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The warmer weather has come around quick and you suddenly find yourself visualising summer and how you are not ready. So, what are we inclined to do? Go on a diet for the 100th time. Honestly, how long have you been trying to ‘lose weight’ or ‘get your dream body’. Does it ever actually end? The answer is this: It ends when you say it does. Frequent dieting is harmful because it is doing the opposite of what your body is programmed to do – which is to survive and store fat. Chronic dieting can impair your metabolism, mood and ability to lose weight. This only then perpetuates a vicious cycle of dissatisfaction with yourself and encourages more dieting.

Excessive exercise when paired with chronic dieting, can further perpetuate complications such as adrenal fatigue and mental health issues. In many cases, people will often feel ‘hopeless’ and may find themselves feeling out of control and begin binging, purging and avoiding social events. So how to be healthy without going over board? Remember this – restriction leads to binge. If you are wanting to get healthy or lose a couple of winter KG’s – focus on ‘health’ not weight loss. Weight loss is not healthy and is against your body’s natural programming. When you aim to be healthy, weight loss is usually a positive side effect. Count your chemicals, not your calories. Focus on eating unprocessed foods, but don’t beat yourself up when you have a treat. Guilt is the most unhelpful emotion as it leads to stress. When we are stressed, we release the stress hormone cortisol which will tell your body you are heading towards a crisis. Excessive cortisol over time can lead to increased abdominal fat, irritability and depression. Therefore, ditch the guilt and enjoy foods that you like about 30% of the time. The other 70% aim to eat vegetables, fruit and unprocessed foods.

There is nothing wrong with wanting to be healthier, but you can choose to accept yourself and love yourself right now, the way you are. When we are happy, we are healthy, not the other way around.
Written by Psychologist Stephanie Georgiou.

Stephanie is a trained CBT-E psychologist which is a specialised treatment for eating disorders. She is passionate about helping women live a better quality of life that doesn’t revolve around focusing on your weight. Make an appointment with her today to discuss your eating concerns.

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Life is hectic as it is.

There is the stress of school, the stress of job, the stress of doing a good job, the stress of being a good parent, child, friend, employee… you name it.

However, imagine, the added level of stress one has to deal with when it comes to diabetes and its management.

Having diabetes can cause both physical and emotional stress on the body, which in turn can further deteriorate ones’ health. When you are stressed, your blood sugar levels rise. When your blood levels rise, we all know the implications and complications it can cause to your body.

In order to respond better to our readers. we recently interviewed experts in the field of mental health for some of their wise advise.

We asked 28 experts (psychologists and psychiatrists) to answer the following question we are asked often: How people with diabetes can better cope with the stress that diabetes can lead to?https://www.thediabetescouncil.com/28-experts-share-their-advice-how-to-better-cope-with-diabetes/

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13 Reasons Why: Has Netflix Gone Too Far?

Teen suicide is not glamorous. It leaves a horrific trail of devastation in its wake, with remaining family and friends left to pick up the shattered pieces that in most cases will stay broken for life. So it’s little surprise that the television series, 13 Reasons Why, currently streaming on Netflix in Australia, is causing such angst.

The show depicts a young woman who suicides. It contains very confronting and graphic messaging and imagery inclusive of suicide method and means.

Parents and the mental health community are united in raising the alarm. Parents must remain vigilant; as headspace warns in a statement recently made, this show contains potentially dangerous content that may lead to a distressing reaction (or worse, copycat behaviour) in young people.

There is no glamour or thrill in teen suicide.

13 Reasons Why is a revenge fantasy. Its delivery serves to trivialise and normalise what will always be a senseless cause of death. Watching the show, young people could be forgiven for thinking that an act of suicide is an acceptable reaction to having problems and stresses. It isn’t. Suicide in youth is a life unfinished.

What the show doesn’t tell young audiences is that feeling stressed – or even upset, hurt or sad – is a normal part of life. Life is full of ups and downs and there are very good services around – such as Kids Helpline and headspace – that assist young people to cope with emotional issues.

Many young people will even experience suicidal thoughts. It’s fine to work through these feelings through talking; the important factor is to focus on the feelings rather than the act itself, which is where 13 Reasons Why is potentially so damaging. Youth is a vulnerable group, often susceptible to copycat tendencies.

How to talk to youth about suicide.

You can talk to teenagers about suicidal tendencies and thoughts. Suicide is caused by a range of factors and can be very complex. Young people may look for answers where there aren’t simple solutions. Avoid blame; it is simply not helpful.

It’s also important not to focus on the method of suicide, but the feelings associated with it. A young person who has lost someone to suicide may experience a range of feelings; anger, confusion and a sense of contribution or responsibility. It’s extremely important to talk through these feelings and a properly trained and experienced counselor can be a great friend in these circumstances.

If you are worried about a young person being at risk of suicide, it’s important to discuss your concerns with them. Be calm and non judgmental. Ask direct questions and give them the opportunity to give you truthful, open answers.

Contact New View Psychology today if you need to speak with an experienced, appropriately qualified child or adolescent counsellor.

Phone us on 1300 830 687, 8am-8pm, Monday to Friday, AEST, or drop us a line and we’ll get in touch. http://newviewpsychology.com.au/contact-us/

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