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I have a great friend in Beth Elliot. Those of you who follow this blog and my posts on Facebook will know that Beth and I try to get together whenever I’m in England. And you may recall that Beth was my saviour when my phone was stolen in London, taking me to buy a …
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Number One London by Victoria Hinshaw - 5d ago
by Victoria Hinshaw The story of Wentworth Woodhouse (WW) is intensely interesting — and convoluted.  Since I am a great devotee of all things British, and especially the great country houses and the people who lived in them, I was particularly excited to visit the estate with Number One London Tours 2017 Country House Tour. …
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Number One London by Kristine Hughes - 1w ago
This is the first installment on a series of posts we’ll be re-running from The Horse-World of London by William John Gordon  (1893), each one chock-a-block full of interesting details. We hope you’ll enjoy them as much as we do! The Post Office owns no horses; it does its work by contract, and McNamara’s have `horsed …
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Number One London Tours loves surprises, whether it’s an impromptu stop at an 18th century village, a surprise run-in with Prince Charles or an unexpected stroll in the rain. Sometimes, we arrange the surprises, as we did by adding a three hour Land Rover tour of the Drumlanrig estate to our upcoming Scottish Writers Retreat …
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By guest blogger Julia Gaspar In her own time, Elizabeth, Lady Craven was famed for two things  – for the private theatricals that she loved to put on in her own home, and for the series of scandalous love affairs that filled the gossip columns and often provided material for salacious satire. Younger daughter of …
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Number One London by Kristine Hughes - 2w ago
Last time across the Pond, my flight landed at 6:30 a.m. at Gatwick. Taking the Gatwick Express to Victoria, I jumped into a cab and headed to meet Sandra Mettler at our hotel in Sloane Square. We were stealing a few days for ourselves before the Georgian Tour began. Pulling into the Square, I spied …
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Number One London by Kristine Hughes - 2w ago
2019 Tours The Country House Tour   The Queen Victoria Tour   The Scottish Writer’s Retreat 2020 Tours The Regency Tour   The Town & Country House Tour
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Number One London by Kristine Hughes - 3w ago
Perhaps the most famous set of false teeth are the ivory set once worn by George Washington, pictured at left. Ivory dentures were popular into the 18th century, and were made from natural materials including walrus, elephant or hippopotamus ivory. These ill fitting and uncomfortable ivory dentures were replaced by porcelain dentures, introduced in the 1790’s, which weren’t …
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This post was originally published on June 18, 2010. When one thinks of the great British soldiers at the Battle of Waterloo, one naturally conjures up visions of the Duke of Wellington, Alexander Gordon and, of course, the Marquess of Anglesey, but one rarely thinks of Sir Frederick Cavendish Ponsonby, whose Waterloo experience is, in …
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From Slight Reminiscences of a Septuagenarian From 1802 to 1815 By Emma Sophia Edgcumbe Cust Brownlow (Countess of) June.—My father went to Mount Edgcumbe, and I remained, as I frequently did, with Lord and Lady Castlereagh. As days passed on, news came of Bonaparte, at the head of a formidable army, being on his march to the Low Countries, where the Duke of Wellington, with the English, …
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