootenai County Farmers’ Market

The market, which has run annually since 1986, takes pace each Wednesday afternoon from May through October.

Summer Concerts at Riverstone

Finally, head to Riverstone Park for their summer concert series. Each Thursday from June 27 through August 29 (barring July 4), a free concert in the park highlights artists performing jazz, blues, folk, country and more. A special concert on Saturday, August 17, features the CDA Symphony.

Fun is always in town

It’s the reason everyone loves this area. Get out and enjoy nature no matter the season. They have lots of ways to do it—by land, sea, air, snow, horse, raft—you name it.

As the weather starts to warm, it’s time to head outside. Take your pick from golfing, hiking, paddling, climbing, biking, or however else you like to play. Summer is also a great time to plan a trip to Silverwood Theme Park.

Lake Coeur d’Alene

The Coeur d’Alene area is surrounded by dozens of lakes left behind by the glaciers from the ice age. There are more than 55 lakes within easy driving distance of Coeur d’Alene, but none more scenic and full of activities than Lake Coeur d’Alene itself.

There is something magical about Lake Coeur d’Alene that’s hard to define, but begins with the spectacular North Idaho sunsets and moonrises, the plunge of an osprey after a fish, the glowing lights of downtown Coeur d’Alene reflecting across its waters at night. The perfect place for your next vacation.

There’s something for everyone in Coeur d’Alene

Local activities and attractions range from the free and family-friendly to thrilling outdoor adventures—and just about everything in-between.

Summer in Coeur d’Alene is filled with epic attractions like parasail rides, zip-lining, boating, float planes and of course the northwest’s largest theme park. Winter brings lit-up streets, dinner boat cruises, miles and miles of ski runs, warm indoor water parks and plenty of warm food and hot music acts.

Coeur d’Alene combines all the ingredients required for a successful family getaway, meeting or conference. Start planning your next vacation or business trip now at coeurdalene.org.

Sponsored Content

The post Summer Events Update: Countless Ways to Play in CDA appeared first on Northwest Travel Magazine.

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WHETHER IT’S COOKING, BAKING, BREWING, winemaking or distilling, when stripped down to their basic elements, all facets of fine food and drink are built upon a foundation of science and artistry. In addition, an individual’s understanding of flavor profiles and recipe development, overlaid with varying degrees of intuition, hard work and natural talent, result in end products that can range from substandard to sublime.

There are those who have excelled in one category of the culinary arts that have chosen to see how well their talents translate into another. It makes sense on paper, but how often do those brave souls pull it off? One shift that has produced real success stories is that from chef to brewmaster. Here’s a short list of notable Northwesterners that have traded in salt and pepper for malt and hops—and flourished in the process.

Alan Sprints, Hair of the Dog Brewing Co. (hairofthedog.com): Sprints moved to Portland in 1988 to go to culinary school. He graduated from Le Cordon Bleu with honors, but at the same time he was being lured by the siren song of the region’s craft beer culture. He entered the scene by joining the Oregon Brew Crew (a homebrew club) and meeting several craft-beer pioneers. Following his heart, he opened the Hair of the Dog Brewing Company in 1993. Driven by creativity, Sprints became one of the first brewers in America to specialize in bottle-conditioned and barrel-aged beers. The brewpub also benefits from Sprint’s culinary background. The food menu incorporates local produce and proteins with their own house-made pickles, baked goods and cured meats.

Will Leroux, Public Coast Brewing Co. (publiccoastbrewing.com): Leroux spent many hours by his mother’s side in the kitchen. His love for food and everything it could do for the soul eventually led him to the New England Culinary Institute and a three-decade-long career as a chef. Leroux was serving as the Culinary Director for the Martin Hospitality Group, which includes such Cannon Beach cornerstones as Stephanie Inn and Wayfarer Restaurant, when the group opened Public Coast Brewing. Having been a home-brewer for several years, Leroux wanted to give it a go on a larger scale, and after taking a month to train at Big Dogs Brewing in Las Vegas, he returned to take over the brewmaster role at Public Coast. It didn’t take Leroux long to get his beer chops—he recently earned two gold medals for his ’67 Blonde Ale, one at the Oregon Beer Awards and one at the World Beer Cup.

Whitney Burnside, 10 Barrel Brewing (10barrel.com/pub/portland): Burnside grew up in Issaquah, Washington, and after attending the Johnson & Wales Culinary School in Denver, she returned to the Northwest to serve an internship at the legendary Herbfarm in Woodinville. She was eventually tasked with taking over the cheese-making program and fell instantly in love with the fermentation process. She started homebrewing as a means of exploring fermentation further. After that, she was off to the races with a fast and furious ascension through the brewing ranks. Burnside first took an internship at Portland’s Laurelwood Brewpub followed by an assistant brewer position at Upright Brewing. She then moved north to brew for Elysian Brewing in Seattle before coming back down to Oregon to work for Pelican Brewing where she earned a bronze medal at the 2014 Great American Beer Festival for Poire, a Belgian-style fruit beer. And since 2014, she has been the head brewer at 10 Barrel Brewing’s Portland location.

The post FROM CHEF TO BREWMASTER appeared first on Northwest Travel Magazine.

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A large patch of forest in Oregon’s Northern Willamette Valley has been converted to a playground for thrill seekers. There, people not only commune with the trees, but climb them, leap from them, zipline between them and walk from one to the other on aerial obstacle courses. Tree-to-Tree Aerial Adventure Park has been designed for all ages and skill levels, so everyone can feel comfortable during their adventure in the trees.

Adventurers embark on a self-guided obstacle course traveling from tree to tree using aerial trails of wobbly bridges, tightropes, balance beams, more than 14 zip lines and more, all set high in the trees. Safety is the number one concern, so adventurers are securely strapped in for the course.

The zipline includes an adrenaline-pumping 1,280-foot-long super zip. Zipliners enjoy breathtaking views of Hagg Lake, the surrounding forests and nearby mountains. An optional visit to the Monkey Grove lets courageous guests climb 40 feet straight up a tree. And the Tree Top Plunge let’s the more fearless leap off a 65-foot platform. The park even offers an Adventure Village gearedfor little adventurers, ages 2 to 8.

Guests can mix and match their adventures to get the experiences they want or purchase an All-Adventure Pass to experience every attraction in the park.

Book your adventure online at tree2treeadventurepark.com. Find out more about visiting the Tualatin Valley area, just outside Portland, at tualatinvalley.org.

The post TREE-TO-TREE AERIAL ADVENTURE PARK appeared first on Northwest Travel Magazine.

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Northwest Travel Magazine by Northwest Travel Staff - 2w ago

Spring in southeastern Washington is an incredibly beautiful time of year to get outdoors. Clusters of balsamroot flowers burst open among the sagebrush and grasslands, making a patchwork of color that brings new life to the shrub-steppe terrain. In the Tri-Cities area, a network of trails lets you easily explore this landscape on a day hike and still finish the day at one of the local wineries.

Candy Mountain Trail is a relative newcomer to the area’s network of trails. Along the way, you’ll be rewarded with panoramic views from the White Bluffs over the Columbia River to Horse Heaven Hills. At the summit, it has 360-degree views that include Mt. Adams and Mt. Rainier.

Keep an eye out for the birds that frequent the mountain, including kestrels, nightjars, magpies, chukars, quails and horned larks.

You’ll have a choice of two trails on Candy Mountain—the Main Trail and the Loop Trail. The 3.6-mile (round trip) Main Trail takes you to the summit and is open to hikers, mountain bikers and equestrians. Dogs are welcome on a leash. From trailhead to summit, it’s a steady climb with a 555-foot elevation gain, much of it on a 10-percent grade. Along the way, you’ll pass an erratic boulder that marks the maximum surface elevation of Lake Lewis, the temporary lake created during the Ice Age Flood

The Loop Trail is shorter and easier but does not go to the summit.

For more information about the trail, go to friendsofbadger.org/ making-the-candy-mountain-trail. Plan your Tri-Cities getaway at visittri-cities.com.

The post Candy Mountain Trail appeared first on Northwest Travel Magazine.

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Pronghorns sprint across the arid plains, tendrils of dust dancing over sagebrush as they disappear into the distant heat mirage. Their speed affirms why these iconic denizens of the American West are so perfectly adapted to their high-desert domain here on southeast Oregon’s sprawling Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge.

Stretching 20 miles north to south, Hart Mountain is a huge tilted fault block rising
to 8,024 feet at Warner Peak and 7,724 feet at Hart Peak. The steep western scarp of the mesa-like monolith hangs precipitously 3,500 feet above Warner Valley, forming rugged canyons, sheer cliffs, and lichen-tinged spires. Narrow gorges incise the mountain’s gently sloping east foot, which slants off into the Guano Creek basin, among southeast Oregon’s most desolate places.

Composed of four immense counties, southeast Oregon is bigger than South Carolina. Lake County itself, home of the refuge, is nearly the size of New Hampshire, but its population density is less than that of Alaska. Hart Mountain Refuge dramatically personifies the region’s expansive, pervasive wildness, a land of sagebrush steppe, juniper uplands and sprawling shiny playas.

Morning sun erupts early on the ramparts of Hart Mountain, illuminating a refuge that encompasses 271,000 acres—almost 500 square miles. This massive preserve was dedicated in 1936 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt as a “…range and breeding ground for [pronghorn] antelope and other species of wildlife…”

At the time, the American pronghorn was imperiled throughout its range. In 1700, some 35 million pronghorns roamed the American West and Great Plains, but relentless hunting reduced numbers to less than 20,000 by the 1920s. Today, thanks to enlightened management, which includes refuges such as Hart Mountain and adjacent Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in Nevada, pronghorn numbers have rebounded to about 1 million animals continentwide.

Road Warrior

Lack of development is an alluring hallmark of the refuge. Only a single regularly maintained tour route—Blue Sky Road—penetrates the mountain, with tire-busting jeep trails branching off into the desert (the spur road into Hot Springs Campground is also maintained). The main access road (Hart Mountain/Rock Creek Road) switchbacks scenically up from Warner Valley to reach the spartan refuge headquarters where a small visitors center, frequently unstaffed, provides information and paper maps.

Often the best way to view wildlife is by vehicle, and while an SUV or pickup is ideal, Blue Sky Road and Hot Springs Road are generally easy to navigate by passenger car from summer through mid-autumn. Spur roads on the refuge are best left to high- clearance four-wheel drive rigs. Regardless of what you drive, carry a good spare tire (two if you venture onto the secondary roads), shovel, and extra water.

Early morning and evening are the best times to encounter the refuge’s abundant wildlife. Pronghorns abound, coyotes and mule deer are common; but the mountain is also home to bobcats, bighorn sheep and jackrabbits; various reptiles slither and crawl, including western rattlesnakes—if you see one, enjoy the experience and keep a respectful distance. Bird life abounds, from striking loggerhead shrikes in the sagebrush to soaring golden eagles overhead. The iconic bird of the refuge is the greater sage-grouse, a robust gamebird of the sagebrush plains, most easily seen at the crack of dawn along the roads.

To read more find this issue at your local Albertsons, Safeway, Fred Meyer or Barnes & Noble.

The post HIGH ON OREGON’S HART MOUNTAIN appeared first on Northwest Travel Magazine.

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Located northeast of Seattle in North Cascades National Park, Skagit Tours offers spectacular scenery in one of the nation’s most rugged parks. This makes it an exciting destination for an epic road trip.

Seattle City Light offers four excursions, including the Diablo Lake and Lunch tour which features a cruise of the glacier-fed, emerald waters of Diablo Lake. The Dam Good Chicken Dinner and Ladder Creek Falls by Night tour serves tradition on a platter with its famous chicken dinner—a custom (and recipe) that dates back to the 1930s. All tours highlight the utility’s long-standing, hydropower legacy.

Whether it’s the majestic mountains, glistening lakes, wildlife, solitude or the tours’ camaraderie, you’ll breathe easier this summer by registering for a tour at skagittours.com.

Sponsored Content

The post Skagit Tours: Spectacular Scenery and Fun in the North Cascades appeared first on Northwest Travel Magazine.

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Headquartered in Portland, Oregon, VIP Hospitality’s several local coastlines and cities. With their focus on exceptional service and maximizing value and goal to be the best in the market, you can’t go wrong at one of their seven hotels in Washington and Oregon. Here are two top picks from Northwest Travel & Life:
 
The Coho Oceanfront Lodge
Lincoln City, OR
A wide sand beach and the Pacific surf become your back yard at The Coho Oceanfront Lodge in the heart of Lincoln City on the Central Oregon Coast. This spectacular oceanfront setting coupled with a wide variety of fresh, comfortable guest rooms, great amenities, warm hospitality and panoramic views keep guests coming back time after time. And it’s within walking distance to restaurants, cafes, art galleries and local shops. Learn more at thecoholodge.com.
 
EVEN Hotel Eugene
Eugene, OR
Whether visiting Eugene for game day, business or a personal wellness getaway, at EVEN Hotel Eugene you will eat well, rest easy, keep active and accomplish more. The amenities and staff are all about guest wellness and wellbeing. EVEN Hotel Eugene is the closest hotel to Autzen Stadium and is just minutes from Downtown Eugene, Alton Baker Park, the Willamette River, and the University of Oregon. The hotel features fitness and meeting space, an indoor swimming pool, spa, an activity lounge and the restaurant Cork & Kale. To plan your stay, visit ihg.com/evenhotels.
 
Get to know their other five hotels at viphgroup.com.

The post VIP Hospitality’s Stunning Northwest Hotels appeared first on Northwest Travel Magazine.

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Have you ever thought about staying in Seattle without paying those Seattle prices? The hub of the tech industry is a nice place to visit but can be hard on your wallet if you play your cards wrong.

Some of the best things about Seattle are found a few minutes north of the Emerald City. And they can often be less expensive than the “tourist-traps.” In Seattle NorthCountry’s Urban Basecamp, you can lodge affordably and make day trip forays into both local and international culture. Here are your best bets:

LYNNWOOD

Lynnwood is seriously the best place to eat. It’s hard to overhype this place. At first blush, the city appears to be a series of strip malls until, upon closer inspection, you discover that most of the strip malls are actually tiny enclaves of authentic international cuisine.

Expect to find the tastiest gyros, pho, tofu, noodle dishes and more. You can eat your way around the world without leaving the city limits.

Lynnwood is also home to Q Spa and Olympus Spa. If you’re heading out of town for a digital detox, treat your body and soul as well with an immersive self-care experience. Enjoy pools, wraps, steam rooms and a full day of self-care.

Check out the “Barcades,” which are what they sound like—bars plus arcades; video games for adults. It also has “nerd culture” in spades—comic book shops, video game stores, etc.

Or, if you’re in the mood, you can plain old “shop til you drop” in and around the vicinity of Lynwood’s Alderwood Mall. The mall is home to 152 stores, restaurants, plazas and atriums. Grab a coffee to pace yourself—there’s plenty of luxury retail in this city just 15 miles north of Seattle.

BOTHELL

When in Bothell, pick up Salish Sea-fresh oysters at the PCC natural foods grocery store, and stroll through downtown Bothell for fresh baguettes, coffee and boutique window shopping. Bothell is a short bicycle ride away from Woodinville wine country on the Sammamish River Trail.

Your best bets for dining are Russell’s—a seasonal restaurant located inside a refurbished old barn. It’s classy in there. If you’re planning to stay in a hotel and want to cook for yourself, be sure to pick up ingredients and excellent beverages at Central Market in Mill Creek.

There’s no wrong way to stay in Seattle NorthCountry. The right time to visit is anytime. To learn more, go to seattlenorthcountry.com/blog/the-seattle-hack.

The post The Seattle Hack is Seattle NorthCountry’s Urban Basecamp appeared first on Northwest Travel Magazine.

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