Loading...

Follow Nom Nom Paleo | Paleo Recipes by Michelle Tam on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

If you thought sweet-and-savory teriyaki was off the menu because you’ve cut out gluten and refined sugar, think again: this ridiculously easy teriyaki salmon recipe is flavorful, Whole30-friendly, and perfect for weeknights!

This easy baked teriyaki salmon hits all the flavor notes of a classic teriyaki sauce (you know—soy, sake, ginger, and sugar), but it contains none of the junk! To be sure, my sauce isn’t as syrupy-thick or cloyingly sweet as restaurant-style teriyaki, but taste is paramount. And when it comes to flavor, I’ll have you know that my kids gobble this stuff up, and they’re my pickiest and most important customers.

Best of all, this recipe is INSANELY SIMPLE. Just marinate, bake, garnish, and eat!

It’s All About the Sauce

Would it shock you to learn that my teriyaki sauce is basically just my All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce?

When I created my All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce, my goal was to make a hyper-versatile flavor-booster that can be used for amping up the taste of, well, EVERYTHING. I wanted an exponential return on the 5 minutes it took me to shake up a jar of this tasty goodness…and I’m pretty sure I succeeded! Don’t believe me? This blog post compiles all the ways you can use All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce…including as a Whole30-friendly teriyaki sauce!

How long can you marinate the Teriyaki Salmon?

You can marinate the salmon fillets for as little as 15 minutes (i.e., the time it takes to preheat the oven), or as long as 8 hours. I wouldn’t push it past 8 hours, though; the acidity of the sauce can make the salmon mushy if you keep it in there too long.

What type of salmon should you use?

I prefer wild king salmon for the taste—and the high fat content makes it hard to overcook. However, wild king salmon can be really expensive, so (being a thrifty child of immigrants!) I often opt for responsibly farmed steelhead trout or Atlantic salmon. On the other hand, I don’t love sockeye salmon—I find it a bit too fishy, and it can be easily overcooked. I’d rather choose sea bass, halibut, or cod if I can’t find my top choices listed above.

(Yes, I know that picking the right seafood can be confusing. That’s why I always consult the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch for the latest recommendations, and you should, too.)

Can you make it in an air fryer?

Yes! I normally create a sling out of aluminum foil or parchment paper for the air fryer basket before putting the fillets inside for easy removal. The cooking temperature is the same—400°F—but I would check the doneness of the salmon starting at the 7 minute mark because the fish will cook faster in an air fryer. (This is the air fryer I use.)

How do you know when the salmon is done?

The most reliable way to check if your salmon is done cooking cooking is with a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the fillet. My family likes our salmon to be medium (cooked through, but not chalky and dry), which is about 130°F to 135°F. If you want your salmon to be medium-rare, aim for 120°F.

The USDA recommends cooking salmon to 145°F, but that’s overcooked in my opinion.

What do you serve with it?

Some great vegetables side dishes to serve with this Easy Teriyaki Salmon include Simple Cauliflower Rice, an Asian cabbage slaw (use my Chinese Chicken Salad recipe, but leave off the chicken), roasted vegetables, stir-fried bok choy, or a big green salad. Don’t forget that the All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce can be used to make or dress your side dishes, too!

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 4 salmon fillets, 5 ounces each
  • ½ cup All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce, divided
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds  
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced

Equipment:

Method:

Place the salmon fillets in a high-sided dish where they’ll fit snugly.

Pour in most of the All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce, but reserve about 2 tablespoons of it. You’ll brush it on at the end to add an extra punch of umami.

Turn the salmon in the marinade to coat well. 

Keep the fillets skin-side up in the marinade until you’re ready to cook. You can marinate the fish for as little as 15 minutes, but no longer than 8 hours in a sealed container in the fridge.

Ready to cook the teriyaki salmon? Heat the oven to 400°F with the rack in the middle. Place the salmon, skin-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet. (You can skip the parchment, but I find that it helps with cleanup.)

Pour some of the marinade from the dish onto the salmon (not the 2 tablespoons of reserved “clean” All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce).

Bake the salmon for 8 to 12 minutes or until it is cooked to your preferred doneness.

As I mentioned above, my family likes the salmon cooked to about medium, where the fish is cooked through, but the flesh is still moist and not chalky (about 130°F to 135°F in the thickest part of the fillet).

Once the salmon is finished cooking, brush on the reserved “fresh” All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce (not the stuff the salmon was marinated in) to add a bright kick of flavor.

Sprinkle on toasted sesame seeds and sliced scallions.

Serve with your favorite side(s)!

Wondering what else to cook with All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce? Head here for all my favorite recipes that use it!

Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013) and Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017)!

 PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Easy Teriyaki Salmon

This ridiculously easy teriyaki salmon recipe is tasty, Whole30-friendly, and perfect for weeknights! Just marinate in All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce, bake, garnish, and eat!

  • 4 salmon fillets (5 ounces each)
  • ½ cup All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce (divided)
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
  • 2 scallions (thinly sliced)
  1. Place the salmon fillets in a high-sided dish where they’ll fit snugly. Pour in most of the All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce, but reserve about 2 tablespoons of it. (You’ll brush it on at the end to add an extra punch of umami.)

  2. Turn the salmon in the marinade to coat well. Keep the fillets skin-side up in the marinade until you’re ready to cook. (Marinate the fish for as little as 15 minutes, but no longer than 8 hours in a sealed container in the fridge.)

  3. Heat the oven to 400°F with the rack in the middle. 

  4. Place the salmon, skin-side down on a parchment-lined baking sheet.Pour some of the marinade from the dish onto the salmon (not the 2 tablespoons of reserved “clean” All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce).

  5. Bake the salmon for 8 to 12 minutes or until it is cooked to your preferred doneness. (I like the salmon cooked to about medium, about 130°F to 135°F in the thickest part of the fillet.)

  6. Once the salmon is finished cooking, brush on the reserved “fresh” All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce (not the stuff the salmon was marinated in) to add a bright kick of flavor.

  7. Sprinkle on toasted sesame seeds and sliced scallions.

The post Easy Teriyaki Salmon appeared first on Nom Nom Paleo®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

These Whole30-friendly grilled pork kabobs with a sweet and spicy peach BBQ sauce will be the hit at your next summer party!

My hometown inspiration for this dish

I grew up in suburban Menlo Park, California. You wouldn’t know if from the tree-lined residential streets and quaint downtown, but my hometown’s the birthplace of Google, Round Table Pizza, and the psychedelic 60s. I lived a block away from what is now the first-ever Tesla Motors dealership; as a high schooler, I worked there as a file clerk when it was a Chevy showroom. (I got hit by a truck while sprinting across the street after work to watch Donahue. If only I’d owned a DVR in 1989, I would’ve skipped the ambulance ride to the hospital.)

Menlo Park used to be home to the Connoisseur’s Marketplace, a difficult-to-spell mid-summer festival highlighting food, wine, music, and art. As kids, my sister and I would peer into each of the stalls, tug on our parents’ arms and beg to buy trinkets and snacks. “Too expensive,” they’d say.

“Can we at least buy a lemonade? It’s hot out!”

“No. We have lemons at home, and we live two blocks away.”

Argh.

The one thing—the only thing—for which my mom and dad would gladly shell out their hard-earned bucks? Pork-a-bobs! We always made a beeline for the Filipino stand offering grilled swine slathered with a sticky-sweet barbecue glaze. I haven’t been back to the Connoisseur’s Marketplace in over twenty years, but I still think about those pork kabobs.

It’s all about the Barbecue Sauce (Whole30!)

My Whole30 version incorporates sweet summer peaches in the smoky, fruity sauce, because I really don’t know of a better flavor combination than grilled pork and peaches. The pork is marinated in a simple, flavorful marinade, which means the sauce isn’t absolutely necessary. But I brush on the BBQ sauce after the pork’s off the grill (so it doesn’t burn) to give the meat an extra boost of flavor and to make it a fun, messy, lick-your-fingers treat.

Use Pork Shoulder!

Although I normally reserve pork shoulder for low and slow cooking preparations, it’s also fantastic cubed and grilled. This recipe keeps on giving because the pork reheats beautifully and the leftover sauce (which can be smeared on your favorite meats) will keep for up to a week in the fridge.

Serves 8

Ingredients:

Pork Kabobs

  • 1 small red onion, roughly chopped
  • ⅓ cup avocado oil, olive oil, or melted ghee
  • ⅓ cup coconut aminos
  • 3 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 2 tablespoons apple juice
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 3 pounds pork shoulder roast, cut into 1½ inch cubes
  • ½ cup diced fresh peach (optional, for garnish)

Spicy Peach BBQ Sauce

  • 1 pound peaches, halved and pitted
  • ½ red onion, peeled and cut through the root end
  • 2 tablespoons avocado oil, olive oil, or melted ghee
  • 1 jalapeño pepper
  • ½ cup coconut aminos
  • 2 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1½ tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons fish sauce
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon minced ginger
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Here’s how to make the pork kabobs:

Time to make the marinade!

First, make the marinade for the kabobs by blitzing together the onions,oil, coconut aminos, fish sauce, apple juice, tomato paste, garlic, and freshly ground black pepper in a high speed blender or food processor until smooth.

Grab your pork shoulder and cut it into uniform 1½-inch cubes.

Place the cubes in a large storage container and pour the marinade over the pork.

Make sure the pork is well-coated before covering the container and storing it in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour and up to a day.

Next up: la barbecue sauce!

Heat your grill or grill pan to medium high. Cut your peaches in half and pry out the pits.

Brush the oil on the cut surface of the peaches and onion. Place the peaches, onion, and pepper on the hot grill and leave ‘em there for a couple minutes per side…

…until you get nice grill marks all over.

Roughly chop the peaches and onion, and discard the stem end of the onion. Trim off the stem of the jalapeño and remove the seeds and ribs. (If you want a less-spicy sauce, just use part of the jalapeño instead of the whole thing.)

Toss the peaches, onion, jalapeño, coconut aminos, tomato paste, rice wine vinegar, fish sauce, garlic, ginger, and a few grinds of freshly ground black pepper into a high speed blender or food processor.

Blitz until smooth.

Pour the sauce into a saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat.

Lower the temperature to medium low and simmer for 5 to 10 minutes or until slightly thickened. The sauce will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

Last step: grilling the skewers!

Heat the grill to medium high.

Thread five to six pieces of pork on each skewer. If you make lots of kabobs, you should invest in some flat metal skewers. Wooden skewers always burn no matter how long you soak them in water.

Grill the skewers for about 10 minutes…

…turning every couple of minutes…

…until cooked through.

Remove the kabobs from the grill and brush on the barbecue sauce.

Rest the pork for 5 to 10 minutes before digging in.

I added some diced peach to make ’em pretty.

Grab some napkins!

(Originally posted: July 28, 2013)

Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013) and Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017)!

 PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Peachy Pork-A-Bobs

These Whole30-friendly grilled pork skewers with a sweet and spicy peach barbecue sauce will be the hit at your next summer party! I like to call them paleo Peachy Pork-A-Bobs!

For the Pork Kabobs
  • 1 small red onion (roughly chopped)
  • ⅓ cup avocado oil (olive oil, or melted ghee)
  • ⅓ cup coconut aminos
  • 3 tablespoons Red Boat fish sauce
  • 2 tablespoons apple juice
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 2 large garlic cloves (minced)
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 pounds pork shoulder roast (cut into 1½ inch cubes)
  • ½ cup diced fresh peach (optional, for garnish)
Spicy Peach Barbecue Sauce
  • 1 pound peaches (halved and pitted)
  • ½ medium red onion (peeled and cut through the root end)
  • 2 tablespoons avocado oil (olive oil, or melted ghee)
  • 1 jalapeño pepper
  • ½ cup coconut aminos
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1½ tablespoons rice wine vinegar (or apple cider vinegar)
  • 2 teaspoons Red Boat fish sauce
  • 2 medium garlic clove (minced)
  • 1 tablespoon minced ginger
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
For The Pork Kabobs
  1. Make the marinade by combining the onions, oil, coconut aminos, fish sauce, apple juice, tomato paste, garlic, and freshly ground black pepper in a high speed blender or food processor. Blitz until smooth.

  2. Cut the pork shoulder roast into uniform 1½-inch cubes.

  3. Place the cubes in a large storage container and pour the marinade over the pork. Mix well to coat the pork evenly. Store in a covered container in the fridge for at least one hour and up to a day.

For the Spicy Peach Barbecue Sauce
  1. Heat your grill or grill pan to medium high.

  2. Brush the oil on the cut surface of the peaches, onion, and the outside of the pepper. Place them cut-side down on the hot grill and sear them a couple of minutes per side or until you get nice grill marks on them.

  3. Roughly chop the grilled peaches, onion, and jalapeño. (If you want a less-spicy sauce, just use part of the jalapeño instead of the whole thing and discard the ribs and seeds.)

  4. Add the peaches, onion, jalapeño, coconut aminos, tomato paste, rice wine vinegar, fish sauce, garlic, ginger, and freshly ground black pepper to a high speed blender or food processor. Blitz until smooth.

  5. Pour the sauce into a saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the temperature to medium low and simmer for 5 to 10 minutes or until slightly thickened. You can store the sauce in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

Grilling the Kabobs
  1. When you're ready to make the pork kabobs, heat the grill to medium high.

  2. Thread the marinated pork cubes on flat metal skewers. Grill the skewers about 10 minutes total, flipping the skewers every couple of minutes or until cooked through. Pork is done when it reaches 145°F.

  3. Remove the kabobs from the grill and brush on the barbecue sauce. Rest the pork for 5 to 10 minutes before digging in. Garnish with diced fresh peaches to make it pretty!

The post Peachy Pork-A-Bobs (Pork Kabobs with Spicy Peach BBQ Sauce) appeared first on Nom Nom Paleo®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Got a jar of All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce in the fridge? You can make this colorful, tangy, umami-packed Whole30-friendly Chinese Chicken Salad for dinner tonight! This salad is topped with slices of crispy Cracklin’ Chicken, so it’s no wonder that this all-in-one supper makes everyone happy!

Although most restaurant-style Chinese chicken salads rely on crunchy noodles to add texture, you won’t miss them in this paleo-friendly version. The combination of crisp veggies, sweet mandarin oranges, Cracklin’ Chicken, toasted almonds, and sesame seeds will more than make up for the absence of stale fried noodles!

All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce is a fab salad dressing!

By now, you should already know that my All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce is truly a workhorse sauce/dressing/marinade for EVERYTHING. Whenever I feel like making a refreshing Asian-inspired salad, I use the sauce as a zippy Whole30-friendly salad dressing. For this dish, I prefer to whisk the sauce with a little avocado oil, but you can keep it oil-free if you prefer a tangier salad dressing. Want more ideas and inspiration for using All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce? Check out this ever-expanding post!

Can you swap the vegetables in the salad?

Definitely! I like the color and crunch that comes from combining Napa cabbage, purple cabbage, and julienned carrots, but feel free to use your favorite lettuce and raw vegetables. I’ve made this Chinese Chicken Salad successfully with a base of romaine lettuce, green cabbage, baby arugula, and even iceberg lettuce. I also like to throw in sliced cucumbers, radishes, and red bell peppers if I have them in the fridge.

What other protein can I substitute for Cracklin’ Chicken?

First of all, if you’ve never tried making Cracklin’ Chicken, you’re really missing out! It truly is my favorite protein for this recipe, and my kids wouldn’t accept anything else. That said, you can use any leftover cooked chicken in place of it. This salad can also be made with roasted shrimp, cooked salmon, and leftover steak. (But come on: Make some Cracklin’ Chicken!)

Can I make this dish ahead of time?

Sadly, salads don’t get better with time. In fact, the longer the salad sits, the more watery the dressed cabbage will get. Plus, you’ll lose the crunch of the toasted almonds and sesame seeds. If you must make this salad in advance, prep all the ingredients ahead of time and combine them right before you serve the salad. Personally, I do eat any leftovers (because waste not, want not!), but the salad doesn’t taste quite as magical once it’s no longer fresh.

Okay—enough chit-chat. Let’s make my family’s favorite Chinese Chicken Salad!

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 6 pieces Cracklin’ Chicken (air fryer or stovetop method), cut into slices
  • ½ cup All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons avocado oil (optional)
  • ½ small head Napa cabbage, cored and sliced thin 
  • ½ small head red cabbage, cored and sliced thin 
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and julienned
  • 3 scallions, thinly sliced on the bias
  • ½ cup cilantro leaves, roughly chopped
  • ½ cup drained canned Mandarin oranges in 100% juice (I buy Native Forest brand)
  • ¼ cup toasted almonds slivers
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds

Equipment:

Method:

Make some Air Fryer Cracklin’ Chicken or OG stovetop Cracklin’ Chicken and set it aside. Don’t worry, the crispy chicken will still be amazing at room temperature.

While the chicken is frying, measure out the All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce and whisk in the avocado oil if you’re using it. Taste the dressing on a piece of cabbage and add more avocado oil if desired.

In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, carrots, scallions, and cilantro.

Pour in most of the salad dressing…

…and toss well. Taste for seasoning and add more dressing if needed.

Transfer the dressed greens to a serving platter…

…and dot the salad with the mandarin oranges. Place the Cracklin’ Chicken on top of the salad.

When you’re ready to serve the Chinese Chicken Salad, sprinkle the toasted almonds and sesame seeds on top.

Serve immediately!

Got extra All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce?

I have a whole blog post about all the ways you can use it!

Too many choices? Make one of these recipes:

Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013) and Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017)!

 PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Chinese Chicken Salad

Got a jar of All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce in the fridge? You can make this colorful, tangy, umami-packed Whole30-friendly Chinese Chicken Salad for dinner tonight!

  • 6 pieces Cracklin’ Chicken ( cut into slices)
  • ½ cup All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons avocado oil (optional)
  • ½ head small Napa cabbage (cored and sliced thin )
  • ½ head small red cabbage (cored and sliced thin)
  • 2 medium carrots (peeled and julienned)
  • 3 scallions (thinly sliced on the bias)
  • ½ cup cilantro leaves ( roughly chopped)
  • ½ cup canned Mandarin oranges in 100% juice (drained (I buy Native Forest brand))
  • ¼ cup toasted almond slivers
  • 2 tablespoons  toasted sesame seeds
  1. Make some Air Fryer Cracklin’ Chicken or OG stovetop Cracklin’ Chicken and set it aside. Don’t worry, the crispy chicken will still be amazing at room temperature.

  2. While the chicken is frying, measure out the All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce and whisk in the avocado oil if you’re using it. Taste the dressing on a piece of cabbage and add more avocado oil if desired.

  3. In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, carrots, scallions, and cilantro.

  4. Pour in most of the salad dressing and toss well. Taste for seasoning and add more dressing if needed.

  5. Transfer the dressed greens to a serving platter and dot the salad with the mandarin oranges. Place the Cracklin’ Chicken on top of the salad.

  6. When you’re ready to serve the Chinese Chicken Salad, sprinkle the toasted almonds and sesame seeds on top. Serve immediately!

The post Chinese Chicken Salad appeared first on Nom Nom Paleo®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

These Whole30-friendly Smashed Steak Skewers with Cherry Barbecue Sauce are a family favorite in the summertime! Time to break out the grill!

Speared hunks of beef, flattened with a heavy object and grilled over an open fire. Sounds like caveman family fare to me, don’t you think?

Trust me: If Lil-O — the pickiest eater in our house — liked ‘em, your kids’ll gobble them up, too!

Wanna see the simple step-by-step instructions? They’re so easy even a caveman could do it!

Here’s what to hunt and gather to make 16 skewers:

For the Cherry Barbecue Sauce (Makes 1⅔ cup of sauce):

  • 2 teaspoons ghee or fat of choice
  • ½ cup minced shallot
  • 1 medium garlic clove, minced
  • 1 tablespoon minced ginger (I use a Microplane)
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • ¼ cup coconut aminos (or wheat-free tamari)
  • ¼ cup balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ cup apple juice (I prefer Martinelli’s brand)
  • 10 ounces frozen sweet cherries, roughly chopped
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste

For the Smashed Steak Skewers:

  • 1½ pounds flank steak
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons melted ghee
  • ¼ cup scallions, thinly sliced (optional)

Here’s the step-by-step instructions:

The cherry barbecue sauce is a cinch to make and can be prepared ahead of time.

First, melt the ghee over medium heat in a small saucepan. Add the shallots and a pinch of salt and sauté until translucent (around 5 minutes).

Stir in the garlic, ginger and tomato paste…

…and sauté for 30 second until fragrant.

Add the coconut aminos, vinegar, juice…

…and cherries…

…and bring to a boil.

Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes or until the cherry mixture is thickened.

While the sauce is simmering, stir occasionally and smush the cherries against the side of the pot.

Season the sauce with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer the sauce to a bowl or measuring cup and set aside.

A half hour before you want to grill your skewers, soak 16 bamboo skewers in water. (Better yet, get these flat stainless-steel skewers that are reusable and won’t burn!)

Grab your slab of flank steak and cut it into 16 pieces.

First, cut the steak in half lengthwise (along the grain).

Next, slice the steak in half across the grain, then in fourths…

…and finally in eighths.

Carefully stab each slice of beef through the center with a soaked skewer.

Now comes the fun part: Grab a hefty meat pounder or small cast iron skillet, and smash each steak skewer until it’s about ½ inch thick.

GRRR! (THWACK!)

I’m sure cavemen would’ve used sticks and stones, but I prefer to keep my kitchen rock-free.

Season the steak with salt and pepper…

…and brush both sides with melted ghee.

Fire up your backyard grill, grease the grates, and cook over high heat for 1 to 2 minutes on each side.

Let the beef skewers rest for 5 to 10 minutes…

…before brushing on the cherry barbecue sauce.

A garnish of fresh green scallions is optional, but it can instantly transform this rugged plate of beef skewers into a more refined dish.

Serve immediately and watch your kiddos tear into them with sharp little incisors!

(Originally published March 2013)

Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013) and Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017)!

 PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Smashed Steak Skewers with Cherry Barbecue Sauce

These Whole30-friendly Smashed Steak Skewers with Cherry Barbecue Sauce are a family favorite in the summertime! Time to break out the grill!

For the Cherry Barbecue Sauce
  • 2 teaspoons ghee (or fat of choice)
  • ½ cup minced shallots
  • 1 medium garlic clove (minced)
  • 1 tablespoon minced ginger
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • ¼ cup coconut aminos (or wheat-free tamari)
  • ¼ cup balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ cup apple juice (I prefer Martinelli's brand)
  • 10 ounces sweet cherries, pitted and roughly chopped (fresh or frozen)
  • Diamond Crystal kosher salt 
  • Freshly ground black pepper
For the Smashed Steak Skewers
  • 1½ pounds flank steak
  • Diamond Crystal kosher salt 
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons melted ghee (or fat of choice)
  • ¼ cup scallions (thinly sliced (optional garnish))
For the Cherry Barbecue Sauce
  1. First, melt the ghee over medium heat in a small saucepan. Add the shallots and a pinch of salt and sauté until translucent (around 5 minutes).

  2. Stir in the garlic, ginger and tomato paste and sauté for 30 second until fragrant.

  3. Add the coconut aminos, vinegar, juice, and cherries, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes or until the cherry mixture is thickened.

  4. While the sauce is simmering, stir occasionally and smush the cherries against the side of the pot. Season the sauce with salt and pepper to taste.

  5. Transfer the sauce to a bowl or measuring cup and set aside.

For the Smashed Steak Skewers
  1. A half hour before you want to grill your skewers, soak 16 bamboo skewers in water. 

  2. Grab your slab of flank steak and cut it into 16 pieces by following these instructions: First, cut the steak in half lengthwise (along the grain). Next, slice the steak in half across the grain, then in fourths, and finally in eighths.

  3. Carefully stab each slice of beef through the center with a soaked skewer.

  4. Grab a hefty meat pounder or small cast iron skillet, and smash each steak skewer until it’s about ½ inch thick.

  5. Season the steak with salt and pepper, and brush both sides with melted ghee.

  6. Fire up your backyard grill, grease the grates, and cook over high heat for 1 to 2 minutes on each side.

  7. Let the beef skewers rest for 5 to 10 minutes before brushing on the cherry barbecue sauce.

  8. A garnish of fresh green scallions is optional, but it can instantly transform this rugged plate of beef skewers into a more refined dish. Serve immediately!

  • The cherry barbecue sauce is a cinch to make and can be prepared ahead of time. Just store it in the fridge for up to 4 days.
  • If you choose to roast them in the oven, heat the oven to 400°F convection or 425°F (no convection). Place the skewers on a rimmed baking sheet and cook them in the hot oven for 7-10 minutes or until cooked to your liking, flipping the skewers over at the halfway point. Broil for an additional 2 minutes if you want some more color.

The post Smashed Steak Skewers with Cherry Barbecue Sauce appeared first on Nom Nom Paleo®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If you’ve been craving smoky chicken satay slathered in a creamy peanut sauce while on your Whole30, I’ve got something right up your alley: this lip-smacking no-nut version of the real deal!

These delicious paleo chicken satay skewers are a simple and tasty Whole30-friendly weeknight meal that you can cook indoors or out. Got leftover Paleo Hoisin Sauce after making Moo Shu Pork? Then use it to make Hoisin No-Nut Sauce—it’s to die for!

What is satay?

Satay is a southeast Asian dish that consists of seasoned grilled meat on skewers that’s typically served with a soy- and peanut-based dipping sauce. Although the dish originated in Indonesia, you can find it on the menus at Thai, Malaysian, and Singaporean restaurants.

Do you have to serve satay with a dipping sauce?

Of course not! These skewers are well-seasoned and don’t require a sauce. Sure, I prefer to slather them with Hoisin No-Nut Sauce, but whenever I don’t have leftover Paleo Hoisin Sauce on hand, I just skip the sauce. By the way, if you want a fiery dipping sauce, I have a Spicy Thai No-Nut Sauce recipe on page 58 of our Ready or Not! cookbook. (There’s also another tasty variation of chicken satay on that page as well!)

Can I use other proteins?

Yes! Feel free to substitute chicken thighs, beef, pork, goat, or whatever meat you prefer. You can’t go wrong with grilled meat on a stick!

How do I make this ahead of time?

You can marinate the meat up to 12 hours in advance, and the sauce can be made up to 3 days in advance—just be sure to store both in sealed containers in the fridge.

What’s the best way to save leftovers?

Keep any leftover cooked skewers in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 4 days. You can quickly reheat them in a hot skillet or in a 350°F oven for a few minutes. (Me? I like to eat them cold right out of the fridge.)

What side dishes do I serve with chicken satay?

Don’t overthink it! Just serve these skewers up alongside a crisp green salad. I also love to serve them with Asian Cauliflower Fried “Rice”, Simple Cauliflower “Rice”, and Smashed Cucumber and Carrot Salad.

Let’s grill some meat!

Serves 4

Ingredients:

Hoisin No-Nut Sauce

Equipment:

Method:

Slice the chicken breasts into ½-inch strips and place in a large bowl.

Combine the coconut milk, Thai red curry paste, date, garlic, fish sauce, and turmeric in a high speed blender…

…and blitz until smooth.

Pour the marinade over the chicken strips and mix well.

Cover the chicken and marinate in the fridge for up to 12 hours. Usually, I just let the chicken hang out in the fridge while I’m preparing my side dishes for dinner. 

When you’re ready to cook the chicken, grab some soaked wooden skewers. Using one strip of chicken at a time, carefully skewer the meat in an accordion-like fashion. Depending on the size of the chicken pieces and the length of the skewer, you might have two to four pieces threaded tightly on a skewer. 

Now, you can choose how you want to cook the skewers: on the grill or in the oven. If you’re cooking the skewers on a grill, set the grill to high heat. When it’s nice and hot, clean the grill and brush the grates with a high smoke point fat (e.g., ghee, avocado oil, etc.)  Place the skewers on the hot grill and cook for about 3 to 5 minutes per side or until cooked through. 

If you choose to roast them in the oven, heat the oven to 400°F convection or 425°F (no convection). Place the skewers on a rimmed baking sheet and cook them in the hot oven for 10 minutes or until cooked through, flipping the skewers over at the halfway point. Broil for an additional 2 minutes if you want some more color.

Time to make the Hoisin No-Nut Sauce! Dump the hoisin sauce, sunbutter, water, and rice vinegar into a blender and blitz until smooth. You can add a smidge more water if you like a thinner sauce.

Slather the sauce on the chicken satay and chow down!

Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013) and Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017)!

 PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Chicken Satay

If you’ve been craving smoky chicken satay slathered in a creamy peanut sauce on your Whole30, I’ve got you covered with this lip-smacking no-nut version that’ll knock your socks off! These delicious paleo chicken satay skewers are a quick and easy Whole30-friendly weeknight meal that you can cook indoors or out. 

Chicken Satay
  • 1½ pounds chicken breasts (boneless and skinless)
  • ½ cup full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 tablespoon Thai red curry sauce
  • 1 large Medjool date (pitted and chopped)
  • 3 garlic cloves (peeled and roughly chopped)
  • 2 tablespoons Red Boat fish sauce
  • ½ teaspoon ground turmeric
Hoisin No-Nut Sauce
  • ¼ cup Paleo Hoisin Sauce
  • ¼ cup sunbutter
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
Chicken Satay
  1. Slice the chicken breasts into ½-inch strips and place in a large bowl.

  2. Combine the coconut milk, Thai red curry paste, date, garlic, fish sauce, and turmeric in a high speed blender and blitz until smooth.

  3. Pour the marinade over the chicken strips and mix well. Cover the chicken and marinate in the fridge for up to 12 hours. Usually, I just let the chicken hang out in the fridge while I’m preparing my side dishes for dinner.

  4. When you’re ready to cook the chicken, grab some soaked wooden skewers. Using one strip of chicken at a time, carefully skewer the meat in an accordion-like fashion. Depending on the size of the chicken pieces and the length of the skewer, you might have two to four pieces threaded tightly on a skewer. 

  5. Now, you can choose how you want to cook the skewers: on the grill or in the oven. If you’re cooking the skewers on a grill, set the grill to high heat. When it’s nice and hot, clean the grill and brush the grates with a high smoke point fat (e.g., ghee, avocado oil, etc.) Place the skewers on the hot grill and cook for about 3 to 5 minutes per side or until cooked through. 

  6. If you choose to roast them in the oven, heat the oven to 400°F convection or 425°F (no convection). Place the skewers on a rimmed baking sheet and cook them in the hot oven for 10 minutes or until cooked through, flipping the skewers over at the halfway point. Broil for an additional 2 minutes if you want some more color.

Hoisin No-Nut Sauce
  1. Time to make the Hoisin No-Nut Sauce! Dump the hoisin sauce, sunbutter, water, and rice vinegar into a blender and blitz until smooth. You can add a smidge more water if you like a thinner sauce.

  2. Slather the sauce on the chicken satay and chow down!

The post Chicken Satay appeared first on Nom Nom Paleo®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This quick and simple Tandoori Shrimp dish can be on the table in no time flat! It’s perfect for folks doing a Whole30 or anyone who wants a flavorful and fuss-free weeknight supper.

I always keep a bag of frozen shrimp stashed in my freezer so I can break it out in case of dinner emergencies. Got one, too? Then it’s time to make Tandoori Shrimp!

What is tandoori?

Rather than a specific recipe, tandoori refers to a type of Indian cooking that utilizes a tandoor, a high-temperature cylindrical clay oven. Traditionally, proteins are marinated in yogurt or coconut milk and mixed with a pungent spice blend before they’re roasted in the tandoor. Like most American suburbanites, however, I don’t own a traditional tandoor, so I simply cook my tandoori-inspired meat and seafood in our kitchen oven or out on our backyard grill.

What’s in tandoori spice blend?

Tandoori spice blends (a.k.a. tandoori masala) can vary, but it usually contains garam masala (which typically consists of coriander, cumin, cardamom, cloves, black pepper, cinnamon, and nutmeg), garlic, ginger, onion, and cayenne pepper. I buy a tandoori spice blend at the store or online, but you can mix some yourself by following this recipe.

What shrimp should you use for this recipe?

I always buy frozen shrimp at the store. The “fresh” stuff you see displayed behind the seafood counter is usually just previously frozen shrimp that’s been thawed for sale—and once frozen shrimp has been thawed, you need to cook it pretty quickly or it will go bad. That’s why it’s better to buy frozen shrimp and thaw it when you’re ready to cook it!

Buying the right kind of seafood can be confusing, so it’s best to refer to the latest recommendations from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch. Here’s their guide to better shrimp. Personally, I prefer bigger shrimp, so I buy jumbo size prawns (about 21-25 shrimp per pound).

Can I use another protein instead?

For sure! You can check out my Super Easy Tandoori Chicken and Tandoori Fish recipes on the blog for the step-by-step instructions.

Can tandoori shrimp be cooked on the grill?

Yes! Stab the marinated shrimp onto pre-soaked wooden skewers and grill them on a medium-hot grill for a minute or two on each side. Easy peasy!

What do I serve with tandoori shrimp?

Tandoori shrimp can be served as an appetizer or even as a Game Day snack. If you’re serving it as a main dish, some great vegetable side dishes include Simple Cauliflower Rice, roasted vegetables, or a big green salad.

How do I save leftovers?

Leftover tandoori shrimp can be kept in a sealed container in the fridge for up to four days. When I eat the leftovers (or any leftover shrimp dish), I don’t reheat it because the smell can be pretty pungent. Luckily, Tandoori Shrimp tastes great cold—I just pile the shrimp on a bed of lettuce and dig in.

Serves 4

Ingredients:

Equipment:

Method:

If using frozen shrimp, thaw them under running water for 5 to 7 minutes, or until no longer icy. Peel and devein the shrimp if not already done.

In a large bowl, combine the Diamond kosher salt, coconut milk, Tandoori spice mix, and lemon juice. 

Whisk until well-distributed.

Add the shrimp and toss to coat well. You can marinate the shrimp for up to 30 minutes if desired. 

Heat the oven to 400°F with the rack in the middle position. Arrange the shrimp in a single layer on a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet.

Roast in the oven for 6 to 8 minutes, flipping the shrimp over at the halfway point. (If your shrimp are smaller than jumbo, they may take just 5 minutes to cook!)

The shrimp are finished cooking when they turn opaque and pink on the outside. They’re easy to overcook, so don’t dawdle. No one likes rubbery shrimp!

Sprinkle with minced fresh cilantro and serve with lime wedges. (Yes, lemons are just as good!)

Serve with cauliflower rice, roasted vegetables, or a big green salad!

Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013) and Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017)!

 PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Tandoori Shrimp

This quick and simple Tandoori Shrimp dish can be on the table in no time flat! It’s perfect for folks doing a Whole30 or anyone who wants a flavorful and fuss-free weeknight supper.

  • 1½ pounds shrimp (21-25 count) (peeled and deveined)
  • ½ teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt
  • ½ cup full-fat coconut milk (or plain coconut yogurt)
  • 1 tablespoon tandoori spice mix (no salt added) ( )
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice (freshly squeezed )
  • ¼ cup minced fresh cilantro
  • 2 limes (cut into wedges)
  1. If using frozen shrimp, thaw them under running water for 5 to 7 minutes, or until no longer icy. Peel and devein the shrimp if not already done.

  2. In a large bowl, combine the Diamond kosher salt, coconut milk, Tandoori spice mix, and lemon juice. Whisk until well-distributed.

  3. Add the shrimp and toss to coat well. You can marinate the shrimp for up to 30 minutes if desired. 

  4. Heat the oven to 400°F with the rack in the middle position. Arrange the shrimp in a single layer on a parchment-lined rimmed baking sheet.

  5. Roast in the oven for 6 to 8 minutes, flipping the shrimp over at the halfway point. (If your shrimp are smaller than jumbo, they may take just 5 minutes to cook!)

  6. Sprinkle with minced fresh cilantro and serve with lime wedges. (Yes, lemons are just as good!)

The shrimp are finished cooking when they turn opaque and pink on the outside. They’re easy to overcook, so don’t dawdle. No one likes rubbery shrimp!

The post Tandoori Shrimp appeared first on Nom Nom Paleo®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Love my Cracklin’ Chicken, but hate the mess? It turns out that my popular and tasty take on Whole30-friendly fried chicken isn’t just easier to make in an air fryer, it’s less messy, too! Make Cracklin’ Chicken in an air fryer, and you won’t spend any time cleaning the grease from your stovetop and floors!

Almost as soon as the air fryer craze started sweeping the nation, questions from loyal Nomsters started landing in my inbox, asking if my Cracklin’ Chicken recipe (a.k.a. Ollie’s Cracklin’ Chicken) could be made in this gadget. There’s no question that Cracklin’ Chicken is a super delicious and easy recipe to cook, but it makes an unholy mess every time I fry it on the stovetop. Even when I use a splatter guard or fry the chicken in a cast iron skillet on my outdoor grill, hot schmaltz still gets everywhere. You just have to take the good with the bad—or so I thought. Enter the air fryer!

What’s an air fryer?

An air fryer is a stand-alone countertop kitchen appliance (mine kind of looks like a ginormous Darth Vader’s helmet) that “fries” food with circulating hot air, using a minimal amount of fat. Basically, it’s like a self-contained convection oven.

Should you buy an air fryer?

To be honest, I don’t think it’s necessary to get one if you already have a good wall or countertop oven. I resisted buying an air fryer for a long time because the reviews were mixed (at least from many of my trusted sources) and I already own a Breville Smart Oven Air, which has an air fryer function. That said,  I never used the air fryer function on my Breville because on the rare occasion that I did,  it was such a pain to clean up afterwards.

But after seeing some of my blogger pals show off lots of tasty, crispy foods that they were making in their air fryers, I had a bad case of FOMO and broke down and bought one. Plus, the model I wanted was marked down 50%  at the time, and who can resist a bargain?

Which air fryer should you buy?

As with all of my kitchen purchases, I did tons of research to find the best reviewed model. After weighing all the pros and cons, I settled on the Philips Avance Digital Turbostar Airfryer because it was highly recommended by Cook’s Illustrated. It’s also the priciest air fryer on the market, so I waited for it to go on sale before I bought it. (I didn’t buy the XL model because it wasn’t on sale and Cook’s Illustrated says the extra capacity isn’t substantial.)

The verdict? All in all, I’m very happy with my purchase…but then again, I’m a compulsive kitchen gadget hoarder.

What are the pros of making Cracklin’ Chicken in an air fryer?

Clean-up is a breeze because you can just plop the greasy parts of the air fryer in a dishwasher or wash them by hand with warm soapy water. Also, the chicken skin gets really thin and crispy because the hot circulating air melts away all of the fat under the skin. It’s no wonder I’m now making Cracklin’ Chicken several times a week now that I have an air fryer!

What are drawbacks to making Cracklin’ Chicken in an air fryer?

Although I love making Cracklin’ Chicken in my air fryer, it’s not perfect. There are three main drawbacks:

  • Because of the size constraints of the appliance, you can cook only up to THREE chicken thighs at a time.
  • If you don’t dump out the accumulated grease at the bottom of the basket in between batches, the appliance can emit a lot of greasy smoke.
  • The chicken thigh meat can turn out a little drier than when you fry it according to the original recipe. (For me, the lack of mess does make up for the slightly less moist chicken, though!)
Can you reheat Cracklin’ Chicken in an air fryer?

Yes! Place the leftover Cracklin’ Chicken skin-side up in the air fryer basket and cook it at 400°F for 8 minutes or until the skin is crispy.

Let’s make Air Fryer Cracklin’ Chicken!

Serves 2

Ingredients:

Equipment:

Method:

Grab some chicken thighs and a sharp pair of kitchen shears. Blot the chicken dry with a paper towel. If the thigh bone isn’t exposed, use the shears to snip down to expose it. Then, starting at one end, carefully cut out the bone, making sure you don’t cut through the meat.

Trim as close to the bone as possible. When you get to the other end, trim around the joint and cartilage and remove the bone. Save these bones for homemade bone broth! Repeat with the remaining thighs.

Flatten the chicken with a meat pounder to ensure uniform cooking.

Sprinkle Diamond Crystal kosher salt on both sides of the chicken thighs. If you want to spice things up, you can sprinkle your favorite seasoning salt (e.g. Magic Mushroom Powder) on the meat side—but avoid sprinkling anything but salt on the skin side. (I don’t recommend putting anything besides salt on the skin because the spices can burn.)

Arrange the chicken thighs in a single layer in the the air fryer basket.

You can actually smoosh up to three chicken thighs in a single layer in the air fryer basket without leaving any space in between them. They’ll turn out fine—the pieces will shrink as they cook.

Set the air fryer to 400°F for 15 to 18 minutes, depending on the size of the thighs. (My air fryer does not need to be preheated, but preheat yours if necessary.)

The Cracklin’ Chicken is ready when the skin is crispy and the meat is thoroughly cooked (at least 165°F in the thickest part of the thigh). If you’re making another batch, pour out the rendered fat before cooking another batch to reduce the amount of smoke.

Slice up the Cracklin’ Chicken and enjoy!

No air fryer? Make the original Cracklin’ Chicken on the stovetop!

Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013) and Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017)!

 PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Air Fryer Cracklin’ Chicken

Love my Cracklin’ Chicken, but hate the mess? It turns out that my popular and tasty take on Whole30-friendly fried chicken isn’t just easier to make in an air fryer, it’s less messy, too!

  • 3 chicken thighs (skin-on, and bone-in (1.25 pounds or less))
  • Diamond Crystal kosher salt (or your favorite cooking salt)
  • Magic Mushroom Powder ((optional))
  1. Grab some chicken thighs and a sharp pair of kitchen shears. Blot the chicken dry with a paper towel. If the thigh bone isn’t exposed, use the shears to snip down to expose it. Then, starting at one end, carefully cut out the bone, making sure you don’t cut through the meat.

  2. Trim as close to the bone as possible. When you get to the other end, trim around the joint and cartilage and remove the bone. Save these bones for homemade bone broth! Repeat with the remaining thighs.

  3. Flatten the chicken with a meat pounder to ensure uniform cooking.

  4. Sprinkle Diamond Crystal kosher salt on both sides of the chicken thighs. If you want to spice things up, you can sprinkle your favorite seasoning salt (e.g. Magic Mushroom Powder) on the meat side—but avoid sprinkling anything but salt on the skin side. (I don’t recommend putting anything besides salt on the skin because the spices can burn.)

  5. Arrange the chicken thighs in a single layer in the the air fryer basket. You can actually smoosh up to three chicken thighs in a single layer in the air fryer basket without leaving any space in between them. They’ll turn out fine—the pieces will shrink as they cook.

  6. Set the air fryer to 400°F for 15 to 18 minutes, depending on the size of the thighs. (My air fryer does not need to be preheated, but preheat yours if necessary.)

  7. The Cracklin’ Chicken is ready when the skin is crispy and the meat is thoroughly cooked (at least 165°F in the thickest part of the thigh). If you’re making another batch, pour out the rendered fat before cooking another batch to reduce the amount of smoke.

The post Air Fryer Cracklin’ Chicken appeared first on Nom Nom Paleo®.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Instant Pot Chinese Beef Stew is an easy and flavor-packed stew that combines beef chuck roast, All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce, and tender daikon and carrots. If you plan ahead, you can cook this Whole30-friendly beef stew on a busy weeknight or make it ahead to reheat during the week!

Got a jar of All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce?

I’ve shared the recipe for my All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce in our latest cookbook, Ready or Not!, on the blog, and our iOs app because it really is that indispensable. I have a jar in my fridge or frozen cubes in the freezer at all times because I can use it for so many dishes besides amazingly easy stir-fries. Don’t believe me? Here’s my ever-growing list of recipes that utilize my All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce.

What other meats can I use in this stew?

Each time I cook this recipe, I plop a different braising cut into the Instant Pot and the stew always turns out great. If you use lamb shoulder, pork shoulder, boneless short ribs, or brisket, you can keep the cooking time the same if you cut the meat into 2-inch cubes. This stew is fabulous with bone-in short ribs, but you will need to increase the cooking time to 45 minutes under high pressure.

If you want to make this dish even faster, you can substitute chicken thighs for the beef. The cooking time under high pressure is 15 minutes if the thighs are bone-in, or just 10 minutes with boneless and skinless thighs.

Can I use other vegetables?

Yes! I love daikon and carrots because they absorb all the flavor of the sauce, but you can substitute cubed potatoes or cauliflower florets in place of  them and keep the same 3 minute cooking time under high pressure. When you don’t want to make greens on the side, stir in some bok choy or spinach to the stew and cook them on the sauté function until they’re wilted.

Why isn’t this stew on the table in 35 minutes?

Ah yes, a common complaint folks share about Instant Pot recipes is that they are advertised as cooking under high pressure for “X minutes” and it ends up taking at least double that time to get food on the table. Annoying, right?

Although this recipe cooks under high pressure for 35 minutes, it takes time to prep the ingredients, sauté them in the Instant Pot, come up to high pressure, and release pressure naturally. All in all, it may take 90 minutes to complete this recipe (always check the Total Time on the recipe card before starting).

If you don’t have this much time to spare on a weeknight, dump all the ingredients in the Instant Pot in the morning and program it to cook while you’re out for the day—the hands on time for prepping the stew is about 15 minutes! When you come home, the stew will be depressurized, piping hot, and ready to add the daikon and carrots. Alternatively, you can cook this stew ahead of time and reheat it when you need it.

What is the best way to reheat it?

In the Instant Pot! My rule of thumb is if you cooked the dish in the Instant Pot, you can reheat it in the Instant Pot. In fact, I recommend refrigerating your stews in the Instant Pot metal insert covered with a silicone cover so you can just pop the insert back in the Instant Pot when you want to reheat it. (Yes, it helps to have extra metal inserts if you want to cook something else.)

If you want, you can remove the hardened fat cap on top of the chilled stew, add any extra vegetables the recipe calls for (e.g. carrots and daikons), and cook under high pressure for 3 minutes.

What do you serve with Instant Pot Chinese Beef Stew?

This is a stew that would traditionally be served with white rice, so you can serve it with Simple Cauliflower Rice. Some other tasty vegetable side dish ideas include roasted asparagus, stir-fried bok choy, or sautéed spinach. Remember: you can use the All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce to season your stir-fried veggies, too!

How do you store leftovers?

Keep the leftovers in the fridge for up to four days or in the freezer for up to 6 months. If you’re going to reheat it later in the week, refrigerate the stew in the Instant Pot metal insert and cover it with a silicone lid. That means you’ll have one less container to wash that day!

What’s your favorite leftover makeover with this stew?

When there isn’t quite enough stew left for another family meal, transform the stew into a quick and easy soup in the Instant Pot. To serve four people, fill the Instant Pot with 6 cups of bone broth and the remaining stew. Also, you should  add some vegetables (e.g. Napa cabbage, sliced carrots, and cubed potatoes) to bulk it up. Cook the soup under high pressure for about 3 minutes and release pressure manually. Taste for seasoning and adjust with salt and/or fish sauce if needed.

How do you make this stew if you don’t have a pressure cooker?

If you want to cook this stew in a slow cooker/Crock Pot, sauté the onions and garlic in a skillet before transferring them to the slow cooker insert. Mix in the rest of the ingredients (except for the root vegetables) and cook on low for 8 to 10 hours. Add the carrots and daikon in the last hour of cooking.

Alternatively, you can make this stew in a Dutch oven on the stovetop or in an oven. Cook the onions and garlic in a heavy-bottomed dutch oven. When the onions are softened, add the rest of the ingredients, including the carrots and daikon. Increase the amount of All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce to 1 cup and add an additional cup of chicken or bone broth to the stew. Bring the contents of the stew to a boil over high heat and turn down the heat to maintain a simmer or place the pot in a 300°F oven . Place a lid on the pot, leaving it slightly askew so it doesn’t accidentally boil over. Cook for about 3 hours or until the meat is fork-tender.

Time to make Instant Pot Chinese Beef Stew!

Serves 6

Ingredients:

Equipment:

Method:

Shake up a jar of my All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce if you don’t already have one in the fridge. Pour out ½ a cup of it and set it aside.

Toss the beef cubes with the Diamond Crystal kosher salt. (Use only 1 teaspoon salt if you are using Morton’s brand or a fine grain salt.)

Turn on the saute function on your Instant Pot. When the metal insert is hot, add the avocado oil and the sliced onions.

Cook, stirring frequently until the onions are slightly softened.

Stir in the minced garlic cloves and salted beef cubes.

Plop in the dried shiitake mushrooms (no need to rehydrate them) and pour in the All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce.

Stir well to distribute the sauce evenly.

Lock the Instant Pot lid and program it to cook under high pressure for 35 minutes.

When the stew is finished cooking, wait for the pressure to release naturally. Impatient? After 15 minutes has elapsed, release the pressure manually.

If you’re eating the stew right away, add the daikon and carrots and program it to cook for 3 minutes under high pressure.

When it finishes cooking, release the pressure manually.

Check that the root vegetables are fork tender and taste the stew to check the seasoning. Transfer the stew to a serving bowl…

…and top with sliced scallions. Enjoy!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Paleo Moo Shu Pork is an easy, hearty weeknight meal that puts a Chinese spin on Taco Tuesday! On a Whole30? Spoon the savory filling on top of lettuce leaves or on a bowl of cauliflower rice for a delicious dinner!

Growing up, when my mom served homemade moo shu pork for dinner, I always joked that we were eating Chinese tacos. I wasn’t actually that far off—after all, my mom would wrap the pork and vegetable filling in store-bought flour tortillas if she couldn’t find traditional Mandarin pancakes at the Chinese market.

These days, whenever I serve Paleo Moo Shu Pork alongside grain-free tortillas, my kids remark that these DIY Chinese tacos have become one of their new favorites. There’s just something about sticking food into an edible wrapper that makes it taste exponentially better.

What is Moo Shu Pork?

A traditional northern Chinese dish, moo shu pork has been adapted many times over in American Chinese restaurants and households. It’s a delicious stir-fry featuring matchstick-thin strips of pork and vegetables and dotted with fluffy scrambled eggs. Typically, the stir-fry itself isn’t strongly flavored because most people tuck it into a thin Mandarin pancake wrapper slathered with sweet-and-savory hoisin sauce.

My mom’s version contains pork, Napa cabbage, and scrambled eggs, but she also adds more exotic components like wood ear mushrooms, daylily buds, and julienned bamboo shoots. I left out these hard-to-find ingredients from my version because I want you to be able to make my Paleo Moo Shu Pork without having to make a special trip to an Asian grocery store—but feel free to include them if you want.

How is this version Paleo- and Whole30-friendly?

To make my Moo Shu Pork paleo-friendly and simple, I use my All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce as the seasoning, and I serve it with store-bought Siete brand cassava and coconut flour tortillas as the wrappers. If you want to make your own paleo-friendly tortillas, I have a recipe on page 78 of Ready or Not! cookbook. I also use my own recipe for Paleo Hoisin Sauce, which pulls the whole dish together and can be whipped up in just a few minutes.

In China, moo shu pork is normally served over rice rather than wrappers, so you can keep it Whole30-compliant by spooning it over Simple Cauliflower Rice. If you’re on a Whole30 and still craving some sort of wrapper, butter lettuce leaves and thinly sliced jicama are a fantastic sub for Mandarin pancakes/grain-free tortillas. (Unfortunately, Siete grain-free tortillas are considered SWYPO and aren’t Whole30-compatible—but they can be part of your Food Freedom after your Whole30 is over.)

How do you eat Moo Shu Pork?

There isn’t a right or wrong way to eat Moo Shu Pork. I serve the stir-fry with a pile of warm grain-free tortillas and a dish of Paleo Hoisin Sauce. Then, I leave it up to the eater to decide how they want to assemble their little packet of porky goodness.

Here’s the way I eat it: I smear a thin layer of Paleo Hoisin Sauce on a warm wrapper, and then I spoon on some savory filling. Sometimes I just pull up the sides and eat it like a taco. Other times, I wrap it up into a tiny burrito.

How do you cut the pork tenderloin into matchsticks?

Cutting the pork into thin matchsticks isn’t complicated, but I do have a few tips that make it easier. First, you should freeze the pork tenderloin for about 30 minutes or until it stiffens, but not so much that it turns into a block of ice. This way, the tenderloin won’t be too slippery or soft when you cut it.

Next, grab a sharp chef’s knife and slice the pork crosswise into ¼-inch thick slices. Stack the pork slices three or four layers high and cut into thin strips. Repeat until you have a tiny hill of pork matchsticks!

What can you substitute for the pork?

You can use chicken, shrimp, or beef in place of the pork—they’ll all taste great.

How do I cook this recipe quickly?

A little advance meal prep will save you lots of time in the evening. If you already have jars of All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce and Paleo Hoisin Sauce in the fridge, you’re already halfway there. When I plan on making anything with dried shiitake mushrooms, I soak them before I leave the house in the morning so they’re soft and ready to go at dinnertime. Also, you should have all your ingredients cut and prepped when you heat up your skillet so you aren’t scrambling for things when you should be stir-frying. And with practice, you will get faster and more proficient at chopping stuff!

What if you don’t have All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce?

Come on, people! My All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce only takes about 5 minutes to mix up and tastes fabulous in everything, so you should take a few moments to shake up a jar. You’ll be happy you made it because you can use it in all these recipes for the rest of the week! (Still not willing to make it? FINE. You can mix together 2 tablespoons coconut aminos, 2 teaspoons rice vinegar, 1 teaspoon Red Boat fish sauce, 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil, and 1 teaspoon arrowroot powder for the sauce.)

How do you store leftovers?

I store leftover Paleo Moo Shu Pork in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 4 days. When I want to eat it, I reheat it in the microwave or fry it in a hot skillet.

Okay—ready to make some Paleo Moo Shu Pork a.k.a. Chinese Tacos?

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • ½ ounce dried shiitake mushrooms or ¼ pound fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and thinly sliced
  • 1 pound pork tenderloin, cut into thin matchsticks
  • Diamond Crystal kosher salt
  • Avocado oil or cooking fat of choice
  • 3 large eggs
  • ¾ teaspoon Red Boat fish sauce
  • 4 cups thinly sliced Napa cabbage (~½ pound)
  • 1 large carrot, julienned
  • ¼ cup All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce
  • 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder
  • ½ teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 3 scallions, thinly sliced
  • Grain-free tortillas (I like Siete brand Cassava and Coconut flour tortillas), lettuce leaves, or thinly sliced jicama
  • Paleo Hoisin Sauce

Equipment:

Method:

Place the dried shiitake mushrooms in a medium bowl and cover with water for at least 30 minutes or until softened. Squeeze out the extra liquid, cut off the stems, and thinly slice the mushrooms. Set them aside with the rest of the sliced vegetables.

In a large bowl, toss the sliced pork with ¾ teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt and 1 teaspoon avocado oil. Set aside.

Whisk together the eggs and fish sauce in a medium bowl.

Heat a small non-stick or well-seasoned cast iron skillet over medium heat. Swirl in 2 teaspoons avocado oil when the pan is hot and pour in the eggs. Stir and scrape the pan constantly until you have soft, moist curds of scrambled eggs. Transfer the eggs to a platter.

Heat a large 12-inch skillet over medium high heat and add 1 tablespoon of avocado oil when it is hot. Add the seasoned pork…

…and cook, stirring frequently until it is no longer pink. Transfer the cooked pork to a plate.

Discard any liquid in the pan and add another tablespoon of avocado oil before tossing in the chopped mushrooms, cabbage and carrot.

Sprinkle ½ teaspoon of Diamond Crystal kosher salt on the vegetables and stir-fry until the vegetables are tender crisp, about 2 to 3 minutes.

While the vegetables are cooking, whisk the All-Purpose Stir-Fry Sauce, arrowroot powder, and sesame oil in a small measuring cup or bowl.

When the vegetables are ready, stir in the reserved cooked pork…

… and pour the sauce over everything. Cook, stirring frequently, until sauce is slightly thickened.

Turn off the heat and stir in the scrambled eggs and sliced scallions. Taste and adjust for seasoning if needed.

If you’re serving the Paleo Moo Shu Pork in grain-free tortillas, heat them up in a dry skillet over medium heat until warm and softened.

Slather some Paleo Hoisin Sauce on a warm tortilla or lettuce wrap and build your own Chinese tacos or mini burritos with the Paleo Moo Shu filling.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Have you missed Chinese hoisin sauce ever since going paleo? Well, your healthy condiment wishes have been granted: I have a thick, fragrant, lip-smacking hoisin sauce that you can whip up in 15 minutes—and it’s Whole30-friendly, too!

I originally created this sunbutter hoisin sauce recipe for our second cookbook, Ready or Not!, but it’s become such a fan favorite that I’ve decided to share it on my blog and iOS app, too.

What is hoisin sauce?

Hoisin sauce—a centuries-old Chinese barbecue sauce—can be hard to pin down. A thick, robust sauce used as a glaze or condiment, hoisin literally means “seafood” in Cantonese, even though the sauce actually contains zero seafood, and isn’t typically served with it. In the West, this tangy-sweet sauce is often misidentified as plum sauce or raisin sauce, despite containing neither plums nor raisins. To top it off, there’s a dizzying number of hoisin sauce varieties out there, and each one offers a slightly different flavor profile.

After weeks of tinkering, I came up with a fantastic Whole30 version of this rich sauce using Paleo-friendly ingredients that still delivers all the complexity and flavor of the classic, with none of the soy, wheat, sugar, or preservatives!

How do you use hoisin sauce?

The possibilities are endless if you love hoisin sauce. Traditionally, it’s used as a dipping sauce for meats or slathered on buns or wraps filled with Moo Shu Pork or Peking Duck. You can also mix it into marinades for grilled meats because hoisin sauce imparts a sticky and savory yumminess. Squeeze bottles filled with hoisin sauce are also commonly found at your table when you’re dining at Vietnamese restaurants because it’s used to flavor steaming bowls of phở.

Can you substitute the sunbutter?

Yes! I’ve tried this recipe with almond butter and tahini in place of sunbutter, and both work well in this recipe.

How long can you keep the sunbutter?

This condiment can be kept in the fridge in a sealed container for up to 1 week. (If it gets too firm, just stir in a tablespoon or two of water when you’re reheating it.)

Ready to make Paleo Hoisin Sauce?

Makes ¾ cup

Ingredients:

  • 4 large dried Medjool dates, pitted
  • ¼ cup sunflower butter
  • ¼ cup coconut aminos
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon aged balsamic vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon Chinese five spice powder
  • ½ teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • ¼ teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt

Equipment:

Method:

First, use a sharp knife to mince and mash up the dates until they’re the consistency of a thick, sticky paste.

Next, combine the minced dates with the rest of the ingredients in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat.

Cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 7 minutes or until the sauce thickens and darkens. Taste and adjust seasoning if needed.

Want a smoother sauce? Blitz it with an immersion blender until it reaches your desired consistency.

Time to slather this paleo hoisin sauce on everything!

Looking for more amazing paleo and Whole30-friendly sauce recipes? Grab our cookbook, Ready or Not!

Looking for more recipe ideas? Head on over to my Recipe Index. You’ll also find exclusive recipes on my iPhone and iPad app, and in my cookbooks, Nom Nom Paleo: Food for Humans (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2013) and Ready or Not! (Andrews McMeel Publishing 2017)!

 PRINTER-FRIENDLY RECIPE CARD

Paleo Hoisin Sauce

This lip-smacking Paleo Hoisin Sauce can be made in 15 minutes! My Whole30-friendly version still delivers all the complexity and flavor of the classic, with none of the soy, wheat, sugar, or preservatives!  

  • 4 large dried Medjool dates (pitted)
  • ¼ cup sunflower butter
  • ¼ cup coconut aminos
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon aged balsamic vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon Chinese five spice powder
  • ½ teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • ¼ teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt
  1. First, use a sharp knife to mince and mash up the dates until they’re the consistency of a thick, sticky paste.

  2. Next, combine the minced dates with the rest of the ingredients in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat.

  3. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 7 minutes or until the sauce thickens and darkens. Taste and adjust seasoning if needed.

  4. Want a smoother sauce? Blitz it with an immersion blender until it reaches your desired consistency. Time to slather this paleo hoisin sauce on everything!

The post Paleo Hoisin Sauce appeared first on Nom Nom Paleo®.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview