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Beyond the Equator’s story began about 10 years ago when a Louisiana sugarcane farmer, Carl, enamored with the potential of superfoods, traveled to South America in search of new farming opportunities. Santa Cruz, Bolivia, was Carl’s landing place, and there he began a chia farm with a group of local Bolivians. Over the next 7-8 years, Carl and his team worked to build a responsible and sustainable farming company, concentrating primarily on chia as well as mung beans, quinoa, and cow peas. In 2016 we decided we could do more for the end consumer by integrating superfoods into everyday use products; and thus, Beyond the Equator was born.
Carl in one of our immature quinoa fields
We very strongly believe that chia seeds are the most underrated superfood in the world, and while experimenting with different recipes we realized that chia was also particularly unique in its ability to absorb and stabilize liquid. With that in mind, we eventually found ourselves experimenting with protein shakes, plant-based milk, and cereals. The a-ha moment for us was when we realized how well ground chia seeds mix with nut and seed butters. Once we added chia, the butters hardly separated and retained a very smooth and creamy texture. As we continued developing our seed butter, we began researching just how our product might fit for consumers and that was where we first found out about the increasing prevalence of nut allergies. While no one at Beyond the Equator has any allergy issues, we all know someone who does and we quickly reached out to friends and family to hear their first-hand takes. Two things were made clear to us: there aren’t currently enough options for those who have allergies and over the last decade allergies have become even more prevalent. Furthermore, with many schools banning nuts outright, it was difficult for parents to keep the peanut butter at home when there weren’t that many other choices besides getting rid of the classic PB&J altogether. We immediately knew that we had the solution to this problem and forged full steam ahead developing our seed butter. Our final recipe is 5 Seed Butter, which features sunflower seeds as the main seed followed by chia, flax, hemp, and pumpkin. Our butter is also all natural including only the 5 seeds, 1 gram of cane sugar, salt, and Vitamin E as the preservative.
We launched our 5 Seed Butter in December of 2017 and are now proudly in 18 grocery stores in Southern Louisiana, as well as Amazon Prime. The response from the community—not only those with allergies but also those who enjoy nut and seed butters in general—has been wonderful, and we feel that we are really helping those with allergies and those trying to avoid nuts in schools or at work by providing them a delicious alternative to peanut butter.
Here’s my personal favorite recipe, our Butter Chocolate and Banana Smoothie. It’s a fantastic dessert that is both craveable and healthy.

Butter Chocolate and Banana Smoothie
Ingredients: 
1 Cup Milk or any Milk alternative
1 Banana
2 Tbsp 5 Seed Butter
1.5 tsp. dark Cocoa Powder
2 tsp. Honey
1/8 tsp. ground Cinnamon
1 Cup Ice
Directions:
1. Blend all ingredients together until it reaches the desired consistency.
2. Enjoy!
3. Optional: Be fancy and garnish with banana, mint, and chocolate shavings.
Kevin and I at our most recent sampling at Breaux Mart in New Orleans
Written by Will Myers with the help of Kevin Bratcher and Carl Newton
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Thank you so much Allergy Shmallergy for nominating No Nuts Moms Group for the Brotherhood of the World Blogger Award. It is always a nice feeling to be recognized by fellow food allergy advocates.

The Rules:
  1. Thank the blogger who nominated you and post a link to his/her blog.
  2. List the rules of the award and post a picture of the award.
  3. Answer the questions from your nominator.
  4. Nominate other bloggers and be sure to let them know.
  5. Write a list of questions of your nominees to answer.
Questions & Answers:
  1. Where do you get inspiration for your blog/writing? I am not a huge blogger, but when I do blog it has to be something I am very passionate about. My inspiration is my food allergic child and members of the No Nuts Moms Group. I really like having guest bloggers and sharing other's stories and experiences.
  2. If there are past lives, who were you/what was your profession? This is a hard question for me. I don't know......maybe a Flapper in the 20's. LOL! I took a test on what were you in a past life and one site said I was a Biochemist and the other said I was a cat, which is funny because I am highly allergic to cats.
  3. What song brings back a strong memory each time you hear it? Janice Joplin, Bobbie McGee and really there are so many others, but this one just stands out to me the most. My girlfriends from high school would blast this in the car and sing so loud. Those days with them were so simple and carefree.
  4. What’s your hidden talent? I am very crafty. I love to make crafts and one of my favorites is making bracelets.
  5. What makes you feel grateful? My family without a doubt. I am not sure what I would do if I didn't have them.  
My Nominees for the Brotherhood of the World Blogger Award:
My Questions for my Nominees:

1. What is your favorite vacation spot and why?
2. What are your top 2 favorite allergy friendly products that you cannot live without?
3. If you could pick any animal that you were in a past life, what would it be?
4. What is your motivation for continuing to be a resource to so many in the food allergy community?
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Guest Blog By Denise, Founder of Partake Foods 
Throughout my life, I’d never really thought twice about food allergies. I don’t have any food allergies, and neither did anyone in my immediate family. However, shortly after my daughter, Vivienne, started eating solid foods, I got very quickly acquainted with them.
 
As an infant, Vivienne suffered from eczema and what my husband and I thought was severe colic, but in hindsight, we now realize that her ailments were tied to my diet, since I was breastfeeding.  After a very scary Thanksgiving (& first birthday), we learned that Vivienne has FPIES to eggs, IgE allergies to bananas, corn, pistachios, and cashews, as well as an intolerance to wheat.
 
I resorted to making all of her meals and snacks from scratch, but quickly realized that was not a sustainable solution for our busy family.  I searched for meal and snack options that would meet her dietary restrictions, my nutritional standards, and still taste good, but I came away from store shelves feeling frustrated and disappointed. And that’s when the idea for Partake Foods was born.
 
My goal for Partake Foods is to provide a top 8 allergen free solution for every meal and snack occasion – one that is not only allergy friendly, but also tastes good and is made with simple, whole food ingredients.  Our first products are 3 flavors of mini cookies – Sprouted Grain Chocolate Chip, Carrot Oat, and Sweet Potato Millet – that are all Free of the Top 8 Allergens, Certified Gluten Free, Certified Vegan, and Non GMO Project Verified. They’re made with simple ingredients, and we skipped the rice flour, gums, and stabilizers that you find in so many allergy friendly products – We also threw in some real fruits and vegetables!
 
My hope is that Partake will not only be a part of the solution, but also will contribute to figuring out what’s causing the stark rise in food allergy incidence, so we donate a portion of revenue to food allergy research.
Partake Foods Giveaway: Two winners will be selected to win three boxes of Partake Mini Cookies.
The giveaway will take place via No Nuts Moms Group's Facebook Page starting Wednesday, August 9th through Friday, August 11th. We will announce the winners on Saturday, August 12, 2017. The winners will have 48 hours to claim their prize or another winner will be selected. Good luck!
Now available to purchase on Amazon.
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Guest Blog By Kathy Argel, Founder of Allergy Kids Central
Long before marriage and kids, I had the desire to help children. As to what extent, I didn’t know. I just wanted to help children, millions of them all over the world. On July 6, 2002, I gave birth to the most precious baby boy who had a laugh that uplifted my soul. I named him Tristan. Little did I know he would be the start of my journey. I grew up in a family with no food allergies and no environmental allergies. Our skin was smooth as silk, our appetite as normal as the next kid, and our kitchen cabinet void of any allergy medications. The word “allergy” was never even muttered in my house.

When my son was three years old, I gave him a piece of toast with peanut butter. A minute later, he handed the toast back to me and he had hives all over his face. I didn’t know anything about hives. I just looked at him and thought he must be allergic to peanut butter. I didn’t feel any urgency to rush him to the ER because I didn’t know the magnitude of its consequence. Luckily, the hives dissipated, so I didn’t think of it again.

It wasn’t until we moved to Virginia that my life changed in so many directions. Tristan was four years old and I also had a five-month-old baby girl. I found a new pediatrician who tested Tristan for allergies because he had eczema. That’s when I found out he had food allergies. I was given an EpiPen, but I still didn’t feel the consequence because Tristan looked fine and acted like any other boy. However, when he was five years old, he came home from school scratching his arms. At first, I thought it was his eczema bothering him again, so I applied cortisone. After a few days of constant scratching, I noticed how voracious his scratching would get and how uncomfortable he was feeling. At that point, I knew something was wrong.

I brought him to an allergist who later told me he had multiple food allergies. He couldn’t eat peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, soy, wheat, shellfish, beef, chicken, watermelon, apples, carrots, and string beans. He was severely allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, and eggs. I had to put my son on an elimination diet to clear his system of these allergens. Suddenly, I felt like I was caught in a tornado sweeping me in crazy directions filled with fear, confusion, helplessness and disbelief. Sleepless nights became my new normal as he would wake me up with bloody arms and sheets from all the scratching, and I found myself cleaning him up every night.

Tristan’s schooling was affected. The social worker said Tristan was delayed developmentally and wasn’t focused in class. They referred me to a pediatric specialist who later told me he had Asperger’s and needed to take medicine to keep him focused at school. I was shocked and numbed with disbelief once again. I read all the literature about Asperger’s, but I couldn’t bring my heart to agree with the doctor. I felt something was not right and that the doctor had been too quick to diagnose and medicate my son without giving him a chance to heal and live. After numerous visits to the pediatrician and endless prescriptions for new steroidal medications, I cried out to Tristan’s pediatrician about how the medications were turning my son into a little monster. She told me the medications were just band-aid fixes—Tristan needed to heal from within. Looking straight into my eyes from one mom to the next, she said, “Go with your mama instincts. You know your son the best.” I decided to stop all medications except for one antihistamine that I gave Tristan once a day.

I tirelessly resorted to the internet and researched everything there was about eczema and food allergies. My pursuit was relentless as I tried to figure out what was going on with my son and what I needed to do to help him. I started a food allergy journal and wrote down every food, medicine, and activity he was exposed to. I was determined to get educated and to heal my son.

Meanwhile, my son’s condition worsened. His eczema spread all over his body with hives. Then his beautiful olive-colored skin became pale. His eyebrows were falling off and his stomach was always bloated. I was frightened because suddenly I saw a different child who was slowly deteriorating in front of me. Despite what was obviously happening on the surface, Tristan remained surprisingly happy and energetic. His little sister, Nina, made him laugh every day. The amazing thing about kids is their resilience and their spirit to live. God bless them!

I found an amazing woman online who wrote a book about eczema and how she had healed her body of it. She became instrumental in my learning. She was patient with me and gave me unlimited coaching whenever I needed to talk to her. I will be forever grateful to her for propelling me to learn more about food and its healing properties.

Through my journal, I learned Tristan had delayed reactions to wheat, which explained the nightly scratching that resulted in bloody sheets. I switched to gluten-free pastas and breads. I also learned that soy contributed to eczema, so I eliminated all the culprits and cooked his food from scratch.

I also took him to someone who analyzed his blood and found that he was not digesting his meals wells, so I started giving him enzymes. Then I learned about probiotics, so I focused on healing his gut while eliminating allergens.

His skin started to heal, his hair started to grow back, and he started to thrive once again. At ten years old, we celebrated when the social worker, his teachers, and special education coordinator all agreed he didn’t need special education anymore. His grades had earned him a place on the honor roll for the first time. Tristan was on top of the world when we told him he didn’t need to be pulled out of class for special education anymore. He started to excel in all his classes and in sports.

I finally understood my son. I accepted who he was and what he needed to eat in order to survive and grow into a handsome, happy young man. I remind Tristan that food allergies do not define who he is, and I encourage him to advocate for himself and for his little sister.

When my daughter, Nina, was ready to enter pre-school, I learned she had peanut and tree nut allergies as well. I wasn’t as nervous and unprepared as I had been with Tristan. She was ahead of the game because food allergies had become common knowledge in my family. Nina knew how important food choices were to the health of the family. My two kids are a dynamic duo as they remind each other to grab their EpiPens before we leave the house and to read all labels. They’ve also become my cooking assistants and are on their way to cooking full meals for the family.

Four years ago, I started to draft my first book. My daughter, a gifted artist, sketched out amazing characters with creative names for my story. I hired an illustrator to make them come to life. That first book is still in draft mode because I felt the characters were meant for a different purpose. I turned those characters into tags. I placed the tags on my kids’ lunch bags, athletic bags, and book bags. Other kids found them adorable and creative, and the tags allowed my kids to advocate for themselves in a non-threatening and fun way. I later created silicone bracelets to wear to school and athletic games too. Necklaces soon followed with various colors.

Because my creations were a hit with my kids and their friends, I knew many kids would benefit from them too. Suddenly, I started to receive custom orders. I realized kids needed support for various medical challenges as well. This was when “Allergy Kids Central” was born. This website serves as a resource and online store for kids and parents living with food allergies and other medical challenges. It has been an amazing journey watching my site develop and connect to many incredible families, peers, and similar support groups.

Empowering kids with safeguarding products is a first step to spreading awareness. However, providing knowledge, encouragement, and support will foster confidence, independence, and self-worth. Raising kids in a society of fast food chains can be challenging, but providing healthy substitutions can be just as rewarding. There can be challenges at school when certain events call for certain foods that are off-limits to my kids. It’s not always easy, but I’ve learned that planning ahead and communicating effectively can turn that dilemma into a success for everyone, including my kids.

This led me to writing my first book, Dear Diary, I’m Going to a Birthday Party! I felt kids living with food allergies needed a voice to express the emotional roller coaster they go through with food allergies. It begins with an “All About Me” page describing Nina Packer’s all-time favorites and the names of her school, her best friends, and her food allergies. I chose this beginning to let the reader know that kids with food allergies are no different than the next. It ends with a positive note and an empowering message.

It has been fifteen years since my journey began. It took ten years to figure it all out. But, today, I realize that in order to help my kids, I needed to learn and experience their way of life. One thing I know about all kids is they are unique individuals possessing different needs. My products are a reflection of those needs. My book is the first of a series I plan to write that will help kids to voice their feelings in this world full of uncertainty. But, one thing for certain is that this mama will continue to advocate, educate, and empower kids through her fun products, kid-friendly website, online resources, and encouraging books. Growing up, my mom always said, “Dream big!” However long it takes, my goal to help millions of kids will come true. Until that day happens, my heart will continue to overflow with love and gratitude for each child touched by my creations.
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Several years ago I joined The No Nuts Moms Group which was founded by Lisa Rutter and a year ago I became a part of the Team as a Support Group Co-Leader.  The NNMG has taught me a lot about how to navigate food allergies and keep my son that has a life-threatening allergy, safer. I have learned about several food products from the group, like Surf Sweets, a company that is dedicated to producing delicious, organic treats free of the 10 most common food allergens. The have been a go-to item for our kids school parties because of the multiple food allergies within the classroom, which makes them the perfect party treat to have a safe and inclusive celebration. These yummy treats sparked a fun idea for my friend, Michelle and I. What if we created an organic allergy friendly lemonade stand with Organic Sweets products?!
Hosting an allergy friendly lemonade stand was a great interactive way to show how kids with food allergies can still enjoy the same things as other kids. To make the lemonade stand, I asked my husband, Scott, if he could make a cute lemonade stand out of pallets that I had seen on Pinterest.  At first this sounded great but then we realized it wasn’t realistic because Scott had enough projects on his honey-do list, we had kids’ events to attend and homework to keep up on.  Instead, I bought a few items at the store and grabbed some items from inside my home to create an organic, allergy friendly & rustic lemonade stand.
The things I purchased from local stores consisted of:
  • Yellow felt table cloth
  • Paper pennants
  • Biodegradable cups & straws
  • Ice tea pitcher
  • Organic lemonade & lemons.
  • Surf Sweets Organic Fruity Bears
To create the table I used a folding table with a white bedsheet over it & then I put the yellow table cloth over the white sheet.  Then I grabbed other items from around the house to give it a more rustic organic appearance. I created the sign from a simple poster board & poster board letters.  All the neighborhood kids loved the Surf Sweets Organic Fruity Bears and lemonade. We even had our really good neighborhood friends join in and help us. My kids are excited to host a few more allergy friendly lemonade stands this summer. Next time we plan to raise money & support our favorite organization, FAACT (Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis connection Team). 
Surf Sweets Giveaway:
Surf Sweets wants you to have fun this summer making your own allergy friendly lemonade stand! Go to their Facebook page and comment on the post about the lemonade stand with your answer to the question, “how does your family celebrate summer?” They will pick 2 random winners to receive 50 packs of Surf Sweets Organic Fruity Bears candy and a Lemonade Stand Kit valued at $100. The kit may include: lemonade pitcher, bio-degradable cups, straws, table cover, chalkboard sign and a bowl or basket. Additionally, 5+ winners will receive Surf Sweets products! The giveaway will run from June 5 - June 12, so hurry up and enter!
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My son, a five year old paleontologist in the making, taught himself to read through his dinosaur books. Quite literally. It began with studious distinctions between “Allosaurus” and “Archaeopteryx,” then shifted into jokes that were almost professorial in cryptic tone: “Oh mom, that’s so Suchomimus of you.” For months he would prattle at length about the Therizinosaur, a deceptively nightmarish beast of the late Cretaceous period. He seemed most to appreciate its evolutionary twist from meat eater to herbivore, and the long monstrous claws it once upon a time used to dig up roots.

He also always beelines for the muddiest puddles, he cries when there’s water in his eyes, and he’s terrified of bee stings. And he is really truly unbelievably kind to his baby sister. And then there are moments when time cracks open in a ray of opalescent light, like one recent morning at our place of worship, when the teacher asked for volunteers and there he was, catapulting over the stairs, and next, in an elegant ellipsis of poised stutters and vowels, and in the most deliberate of tiny voices, he read a paragraph aloud about a man that found G-d by gazing at the stars. This kid, who we couldn’t even afford to send to preschool.  He’s also beautiful: shaggy hair, big hazel eyes, the paws of a miniature quarterback. And, like one in thirteen kids among him, he has life-threatening food allergies.

It is not only fear of the hard end line potentiality of food allergies, anaphylaxis, that loops through the consciousness of almost all allergen families, but the cavalier nature of reactions themselves. The standard reaction is one or more of the following: hives, swelling, violent, mucousy white projectile vomiting, itchy tongue, throat, and mouth, difficulty breathing, drop in blood pressure -- and the odd and terrible (not unlike many of my son’s favorite dinosaurs, which I only add because I imagine he’d appreciate the mention)-- sensations of profound doom. The signs can be violent, sometimes erratic, literally as incorrigible as the devil: my son finds a stray sesame seed on his bagel, has a momentary itchiness of throat, then two hours later spikes a high note fever and vomits all through the night. The next day he is articulate, sweet as always, but wheezy, and his energy vaporous. Then, for the next two days he acts quiet and vacant, his body easily breathless, and we tend to him with albuterol treatment, quietly poised to call 911.

A retired labor and delivery nurse once told me, squinting into my face while rage seemed to literally run out the sides of her eyes: “How dare they take away peanut butter and jelly lunches, the most beloved food of all children?” Verbatim. And then: “How many people die of food allergies a year in anyhow? Four? Five? That’s nothing.” The number in fact being in the hundreds, a statistic best reflective not of its potential for fatality, which is very real, but rather the eternal vigilance of preventative care. A detail sometimes lost in the mix of general misinformation. My former sister-in-law once, for example, took my son out of her car and placed him heavily on the floor with a slap of his epinephrine to say "Fuck his epis. I’m not taking him with me anymore." And then in an exhale of anger: “Fuck your allergists. He doesn’t need them.”

To them, to the others who hiccup down tunnel-vision passages of “well that’s not my child,” I ask, but what if it was? What if it was your child that you saw swollen and struggling to breathe and were forced to confront the question “is this it?,” had to inject a needle in a swoop to the thigh, to next ride in an ambulance with a smirky non-plussed paramedic through 20 minutes of heavy traffic otherwise averted if the driver had just put the siren on, hating yourself for not demanding it while your child's eyes roll forward and back, finally dragging the paramedic back who responds with the resistance of a wet cat to check on your child and then condescendingly states; “He’s fine. Kids always get hyper from the epi.”  “But he’s not hyper. He’s – “; cut-off to discover at the ER that your child may have gone biphasic and now has a collapsed right lung –. 

Or another occasion, when your six year old wakes you up in the middle of the night, screaming between pitches of croup, and you run into the bathroom to see him trying to throw up, face red, wheezing, revelation hitting like a meteor “oh my G-d he’s having a delayed reaction,” and the first round of epinephrine and three puffs of asthma medication only subtly work, until the paramedics arrive oxygen tank in tow, “we’ve got this mom,” and in a blink you are in the back of the ambulance again, but this time it’s a year later, and past midnight, and a young paramedic with powder blue eyes and a thick Philadelphian accent holds your son’s quivering hands (a side effect of the medication) while he still wheezes strider breathes, and he calms him down talking about video games and basketball (“he’s a daddy too), all the time your son’s eyes bursting with bigness over the nebulizer mask, an image burned like an arson into your heart. Hours later there is a formal diagnosis: throat constriction, definitive ANA, conclusively made after a second shot of epi is given hours later into the already dead late night, and only after then, does the wheezing finally, finally subside. The source remains idiopathic, unknown.

And then the following days of guilt and your little person continuing to mentally roll around the perception of their own mortality like it was some marble half smashed in their hand, acting out with childish misdemeanors because Christ, they’re five, because where in the world are the words they might have for what happened, and so they're breaking things and not smiling for seven days straight and will not, adamantly will not be hugged. And you, mom, or emotionally repressed dad, are vanquished. Because no one else understands the particular treasure of this child like you do. The bravery. The unreal courageousness of that body, that tiny-housed soul.

When we returned from the hospital after our first stay, my son insisted I make a cut out of his hand and glue it to the wall with a message splayed across the palm, stating, “I am grateful.” The episode had been around Thanksgiving, and as one can imagine, nothing exemplified the feelings of immense love and gratitude more than the semiotics of that little paper hand. For my son had indeed brushed against death during that episode, he told me so himself while holding his throat and asking, “where did grandpa go again? That’s right, Heaven. That’s where I’m going right now;” shortly later crumpling on his bed.

For the most part, we have been blessed by a community village that if not fully comprehending the nuances of food allergies, genuinely tries, and cares. And for that we are immensely thankful. But sometimes, it seems there is still so much unfortunately willful ignorance. And when someone says something callous at best and pathological at worst, and murder and fear tighten my heart; or alternately something so absurd it literally stings my mouth to respond – (because he is little, and who else does he have but me to come to his defense) -- I stop, and instead think of him objectively, and in reverse, seen far away like a brilliant star found at the end of a telescope.

I imagine him and his honey smell and his perfect little fingers, as he pages through a well-worn book. And I imagine, if one were to ask him his opinion on these things, about the people who seem to think the parents of these literally millions of diagnosed children are just being dramatic, or who simply just don’t care, strangers who buttress themselves with narratives like “keep your kids at home,” “helicopter parenting,” or the markedly heinous, “it’s nature’s way of thinning the herd”-- I know in a heartbeat, for he is heart of my heart, how he would respond. It would be with one simple word: “Therizinosaurus.” Evolve. Dig deep.
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Hi! My name is Maddox, I am 8 years old, and I am MADD ABOUT FOOD ALLERGIES!
When I was a year old, I was diagnosed with a peanut allergy. Luckily, my reaction was not life threatening. My parents gave me a peanut butter cracker and being 1 years old, I was more interested in smearing it on my face than eating it. I’m glad I didn’t eat it, because my skin quickly broke out into hives. My Dad quickly reacted and gave me a dose of Benadryl and everything seem to be ok after taking it. We visited my pediatrician the next week, who referred us to an allergist. This is when we found out that I was highly allergic to ALL nuts and from that point on I needed to carry EpiPen’s with me.
This isn’t where my story ends. Did you know behind this boy-like face, I am a super hero? The irony to my story is that I love someone with Food Allergies. Nope, not myself. This is my little sister Skylar. This picture says it all, she is full of life and the silliest girl I know.
Since we found out I was allergic to nuts, our home has always been nut free. My parents often checked with the allergist to see if we could test my sister, but we were under the impression the longer we waited the less likely she would be to have the allergy. We started the discussions, but just were too nervous to give her anything. We didn’t think much more about it until the day came to us
I am a pretty big basketball fan, so the sport I love playing the most is basketball. My favorite team is the Wake Forest Demon Deacons. GO DEACS!
January 30, 2016, was a typical Saturday morning. I had a basketball game at the D-1 sports complex, so I grabbed my EpiPen sports belt and we headed to the gym. About mid-ways through my game, I noticed a bit of commotion in the stands.  Not long after that, I saw my Dad race out the door. What I learned is my sister shared a granola bar snack with a friend that included nuts. Do you still wonder how I saved my sister’s life? What I learned, is my Dad grabbed MY EpiPen sports belt at that very moment and raced outside to give her a shot of epinephrine and drive her to the hospital, which was directly across the road.
Everything was happening really fast. My Mom made sure my grandparents knew to stay with me so she could follow my Dad and sister to the ER. Once my Mom got to the hospital and was with my sister she called me to let me know things seem to be ok. Whew, thank goodness!
Have you ever wondered why there are two EpiPen’s in a pack? Have you ever split them up? We found out that day, that not having them together could have been fatal for my sister. Things quickly turned for the worse after that phone call from my Mom. My sister experienced rebound anaphylaxis 45 minutes after the first dose of epinephrine, which is rare but can happen 20% of the time, and she began to go into shock again. That’s when you would need that second EpiPen……if you were not at the hospital yet. Skylar’s body quickly broke out into hives and her breathing became shallow and labored, doctors began to work on her to pump her with 3 more doses of epinephrine, antihistamines, and steroids. As my sister was becoming very distressed they tried tubing her, but couldn’t with how fast her throat was swelling. After so much medicine her body finally started to react positively to it and from what I know deflated like a balloon releasing its air.  They transported my sister to a children’s hospital nearby to monitor her. She finally came home the next morning. I worried so much about her hoping that nothing tragic would happen after learning all the series of events. If she had not had that first EpiPen at the gym, I might be telling a different story.
SO! This is my person. This is someone I love who has Food Allergies. I want to help kids cope and understand their allergies to stay safe during the hustle and bustle of everyday life. There is A LOT of planning that goes into any type of day/event and the more we talk about it, the safer we will be. I want to start the conversation. I am not ashamed of my allergy and I am not embarrassed of my allergy. Please check out my YouTube channel, Instagram, and Facebook to follow my journey!
This is me Maddox, The Real MADDSKYE, MADD ABOUT FOOD ALLERGIES!

My Story - YouTube
YouTube: https://youtu.be/I1eJabx1diA
Instagram: TheRealMADDSKYE
Facebook: MADDSKYE
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