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Starbucks is best known for its tempting pastries, names on cups and sparkly seasonal coffees. But, like many high street chains, it has a few healthy tricks up its sugary sleeves.

Plus, with the Nutrifix app at hand, it’s easier than ever to navigate the menu with nutritional clarity and make informed dietary decisions that meet your fitness goals.

We’ve decided to piece together a nutritional guide to Starbucks and show some of the best healthy options available.

To Breakfast!

When it comes to coffee shops, it’s all too easy to break fast in beige. And with deliciously tempting buns, biscuits and pastries galore piled up by the counter it’s hard to resist.

But fear not, there are a few healthy hacks to help you boot the beige for something delicious AND nutritionally optimised.

The protein-packed post-workout breakfast… 1# The New York Salt Beef Bagel

If you’re looking to fill your breakfast boots with something meaty, then look no further than this thoroughly beefy bagel.

The Starbucks New York Salt Beef Bagel provides 490 kcals, 32g of protein and 60g of carbs, so great to replenish tired muscles post-workout.

Related: 7 Best Plant-Based Lunches Bursting With Protein.

2# The Smoked Salmon Bagel

The Starbucks Smoked Salmon Bagel is another solid post-exercise option, providing 472 calories, 24g of protein, 58g of carbs, and 14g of fats.

Salmon is rich in omega 3 fatty acids, a good source of potassion and high in B vitamins. These benefit brain and joint health as well as arterial function (1).

Related: Healthy Fats: Sorting the Bad from the Good 

For the veggies… 3# Classic Oatmeal

Don’t be fooled by the pasty pics, the Starbucks Classic Oatmeal is bursting with nutrients and provides a medley of health benefits.

Oats are rich in antioxidants, high in fibre and proven to lower LDL cholesterol (2). Not to mention the fact they’re filling and a great source of carbs to keep you energised throughout the day.

A Starbucks classic pot contains 24g of protein, 14g of fats, 58 grams of carbs and provides 872 calories.

Now, for lunch…

The healthy Starbucks lunchtime selection is fairly diverse and nutritious! There are a number of options for the meaty, the veggie, the fishy and the gluten-free. So if your dietary preference is tricky to cater for and you’re up high street creek without a paddle (note: long-winded metaphor where the paddle represents Nutrifix app) rest assured Starbucks has something for you!

Here’s a selection of our fave healthy Starbucks lunchtime hacks.

4# Gluten Free Chicken Pesto Panini

This is a great little Starbucks health hack packed with protein and healthy carbs minus the gluten. Another great post workout option with less chance of blowing you up with bloat.

Related: Is Gluten Bad For You? 

This Chicken Pesto Panini provides 562 calories, 29g of protein, 38g of carbs an impressive 38g of fibre. It’s not often you find a panini with much in way of fibre either! Fibre’s great for your digestive health.

The Lean Lunch Option… 5# Firecracker Chicken & Giant Cous Cous

For a lean option popping with fiery flavour and crunchy veg, the Firecracker is not one to miss!

This colourful medley has only 5g of fat (of which only 1g is saturated), 30g of protein, 69g of carbs and 448 calories. So a great dish to consider if you’re watching your fat and/or caloric intake.

For the Vegans… 6# The BBQ Vegan Wrap with Jackfruit & Slaw

A rainbow wrap bursting with vitamins and healthy carbs but low in calories is the bbq jackfruit.

This lean lunch is loaded with veggie goodness to keep your gut happy. Plus, it’s wrapped in a tasty whole grain sheath to keep you fuelled-up with slow release energy throughout the day.

This tasty vegan wrap is only 286 kcals and provides 42g of carbs, 8g of protein and 9g of fats.

An Immune Booster… 7# The Grilled Veg & Grain Salad Bowl 

Another rainbow option to boost your immune system, ease digestion and give you an all-round healthy glow!

The Grilled Veg & Grain Salad bowl packs 302 calories, 15g of protein, 14g of fats and 26g of carbs to keep you full and energised throughout the day.

A seriously healthy Starbucks lunchtime option that gets a big Nutrifix tick!

The Healthy Starbucks Afternoon Snack… 8# Smoked Almonds 

Sometimes when it comes to high street snacking it’s best to keep things simple.

Ingredients: Almonds.

High in protein, healthy fats, fibre, antioxidants and vitamin E. They’re also naturally anti-ageing thanks to their anti-inflammatory properties and linked with lower rates of heart disease, cancer and Alzheimers (3)

A pack of the smoked Starbucks almonds provide 305 kcals, 13g of protein, fats, carbs and 5g of fibre.

A couple of naughties to look out for…

As a bonus, we thought we’d throw in a couple of Starbucks’ less healthy options so can remain extra nutritionally mindful when choosing your snack!

Luxury Fruit Toast

The price you’d pay for this luxurious, sugary breakie option is a steep one. This Starbucks fruit toast packs 39g of sugar and hits in at 455 calories. Ouch!

Choc Chunk Shortbread

This sinfully saturated treat is loaded with 19g of sat fat, 26g of sugar and 514 calories.

As with most shortbread biscuits, the main culprit for those sat-stats is butter!

Related: Is Rapeseed Oil Healthy? We Asked A Nutritionist. 

To access the high street nutritional transparency you deserve

Download the Nutrifix app. 

The post 8 Healthy Starbucks Super-Hacks | The Nutrifix Guide appeared first on Nutrifix | Find Your Healthy | Nutrition App.

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“What do you want for lunch?”
“Something healthy.”

If you’ve ever had a conversation like this and still struggled to find healthy high street eats, or always end up with the same dull salad (that you suspect maybe isn’t that healthy), or simply want to find the most nutritious meals when you’re on the go, then this exclusive Nutrifix guide is for you.

We’ve scouted the UK’s favourite eateries for their healthiest options, comparing old favourites with obscure menu items and looking for easy swaps you can implement to make eating out as healthy as knocking up a nutritious meal at home.

Give it a read or save it to your phone, and next time you’re hungry and on the go, find something tasty to eat with the confidence that you’re helping your health.

Your guides

Meet our expert and most-of-the- time healthy-eating Nutri x crew. Combing menus and crunching mountains of nutritional data so you don’t have to.

Joel Burgess
Nutrifix CEO

When injuries put paid to a competitive rugby career, Joel moved into the restaurant and food industry – then, after realising just how easy it is to fall off the healthy eating bandwagon, created Nutrifix to help ordinary people eat better

 

 

 

Joel Snape
Editor

With over a decade of experience writing about fitness, Joel’s competed in strongman competitions, CrossFit and MMA, and tried every diet from Paleo to intermittent fasting. He’s also editor-at-large for Men’s Fitness magazine.

 

 

 

Ruth tongue
Nutritionist

An MSc qualified Nutritionist with over a decade of experience coaching everyone from athletes to schoolchildren, Ruth spends as much time training for marathons as she does researching nutrition or perfecting her own healthy recipes.

 

 

 

How we made these choices

It’s not just about the numbers – here’s our selection criteria, explained:

Calories and Macros This is the stuff you can see on most menus, and the simplest way to make a selection. Yes, you should look for hidden high- calorie traps, but the most low-cal option isn’t always best: we’ve aimed to select meals that have a decent helping of protein – 20- 30g is ideal – to keep you full and stave o hunger pangs, with moderate fat and carbs.

 

Sugar and Salt Not all calories are created equal – 200 calories from chicken breast and 200 from refined sugar will have a dramatically different effect on your body – so we’ve aimed to keep sugar intake low to keep you below 30g per day. We’ve also aimed to keep salt low – less than 1.5g per meal is the aim, since your recommended intake is 4-6g per day.

 

Healthy fat You need fat in your diet – aiming for 30% of your calories from healthy fats is a good goal – but there’s a big difference between mono and polyunsaturates (found in avocados, olive oil and nuts) and processed trans fats – most often found in baked and fried foods, margarine and vegetable oils. Saturated fats are a trickier area: generally, you should aim to get them from good-quality meat or dairy, rather than fried food or processed meat. We’ve picked with that in mind.

 

Food Quality Yes, quantities are important, but so is this: free-range animals, for instance, often have a more healthy profile of omega 3:6 fats than their cage-reared brethren. Similarly, there’s some evidence that organic food is better from a nutritional perspective – so, where shops o er an option, we’ve aimed to choose higher-quality food.

 

Good Carbs and Nutrient Density Ideally, you should aim to get your carbs from unrefined whole foods, including whole grains, fruit and vegetables. You should also aim for a rainbow of colourful veg and dark, leafy greens – even if they have the same calories, peppers and spinach beat iceberg lettuce. We’ve chosen options that give you the biggest nutritional bang for your buck.

 

Tasty Last but definitely not least – we want your meal to taste good! Eating healthy shouldn’t mean you have to compromise on flavour, and we’ve selected food that get’s the double thumbs up from our taste buds as well as being nutritionally beneficial.

 

Costa : top up your-omega 3s with a tuna nicoise

The dark horse of coffee has been going since 1978 – its first store opened in London’s Vauxhall Bridge Road – but they’re expanding fast, with coffee machines in service stations and Sainsbury’s offering the same beans as their regular outlets. They’re also a regular fixture of motorway services, airports and cinemas – so it’s worth knowing what you’re getting.

Worth mentioning: Costa is the only coffee chain in the UK that only uses sustainably grown beans sourced from Rainforest Alliance Certified farms, which encourage farmers to grow crops and manage ranchlands in a way that looks after the land for the long-term. It also offers social, economic and environmental benefit to farmers, such as access to schools and healthcare.

Nutrifix Hero: The Roast Chicken Salad Sandwich is your low-cal, high-protein champ, but steer clear of the gluten-free option: it’s much lower in protein. 

For fat loss: Keeping it low-cal? The Tuna Nicoise Salad is only 219, with a decent hit of protein and some potassium-rich chives, with eggs for your omega-3s.

The snack: Get the Fruit & Nut Mix: it gives you a blend of almonds, cashews and walnuts – a much better option than a bag of peanuts, and high in magnesium, healthy fats, and Vitamin E.

The vegetarian option: The Italian Mozzarella, Tomato & Basil Panini is one of the higher-calorie breads on the
menu, but it’s the highest protein by far: the Emmenthal And Mushroom Toastie is a decent second option.

Vegans: you’re stuck with the fruit/nut selections and the high-sugar Fruity Crumble.

Avoid: You know you should skip the cakes, but be careful elsewhere: the Fruity Flapjack, for instance, has almost three times the sugar of the Ultimate Jammy Biscuit. Also give the Dried Mango a miss: it’s got 22.9g of sugar in a packet that won’t do anything to sate hunger pangs.

What I drink: ‘An Americano with hot milk because I drank coffee black for years – because I thought that’s what I ’should’ drink it– when in reality I prefer the taste with milk. I don’t count macros – I focus more on intuitive eating.’
-Nicola Jane Hobbs, author and yoga instructor

Pret A Manger a wealth of goodness (if you can resist the cakes)

Once your basic coffee-and-a-croissant stop-off , Pret’s stepped up its game: off ering a maelstrom of healthy all-day options and thinking out-of-the-box in terms of ingredients to stay ahead of the other chains.

A wide range of snack pots also make it one of the best chains for mix-and-match eating: if you need more protein than the standard options provide, you can always invest in an extra egg or two.

Worth mentioning: They’ve earned at least one Cage Free Award for their approach to animal welfare, and a commitment to giving their cows, pigs and poultry freedom to roam makes them healthier and better-fed before they end up in your salad. Smoked salmon from low-density farms and sustainably-caught tuna also mean a guilt-free hit of omega-3s. Oh, and their co ee (and milk) is all-organic.

Nutrifix Hero: Where Pret really scores is on slow-release, nutrient dense carbs, like quinoa, buckwheat and flax seeds: load up if you’re trying to avoid the o ice Custard Cream pusher. The Salmon & Avo Superbowl is the overall winner – lots of heart-healthy mono-unsaturates – but the Chicken and Buffalo Mozzarella is a worthy second place. If you’re going salad, skip the other dressings and go for lemon: it’s the lowest in sugar by a long way.

For breakfast: For all-day energy, go for the Five Grain Porridge, and skip the other options – they’re too high in sugar.

For vegetarians: Pret are leading the charge here – they even have veggie-only locations – but one of the all-out best options is the Super Beans, Broccoli and Turmeric Cauli box, with *two* different types of cruciferous veg and a handful of spinach.

For snacking: The ‘protein pots’ are ideal to add to another meal, or grab as a mid-morning snack: Egg & Avo is the most filling, but edamame has a decent hit of muscle-sparing amino acids, and works for snacking. If you’re keeping it low-cal, the Miso soup has less energy than your average biscuit, but comes with a cocktail of healthy seaweed. Yes, it still tastes pretty good.

Avoid: Obviously, you’re going to skip the sweet section entirely – even the fruit/oat options have more than your NHS-recommended daily sugar allowance – but you’ll also want to give the cereal bars, yoghurt and compotes a miss: they’ll give you a quick buzz, but probably leave you making a run to the vending machines before lunch.

What I eat: ‘I’d probably go for a Falafel Wrap or Humous Wrap at Pret because a) I love chickpeas, b) it’s more practical to eat than a salad or soup if I’m in a rush, and c) even if the macros were ‘better’ I rarely buy salads out because they always feels a little paltry to what I eat at home.’ -Nicola Jane Hobbs, author and yoga instructor

Ruth says: “Popcorn has ditched its unhealthy rep and Pret’s Salty Popcorn is a high- fibre, wholegrain snack to keep you feeling full.”

“It’s much easier to overindulge when you’re gulping than chewing” 5 eating out habits to avoid

01/Starting hungry It’s not always avoidable, but the more you let your hunger build, the more likely you are to choose a high- calorie, super- tempting option. Staying hydrated might help – or if you’re going out for a sit-down dinner, grab a piece of fruit beforehand to kill your worst urges.

02/Going in with no plan If you haven’t got a strategy, you’re at the mercy of whatever looks best to your hunger-starved brain. Create what psychologists call if/ then plans instead – ‘If I have to eat fast food, then I will go for the grilled chicken.’

03/Getting upsold Sure, 30p for an extra fistful of fries seems like a good deal – but if small or standard is enough to sate your hunger, why bother? Once you’ve made the decision on size, resist the temptation to go large.

04/Drinking your calories Generally speaking, it’s much easier to overindulge when you’re gulping than chewing – and with around 300 calories in a large Coke, you can easily undo your good work in seconds. Even diet drinks have been shown to mess with your body’s hunger hormones – still or sparkling water is best.

05/ Loading up on snacks It’s not always an option, but if you’re in a higher-end place, the complimentary bread and nachos add up – especially if you’re dunking them in olive oil or guac. Tell the servers to keep them – and bring you another jug of tap water while you wait.

Burger King: time to hack your burger

His majesty had a bit of a wobble back in the early 2000s, when unhealthy fats took pride of place on the menu: but since then they’ve reformulated the menu to put health up front, with veg-and- sh options alongside the Whoppers. Having it Your Way isn’t just a slogan, either: customising your burger can be the best way to eat smart.

Worth mentioning:Burger King has its own organisation – the McLamore Foundation – which partners with charitable organisations to advance education worldwide.

Nutrifix Hero: Order the King Fish, but skip the sauce: you’ll save 90 calories, 9g of fat and 2g of sugar. The lettuce doesn’t give you a huge fibre hit, but you can always toss in a Garden Salad on the side.

For muscle: Get yourself an Angus Classic and leave out the mayo – you’ll save 90 calories with minimal loss in taste (if you keep the Steakhouse Sauce).

The Snack Option: They’re just chopped-up chunks of apple, but there’s something about the Apple Fries that actually works. Alternatively, grab some Chicken Strips and skip the BBQ Dip for a hit of protein with zero sugar.

For vegetarians: It has to be the Veggie Bean Burger – 15g of protein isn’t bad, though you could always toss the top of the bun and eat it open-faced to cut down on that 9g of sugar.

The Breakfast: There’s always the Quaker Oats Porridge, but the Bacon King Mu in is a solid option, especially if you skip the American Cheese. Don’t be tempted by the Croissan’Wiches – they’re loaded with fat.

For fat loss: The Crispy Chicken Salad is a mere 210 calories, but comes with 16g of protein, mixed lettuce leaves, carrot and tomatoes – ideal for nutrient density.

Avoid: The Warm Belgian Waffle: it’s the most surprising sugar hit on the menu, with 45g and 1.5g of trans fats. If you’re hungry, grab a portion of Chicken Nuggets for a mere 190 calories.

What I eat: ‘I used to be a vegetarian, and the spicy bean-burger- almost unchanged for 20 years – is still one of my biggest guilty pleasures, especially the cheese. I’ll usually skip the chips and have it with a sparkling water or a coffee.’ Joel Snape, editor-at- large, Men’s Fitness

Nando’s Bring on that mother load of protein

Ah, yes: the cheeky one. There’s a lot to like in the UK’s premier protein-per-pound hotspot, from the marinades to the macho peas – but it’s the chicken you’re there for, right? Good thing too: once you start straying into wraps-and-fries territory, the Portuguese chain starts to come o worse in calorie comparisons with other outlets, but stick to a butterflied bird and you won’t go far wrong.

Worth mentioning: Standalone poultry options make Nando’s one of the best choices if you’re going paleo or on the ketogenic diet: high protein, moderate fat, super low carbs. One word of warning: the chicken’s only reared to ‘Red Tractor’ standard– meaning it’s likely to be lower in heart-healthy omega 3’s than fully free-range stock.

Nutrifix Hero: The protein mother load: Why mess about? You’re going to get the chicken, so get the chicken: either a quarter or half, depending on your protein demands (52 or 80g respectively). The real question is about sides, and the answer depends on your goals: go mixed leaf salad if you’re keeping it light, or Supergrain and Spicy Rice for post-workout recovery. And yes, a bit of spice helps: capsaicin in the chilis will up your metabolism slightly.

For vegetarians: If you’re going for salad, Supergrain is your best option: healthy fats from avocado and fibre from beans beats Caesar dressing and croutons hands-down.

For dessert: The vanilla gelado’s the lowest- sugar thing on the menu – yes, there’s less in it than the yoghurt and those tiny custard tart things.

Avoid: You (hopefully) know not to be tempted by the unlimited refills, but keep on the water – the Pressed Apple Juice and Mango Quencher both pack as much sugar per gram as Coke. The Sweet Potato Mash is also surprisingly heavy on the sweet stuff : for that Vitamin A hit, make your own at home.

What I eat: ‘If I’m eating dinner out but thinking ‘functional’ I’ll double up on the chicken pitta with a salad side – it’s dripping in lean protein but low fat, plus I’m a huge lover of bread so in terms of dieting sustainably it ticks all of my boxes – I think I saw a study once where the most common denominator in western diets that fail is the removal of bread products. I may also have a coleslaw. I find the mixture of tastes and textures is a major key in something being satiating.’ Andrew Tracey, Creator of The Nomad Way fitness method

Ruth says: ‘Alert! The hummus – which you’d think would be healthy – packs in more than 800 calories, or more than you need in a whole meal! Stick with the spicy olives for an eighth of the calories.‘

“There can be as many calories in a milkshake as a burger” 5 Things To Avoid On Any Menu

01/ Milkshakes There are as many calories in a McDonald’s milkshake as most of the burgers, and they’re not even the worst o enders– once you start smashing in Oreos or ice cream, all bets are o . Unless it’s bulking season, leave them out.

02/ Fries They’re nutritionally empty calories, and even though many chains have stopped pre-salting them, you’re only going to layer them in ketchup or sodium. Leave the meal deals out, or ask if there’s another option.

03/ Caesar Salads You see them everywhere, but they’re a poor option: iceberg lettuce is short on nutrients, croutons aren’t a vegetable, and the dressing adds calories when olive oil would be a better option. If..

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Holidays! Who doesn’t love them?

Once you’ve got the stress of checking in, flying out and navigating the local customs out of the way, they’re the one time of year when you can really kick back and do whatever you like – then head back home (hopefully) recharged and raring to go. And that’s kind of the point of this guide to healthy holiday eating. We’re not here to tell you to avoid delicious crepes or gelato, or to skip the bread-basket and order the grilled chicken at your favourite taverna: we’re here to help you have a good time.

That means enjoying your holiday by having more energy for your adventures, feeling less stressed on the go, and having the odd cocktail – then coming back without feeling like you’ve ruined the rest of your year’s healthy eating. We know how to do it, because at Nutrifix, we do the same. Enjoy the guide! We had a great time putting it together.
Joel Nutrifix Founder & CEO

Whatever your holiday plans this year – staycation, beach blast, vision quest in the Himalayas – one thing that’s for sure is that good food can make or break your stay. Maybe you’ve been watching your carbs during the countdown and you’re hoping to keep your health and fitness goals on track while you’re away, or maybe you’re planning to throw the rulebook in the bin and go for a splurge, but if you’re anything like us you won’t want to let all your hard work go to waste: and so for at least one or two meals a day you’ll want to make good food decisions.

At Nutrifix, our goal is to help you make better food choices on the go – but since we haven’t gone global just yet, there are still a few corners of the world where you’ll be on your own.

That’s what this guide is for: helping you to make better food decisions on the go, whether you’re on a road trip for work, inter-railing around Europe or venturing off to the ends of the Earth. Sure, there will be times when dietary diligence will be the last thing on your mind, and all you want to do is eat street food in Thailand, churros con chocolate in Spain or a tomahawk steak the size of a shoebox in Vegas, but the rest of the time, here’s what we can help with:

 Smooth landings
There’s nothing worse than losing your first day of holiday – or even your first day back at work – to jet lag and lethargy. Smart eating choices can help roadblock the damage.

 Improved energy
Planning a six-hour hike up a mountainside? An all-nighter at the Full Moon Festival? Just chasing after your children for a week at the all-inclusive? Pick the right macros and it’ll all be easier.

Business-class focus
If you’re a frequent flyer, it’s even more important to be able to perform when you land – so we’ve included tips on how to maintain your energy levels after the red-eye.

…And a better beach body
Okay, fine: looking good in swimwear isn’t everyone’s first priority – but it’s often a nice side-effect of training for health, performance and fitness.

And remember: if you’re holidaying in the UK – or just at the airport – you’ll be able to use the Nutrifix app to find good food on the go, even when you’re in a strange city. If you’re further afield, use the advice in this guide to have a great holiday…and we’ll see you when you get back. Have a great trip!

 

 

How to… plan for the best
By Ben Coomber

Traveling can be tough, but not if you plan. Most people, if they bother at all, plan for one day – or just the airport – then leave the rest up to chance. Look ahead more, and you won’t just be healthier – you’ll actually have a better holiday, by experiencing some of the local delicacies.

Where are you staying? What food do the locals eat, what do you need to eat, when will you have time to eat? A brief period of fasting in the morning can help when you are often out in the evening for dinner and eating calorific food. Having a period without food means you ‘bank’ more calories so you can fill up later.

As you travel, opt for voluminous food, so lots of vegetables where you can for the filling fibre, with lean protein. I carry biltong, protein bars and apples with me, and often many portions of them. That allows me to get what I need so that I don’t need to stop for a big sit-down meal every few hours, then I can save my calories for dinner where I’m often out or entertaining or just want to relax with a big feed.

 How to… sin healthily
By Sarah Lindsay, three-time Olympian and personal trainer

Of course you should indulge a little and enjoy foods you might not allow yourself to eat at home – you are on holiday – but try to avoid foods that you are intolerant to or that don’t agree with you. If something makes you feel terrible or bloats your stomach and ruins your day then it’s not exactly a treat and will have the biggest negative impact on body fat/composition.

Similarly, of course you’re going to drink – but don’t try to ‘work off’ or ‘sweat out’ the alcohol you had the night before. Obviously we all tend to drink more on holiday and I see lots of people go to the gym or beach the next morning and do cardio to sweat it out. The problem: alcohol really compromises your immune system so this the the worst time to train! If you know you’re going drink then by all means train that morning or the day before but never the morning after as you’re more likely to become run down.

My number one tip: trim down a bit before you go. So I know and fully accept that I will gain at least 3kg on a 7-10 day holiday – my best was 5kg in a week in NYC – so I make sure I lose a couple before I go. This way not only do you feel more confident on the beach but you can indulge without the depressing situation of having to ‘diet’ when you get home. Always on the front foot!

How to eat healthy on the road

Whether you’re commuting for business or tackling Route 66, the same principles can keep you in shape.

01/ Before you go… If you’ve got a long trip ahead, eat a proper meal ahead of time so you don’t end up hungry and grabbing the first thing you see. Aim for a palm sized portion of protein, a serving of veggies, and top up with healthy fats or carbs.

02/ In the car… Long drive with few stops? Think easy-to-grab food like quality beef jerky, nuts and seeds, or a protein bar – look for the low-sugar versions. If you’re a passenger, your options expand: some cut carrots or celery with hummus or nut butter work a lot better than crisps and Mars Bars.

03/ At the petrol station… Not many options? Again, look for jerky, salt-free nuts, seeds or plain Greek yoghurt, with fresh fruit if you can get it – dried fruit and cereal bars can be good backup options, but check the sugar content on the label. You can actually put together a pretty good petrol station ‘meal’ if you ditch the normal pairings and think protein, carbs and healthy fats.

04/ At the motorway services… Bigger service stations expand your options: grab some guacamole for a helping of healthy fats, or get a pre-made salad and throw in some extra pre-cooked chicken if you want more protein. Alternatively, grab a ready-made meal at a fast-food spot – but resist the temptation to pretend that service station calories don’t count…

05/ On the train… UK trains are some of the hardest places to eat properly, thanks to a serious lack of healthy protein or non-refined carbs. Assuming you haven’t brought a packed lunch, your best option’s a piece of fruit and a sparkling water – but remember that (black) coffee is an appetite suppressant, so you could just tough it out…

Smarter snacks to pack
As well as the above, load up your lunchbox – or glove compartment – and you’ll be all set to eat on the road.

01/Edamame It’s high in protein and vitamin C, and low in calories. Grab some from itsu or Wasabi.

02/Eggs Hard-boil a bunch – dropping them in pre-boiled water makes them easier to peel – and grab a black pepper sachet to give them a bit of flavour.

03/Protein powder Bringing your own means you don’t need to rely on sugar-laden pre-made drinks.

04/Dark chocolate It’s tougher to overindulge on than the milk variety, and pairs well with an apple or a smear of nut butter. A couple of squares are fine.

05/Trail mix Make your own with mixed nuts, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, and (not too many) dried cranberries.

Related: What to eat when you are feeling ill How to eat smart at the breakfast bar

Whether you’re going Continental, Full English or All-American, a good breakfast can set you up for a day of healthy eating – while a bad one kicks of a day of overindulgence. Here’s how to be smart.

01/ Do Eat fruit and veg. The buffet’s the best spot to load up on watermelon, grapefruit, and other fruity options you won’t get in your everyday diet, and fibre slows the fructose hit. If you’re going for a fry-up, have some mushrooms and take your tomatoes cooked – heat increases the bioavailability of cancer-fighting lycopene.

02/ Don’t Get on the juice. Yes, it’s high in vitamin C, but it’s also laden with sugar. If you want to feel classy, stick to a small glass – or grab some orange slices to go with your coffee instead.

03/ Don’t Hit the cereal bar. It’s fearsomely easy to overeat, and most options – including the granola and muesli – are likely to be loaded with sugar. If porridge is an option, sweeten it up with some sliced banana.

04/ Do Order your eggs a la carte. If it’s an option, going for poached will save on the unamed fats that come in that steaming tray of of-the-shelf oeufs. An omelette bar, of course, is the holiday jackpot: load up on onions, peppers and spinach leaves.

05/ Don’t Eat the pastries. Dessert for breakfast? Yes, you’re on holiday, but there have to be limits. Skip the tiny muffins and pain au chocolate, and save the overindulgence for later in the day.

06/ Do Eat some protein. At the buffet, sliced deli meats and cheeses can be a great way to get your portions, while turkey sausages offer a healthy meat-alternative you won’t often see at home. Sausages and bacon aren’t the end of the world, but don’t go over the top.

07/ Don’t Overload on potatoes. Sure, hash browns, home fries or USA-style breakfast potatoes are a treat not to be missed, but do you need a tray of them? Have another couple of eggs instead. And maybe… Grab something for later This is a moral grey area, but swiping a tiny yoghurt or a banana to go might be just what gets you through to lunchtime without a collapse. Just remember to be nice to your server.

 

Make your breakfast global Want to absorb some local flavour in the morning? Here are your best (and worst) options

Excellent: Japan In Japan, the daily fruit-n-veg recommendation is 17 (small) portions, and a typical breakfast gets things of to a good start by including seaweed, pickles, fermented soybeans and a mixed salad, often accompanied by fish or miso soup. More appetising than it sounds.

Great: Israel Salad options typically include cucumber, tomato, while feta adds protein and olives up the healthy fat content. Best of all is shakshuka, or eggs poached in tomato sauce – one to try at home too.

Good: Malaysia Nasi lemak, as it’s known, is made up of coconut rice, anchovies, a hard-boiled egg and a handful of peanuts… with hot sauce. Aggressive spiciness and protein both act to aid satiety, so you’ll be fine until lunch.

Okay: Venezuela Lots of salt and starch on the menu here – arepas, a kind of cornmeal patty, are a staple, usually filled with butter and cheese. But there’s also typically a helping of chicken and avocado, so you’re sorted for lean protein and healthy monounsaturates.

Bad: France If you’re going to indulge, skip the toasted baguettes and head straight for the Croque Madame – cheese and bechamel sauce on toast with an extra egg on top to add protein. It traditionally comes with fries, but you could always avoid them.

What should you eat when you haven’t got the Nutrifix app to hand? We’ve picked out the best options for popular destinations.

In Tokyo… Gyudon The beef bowl – or ‘gyudon’ – as it’s known locally, is Japan’s favourite convenience food, and one-on-everycorner favourite Yoshinoya just edges out rival brand Matsuya as Tokyo’s biggest seller. Because it’s not fried, the combination of beef, onions and rice isn’t actually that bad for you – and in 2015, volunteers on a Super Size Me-style three-month gyudon diet saw no change in health.
Alternatively… 100-yen sushi – where every plate is less than a pound – or grocery store bento boxes are a great way to load up on omega-3- packed fish. Convenience store options have a wide variety of healthy options – 7-11 has everything from pre-packed salad to seaweedwrapped rice balls.

In Barcelona… Raciones Technically, tapas – tiny dishes served with drinks – are quite rare in Barcelona, but raciones, or larger platters designed to be shared, are common, and several companies ofer Tapas ‘tours’, designed to let you sample a variety of dishes whilst educating you about traditional Spanish cooking.
If you’re going it alone, avoid tourist-heavy places with chic decor and head for side streets where you’ll be able to load up on seafood and olive oil. Alternatively… If you’re prepared to seek them out, traditional restaurants ofer sauce-centred Catalan cuisine including high-quality sausages – less risky than the heavily processed kind – and salted cod with artichokes or spring onions. Start at La Cova Fumada.

In Paris… Mediterranean It’s not the most traditional option, but good-quality falafel’s ubiquitous in Paris. The Rue De Rosiers, in particular, is full of places ofering crispy chickpea balls served with fresh-cut veg and homemade hummus. L’As du Falafel is one of the most popular restaurants – or on a similarly Mediterranean tip, dozens of Lebanese restaurants offer up mouthwatering, protein-heavy dishes like shish taouk or shawarma.
Alternatively… If you’re up for doing your own prep, Paris’s many permanent open-air markets offer up fresh fish, quality olive oil and fromage that’s teeming with the good kind of bacteria. Head to the Rue Montorgueil for health-conscious shopping, and treat yourself to a pastry at La Maison Stohrer, the city’s oldest baked goods emporium.

In Dubai… Hit the market There’s no shortage of fine dining in Dubai, but if you’d rather keep it (moderately) cheap and healthy, the local souks are your best bet. Get your RDA of potassium and vitamins with fresh coconut and spiny rambutan fruit, then load up on seafood ranging from crab (high protein) to fresh-caught tuna (great for omega-3s). The Spice Souk is a short walk from the Fish Souk – grab some chilies to ramp up your metabolism, or turmeric for its anti-inflammatory effects. Alternatively…Try the Wafi Gourmet for its outstanding deli, which boasts local cheeses, olives and pickles alongside fish, fruit juice and mezze meats.

In New York… Fast casual With options on every corner in the city that never sleeps, it’s easy to load up on bagels and pretzels – but one city-wide trend that you can harness for health is the rise of chains offering locally-sourced salad, organic meat options, and grains from old faithful quinoa to hot up-n-comer freekeh. Head for Dig Inn, which has six locations around the city – or hipster favourite Fresh & Co, which has nine.
Alternatively…West 32nd street’s Koreatown has some of the best Korean food outside Seoul, and the BBQ options – where you season and cook your own meats – are consistently delicious. Load up on steak and pork, then order some kimchi on the side to top up on probiotics.

 

What about food quality? Every country has its own expectations and public health challenges when it comes to diet, and there’s (obviously) a huge amount of variation when it comes to traceability, food borne illness rates and even basic food safety.

Comparisons are tricky, but a couple of reports have tried to make sense of it – in 2014, for instance, a large-scale study found that Canada and Ireland had the highest food safety standards, while other countries including the UK and USA had a low risk of bacterial contamination in food.

But when it comes to other factors – labelling, pesticide use and the legality of trans fats, for instance – there’s a huge amount of variation between countries. If you’re concerned, Google the labelling practises of your planned country in advance – or just try to go unprocessed, and look for resources like ewg.org’s Dirty Dozen and Clean 15 to stay pesticide-free.

We hope you found our guide useful and it helps you stay healthier on your next holiday! You can download the article in a handy pdf to share with friends and family or take with you so you have tips close to hand when on the move!

The post How To Eat Healthily On Holiday appeared first on Nutrifix | Find Your Healthy | Nutrition App.

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Food and fitness in your 20s, 30s, 40s, and 50s
Here’s to a lifetime of healthy eating

At Nutrifix, our goal is simple: to make a healthy lifestyle more accessible for everyone. But we know that’s not a one-size-fits-all proposition, and one of the biggest ways it changes is as you get older: your goals and priorities change, your metabolism might slow down or problems might come up, and you might want to shift the way you eat (and train!) to accommodate them.
This guide is designed to make that process easier: by explaining the physical activity targets you should be able to hit in the key decades for health, and how your food intake can support them.
We’ve also compared the UK’s most popular eateries to explain how each can help – and given suggestions for where and what to eat depending on your aims. 
Joel Burgess, Nutrifix Founder

There’s Something to Learn At Every Age

How This Guide Works 

Staying in shape might seem simple when you’re in your 20s – or, hey, it might not – but as the years go by and issues pile up, things can get trickier. The key to better health isn’t a short ‘transformation’ but building habits you can maintain for life – that includes how active you are and how you eat at home, but also where you choose to eat out or buy lunch when you’re short on time. By laying good foundations while you’re young, you’ll hit your 40s and 50s in better shape – but even if you’re already there, a few simple changes in your lifestyle can see you benefit from more energy, better sleep and improved mood.

In this guide, you’ll find advice for every age from your 20s to your 50s – physical markers you should be aiming to achieve, things to emphasise in your diet, and the restaurants and fast-food places you can go to get them. If you’re already in shape, that’s great – but read through the rest of the guide to see what dietary tweaks you can make to get in even better shape. If you’re struggling, do what you can – and consider doing more movement as you make shifts in your diet that you’ll be able to maintain for the long term. By learning the elements of good movement and nutrition, you’ll be able to create your own plan for the long term…and stay fit at any age.

 

What to eat and do in your…
20s

What to expect:
What a time to be alive! Both men and women tend to peak in terms of strength and muscle mass during their 20s, and this is also the decade where recovery – from both exercise and overdoing it at the weekend – are fastest.

It’s fairly easy to build bone and muscle, and you can probably get away with a little more junk food and booze than you’ll be able to cope with as your metabolism slows in later life. The downside? This is a time when work, relationships and pressure to look good can be most stressful – and you might be on a serious budget.

You should be able to…

01/ Do 10 strict press-ups (if you’re male) or three (if you’re female)
Strict means straight like a plank, chest almost touching the ground at the bottom, arms straight at the top. If you can’t do even one, get to the top position and lower yourself slowly, then go to your knees for the push back up. They’re tough, but they’ll build your core better than crunches.

02/ Do at least one pull-up It’s the perfect indicator that your strength-to-weight ratio is on point. This is much tougher for the ladies, but definitely possible: start with negatives (jumping to get your chin over the bar, and lowering slowly) and work forwards.

03/ Do a ‘goblet’ squatThe weight hardly matters, but the technique’s a good way to check up on your hip, ankle and knee mobility: grab a dumbbell by one end (like a goblet), squat until your elbows touch the insides of your knees, then stand up.

How to train:

With gym work that lays smart foundations for later life. For men, testosterone production peaks around 27, making it easy to recover fast, and grow easily. Make the most of it with some resistance training, including bodyweight movements like squats, lunges and press-ups – and, if you’ve got the option, barbells, dumbbells or kettlebells. Cardio and conditioning is fine too: if you’re aiming to stay in shape, keep it short and sharp by doing HIIT sessions or sprints.

What to eat:

Because you’re aiming to build or maintain lean muscle, protein is key – aim for 1-1.6 grams per kilo you weigh, per day, going even higher if you’re training intensely. Eat regularly throughout the day – 20-30g at a meal or after training is ideal to maximise recovery, and will also keep you from over-eating by making you feel full. This is a great age to learn to cook, and find healthy habits that you’ll be able to sustain for the rest of your life. Cheap and cheerful is okay – as long as you’re getting a variety of nutrients.

 

 

 

Key Foods:

Where to go:

Nandos If you want value-for- money protein, it doesn’t come much better: stick with the chicken (quarter or half), and grab a Supergrain Salad on the side, with a Spicy Rice on top if you’ve been training hard.

Subway Endless options mean that Subway’s really only as healthy as your regular order: load up on lettuce, onions, peppers, tomato and cucumber, then take your pick between the poultry and steak for your filling.

Pret A Manger There’s a lot to recommend at Pret: a commitment to animal welfare and vegan options, Protein Pots for the snack- deprived, and nutrient-dense salads that’ll keep you going until 6pm. Also, they dooneofthebest– and cheapest – Americanos on the high street.

What to eat and do in your…
30s

What to expect:

This is the decade where you’ll notice which of your friends are taking care of themselves – it’s not quite as easy to lose body fat or add muscle, and people’s metabolisms tend to slow as they naturally move less. You might take longer to recover from tough workouts or big nights out, or find that bad habits start to catch up with you.

This is also the decade when work/life balance becomes an issue for a lot of people – and where hormonal health can become an issue. For men, training and eating to maintain testosterone might be a good idea – for women, fertility might be a concern.

You should be able to…

01/ Run 1k without stopping
Seems simple, but this is the age when you start to get out of breath running for a bus or walking up a flight of stairs: keep your cardio up so you can do both.

02/ Broad jump your own height
It’s a better indicator of explosive ability than the box jump, where hip flexibility can make up for a lack of power. Warm up: then, from a standing start, bend your knees slightly and jump as far as possible, aiming to take o and land on both feet together. If you can’t come even close to your own height, do some squats and lunges.

03/ Carry something heavy
Grip strength is an indicator of longevity, but there’s more to it than that: being able to haul shopping, sofas or loved ones (in an emergency) is just good form. Men should aim to be able to carry their bodyweight split between two dumbbells: women should go for half their bodyweight or more.

How to train:

You can still go after it pretty hard, but it’s time to fix postural problems before they’re too ingrained. To deal with your desk-slouch, get a resistance band for the house and do ‘pull-aparts’, in which you pull the band apart across your chest, for 10-30 reps a day.

What to eat:

Here, you might need to adjust your food intake to account for the fact that you’re not moving as much, as five-a-side and all-nighters give way to evenings in and Netflix bingeing. You’ll need to be a bit more careful with the quality of your food: eat a wide variety of antioxidants, along with glutamine-rich foods like kale, beans or animal protein to support muscle recovery.

Key Foods:

Where to go:

Eat The cheap-and- cheery option for city professionals on the run has a variety of hot pots that boast a double-whammy of protein and veg: egg and avocado for breakfast, chicken and kale for lunch. Their Thai curries also o er more than plain rice: peppers, onion and carrot ribbons give you everything from magnesium to manganese.

Barburrito With stores across 11 UK cities, this upcoming Mexican chain has more health-friendly options than you might expect: pinto and black beans both pack a fair hit of protein and nutrients, and their avocado- rich guac is good for heart-health monounsaturates. Create-your-own options means it’s easy to knock up a tortilla stu ed with lean chicken and a variety of veg, while taking it easy on the cheese and cream.

Wasabi Simple sushi options make wasabi equally ideal for post-gym fuelling – you’ll want the salmon nigiri set – or grabbing a hot lunch. Research suggests you’re better o getting phytonutrients from less-processed sources: it’s fine to have tempeh or tofu occasionally.

Related: How to Hit Your Max in Midlife What to eat and do in your…
40s

What to expect:

This is the age to start taking your health seriously, if you haven’t been doing that already. You know the score, or you’ve heard it from over-forties friends – suddenly, things don’t heal themselves, minor injuries seem to last for ages, and aches and pains appear from nowhere. Chronic disease starts to become a concern, and eating to avoid it is key. This is also the age when body composition can take a real effort to change, so if you’re in shape heading for the big four-zero, remember: it’s easier to maintain a healthy body fat percentage than to leave it until later.

You should be able to…

01/Climb stairs effortlessly Well, fairly effortlessly. For an indicator of how you measure up, try the step test: find a 20-25cm high step, and set a timer going, then step on and o , alternating feet and maintaining a steady pace. Rest for 30 seconds, then take your pulse: ideally, it’ll be below 118 BPM.

02/ Touch your toes No, not from standing. Get on the floor with your back to the wall, legs extended out in front of you with the backs of your knees against the floor. Keeping your chest up, reach forward: reaching your ankles or beyond is excellent, your shins and knees are okay, but thighs or less are cause for concern.

03/ Fit into your jeans Your Body Mass Index, which compares your weight to your height, is an outdated measure of health, especially for people who train. Your hip-to-waist ratio is a better indicator, especially since fat stored around the waist poses a higher risk of coronary disease. Measure your weight as its narrowest point, then your hips at their widest. Divide the first number by the second – if your ratio is higher than 0.8 (for a woman) or 1 (for a man), you’re at an increased health risk. Cut down the sugar.

How to train:

Be realistic. This is where performance starts to suffer – you aren’t going to be competing with the young bucks at the elite levels, and there’s a chance of injuring yourself if you try. This might mean it’s time to reassess your goals: instead of aiming for a bench press PB or a sub-three marathon, maybe you want to learn a new sport or gain more mobility. You should still spend time on strength training to keep muscle and bone density and maintain insulin sensitivity, but also add ‘active’ recovery in the form of easy, fun stuff.

What to eat:

This is where to start piling in nutrient-rich veg – aiming to eat every colour of the rainbow will give you the right mix of micronutrients, and keep you from getting complacent. If you don’t already eat oily fish once or twice a week, learn to love it – or supplement your diet with omega-3 oils. Women in particular should try to top up on phytoestrogens from natural sources, ranging from carrots to oats and lentils. You should also consider shifting your diet to eat more iron, including leafy green vegetables – twin them with sources of vitamin C to make sure you’re absorbing it – and animal proteins.

Key Foods:

Where to go:

Itsu Plenty on offer here: options like the Salmon Sashimi keep it low-cal (only 180) while packing in the oily fish and phytonutrient-packed seaweed, while the Humble Warrior crams in tenderstem broccoli, avocado, red pepper and leeks for a vegan-friendly feast.

Leon Digestive issues can be more of a concern as you age, and Leon’s menu is one of the most gut-friendly on the high street. Go for the Squash, Sage & Kale Salad, the Sweet Potato Falafel Hot Box or the Blueberry & Elderflower Kefir, a yogurt-style source of friendly bacteria, protein and calcium.

Pizza Express If your friends aren’t always the type to be swayed by the healthy option, at least steer them here: grab roasted tomatoes for a heart-healthy starter (they’re high in antioxidant lycopene), and a Leggera Superfood Salad for a fibre and protein-rich combination of mixed leaves and legumes.

What to eat and do in your…
50s

What to expect:

Everything in the decades above becomes more of a problem: aches, injuries, disease and joint problems start to crop up with some regularity, and even t people find it harder to stay lean. Loss of muscle, fat and bone under the skin, alongside changes in collagen, make wrinkles more evident, especially if you’ve been smoking or tanning heavily in previous decades. Cartilage between your bones is starting to wear down, leading to aching joints and those creaking and popping noises you start to hear regularly. The good news? If you’ve been active up until now, it’s pretty easy to maintain – and it’s never too late to improve.

You should be able to…

01/ Get up o the floor without using your hands It seems simple, but it’s a key test of flexibility, coordination and musculoskeletal fitness: in a Brazilian study, men and women who needed to use their hands (or knees) to get down or up o the floor were almost seven times more likely to die over the following six years than those who could spring up and down without support. If you struggle, it’s a warning sign: start doing some basic strength and mobility work.

02/ Do 17 ‘chair stands’ in 30 seconds At this age, everyday tasks work as a predictor of overall health. Sit on a chair with a straight back, cross your arms so your hands touch your opposite shoulders, then keep your feet flat as you stand up and sit down again. In a study of 5,000 people, 53-year old men who could sit and stand 37 times in a minute were found to be least at risk of premature death – the magic number for women was 35. Less than 22, for either gender, is cause for concern.

03/ Stand on one leg for 10 seconds (with your eyes closed) Another key predictor of early mortality found in the above study was the stand-on-one-leg test: men and women unable to balance for more than two seconds were 10 times more like to die in the following 13 years than those who could hold it for 10 seconds or more.

How to train:

Do what you enjoy – at this age, it’s important to keep the habit of daily movement – but also focus on maintaining mobility and rehabbing old injuries. Research suggests that the best way to optimise recovery is to move: activate muscles surrounding damaged tissue to achieve the largest possible amount of pain-free, low-stress muscle activation.

Gentler forms of yoga might help with balance and flexibility, while swimming, cycling and rowing put less stress on your joints than running or even walking. That said, if you can handle a little bit of impact, there’s evidence it’ll help maintain bone density.

What to eat:

Stick with the colourful fruit and veg – apart from helping with general health, they’ll reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease. This is also the time to target inflammation: researchers at the Yale School of Medicine have singled it out as the common factor in a number of age-related diseases, including Alzheimer’s, arthritis and diabetes, and evidence suggests that green tea, garlic and berries can all help keep it in check.

Keep blood sugar in check by cutting down on refined carbs – or, according to some studies, by adding cinnamon or lemon to meals. Eat more fibre and omega-3 fatty acids (found in fish) to keep cholesterol in check, and also to regulate blood pressure.

Key Foods:

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Eating healthy on the go isn’t always easy, our simple tips will help you nail it

Unless you’re the sort of
person who never fails to prep
the next day’s meals, and likes lugging them around in
sweating tupperware, it’s likely that eating on the the go
means a trip to the high street.

But where to begin? Even the most diligent of
healthy eating and training
plans can come unstuck when
choosing which coffee shop
sandwich will fill that hole, or
which restaurant chain lunch
will do the least damage, or
better still, most good.

Luckily, Nutrifix is here to
help. Our experts have scoured
the high street to provide this
failsafe guide to the best
options to keep you on the
straight and narrow path to
weight loss. Tuck in.

Meet the experts

Tom Ward Journalist and author, Tom spent the last few years as features editor on Men’s Health magazine. He has written for Esquire, FHM, GQ, the Guardian and more, and won the PPA New Consumer Magazine Journalist of the Year Award 2017. He is also the recipient of the GQ Norman Mailer Award 2012.

 

 

Ruth Tongue As an MSc qualified nutritionist, Ruth knows her stuff. Best of all, her background in pilates and sport and exercise science means she knows exactly how diet can impact performance – and how to optimise both.

 

 

 

Jasper MacDermot An exuberant and charismatic 6 foot 5 personal training mountain, Jasper is one of the strength and conditioning experts at London’s Roar Fitness. And equally as important as his weights regiment for staying lean is his diet – even when he’s on the go.

 

10 Common Mistakes When Trying To Lose Weight Eating Out

01 / Wear a jumper Watch out for chill restaurants with an uber-efficient A/C system. Research has shown that we eat up to 20% more when we’re 10 degrees colder as the hormones that control satiety are slower to make themselves heard. Take a jumper and you’re more likely to stop before you over-eat.

02/ Remember your sunglasses While you’re at it. Pack sunglasses. Mixed messages, we know. But if the restaurant is brightly lit, it’s been proven that you’ll eat 18% more calories. Think about the white glare of McDonald’s and we know you’ll see the sense in this. (If you don’t want to be the weirdo wearing sunglasses to dinner then choose your date night venue more wisely!)

03/ Get your sauce as a side When your steak is covered in peppercorn or hollandaise sauce, wouldn’t it be rude not to mop it all up with your chips? Ask for your sauce on the side, though, and you are more likely to be able to restrain yourself from having the whole lot (plus, you can see how much there really is!)

04/ Music is money (and calories) Your money’s where the music’s at. Classical music has been proven to increase sales of expensive wines, and even more specifically, French and German music prompts you to buy French and German wines respectively. Listen out and wise up.

05/Eat to the beat You might even have to be that person and ask them to change the playlist. Faster, more upbeat music can make you eat more and feel less satisfied with what you’ve had. Whereas a calmer, more laid-back background tune will make your meal smaller, longer and more enjoyable.

06/Resist the set menu Getting the set menu makes some sense money-wise. But it’s always cheaper not to have a dessert. They’re just ploys to get you to spend and eat more.

07/Share the brownie If that brownie really is calling your name, then share it. A problem shared is a problem halved and you’ll enjoy that smug feeling when you ask for two spoons as well.

08/ Green juices are false friends “Green juices and health bars sound good, but generally are packed with calories. They’ll derail your weightless goals in one bite.” Jasper

09/De-code marketing messages “Don’t fall for clever marketing ploys; ‘low fat’ often means packed with sugar, and ‘whole, organic, gluten-free and vegan’ don’t necessarily equal healthy. Get used to checking labels and focus on sugar, fibre and protein content.” Ruth

10/Take your time “Don’t operate on auto-pilot just because you’re hungry or thinking about work. Take a few minutes to really look at what you’re choosing. Rushing back to the office can wait.” Jasper

The Best Post-AM Workout Option

A pre-breakfast workout fires the metabolism, helping you burn through fat stores instead of the meal you’ve just eaten. In other words: it’s the best way to shift fat fast. Best of all, because you’ll have placed your body in a calorie deficit, you’ll utilise more of your breakfast, instead of storing it around your middle or hips.

“Aim for a decent serving of protein; 30-50g to aid workout recovery and a serving of carbs around 30-50g, depending on your size/ goals. My favourites include eggs on toast, or Greek yoghurt with fruit.” Jasper

 

“The ideal ratio for post-workout is 3:1 carbs to protein. This helps restock the glycogen stores in the muscles, which provide energy for your next workout. The protein, meanwhile, works to repair torn muscle fibres, helping the muscles to grow bigger. And more muscle mass equals an increased metabolism, and even more fat loss.” Ruth

 

The takeaway Opting for protein only may seem like the leaner option, but it won’t allow your muscles to properly restock after a heavy session, meaning you’ll feel weaker next time round. Include some carbs to aid recovery and help keep you feeling full.

The hack Keep hot sauce (or at least chilli flakes) in your bag. A generous sprinkle will not only keep your metabolism fired up, but work to reduce training-induced inflammation, helping you recover more quickly for tomorrow’s session.

Choose Ditch the porridge pot and opt for Pod’s Protein Feast Scrambled Eggs, instead. With toast on the side you’ll hit all three macros: fat, protein and carbs in one meal, and set yourself up for the day.

Best Sleepless Night Pick Me-Up

Whether it’s a new baby keeping you awake or watching one too many episodes of Game Of Thrones, everyone has gone into work feeling exhausted at one point or another. Worst of all, this stress means you’ll retain calories and extra weight, too. Here, then, is your new breakfast order to help you power through.

“Resist the urge to go for sugary carbs and choose porridge with seeds and blueberries. When you’re sleep deprived you’re more prone to infection so you need antioxidants and anti inflammatories, which blueberries and seeds are perfect for.” Ruth

“If you’re getting caffeine, don’t add sugar and keep it to earlier in the day. If you’re more sensitive, opt for green tea for a less jittery pick me up.” Jasper

 

The takeaway Level-up by combining your oats with Pret’s dairy-free chocolate chia pot. You’ll add even more fibre, which will help drip-feed energy throughout the day, helping you keep your cool.

Choose Avoid the brownie bar and rice cakes: too much sugar means any high will be short-lived. Instead, go for Pret’s Proper Porridge for a less calorific and sugary alternative to other chains

 

The hack Caffeine raises levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which sends your body into survival mode, leading to it stockpiling fat. Green tea has less caffeine and is kinder to you, although one espresso before you head into the office will still help. A solid breakfast of non-sugary carbs will drip-feed energy until lunch time.”

 

Best PreMeeting Meal

The big meeting has been glaring out at you from your iPhone calendar for weeks. Now it’s time to put all your planning into action. But first, you need to fuel up!

“If you want to stay focused and alert, you’ll need a protein hit, and some slow release carbs (your brain will need energy so don’t ditch the carbs completely).” Ruth

“Skip the starchy carbohydrates as they’ll likely encourage your mid-meeting snooze. Instead aim for a high volume salad of leafy greens, crunchy vegetables and a good protein like chicken or fish. Opt for water to ensure you stay hydrated and alert.” Jasper

 

 

The takeaway Staying focused requires carbs to power your brain, but don’t go overboard. Your performance – and waistline – will benefit from opting for something healthier. Leafy greens like spinach are packed with antioxidants, carotenoids, folic acid and B-vitamins; all proven to boost your clarity, brain power and well being.

Choose Avoid the bland chicken salad and opt for Costa’s Tuna Nicoise Salad. It has protein, greens and brain-boosting natural fats to cover all bases.

 

The hack Carry your own seeds for an extra hit of fibre and slow-release carbohydrates to ensure a level head throughout even the toughest queries from your boss.

 

For more ideas on how to eat healthy on the high street check out the best and worst meal deals  Smart Choices When You’re Eating…

Whatever country you’re taking your taste buds to, here’s some quick tips on what to eat and what best to skip

Italian Creamy carbonara or mushroom pasta sauces are some of our favourite comfort foods. But the pasta will still taste just as good in a rich tomato sauce and it’s likely to be lower in fat and calories. If you’re a pizza fan, you know what you don’t need: stuffed crusts.

Chinese Choose steamed not fried – keep away from fried food in general. Even stir-fries can contain about as much fat as 16 rashers of bacon! Instead get steamed rice, veg and dumplings, or, if it’s a big group, a whole steamed fish.

Indian Anything cooked in a tandoor are your healthiest options here. Tandoori Naan or Roti contain none of the sugars of the regular kind and taste just like mini pizza bases. For the main event, go tikka or bhuna to avoid the heavy sauces of the other curries. Check out the best high street options here 

Japanese You probably already know to skip the tempura but pay attention to detail with sushi – the rice can contain sneaky added sugar and so can anything marinated in teryaki.

Mexican Chicken enchiladas, without the usual mass of cheese they come with, are often made with corn tortillas that are baked not fried – don’t shy away from asking for the lower fat option. Restaurants often re-fry beans too so start negotiating with your waiter/tress for a healthier deal.

There are also a few easy hacks to maintain your weight when abroad and on the road, check out our guide on how to eat healthy on holiday

If you found this guide useful share with your family and friends!

The post High Street Hacks To Super-Charge Your Weight Loss appeared first on Nutrifix | Find Your Healthy | Nutrition App.

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Why High Protein?

Protein is the building blocks of your bones, muscles and cells in the body. It is essential for creating hormones, red blood cells and for keeping our brain functioning.

Protein also helps you stay feeling full for longer and can help with weight loss. In short it’s an essential macronutrient.

That’s why we wanted to share these high protein recipes with you. The recipes are also nutritionally balanced, simple to make and prepared in a way, where whole, unprocessed, seasonal products do most of the work.

We’ve also included vegetarian, vegan and gluten free options too. Enjoy!

We’d love to see your creations, tag us in your photos @nutrifix_app and use the hashtag #NutrifixRecipe 

Joel Burgess Founder and CEO of Nutrifix

In A Rush (Recipes under 30min)

01/ Green Eggs & Ham
02/ Mussels, Coconut Milk, Chilli & Lime
03/ Salmon & Steamed Veg
04/ Courgetti with Salmon & Pesto
05/ Chicken Stiry Fry
06/ Salmon & Sesame Noodles
07/ Shakshuka & Baked Eggs
08/ Lentil & Massaged Greens Power Salad
09/ Lamb Chops, Tzatziki & Chopped Salad
10/ Breakfast Burrito
11/ Steak & Broccoli Stir Fry
12/ Vegan Satay Tofu Quinoa Bowls
13/ Coconut Curry Lentil Soup

Time To Kill (Recipes more than 30min)

14/ Tuna and Avocado, Ginger & Lime Poke
15/ King Prawn & Tomato Orzo
16/ Chicken & Bacon Casserole
17/ Bangers & Sweet Potato Mash
18/ Beef Stifado
19/ Apple & Sausage Bake
20/ Mexican Pork Birria
21/ Sardinian Beef Stew
22/ Cajun Steak With Rice & Peas
23/ Pork In Milk With Quinoa
24/ Sweet Potato Fries & Mexican Beans
25/ Duck Cassoulet
26/ Moussaka
27/ Vegan Tofu Katsu Curry

Abbreviations
| GF = Gluten Free | DF = Dairy Free | VGN = Vegan | VEG = Vegetarian | PESC = Pescatarian| LS = Low Sugar |

| tbs = Tablespoon | tsp = Teaspoon| g = grams | ml = millilitres |

Green eggs & ham

GF, LS Serves 2
Macros 
Kcal 302|Protein 23g|Fat 21g | Carbs 9g| Sat Fat 7g| Sugar 1g

Ingredients  
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 avocado
  • 1 tsp salt 1
  • handful parsley (plus extra to garnish)
  • 1 handful basil
  • 1 tsp dried chilli flakes (plus extra to garnish)
  • 1 tsp coconut oil
  • 4 slices good quality cooked ham
Method
  • In a blender or nutri-bullet, add your eggs, avocado, salt, chilli and herbs, blitz to combine
  • Place a small heavy bottomed pan over a medium heat and melt your coconut oil
  • Add your egg mix and stir slowly to scramble gently
  • Once cooked serve with 2 pieces of ham and an extra scattering of herbs and chilli flakes
For more ideas on how to get your protein & eat your eggs on the go check out ‘How to pimp your egg pot’ Mussels, coconut milk, chilli and lime

 

GF, LS, PESC Serves 4
Macros 
Kcal 492|Protein 60g|Fat 15g | Carbs 27g| Sat Fat 5g| Sugar 1g

Ingredients
  • 1kg mussels, cleaned and de-bearded by your fishmonger
  • 400ml coconut milk
  • 1 red chilli, diced
  • 2 limes, juiced
  • Handful coriander, roughly chopped
Method
  • Take a large heavy bottomed pot with a fitting lid
  • Place over a medium high heat and allow to get hot
  • Prepare chopped chilli and juice limes
  • Put mussels into the hot pan, immediately throw in chilli and coconut milk and put the lid on the pan
  • Give the pan a gentle shake and leave to cook for 2 minutes
  • Remove lid and see if the mussels have all opened
  • If not, pop the lid back on and cook for a further 30 seconds to 1 minute
  • If so, take them off the heat, add lime juice and coriander
  • Spoon the mussels into two bowls and pour over the cooking liquor
Salmon & steamed veg

GF, LS, Serves 2
Macros 
Kcal 182|Protein 25g|Fat 3g | Carbs 14g| Sat Fat 1g| Sugar 7g

Ingredients  
  • 2 courgette, sliced lengthways
  • 1 fennel bulb, finely sliced
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 2 salmon fillets, de skinned
  • 1 handful pine nuts, toasted
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • small handful basil leaves
Method
  • Place a pan over a medium heat with about an inch of water in the bottom
  • Place a colander over the water so that you create a steam basket (if you have a bamboo steamer, use that)
  • Prepare all your ingredients, and then when ready, layer into the steamer the fennel first, then courgettes, then halved tomatoes
  • Season each layer as your go
  • Cover with a lid or some tin foil and allow to steam for a few minutes to start the cooking of the veg
  • After 3-4 mins, place the salmon on top and cover the steamer again. Cook like this for 8 minutes until the salmon is just cooked through
  • Whilst the salmon and vegetables cook, toast pine nuts
  • When cooked, remove fish and vegetables from the pan and plate up. Scatter with pine nuts, a good squeeze of lemon and a few basil leaves
Courgetti with salmon & pesto

GF, LS, PESC Serves 2
Macros 
Kcal 343|Protein 33g|Fat 21g | Carbs 5g| Sat Fat 3g| Sugar 3g

 Ingredients  
  • 2 salmon fillets, de-skinned
  • 4 courgettes. spirallised
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 bunch basil, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 8 brazil nuts
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
Method
  • Preheat the oven to 200C
  • Place salmon fillets in a baking tray and season with a little salt and pepper
  • Put in oven and cook for 8 minutes
  • Whilst they cook, spirallise or thinly slice courgette and put to one side
  • In a blender, blitz basil, brazil nuts, olive oil and garlic until a bright green paste
  • Fry over a medium heat and add tomatoes
  • Allow to cook for a moment and start to burst and release their juices, before adding courgette to pan
  • Add a splash of water, and allow courgette to steam and cook
  • Add one tablespoon of the pesto, toss well, and flake in the cooked salmon
  • Portion the courgetti onto two plates and top with a little more of the pesto, enjoy!
    Which nut is the healthiest and most protein packed? Check out the stats.
Chicken stir fry

GF, LS, Serves 2
Macros 
Kcal 346|Protein 36g|Fat 4g | Carbs 36g| Sat Fat 1g| Sugar 5g

Ingredients  
  • 200g rice noodles, soaked in boiling water
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 2 skinless boneless chicken breasts, sliced into very thin strips
  • 10 florets broccoli, chopped
  • 100g shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 1cm peeled and sliced fresh ginger
  • 1 red chilli, sliced
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 lime, juiced
Method
  • Get a large frying pan very hot over a high heat
  • Add a teaspoon of sesame oil, and quickly add the broccoli, mushrooms, chilli and ginger
  • Toss for a few moments, before adding the thinly sliced chicken
  • Again cook for a minute, tossing occasionally, add the soy sauce and allow to coat everything
  • Finally, add the noodles and squeeze over the lime juice. Serve as it is.
Salmon & sesame noodles

 

LS, PESC, Serves 2
Macros 
Kcal 344|Protein 32g|Fat 10g | Carbs 38g| Sat Fat 2g| Sugar 4g

Ingredients
  • 2 salmon fillets
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce 1cm ginger, grated
  • 1 garlic clove, grated
  • 150g of buckwheat soba noodles, soaked in boiling water
  • 1 red chilli, sliced
  • 2 spring onions, sliced
Method
  • Preheat the oven to 200C
  • Place your salmon fillets in a baking tray and add the soy sauce, sesame oil, ginger and garlic
  • Place in the hot oven and cook for 8 minutes
  • Meanwhile, cook your noodles by soaking them in boiling water, and slice your red chilli and spring onions
  • When the salmon is cooked, simply flake its flesh into a mixing bowl, toss with noodles and half of the spring onion and chilli
  • Divide onto two plates and top with any left over dressing, and rest of the spring onion and red chilli
Shakshuka & baked eggs

GF, VEG, PESC, Serves 2
Macros 
Kcal 421|Protein 24g|Fat 25g | Carbs 23g| Sat Fat 6g| Sugar 15g

Ingredients
  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely diced
  • 2 red pepper, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed 2 tsp sweet paprika
  • ½ tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 800g tinned tomatoes
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped
Method
  • Place a large lidded frying pan over a medium heat, add olive oil and gently sweat the onions with a pinch of salt
  • When soft and just golden, 8-10minutes, add garlic, peppers and all spices and fry until the peppers are starting to soften
  • Add the tomatoes, bring to the boil, then turn down the heat and simmer for 25-30 minutes
  • With a spoon make 4 little dents in the sauce and break in the eggs
  • Season them with salt, turn the heat right down as low as possible, cover tightly with the lid and cook gently for 10 minutes until the egg yolks are just set
  • Sprinkle with coriander and serve.
Lentil & massaged greens power salad

GF, LS, VGN, VEG, PESC, Serves 4

Macros 
Kcal 301|Protein 22g|Fat 5g | Carbs 48g| Sat Fat 3g| Sugar 6g

Ingredients
  • 250g cooked puy lentils
  • 2 carrots, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 bag kale, chopped
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil 1 tbsp vinegar
  • 1 tbsp mustard
  • 1 handful parsley, chopped
  • 5 springs mint, leaves picked and chopped
  • 1 small bunch dill, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
Method
  • This is really an assembly job
  • Mix the coconut oil, mustard and vinegar together and, in a large bowl, massage well into the kale
  • Next, simply add rest of the ingredients to the bowl and mix well together
  • Turn salad out onto a platter and enjoy
    For more plant based, protein packed lunches check out our guide to the high street’s 7 best plant-based lunches
Lamb chops, tzatziki & chopped salad

GF, LS, Serves 2

Macros 
Kcal 561|Protein 46g|Fat 33g |

 

Carbs 20g| Sat Fat 12g| Sugar 13g

 

Ingredients
  • 4 lamb chops
  • 1/2 cucumber, grated
  • 1/2 cucumber, chopped
  • 1/2 garlic clove, grated
  • 250g yoghurt
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 2 sprigs mint, chopped
  • 2 large tomatoes, chopped
  • Handful black olives, pitted
  • 50g feta cheese, chopped
Method
  • Preheat the oven to 200C
  • Season lamb chops with a little olive oil and place in oven for 15-20 minutes until cooked
  • Whilst lamb chops cook, make tzatziki by grating cucumber and placing in a sieve with a little salt
  • After 5 minutes, squeeze as much liquid out of the grated cucumber as possible using your hands
  • Add squeezed cucumber to yoghurt and stir in a squeeze of lemon juice, a pinch of salt and chopped mint
  • Leave to one side whilst you chop your salad
  • Take all chopped cucumber, tomato and olives and place in a bowl
  • Season with the rest of the lemon juice, a little oil and a pinch of salt, before topping with chopped feta
  • When your lamb chops come out of the oven, simply serve them with some chopped salad, a good spoonful of tzatziki and another liberal squeeze of lemon for good measure
Breakfast Burrito

GF, LS, Serves 4

Macros 
Kcal 644|Protein 33g|Fat 34g |

Carbs 56g| Sat Fat 11g| Sugar 4g

Ingredients
  • 4 corn tortillas
  • 4 large eggs
  • 25g butter
  • 2 large tomatoes
  • 1 avocado
  • 400g black beans
  • 200g leftover chicken, turkey or steak
  • 1 lime, juiced
Method
  • Take a saucepan and empty black beans into it and place over high heat.
  • Bring to boil and allow to cook until very soft
  • Add a little salt, dried chilli and lime juice and put to one side to cool
  • In another pan, melt butter, add eggs and gently whisk until eggs are suitably scrambled. Place to one side whilst making up the burrito
  • Lay tortilla on a piece of parchment or foil and lay down a layer of egg in the centRE of the tortilla. Onto this, place some black beans, slices of avocado, pieces of tomato and a few slices of chicken, turkey or beef. Tuck in two sides of tortilla and roll one un-tucked side over the filling
  • Completely roll the burrito, using the parchment or foil to keep it all together and to help you to get a neat roll. Enjoy immediately, or leave to one side to enjoy after a work out or morning run
Steak & broccoli stir fry

Serves 2

Macros 
Kcal 726|Protein 57g|Fat 35g | Carbs 79g| Sat Fat 3g| Sugar 12g

 

Ingredients
  • 10 stalks tender stem broccoli, halved lengthways
  • 350g rump steak
  • 2 tsp coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 1 tsp Maldon sea salt 100g wholewheat soba noodles
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 spring onions, sliced
  • 2 cloves of garlic, finely sliced
  • 6cm piece of fresh ginger, finely sliced into batons
  • 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1 fresh red chilli, finely sliced
Method
  • Bring a kettle of water to boil. Place halved broccoli and soba noodles in a large bowl and pour over boiling water
  • Add a pinch of salt and sit for 10 minutes before draining and seasoning with sesame oil. When dressed, leave to one side whilst you cook your steak
  • Place a large frying pan over a high heat and get smoking hot
  • In a pestle and mortar, grind coriander seeds, salt and dried chilli flakes, before scattering them over both sides of steak along with olive oil. Rub in well so that steak is completely coated before placing in pan and cooking for 3 minutes each side.
  • Remove steak from pan to rest on a plate, and into the pan throw garlic, ginger and spring onions. Soften for 1 minute before adding soy sauce and cooking for a further minute.
  • To assemble the stir fry, toss the cooked spring onions etc through the noodles and broccoli and divide between two plates.
  • Finely slice the steak and divide again between the plates. Top with some sliced chilli and a good squeeze of lime juice.
Vegan satay tofu quinoa bowls

GF, LS, VGN, VEG, PESC, Serves..

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Lean, Green Protein by Feedmyglow.

If there are two things we love about exercise, it's that post-workout rush of endorphins and the rewarding re-feed!

But in order to see the necessary signs to indicate we're on track to meeting our health and fitness goals, there are two particularly important nutritional boxes that need ticking - carbohydrates and protein.

Protein shakes are a great way to deliver the necessary dose for each + they're convenient, quick to digest, and there's good variety on offer to suit whatever dietary preference.

Related: The One and Only Best Protein Powder For You 

But you can't beat a tasty, well-rounded meal comprising of nutrient-dense whole foods to satiate and replenish your body! A well rounded post-workout meal should ideally include fibre-rich complex carbs such as sweet potatoes, oats, brown rice or wholegrain bread. It should also include protein, ideally from a source low in saturated fat that provides a complete amino acid profile.

For the meaty...

Fish and chicken breast are good sources for those who eat meat. Fish is rich in omega 3 fatty acids and vitamins D and B2. Chicken breast is very high in protein and low in saturated fat.

Related: 6 Shocking Ketogenic Diet Side Effects

For the veggies...

A couple of years ago, the average gym goer wouldn't have thought it possible to re-fuel sufficiently on a plant-based diet. Nowadays, that misconception is far less common. Soy and legumes are very good sources of protein as they offer an almost complete amino acid profile. Other plant-based proteins have a lower percentage of at least one amino acid.

So if you're vegan and building a nutritionally optimised post-workout meal without soy or legumes (peas, lentils, beans etc), it's best to combine a number of other plant-based protein sources to meet a complete amino acid profile.

Thoroughly optimised high protein pasta... And it's veggie.

Since Veganuary is fast approaching, and we're super keen to try tasty new recipes that meet our nutritional targets, we've hit up one of our fave plant-based foodies, Shannon Tang (aka feedmeglow) for one of her favourite post-workout recipe.

Here it is!

 

Post workout high protein spaghetti bolognese
-
Ingredients:
50g @explorecuisine Mung bean and edamame spaghetti
1 chopped mixed peppers
A handful of green beans
1/2 courgette
1/2 pack of @waitroseandpartners vegan grain mince
1/2 can of @bionaorganic chopped tinned tomatoes
1 tsp of tomato paste
Handful of kale
1/2 head of small cauliflower
Few splashes of tamari and apple cider vinegar
Spices and herbs: onion and garlic powder, paprika, mixed herbs, dried coriander, black pepper, cumin
-
Method:
1. Chop the cauliflower into slices and add spices, tamari and roast for 30 minutes at 180 degrees flipping halfway through.
2. Chop the vegetables and sauté for 7-10 minutes adding in the spices shortly after.
3. Add in the tin of tomatoes and let it simmer for 15-20 minutes.
4. Add in the vegan mince and kale and let it simmer further for 5 minutes.
5. Cook your spaghetti of choice and drain and rinse once done.
6. Top everything with black pepper and nutritional yeast.

For more healthy recipe inspiration head over to the Nutrifix Discovery feed! There, we share some of our favourite health-boosting recipes and the best of the high street's nutritionally optimised food.

The post Vegan Spaghetti Bolognese Recipe | Shannon Tang’s Post Workout Pasta appeared first on Nutrifix | Find Your Healthy | Nutrition App.

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Low carb dieting still seems to be all the rage at the moment, even though it's been around for a while now.

You can even find article headlines such as “If you don't stop eating these 7 high carb foods, they could kill you

Which does not help people get a balanced view of how to eat a healthy, balanced diet.

So let's take a look at some of the negative effects of a ketogenic diet such as how it might increase your risk of type 2 diabetes.

Plus, learn what keto breath is and how to fix it!

 

The New Macronutrient on The Block

Just as fat was demonised for many years, now carbohydrates are taking a hit.

Only this time, we have Instagram and Facebook to spread the news like wildfire!

 The Ketogenic Diet: A Smash Hit

A big hit has been the Ketogenic diet, with many authors and sites promoting its health benefits and leading with statements such as:

A keto or ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, which turns the body into a fat-burning machine. It has many proven benefits for weight loss, health and performance, as millions of people have experienced already”

With such big claims and promises, you'd be forgiven for thinking it could be a miracle cure, sent from the heavens above to cure all!

But, beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep's clothing...

Before we get stuck in, let's make sure we're singing from the same hymn sheet

What is the Ketogenic Diet?

It's a high fat, very low carbohydrate eating strategy.

In the earlier part of the century it was used as a way to treat epilepsy in children. More recently, however, it has been used by people who want to lose weight, usually fast.

It is sometimes compared to diets such as Paleo, Atkins and The South Beach. But there is a difference.

A ketogenic diet is high in fats and doesn't have to be high in protein. The other aforementioned diets stress the importance of high protein, too.

As with most extremes, there can also be some consequences. Let's look at 6 such side effects when following a Ketogenic Diet.

Related: Join The Future Of Dieting: Real Fitness Progress Starts Here

#1 Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A recent research study using mice showed that in the early stages of a ketogenic diet, their bodies were not able to properly use insulin.

This leads to insulin resistance because blood sugar levels were not controlled properly. If the same is true for humans, this could put someone at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Although not conclusive, the authors of the study believe that there is a possible risk when following a very high fat, low carb diet that a person will become insulin resistant.

This means their blood sugar will increase because the body cannot control the blood sugar level properly.

It is thought that this would be reversible once the person went back to a normal fat and carb intake.

However, they noted that adding higher levels of carbs to a normal ketogenic, high-fat diet could cause problems due to insulin resistance.

Related: Is Gluten Bad For You?

  #2 You May Die Sooner 

A study published in The Lancet, investigated how both low-carb and high-carb diets impact people's health and their risk of mortality.

In part of their conclusion they state:

“The highest risk of mortality was observed in participants with the lowest carbohydrate consumption”

It should be noted that what you replace your carbohydrates with is important. The general thinking is that replacing with higher fats from animal products could cause more of a problem compared to replacing with fats from plant based sources.

Whether this is conclusive remains to be seen, but there is no smoke without fire. Some scientists and researchers are putting this information out there which means it could be true.

Do you really want to find out the hard way? It's your choice!

 #3 You May get Keto Flu 

Not to be confused with Man-flu, this is actually a legitimate thing...

The keto flu can cause symptoms such as headaches, fatigue and irritability, to name just a few of the more common problems faced when starting a keto diet.

The reason is because the body has to switch from using sugar (carbs) as a source of fuel to using fat instead.

When breaking down the fat, the body produces ketones which cause frequent trips to the loo as your body attempts to remove them from your system.

This can lead to dehydration and flu-like symptoms. You will also likely suffer from brain fog and withdrawal symptoms.

But, apparently, you can get over these symptoms within a week or two...That's if you manage to stay on the diet as it's very restrictive and hard to follow properly.

Just 20g of carbohydrates a day is nothing. A medium sized apple has around 20-25g of carbs.

  #4 Your Social Life will Suffer 

If you think about pretty much every social occasion you go to, it will involve eating or drinking some carbohydrates. Especially around Christmas time.

That means no potatoes, parsnips or mulled wine. Bummer.

And almost no fruit either. Fruit contains a good serving of carbohydrates, so you're going to have to stick with a few berries if you want to stick to such low levels of carbs.

That makes it very hard to live a normal life when you're trying to stick to such low levels of carbohydrates. There are some strategies for coping, but it's not going to be easy.

If you're thinking about trying out the keto diet, make sure you have some strategies you think will work for you, because avoiding social situations is most definitely not a long-term solution if you value your mental health.

 #5 You May Damage Your Health 

Being on such a low carbohydrate diet means eating fewer nutrient-rich foods such as fruits and vegetables.

To function properly, our body requires these important nutrients and vitamins.

Some people might say that you can just use supplements, but unfortunately, it's not the same.

Our bodies absorb nutrients and vitamins from whole foods. It's what we have been doing for a long time. Spoon feeding specific nutrients and vitamins is not the same as getting them from whole foods.

Related: The Best Foods To Eat When You're Feeling Ill

 #6 The Dreaded Keto Breath...

 

And let's not forget about keto breath! keto breath is not your ordinary smelly breath from too much onion or garlic. No, this is bad breath on a whole new level...

This horrible side-effect of a ketogenic diet is the result of being in ketosis. So if you have it, at least you have confirmation you're doing the diet right.

 

But how do you get rid of keto breath?

 

Most people say that it goes away naturally, as your body gets used to the diet, but I'm sure you'd rather not have it at all. Totally understandable, so here are some suggestions to help you.

 

A) Don't overdo the protein

 

According to First for Women, eating too much protein could cause fermentation in the gut which releases a foul odour and may contribute to bad breath.

How much protein should you consume on the keto diet?

Good question. Harvard Health reports that the recommended daily allowance is around 0.8 grams of protein per kg of body weight.

If you're 70kg, that's around 56 grams. Or a decent sized chicken breast (172g).

If you take a look online, though, many people will recommend much higher levels.

A lot of bodybuilders would aim for 2-2.5g of protein per kg of body weight. So there are big differences in the estimates.

So what do you do?

Precision Nutrition uses a much simpler method and recommend 1 palm-sized piece of protein for women and 2 for men at each meal.

Also, bear in mind that your requirements will differ depending on how active you are. A sedentary 70 year old female will require much less than a 25 year old male athlete.

 

B) Ensure you're not dehydrated

 

Dehydration can increase the chances of you having keto breath, so make sure you're sipping from a glass of regular water throughout the day.

Coffee, tea, energy drinks and artificial sweeteners in chewing gums are only likely to make your bad breath worse.

Aim for around 2-3 litres a day. You'll also get more from your diet, such as by eating vegetables containing water.

 

C) Freshen your breath naturally

 

Perfect Keto have some great ideas for home-made, all natural breath fresheners you could try out.

The short story is you can use natural herbs and spices, such as parsley, cinnamon and sage to help alleviate bad breath.

Simply add them to your favourite meals or make your own all natural mouthwash, as described in their post."

 

The Moral of the Story

The Keto diet, just like many other fad diets, is an extreme.

Extremes are often unbalanced and not healthy for you in the long-term. With such little evidence to promote such extremely restrictive dieting strategies, it seems unwise to follow such a plan for the long term.

Does it help you lose weight? Yes, I'm sure that it would just as restricting normal foods would do the same.

When you're not drinking alcohol and removing those tasty treat foods, you can be sure your calorie count for the day will be much lower.

The question is, how long can you sustain this kind of diet? Probably not very long is the answer most people who have tried it will tell you.

Written by Robert Jackson of Minimal FiT, a certified personal trainer and nutrition coach in London.

But if you're still interested...

Here at Nutrifix, we endeavour to provide people with health and nutritional guidance they can trust, so they can make informed lifestyle and dietary decisions for themselves!

However, in this instance, if you're still interested in pursuing the ketogenic diet then you can use our app to tailor your high street meal results to match your low-carb, high-fat preference.

Here's a selection of some of the Keto-compatible highstreet options that pop up!

Leon's Full English Pot - Keto Breakfast Protein Hit

Leon's Poached egg, sausage, bacon, beans combo scores in at a whopping 34g of protein, a hefty 36g of fat (10g are saturated) and only 9g of carbs. Not the healthiest breakfast by any account, but if your focus is on hitting those high-fat, high-protein and low-carb macros, this may be an option to consider.

Pod's Protein Feast Scrambled Eggs - Another keto breakfast protein hit. But scrambled... 

Pod's keto breakfast option has us in a bit of a scramble with that protein stat (51g protein) - that's almost hitting your daily quota in one hit. The meal also provides 53g of fat (17g of which are saturated...) and only 14g of carbs.

Crussh's Butter Bean, Cherry Tomato & Parsley Health Pot - Vegan Keto Lunch Option

This colourful vegan keto lunch is loaded with fresh veggies and rich in healthy fats. Butterbeans are a great source of protein, iron, fibre and B vitamins. This healthy keto lunch option provides 7g of protein, 20g of fats and only 15g of carbs. A healthy lunch option all-round, packed with healthy micronutrients to keep your system happy.

Tossed's Omega Salmon - The pescatarian's protein-packed keto breakfast (spoiler alert - there's egg)

Tossed's Omega Salmon is a protein-packed pescatarian breakfast rich in essential fatty acids to keep your joints oiled and your brain functioning super smooth. This little dishy hits in at 31g of protein, 39g of fats and only 3g of carbs - so a tasty keto breakfast prospect for the protein heads once again.

For more high street meals tailored to your dietary preference, check out the Nutrifix app - the ultimate tool for seeing the high street food options with nutritional clarity.

The post 6 Shocking Ketogenic Diet Side Effects appeared first on Nutrifix | Find Your Healthy | Nutrition App.

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…Measured by the teaspoon

 

It’s that time of year again – the red cups are back! And with the red cups come a whole new tempting array of Christmas drinks to add to our morning coffee dilemmas – ranging from Fudge Hot Chocolate, Eggnog Latte and Toffee Nut Latte to Pumpkin Spice Lattes and Christmas Brûlée Lattes. But let’s get all scrooge about it. What are these drinks really doing to our sugar intakes? And would we actually be better off eating a slice of Christmas cake than downing one of these speciality brews?

Our nutritionist takes us through the best and the worst of the Christmas drinks out there:

 

The Worst:

 

Starbucks Salted Caramel Brownie Hot Chocolate with Whipped Cream

 

 

This drink packs in more calories than one and a half Mars bars (433 kcals), and more than 12 teaspoons of sugar. Yep, you read that right – TWELVE whole teaspoons of sugar. And if you think you’ll skip the dairy for a healthier choice, don’t be fooled – the oat milk version contains even more calories at a huge 462 kcals per cup.

 

Costa Hazelnut Praline Hot Chocolate

 

 

Not surprisingly another hot chocolate is one of Costa’s highest sugar bevvies – with a medium version made with semi-skimmed milk packing in over 50 grams of sugar (that’s over 13 teaspoons and less sugar than in every one of their cakes on the menu).

 

Caffe Nero Belgian Truffle Hot Chocolate

 

 

Ok we know we know, it sounds delicious. But at 464 calories for a large cup, this drink contains almost as many calories as two Mcdonalds hamburgers and less calories and less sugar than Nero’s Belgian Chocolate fudge cake! If you had one of these every day for the month of December you could end up 5 kilos heavier come New Year’s Eve. Just an FYI.

 

The Best:

 

Costa Hot Spiced Apple

 

 

Think of this as a non-boozy mulled wine to warm your cockles on those wintery mornings. Coming in at less than 200 calories and completely caffeine free this is a good alternative to another high calorie morning coffee. Just note that as it’s not much more than a flavoured water with sugar you might get a quick energy burst followed by a dip – so have with some protein-rich food like Costa’s bag of mixed nuts to prevent this.

 

Starbucks Semi-Skimmed Flat White with Cinnamon Spice

 

 

If you really want a taste of Christmas without taking too much of a hit on your macros, try the Starbucks Christmas flat white with cinnamon spice. It still contains almost 4 teaspoons of sugar but only weighs in at 122 calories and will give you a fair protein boost of 6.3g (the same as in one large egg!).

 

Starbucks Chai Tea (not the latte version) with Whole Milk and 1/2 Teaspoon of Sugar

 

 

If you want the taste of Christmas with half the calories and a fraction of the sugar try the Starbucks Chai tea bags, adding hot whole milk and a sprinkle of sugar. Top tip – leave the teabag in for as long as possible to maximise the flavour and get that spicy hit. Definitely the most virtuous item on the Starbucks menu after a plain old mint tea.

The post HOW much sugar?! The Best & Worst Christmas Drinks 2018 appeared first on Nutrifix | Find Your Healthy | Nutrition App.

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Low carb dieting still seems to be all the rage at the moment, even though it's been around for a while now.

You can even find article headlines such as “If you don't stop eating these 7 high carb foods, they could kill you

Which does not help people get a balanced view of how to eat a healthy, balanced diet.

So let's take a look at some of the negative effects of a ketogenic diet such as how it might increase your risk of type 2 diabetes.

 

 

The New Macronutrient on The Block

 

Just as fat was demonised for many years, now carbohydrates are taking a hit.

Only this time, we have Instagram and Facebook to spread the news like wildfire!

 

 The Ketogenic Diet: A Smash Hit

 

A big hit has been the Ketogenic diet, with many authors and sites promoting its health benefits and leading with statements such as:

A keto or ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, which turns the body into a fat-burning machine. It has many proven benefits for weight loss, health and performance, as millions of people have experienced already”

With such big claims and promises, you'd be forgiven for thinking it could be a miracle cure, sent from the heavens above to cure all!

But, beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep's clothing...

Before we get stuck in, let's make sure we're singing from the same hymn sheet

 

 

What is the Ketogenic Diet?

 

It's a high fat, very low carbohydrate eating strategy.

In the earlier part of the century it was used as a way to treat epilepsy in children. More recently, however, it has been used by people who want to lose weight, usually fast.

It is sometimes compared to diets such as Paleo, Atkins and The South Beach. But there is a difference.

A ketogenic diet is high in fats and doesn't have to be high in protein. The other aforementioned diets stress the importance of high protein, too.

As with most extremes, there can also be some consequences. Let's look at 5 such side effects when following a Ketogenic Diet.

Related: Join The Future Of Dieting: Real Fitness Progress Starts Here

 

 

#1 Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

 

 

A recent research study using mice showed that in the early stages of a ketogenic diet, their bodies were not able to properly use insulin.

This leads to insulin resistance because blood sugar levels were not controlled properly. If the same is true for humans, this could put someone at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Although not conclusive, the authors of the study believe that there is a possible risk when following a very high fat, low carb diet that a person will become insulin resistant.

This means their blood sugar will increase because the body cannot control the blood sugar level properly.

It is thought that this would be reversible once the person went back to a normal fat and carb intake.

However, they noted that adding higher levels of carbs to a normal ketogenic, high-fat diet could cause problems due to insulin resistance.

Related: Is Gluten Bad For You?

  #2 You May Die Sooner 

 

 

A study published in The Lancet, investigated how both low-carb and high-carb diets impact people's health and their risk of mortality.

In part of their conclusion they state:

“The highest risk of mortality was observed in participants with the lowest carbohydrate consumption”

It should be noted that what you replace your carbohydrates with is important. The general thinking is that replacing with higher fats from animal products could cause more of a problem compared to replacing with fats from plant based sources.

Whether this is conclusive remains to be seen, but there is no smoke without fire. Some scientists and researchers are putting this information out there which means it could be true.

Do you really want to find out the hard way? It's your choice!

 

 

#3 You May get Keto Flu 

 

Not to be confused with Man-flu, this is actually a legitimate thing...

The keto flu can cause symptoms such as headaches, fatigue and irritability, to name just a few of the more common problems faced when starting a keto diet.

The reason is because the body has to switch from using sugar (carbs) as a source of fuel to using fat instead.

When breaking down the fat, the body produces ketones which cause frequent trips to the loo as your body attempts to remove them from your system.

This can lead to dehydration and flu-like symptoms. You will also likely suffer from brain fog and withdrawal symptoms.

But, apparently, you can get over these symptoms within a week or two...That's if you manage to stay on the diet as it's very restrictive and hard to follow properly.

Just 20g of carbohydrates a day is nothing. A medium sized apple has around 20-25g of carbs.

  #4 Your Social Life will Suffer 

 

 

If you think about pretty much every social occasion you go to, it will involve eating or drinking some carbohydrates. Especially around Christmas time.

That means no potatoes, parsnips or mulled wine. Bummer.

And almost no fruit either. Fruit contains a good serving of carbohydrates, so you're going to have to stick with a few berries if you want to stick to such low levels of carbs.

That makes it very hard to live a normal life when you're trying to stick to such low levels of carbohydrates. There are some strategies for coping, but it's not going to be easy.

If you're thinking about trying out the keto diet, make sure you have some strategies you think will work for you, because avoiding social situations is most definitely not a long-term solution if you value your mental health.

 

 

#5 You May Damage Your Health 

 

 

Being on such a low carbohydrate diet means eating fewer nutrient-rich foods such as fruits and vegetables.

To function properly, our body requires these important nutrients and vitamins.

Some people might say that you can just use supplements, but unfortunately, it's not the same.

Our bodies absorb nutrients and vitamins from whole foods. It's what we have been doing for a long time. Spoon feeding specific nutrients and vitamins is not the same as getting them from whole foods.

Related: The Best Foods To Eat When You're Feeling Ill

 

 

The Moral of the Story

 

The Keto diet, just like many other fad diets, is an extreme.

Extremes are often unbalanced and not healthy for you in the long-term. With such little evidence to promote such extremely restrictive dieting strategies, it seems unwise to follow such a plan for the long term.

Does it help you lose weight? Yes, I'm sure that it would just as restricting normal foods would do the same.

When you're not drinking alcohol and removing those tasty treat foods, you can be sure your calorie count for the day will be much lower.

The question is, how long can you sustain this kind of diet? Probably not very long is the answer most people who have tried it will tell you.

Written by Robert Jackson of Minimal FiT, a certified personal trainer and nutrition coach in London.

 

 

But if you're still interested...

 

Here at Nutrifix, we endeavour to provide people with health and nutritional guidance they can trust, so they can make informed lifestyle and dietary decisions for themselves!

However, in this instance, if you're still interested in pursuing the ketogenic diet then you can use our app to tailor your high street meal results to match your low-carb, high-fat preference.

Here's a selection of some of the Keto-compatible highstreet options that pop up!

 

Leon's Full English Pot - Keto Breakfast Protein Hit

Leon's Poached egg, sausage, bacon, beans combo scores in at a whopping 34g of protein, a hefty 36g of fat (10g are saturated) and only 9g of carbs. Not the healthiest breakfast by any account, but if your focus is on hitting those high-fat, high-protein and low-carb macros, this may be an option to consider.

 

 

Pod's Protein Feast Scrambled Eggs - Another keto breakfast protein hit. But scrambled... 

Pod's keto breakfast option has us in a bit of a scramble with that protein stat (51g protein) - that's almost hitting your daily quota in one hit. The meal also provides 53g of fat (17g of which are saturated...) and only 14g of carbs.

 

 

Crussh's Butter Bean, Cherry Tomato & Parsley Health Pot - Vegan Keto Lunch Option

This colourful vegan keto lunch is loaded with fresh veggies and rich in healthy fats. Butterbeans are a great source of protein, iron, fibre and B vitamins. This healthy keto lunch option provides 7g of protein, 20g of fats and only 15g of carbs. A healthy lunch option all-round, packed with healthy micronutrients to keep your system happy.

 

 

Tossed's Omega Salmon - The pescatarian's protein-packed keto breakfast (spoiler alert - there's egg)

Tossed's Omega Salmon is a protein-packed pescatarian breakfast rich in essential fatty acids to keep your joints oiled and your brain functioning super smooth. This little dishy hits in at 31g of protein, 39g of fats and only 3g of carbs - so a tasty keto breakfast prospect for the protein heads once again.

 

 

For more high street meals tailored to your dietary preference, check out the Nutrifix app - the ultimate tool for seeing the high street food options with nutritional clarity.

The post 5 Shocking Ketogenic Diet Side Effects appeared first on Nutrifix | Find Your Healthy | Nutrition App.

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