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For a tropical take on bircher, how’s about adding some mango instead of the more traditional apple, to make this mango bircher with lime, Greek yoghurt & blueberries 

Earlier this year I watched ex Great British Bake Off champion Nadia Hussein make a simple vegan bircher out of tinned mango puree, oats and almond milk on the telly box. I made smaller portions of it as a ‘breakfast dessert’ for one of the first retreats I catered for this year, and became hooked. Not only was it an incredibly simple recipe, it was suitable for everyone (those with nut allergies aside), but everyone seemed to love it as much as I did, and It’s been on every retreat menu I’ve catered since.

I actually recall having a mango bircher style dish in one of London’s chain cafes many years back, and now I’m remembering that I also recreated something along those lines 5 years ago when I was working as a chef in a cafe. So, basically what I’m trying to say is I don’t know who to credit for putting this idea in my head in the first place, but can absolutely credit Nadia for bringing it back into trend for 2019.

I usually offer an oat and an egg based dish for breakfasts on retreat and this mango bircher has become a new alternative to my usual rotation of granola and my vegan coconut apple bircher (which you can find on my app). Every time I make this I am asked for the recipe and always pass everyone in the direction of Nadia. It’s times like this when I wish I’d have come up with the dish myself.

So, could I vary the dish, and make it a bit more my own?  If this was to be served as the main part of breakfast and not a smaller portion as a ‘breakfast dessert’ what ingredients would I choose to put in, to make it a bit more filling, or to up the protein perhaps?

So, I decided to add in some Greek yoghurt, chia seeds, and made the puree myself. I’ve found the easiest way to do this is to use defrosted frozen mango rather than fresh for speed and ease. Just leave it defrost for a few hours then blitz it up in a powerful blender, I love my froothie* for this. Don’t skimp on the lime. The acid helps soften the oats, and it really adds to the taste.

We’re finally getting blueberries from Europe in the supermarkets now instead of from South America, so now is the time I am happy to go forth and enjoy them.  Raspberries, pomegranate and pistachios would be pretty good with mango too.

This is an excellent recipe to scale up for a crowd. Either serve it sharing style from a huge dish, or portion up individually in bowls, tumblers, or wine glasses. It also works especially well in an old jam jar for a packed take-to-work breakfast. So pretty too, who could resist?

Mango Bircher with Lime, Greek Yoghurt & Blueberries

Mango Bircher with Lime, Greek Yoghurt & Blueberries
 
Prep time
5 mins
Total time
5 mins
 
For a tropical take on bircher, how's about adding some mango instead of the more traditional apple, to make this mango bircher with lime, Greek yoghurt & blueberries
Author: Ceri Jones
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 200g mango puree (see note)
  • 150g Greek Yoghurt
  • 80g oats
  • 50mls milk of choice
  • 1 lime, juice and zest
  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
Toppings
  • Add whatever you like; an extra dollop of yoghurt, flaked or desiccated coconut, lime zest, blueberries, pomegranate seeds, pistachios are all lovely
Instructions
  1. The night before mix together the oats, mango puree, lime juice and zest, Greek yoghurt, milk and chia seeds in a small bowl, and make sure all is well combined. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
  2. In the morning, add milk if you prefer a looser Bircher. Transfer to a serving dish, or jar and top with your favourite toppings. Here I've used an extra swirl of mango puree, Greek Yoghurt, toasted coconut flakes, blueberries and lime zest.
Notes
Mango puree can be a pain to prepare, because they're almost never ripe at the right time. The most economical way to make mango puree is to buy it frozen, defrost and then blitz into a puree. You can buy tinned puree which usually contains added sugars, so is best used occasionally.
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What are your favourite flavours to add to your morning oats? Pin me for later

*Disclosure: I am an ambassador for Froothie and some links in this article may be affiliate links. The above product reviews is, as always based on my honest opinion. If you’d like to know more about Froothie health products, or this machine in particular, please visit the Froothie Website for more details. Any purchases made through this/these link(s) are at no extra cost to you but give Natural Kitchen Adventures a small commission. Thanks!

The post Mango Bircher with Lime, Greek Yoghurt & Blueberries appeared first on Natural Kitchen Adventures.

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If you’ve not tried griddled gem lettuce before, then grab your nearest cast iron griddle pan, warm it up on the stove, char your lettuce then serve it with a lemony Caesar dressing, giant crouton and shaved Parmesan. You will not be disappointed

I am most definitely not the first chef to cook lettuce on a griddle pan, and I’m sure I won’t be the last.

I actually only griddled gem lettuce myself the first time a few months ago and have been cooking it this way non stop since. I really like raw lettuce, I really like the crisp texture it adds to a salad, and the way that it is best prepared by tearing with your bare hands rather than with the precision of advanced knife technique. But splitting it in half, and searing it face down into the hot lines of my cast iron griddle pan transforms it into an almost entirely different entity, and I absolutely love it.

You can use baby gem, or slightly larger gem as I have below. You could even go totally crazy and try this method with a romaine or cos lettuce, gem’s older sibling.

I’ve been serving this griddled gem lettuce recipe for the last few months as a starter dish. I realise I have a lot of starter dishes in my life, and that is not because I regularly eat three course meals at home, but because I’m often serving three course meals for all the retreats I cater.  I also wheeled it out for a cooking demo at The Big Retreat, Wales festival a few weeks ago (where stove top cooked food was the only option in a tent, in a field, in the middle of no where.)

I realise that sharing starter dishes on repeat isn’t entirely a practical suggestion for the homecook, so I’ve come up with a few other ways to transform the basis of this dish into something a bit more practical below.  Recipes can, and need, to work hard for me. With a bit of thought they can very easily can pop up in various guises. This makes repeated menu planning much simpler.

To make this dish more substantial, there is lots you can do. Add some cooked shredded chicken, or what about salmon? There’s always the humble egg (like I have done below), or what about some crispy chick peas, tofu, extra avocado or griddled asparagus? Go wild!

It also works very well as a side dish; just pile up the lettuce on a plate, drizzle over the dressing and top with the croutons chopped up.

The key to this simple dish is the unctuous dressing. Of course I didn’t develop the Caesar dressing, so can’t claim it as my own. There doesn’t seem to be a clear definition of what actually should religiously go in it (as always, I usually start with looking up what Felicity Cloake does for comparison’s sake.)

I decided to make my vegetarian and omit the anchovies. I love anchovies, but I’m so often serving a group where there is at least one or two vegetarians, it makes sense for my base recipes to be suitable to all. You could always add them to the top of the dish as a garnish.

Without the anchovies, I rely on Worcestershire sauce (a vegetarian one), which I’ve also used before to dress my Okonomiyaki dish. Its umami flavour really makes the dressing, which is basically a looser version of mayonnaise. It’s really easy to make, everything goes in the food processor and is whipped until it’s shiny and thick. Much easier to make than mayo, no chance of it splitting as it doesn’t rely on delicate emulsification. I adapted mine from Delicious magazine.

What would you put in your ultimate Caesar style salad?

Griddled Gem Lettuce with Lemony Caesar Dressing, Giant Crouton & Shaved Parmesan
Griddled Gem Lettuce with Lemony Caesar Dressing, Giant Crouton & Shaved Parmesan
 
Prep time
10 mins
Cook time
15 mins
Total time
25 mins
 
Griddled Gem Lettuce with Lemony Caesar Dressing, Giant Crouton & Shaved Parmesan; a versatile dish you can serve this as a starter or a side.
Author: Ceri Jones
Recipe type: Salad
Serves: 2
Ingredients
Dish
  • 2-4 pieces of day old bread for giant crouton. I like using ciabatta as the size is perfect
  • 2 gem lettuces, gently rinsed clean and split in half lengthways
  • Parmesan or other vegetarian style hard cheese, shaved with a peeler
  • Olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
Dressing (with leftovers)
  • 1 medium organic egg + 1 egg yolk
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • Zest of half a lemon + 1 tablespoon juice
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons of Worcestershire sauce (I used a vegetarian friendly one)
  • 90mls light olive oil
  • salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 180ºC to make your giant crouton. Slice the bread into 1cm thick piece, and brush both sides with olive oil. Bake in the oven for 8-10 minutes at 180ºC (fan) until browned. You can also cook the bread on the griddle pan for a few minutes each side. Set aside.
  2. Next make your dressing, easily done in a food processor. Place the egg, egg yolk, garlic, mustard, lemon zest, Worcestershire sauce into the food processor, and season with a pinch of salt and pepper. Whizz untll just combined. Then with the motor running pour in the olive oil, whisk for at least 10 seconds after the oil is poured in, it helps it thicken. Add the lemon juice and briefly pulse again. The texture won’t be like mayonnaise, far looser. Taste and adjust seasoning, or add an extra dash of Worcestershire sauce. Set aside.
  3. Now cook your gem. Heat up a griddle pan on the hob over a medium heat, and add a touch of oil to the pan. Place the gem cut side down on the griddle and cook for 1-2 minutes until char marks appear. Turn over and cook for another minute. Remove from heat, season, and get ready to serve immediately. If frying a large batch you can keep warm in the oven.
  4. To plate up start with a pool of dressing on the bottom of the plate, top with the grilled gem, make sure the the second piece is balanced on an angle for top presentation, then add the crouton, more dressing, shavings of parmesan and a final pinch of black pepper.
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The post Griddled Gem Lettuce with Lemony Caesar Dressing, Giant Crouton & Shaved Parmesan appeared first on Natural Kitchen Adventures.

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Introducing my herb baked fish with pea purée & samphire, served with roasted new potatoes; basically a posh version of fish, chips and mushy peas. 

Hey blog, it’s been a while. The truth is that in between cooking for multiple retreats, teaching work, redecorating my entire flat leaving my kitchen out of action, and just trying to have some time off, the blog has been a bit neglected. I even missed celebrating 8 years of its existence, at the beginning of the month. EIGHT YEARS!

I cooked a variation on this baked fish and pea purée dish, at a retreat last weekend, and remembered that even though I had it all photographed and ready from May 2018 (I used it at my spring supper club), I’d never actually had the opportunity to share it. Could I rectify that and use it to bring the blog back from it’s deafening silence?

Yup.

I’ve made iterations of this herb baked fish with pea purée over the last year. From Cornish hake in London, trout and perch in South west France, and salmon in Somerset, so can prove its fishy versatility.

Most of the times I have cooked this for a large group I have opted to marinate the fish in a mix of herbs, and then bake, and have included the recipe for that below. This is mostly because it’s less risky than pan-frying, when you don’t have your favourite pan and a reliable hob for just the right amount of heat.

However, if prefer your fish with a crispy pan-fried skin, it can absolutely be done, even for 16 people. The key is to make sure the pan is nice and hot, oiled a little, the fish is placed skin side down, and not moved an inch it until it is ready to be flipped. The fish should come away easily once a crust has formed on the skin. If you find the skin is getting stuck to the pan when you try and flip it, it’s likely it wasn’t ready to be moved. The way I do this for a large group is to fry skin side down in in batches, then flip over onto a baking sheet and then put them all in the oven together to finish cooking. You can find my method for pan-frying hake here.

I’ve written about samphire before. I love the salty stuff. The saltiness is muted a little when washed thoroughly and cooked, but even so don’t over season the purée or the whole dish could taste a little too much like you’ve accidentally been knocked over by a strong wave and inhaled a cup of seawater. And no one likes that.

When I created this dish, I had absolutely no intention of creating a posh version of fish, chips and mushy peas, but it appears that is exactly what I’ve done. It seems my Saturday job in a fish and chop as a teenager has created more of a legacy on my recipe development skills, than one would have expected.

Herb Baked Fish with Pea Purée, Samphire & Shoots

Herb Baked Fish with Pea Purée, Samphire & Shoots
 
Prep time
10 mins
Cook time
20 mins
Total time
30 mins
 
Introducing my herb baked fish with pea purée & samphire, served with roasted new potatoes; basically a posh version of fish, chips and mushy peas.
Author: Ceri Jones
Recipe type: Main
Serves: 2
Ingredients
For the fish
  • 2 x fish fillet such as hake, a portion is around 150-200g per person, depending on the fish.
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped chives and parsley
  • Zest from half a lemon
Pea purée
  • 1 small white onion, minced
  • 1 stick of celery, small dice
  • 250g frozen peas
  • 80mls almond or cows milk + a little more if necessary.
Samphire
  • 60g samphire, rinsed well
General
  • sea salt, pepper, olive oil and butter
  • Roasted new or regular potatoes to serve, and a handful of shoots such as pea or watercress
Instructions
Puree
  1. First make your purée. This can be done ahead of time, chilled in the fridge and warmed up when ready to serve. Make sure it is fully cooled and chilled within 2 hours of making for food safety.
  2. Add a glug (around a tablespoon) of olive oil to a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat, and sauté the onion and celery with a pinch of salt until softened, approx. 5 minutes. Add the peas along with the almond milk. Turn up the heat a little and cook for 4-5 minutes until the peas are al dente. Remove from the heat and cool off for a couple of minutes before blending in a high-speed blender, food processor or with a hand blender until silky smooth, you may need to add more milk. If not serving immediately, you can cool off and chill at this point.
  3. Return the purée to the saucepan, and add salt (start with ¼ tsp) and pepper to taste. A large knob of butter or a drizzle of oil to balance the flavours is also good. If it needs brightening add a dash of lemon juice.
Fish
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 175°C (fan).
  2. Mix the chopped herbs with the lemon zest and a couple of teaspoons of olive oil to make a paste, stir in the lemon zest. Rub all over the fish skin and flesh, season with salt and pepper, and transfer to a lined baking tray skin side up. Bake in the oven for 7-10 minutes until the fish is opaque and flakes easily.
Samphire
  1. Meanwhile, warm a frying pan over a medium-high heat and add a knob of butter / drizzle of oil. When hot, add in the samphire and toss in the heat of the pan for 1-2 minutes, until slightly wilted and warm.
To plate up
  1. Start with a pool of pea purée on the base of your plate, a pasta bowl also works well for this dish. Top with the fish, the samphire and then garnish with shoots such as watercress or pea-shoots. Serve with potatoes on the side.
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If you like this, you might like my other dish with pea purée, a riff on Turkish Eggs. Pin me for later

The post Herb Baked Fish with Pea Purée, Samphire & Shoots appeared first on Natural Kitchen Adventures.

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This simple purple sprouting broccoli & ricotta puff pastry tart topped with olive & wild garlic tapenade, makes the most of hungry gap star purple sprouting broccoli and foraged wild garlic. 

We’ve sailed past the spring equinox so surely spring should have sprung by now? There are signs of spring everywhere – beautiful blossom, the creeping in longer days, and although the weather is still pretty dire in London (a pathetic fallacy for the state of politics right now?) we remain hopeful it’s going to get a bit better soon. With trees and flowers in bloom, surely we should be starting to see an abundance of vegetable produce to match? Well, sadly no.

You see, we’ve hit the hungry gap, the period in the U.K. when winter produce is over and the next round of growth hasn’t come through yet, and may not until end May-June. I had no idea that this even existed until a couple of years ago when  started doing comms for my local veg bag scheme; a scheme that prioritises UK produce where possible. This time of year we have to rely on more European imports than normal to fill our bags, something the supermarkets do year round so that a consistent range of fruit and vegetables is available at all times. I’m hugely aware that being able to import food at a reasonable cost is such a wonderful privilege to us in the UK.

Hungry gap aside, there are are few gems to look out for this time of year, purple sprouting broccoli (PSB for short) and foraged wild garlic being two of them. Both of them are featured in today’s recipe. Neither are new ingredients to Natural Kitchen Adventures, but PSB has never been the star of the show before.

Purple sprouting broccoli provides good value for money with its long tender stems, vibrant purple flowery head, and leaves all being edible. Regular broccoli stalks are of course edible too, although not ordinarily added to recipes.

Classic flavour pairings for PSB include chilli, anchovy, capers, garlic and sesame. Roasted PSB covered in sesame oil and sesame seeds piled high on a long platter makes an excellent side dish, and something I served at retreat earlier this spring. I thought about sharing my simple recipe for that, but then sidetracked into the idea of trying something quite different from what I would usually do here.

You see, I’m almost at the 8 year anniversary of writing this blog, in blog years that’s quite a long time. And, if I don’t try my hardest to keep the sprit of kitchen adventures on these pages, then who will? I’ve got to keep trying new things, keep pushing the boundaries, cook an octopus…

So here I present you a full gluten, full butter, shop bought puff pastry tart base topped with creamy ricotta cheese, blanched broccoli stems, baked them topped with a drizzle of homemade olive and wild garlic tapenade. It’s simple and seasonal, two of my Natural Kitchen Adventures recipe objectives.

Being a very simple dish, this puff pastry tart is less of an adventure in terms of skills, but definitely an adventure in terms of what a puff pastry tart represents for me, personally and also for this blog. I used to think puff pastry was out of bounds, unhealthy, too full of gluten or calories. It’s taken me a while but I now understand what balance and variety is all about.

I’ve made puff pastry once before in my life. It took hours. If you want to go ahead and make it yourself, absolutely go for it. If on the other hand you want some precious time back in your life, then there is absolutely no shame in buying it ready rolled. My not so secret secret is that I don’t massively enjoy baking or making things like pastry, so ready made all the way. Many shop bought puff pastries are actually made with vegetable oil, and as a result are naturally dairy free or vegan. This is great if that’s who you are catering for – and indeed I am sure I will do a version of this one day – but for this tart I wanted the taste of real butter in my pastry, as if it were homemade. I used a supermarket’s own brand all butter version, I’ve checked and there are quite a few about.

Just a quick word on cooking the broccoli. Sadly, the purple colour is near on impossible to maintain once cooked. If you roast or stir-fry the broccoli from raw, you will retain a very little of the colour, but boiling or steaming, you will certainly loose the purple to the water. It’s just one of those things, and I wouldn’t stress about it. To top my puff pastry tart I decided to blanch and shock the broccoli. This method means it is partially cooked before it goes in the oven, as it wouldn’t cook through properly if you added it raw on top of the pastry.

Blanch and shock is a bit of a technical term so I’ll be sharing one of my how to videos on instagram later this week.

By the way since I live in a pretty urban area I did not forage for my wild garlic, but purchased it from a market, no shame! It’s quite strong in flavour so just added a touch to my olive tapenade for fun.

I can’t wait to explore the new world of puff pastry tarts, what would be your ultimate topping?

—-

Purple Sprouting Broccoli & Ricotta Puff Pastry Tart with Olive & Wild Garlic Tapenade

Purple Sprouting Broccoli & Ricotta Puff Pastry Tart with Olive & Wild Garlic Tapenade
 
Prep time
15 mins
Cook time
25 mins
Total time
40 mins
 
This simple purple sprouting broccoli & ricotta puff pastry tart topped with olive & wild garlic tapenade, makes the most of hungry gap star purple sprouting broccoli and foraged wild garlic.
Author: Ceri Jones
Recipe type: Lunch
Serves: 2-4
Ingredients
For the tart
  • 180g all butter puff pastry (from the fridge section of supermarket or make your own)
  • large handful of purple sprouting broccoli spears, enough to fill the tart
  • 150g ricotta
  • 1 egg, lightly whisked
  • sea salt and pepper
For the tapenade
  • 90g pitted kalamata olives
  • ½ tablespoon capers
  • 4 leaves of wild garlic, roughly chopped
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ lemon, juice and zest
  • sea salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Remove the pastry from the fridge 10 minutes prior to using and pre-heat the oven to 180ºC (fan)
  2. First prep your broccoli, trim off the woody ends, and trim to fit across tart width. Slice any bigger spears into half lengthways. Blanch and shock the broccoli (see video), by boiling (in batches if necessary) in a saucepan of salted boiling water for 1 minute, and chilling in iced cold water before draining.
  3. Next prepare the ricotta, by whisking with the lemon zest and seasoning with salt and pepper.
  4. Roll out the pastry to approx 20cm x 24cm and place on a lined baking sheet. Score 1cm in from the edge and prick all over. Smooth the ricotta over the inner rectangle, top with the blanched broccoli, and brush the exposed pastry sides an with an egg wash.
  5. Bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes until the pastry is browned and crispy.
  6. Meanwhile make your tapenade. Blend all the ingredients together in a small food processor taste and adjust seasoning to suit.
  7. When the tart is done, drizzle over the tapenade along with a final grating of lemon zest. Slice up and serve with a simple side salad.
Notes
I used a 375g pack of puff pastry divided into 2 for this tart, and froze the rest for later.
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For other PSB recipes check out my chicken, PSB and pomegranate molasses tray bake from last year, pan-fried hake with sauce maltaise and PSB from 2017 and PSB and sprout gratin from way back in 2014. Pin me for later

The post Purple Sprouting Broccoli & Ricotta Puff Pastry Tart with Olive & Wild Garlic Tapenade appeared first on Natural Kitchen Adventures.

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Inspired by one my recent retreat chef trips to Southern Portugal I’ve recreated one of my favourite recent recipes; Kumquat Salsa with Baked Whole Red Mullet. 

I’ve been incredibly lucky to spend much of the last month working in Portugal, a country that until last September I’d never had the chance to visit. I’ve been cooking for a mixture of yoga, fitness and wellbeing retreats in a beautiful venue called Casa Fuzetta in the fishing port of Olhão, in the Eastern Algarve. 

It’s always an adventure the first time I visit a new country or area for retreat chef work (or even an old country but at a different time of year), as I don’t always know what produce I’ll be able to get hold of. For a veg-focused chef, it does make menu planning from my London kitchen a bit of a challenge!

Cooking in Portugal has proved to be an utter joy. A combination of Olhão’s fabulous waterfront Municipal market selling the best local fish, seafood, fruit and veg, along with the 300 days of sunshine each year which result in the wide variety of sun-drenched fresh fruit and vegetables always being available. Tomatoes, aubergines, broad beans and fresh peas were in abundance on my last visit a few weeks ago (mid March). We’ll have to wait many months for this kind of produce to grow at home.

Today’s recipe is however based on something even more local than Olhão’s market; the inspiration being the kumquat tree growing on one of Casa Fuzetta’s terraces.

Kumquat Tree at Casa Fuzetta, Olhao. Photo of me thanks to my kitchen assistant Sinead Delahunty aka https//Delalicious.com

Kumquats and I have a history, which goes right back to my final exams at chef college, 5 years ago in March 2014. They were new to me back then, and I hadn’t thought about them again until the sight of the tree at Casa Fuzetta happily jogged my memories. For our showcase dinner we used dehydrated kumquats as a garnish for our dessert, or rather we intended to use dehydrated kumquats as a garnish. In the excitement of the evening we forgot to adorn our chocolate torte with them before it went out for service – how frustrating!

I shared this little story (kumquatgate) along with the photos of the tree on my Instagram during my first of two retreats at Casa Fuzetta this month, and in response my chef peer Brooke, shared a pic of them from a Berkeley market along with a recipe idea for a kumquat salsa. The recipe took the form of a simple list of ingredients; kumquats quartered, mint, lime, honey and salt. The salsa sounded incredible, and in order to get over kumquatgate I decided that during my second retreat (this time for The Reset), I’d try it out. I thought it would be perfect served with whole baked fish, a dish I am often a bit nervous of cooking for a new crowd because some people are funny about a) fish with heads on and b) bones. I decided to go for it anyway, and along with Red Snapper from the Olhão fish market, roasted potatoes and a leafy salad it made the perfect first night dinner.

With only a list of ingredients to go on, I took the liberty of playing around with the recipe a little. I marinated the red onions in lime juice and salt before adding in the rest of the ingredients to tame down the raw onion taste, and also added some capers – can’t have fish without capers. I made a note of what I did as I went along, which is just as well as the guests asked me for the recipe, which I’m now happy to be sharing with you all too.

I’ve since learned that the original version of the salsa was posted on the Bauman website some time ago, but with the inclusion of jalapeno and coriander. Wonderful.

So, what are kumquats, and where can you find them?

They’re part of the citrus family, and around the same size as a cherry tomato. They’re in season through the winter till just about the end of March and you eat them whole. The skin has a sweet taste, and the juice inside (there isn’t much of it) is a little sour. I’ve kept them raw in this salsa, but you can also cook them down for dishes like marmalade or compotes to go with ice cream. The kumquats are easy to prepare, they need a good rinse, and then just chopping into quarters, and removing the one or two pips. You can slice into rounds, but I think the quarters give that deeper burst of orange to the plate.

Kumquats can be a little tricky to track down, especially now we’re closer to the end of the season. Some supermarkets do stock them (perhaps they might be easier to order from an on-line shop), or any good grocer should be able to source them for you. I kept my fingers crossed that one of the many veg stalls at London’s Borough Market would stock them, and luckily found some at Elsey & Bent this morning.

Just a quick note on the fish. In Portugal I served Red Snapper, but this is more of a Mediterranean fish so just go with whatever white fish your fish monger recommends. Red Mullet as I have done (on the advice of the fishmonger I spoke to at Borough this morning) or Sea Bream should also be a winner. Many people are scared of cooking fish, and I used to be one of them. When you bake it whole on the bone like this, you can’t go wrong, it will always end up moist. Just make sure your fishmonger de-scales and guts the fish for you and there should be no problems at all.

Have you ever tried kumquats before? Do you have a serving suggestion for the leftover salsa?

Kumquat Salsa with Baked Whole Red Mullet

 
#version#

Kumquat Salsa with Baked Whole Red Mullet
 
Inspired by one my recent retreat chef trips to Southern Portugal I've recreated one of my favourite recent recipes; Kumquat Salsa with Baked Whole Red Mullet.
Author: Ceri Jones
Recipe type: Main Course
Serves: 2
Ingredients
Kumquat salsa
  • 1 small or half a large red onion, very thinly sliced with a knife or mandolin
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • A large handful (around 20) of Kumquats, quartered, any pips removed
  • 2 tablespoons capers
  • 2 tablespoons of shredded mint
  • 1 teaspoon, or more of honey
  • 1 teaspoon, or more of extra virgin olive oil
  • sea salt & cracked black pepper, to taste
Red mullet
  • 1 large red mullet, approx 400-500g (or other similar fish), descaled and gutted (by fishmonger)
  • Lemon slices
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • Olive oil
  • Sea salt and cracked black pepper
To serve
  • Roasted potatoes and a leafy side salad
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat oven to 220ºC (fan) ready for your fish.
  2. First make the salsa. Put the onion in small bowl, squeeze over the lime juice and add a pinch of salt, mix well and leave the onions to marinade in the lime for at least 10 minutes. Then add the chopped kumquats, capers, honey, olive oil, mint along with some salt and pepper. Taste and add more lime or salt if it needs a boost. Set aside.
  3. Next prep your fish. Slash the fish skin 3 or 4 times, then rub the skin with olive oil, garlic (going into the slashes) and season with salt and pepper. Leave sit for 10 minutes.
  4. Place some lemon slices in the fish cavity, and a few on the bottom of your parchment lined or ceramic baking dish. Add the fish on top and then bake for 12-14 minutes, turning over half way. The fish skin should flake easily when done. If your fish is smaller, cook for less time or particularly large, a bit longer.
  5. Serve with the kumquat salsa scattered over the top, and roasted potatoes and green salad for a simple accompaniment.
Notes
There may be some salsa left over. Enjoy!
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Za’atar roasted sweet potato with radicchio, orange & falafel, just a simple ‘throw-it-together’ affair of seasonal ingredients! 

My toes often make it into the background of my quickly snapped instagram photos, and having spent most of the winter an outrageous shade of coral, I recently declared that I would rather like to repaint them the colour of radicchio to match.  Maybe Chanel (other brands are available) are listening and would like to mix up a new shade just for me?

I had actually just intended to take a quick snap of this dish I threw together and use the photos to flourish out my instagram account with some brightly coloured content. After taking a tonne of photos I decided that it wouldn’t harm to share the recipe in its full glory here on the blog also. It was rather good.

Today’s recipe isn’t really a recipe as such, more of a collection of meant to go together seasonal ingredients, cooked simply and then assembled purposefully on a plate. Some days I just have all the right things at home that I can throw together for a simple meal like this (having a weekly veg bags helps). You might also like to know that some days I’m eating peanut butter on defrosted toast.

Sweet potato joins seasonal favourites radicchio and oranges (choose bloods if you can), offering sustenance, comforting carbs, and sweeter notes to balance out that bitter radicchio. You don’t have to roast it in za’atar (a shop bought pre-mix I confess), but it tastes really good so comes recommended.

I’ve used pre-made falafel (disclosure: a previous sponsored post, but now a freezer staple) in this recipe, because whilst I would always make them from scratch for a catering job – indeed they are a favourite on a retreat, my home life doesn’t always allow me such time in the kitchen. I think shredded chicken, some beautiful poached trout or salmon would be equally at home with all of these flavours.

The first outing for this radicchio and orange combo this year, was for one of the course for an an event I catered back in January for Yoga Brunch Club. Then, they featured alongside creamy complementary ricotta and with a slightly different dressing using pomegranate molasses as a side dish to a celeriac frittata. The event was held on a beautifully sunny Sunday morning in London, and it was good to be reminded that winter isn’t all about darkness. On the plate, or otherwise. You can see some photos from the event here.

Enjoy all of these beautiful colours and flavours while you still can.  Blood oranges may only be around until next month. How would you put them all together? Perhaps like I did last year using the radicchio leaves as cups instead of being torn?

Za’atar Roasted Sweet Potato with Radicchio, Orange & Falafel

Zahtar Roasted Sweet Potato with Radicchio, Orange and Falafel
 
Prep time
10 mins
Cook time
25 mins
Total time
35 mins
 
Za'atar roasted sweet potato with radicchio, orange & falafel, just a simple 'throw-it-together' affair of seasonal ingredients!
Author: Ceri Jones
Recipe type: Salad
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 2 medium sized sweet potatoes, skin on and scrubbed clean, sliced lengthways into thick wedges
  • 1 tablespoon za'atar
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 oranges, supremed (segmented)
  • Large handful of radicchio leaves, torn into bitesized pieces
  • 6 cooked and ready to eat warm falafel
  • handful of walnuts
  • Sea salt and black pepper
Dressing
  • 2 tablespoons walnut oil
  • 1 tablespoon orange juice (caught from segmenting)
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat oven to 200ºC (fan)
  2. Toss the sliced sweet potato in olive oil and the za'atar and make sure they are well covered. Lay on a lined baking sheet, and roast in the oven for 25 mins until crispy on the outside with tender flesh.
  3. Meanwhile, make up your salad dressing, by combining the oil with the juice and vinegar and seasoning with salt and pepper. Dip in a bit of radicchio to check flavour, you want the sweet dressing to balance the bitter leaves. Place half of the dressing in a large bowl and toss in your leaves and make sure they are all well coated in the dressing.
  4. Toast your walnuts by warming them through in a frying pan with a drizzle of olive oil for a few minutes until lightly charred on all sides. Set aside.
  5. When the potatoes are ready (and you've got your falafel ready too), lay the dressed radicchio leaves on a plate and scatter over your potato, orange segments, falafel and walnuts. Add a final drizzle of the dressing, and some black pepper too.
  6. I added a few extra seasonal green leaves for a colour pop but this isn't necessary!
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If you need a quick reminder on how to supreme, check out my instagram video below.

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Chocolate granola with pistachio & quinoa puffs makes a delicious brunch dessert or topping for yoghurt or ice-cream any time of day.  Serve with rhubarb and blood orange for a late winter dish.

I don’t really get the whole chocolate for breakfast thing. Chocolate in porridge, chocolate cereal, and even the classic pain au chocolate pastry, I just can’t.

Now this might be a strange way to open a blog post all about a recipe that is traditionally eaten at breakfast time, and is full of chocolate, but hear me out.

I love chocolate, absolutely love the stuff, I eat it everyday (no word of a lie), but Easter Sunday aside, I rarely want to eat it before lunch.  I love to enjoy my chocolate as a mid afternoon pick me up, or to round off my evening dinner. It’s just how I feel and let that be it!

So, I never really entertained the idea of making a chocolate granola, that is until I started catering brunch events with Replenish You and Tally Rye.  A ‘brunch dessert’ had already become a thing at previous events, this time around (our event was last Saturday) I wanted something to pair with seasonal roasted forced rhubarb and blood oranges. They both go with chocolate, and then the idea for the dish just then took flight.

So brunch dessert is a pretty rare occurrence, normally (there is a fair amount of chocolate and sugar in this one, because go big or go home), but having munched my way through various test batches of this recipe for my mid afternoon chocolate hit, and evening dessert I realised that granola doesn’t just have to be for the morning; a sprinkle of this on top some Greek Yoghurt for some crunch, or even on top of some ice cream for a dessert. Why ever not?

I adapted my recipe from Minimalist baker. The pistachios are I think the perfect pairing for both chocolate and the fruit I served with it, and the quinoa puffs whilst optional, do add a lovely texture into the mix. I bought a bag from UK grown brand Hodmedods last year when I did a batch order of yellow pea flour (like gram flour, but better tasting) last summer and needed to get my basket over £30 for free delivery.

If, however you do want a slightly more sensible morning granola, you can try my go to recipe, a retreat catering favourite.

To serve as I have, roast some sticks of rhubarb, roughly 5cm long with a drizzle of maple syrup and if you like some chopped stem ginger, for around 8-10 minutes at 180ºC (fan) – any longer than that they tend to disintegrate, but it will depend on the girth of your rhubarb sticks (also nice with a cheesecake, like last year)

You can also add some segments of orange, blood orange preferably. To segment your orange like so, you can check out my instagram video.  The technique is called suprême by chefs, particularly French ones.

——

Chocolate Granola with Pistachio & Quinoa Puffs
Chocolate, pistachio & quinoa puff granola
 
Prep time
10 mins
Cook time
20 mins
Total time
30 mins
 
Chocolate granola with pistachio & quinoa puffs makes a delicious brunch dessert or topping for yoghurt or ice-cream any time of day.  Serve with rhubarb and blood orange for a late winter dish.
Author: Ceri Jones
Recipe type: Breakfast
Serves: ~15
Ingredients
Chocolate Granola
  • 400g rolled oats
  • 45g light muscovado sugar
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 45g cocoa powder
  • 90mls olive oil
  • 180ml maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 150g dark chocolate chips
  • 100g chopped pistachios
  • 25g quinoa puffs
  • 5g freeze dried raspberries
to serve
  • per person, 120g Greek yoghurt
  • 5 x 5cm sticks of roasted rhubarb
  • 5 blood orange segments (~half an orange)
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat your oven to 170ºC (fan).
  2. Combine the oats, muscovado sugar, cocoa powder and salt in a medium sized bowl. Meanwhile put the maple syrup and olive oil in a small saucepan, heat gently and stir until the maple syrup and oil are well combined. Add the vanilla extract. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry and stir to combine, till all the oats are nicely brown with chocolate.
  3. Line a baking tray and spread out the granola evenly, in a thin layer. Bake in the oven for 18-20 minutes, stirring half way to ensure it cooks evenly, then remove from the oven. The granola will still be soft and a little wet when it comes out of the oven, that's fine as it will harden as it cools.
  4. If you cook it till its dry, chances are it will burn, and its hard to tell when chocolate is burnt because of the brown. Sprinkle over half the chocolate chips whilst still warm, and stir so they melt into the granola, then leave to cool completely.
  5. Finally when fully cooled, sprinkle over the remaining chocolate, pistachios, quinoa pops and freeze-dried raspberry. Keep in an airtight container.
  6. A serving is around 40g of granola
Notes
When selecting your oats for this recipe, you want rolled oats rather than jumbo, however some brands of rolled oats are very powdery, so try and choose those with a little more shape and texture. The very powdery ones don't make a very good granola in my experience.
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Borough Market December 2018

Back in the autumn I started a new tradition of pulling together my favourite recipes from the season in one easy to read blog post. So, here I am again with my ‘top ten winter recipes’.

I forget, I think, just how many recipes I’ve created over the years. If I’ve forgotten then I’m sure you have too. Reminding myself of them all has definitely given me a hunger for cooking them again, especially as many of the seasonal ingredients are popping into my veg basket.

Much like the autumn, vegetables from the root and brassica families make up the bulk of seasonal veg this time of year, as well as the allium family. Not as plentiful as during the autumn harvest though, and you will often find that produce you’d expect to come from the UK is imported from Europe to meet our demands. What will happen with Brexit and imports, deal or no deal, who knows, but the BBC Food programme this last week covered some interesting points.

Borough Market January 2019

Those bright winter days, that are freezing cold, but with a piercing blue sky are my favourite thing about this time of year. If there is one thing I have trouble with in winter it’s the darkness. The cold really doesn’t bother me. I’m a fiery Aries, and generally warm all of the time (maybe as I spend so much time standing next to an oven), the grey skies and days that are dark before 5 though. I hate them.

When those bright days come I embrace them. Much in the same way I want to embrace each and every brightly coloured fruit and vegetable to be found; rainbow carrots, red cabbage, radicchio and forced pink rhubarb. I’ve always found it a bit mind blowing that citrus is a winter thing; even if we have to borrow them from much further south.

It turns out that many of my favourite recipes are from this time of year, so choosing ten was a tough choice. I’ve selected quite a few from my app, some of which were new to the update we released last summer, and therefore haven’t had a winter outing yet. For the rest I have gone down the sensible route and suggested dishes that are perfect for healthful everyday cooking.

If you want to download my app, you can click on the tab below.  There are 20 recipes designed just for winter on the app, and many more that can be adapted for winter veg too. 

Here are my Natural Kitchen Adventures top ten winter recipes
  • Feta Baked Eggs with Brussels Sprout Tops. Last winter I’d received Brussels sprout tops in my veg bag a few times before I could quite work out what best to do with them. Then came along this dish, inspired by the flavours of Greek Spanakopita, which usually uses spinach as the green element. Now I look forward to getting greens like this in my veg bag as I can make this delicious dish. The leaves can be quite tough, but are best when shredded and cooked like the leafier cabbages or kale. You can find the recipe on my app.
  • Warm Brussels and Butter Beans with Nigella Seed Crispy Onions. Sticking with the Brussels theme with dish two. Brussels sprouts are not just for Christmas, and when roasted are delicious in a warm salad dish. This one is packed with flavour, made irresistible with the topping of onions cooked in gram flour and Nigella seeds. This dish is also in my app as well as online.

Feta Baked Eggs with Brussels Sprout Tops

  • Celeriac and Lentil Salad with Parsley Dressing and Hazelnut Cumin Crumble. Another one for app users! Following my formula of roasted veg + legumes + killer dressing + textural topping, this dish makes great use of the subtle flavour of celeriac, with the less than subtle flavour of garlic in the dressing and freshly toasted cumin seeds in the topping. One for the lunch boxes.
  • Celeriac and Butter Bean Puree with Pan Fried Hake and Mushrooms. I only blogged this dish in late November, but it’s already a firm favourite for the season. That celeriac and butter bean puree is a beauty to behold, just don’t skimp on the large knob of butter.
  • Red Cabbage and Citrus Slaw with Sticky Pomegranate Trout. This is exactly what I mean by winter colour. Citrus fruits such as grapefruit, blood orange and clementine combine with red cabbage and pomegranate seeds to go alongside a fillet of oily fish baked with sticky pomegranate molasses! Yet another exclusively on my app.

Red Cabbage and Citrus Slaw with Sticky Pomegranate Trout

  • Jerusalem Artichoke Spaghetti with Hazelnut Parsley Pesto. In this recipe the artichokes are steamed before being sautéed with shallots and garlic (and butter), and then tossed through cooked spaghetti and a fresh hazelnut parsley pesto. Who doesn’t love pasta eh?
  • Spelt, Rhubarb and Smoked Mackerel. I am on the cusp of the Millennial name-tag yet here I am once again, creating recipes with a very strong pink focus (pink is supposed to be a Millennial colour). Forced pink rhubarb doesn’t just serve a colour function in this recipe though, the sour tang of the rhubarb is a perfect pairing for the oily fish mackerel. Rhubarb is technically a vegetable, rather than a fruit and though rarely used in savoury recipes, it does actually work.
  • Romanesco, Beluga Lentil and Rainbow Carrot Salad. I learned recently that carrots were actually all those rainbow colours before the orange became what we know a carrot to be. Crazy times. Serve this dish warm or cold in a lunchbox. It would certainly add colour to any of those grey winter days.

Spelt, Rhubarb and Smoked Mackerel

  • Cauliflower & Cavolo Nero Vegetable Pakoras.The best thing about this recipe is that it is so versatile, you can swap in and out your brassicas based on whatever you have to hand. I’ve also made them with curly kale, broccoli, purple sprouting broccoli and peas (frozen obviously). They look more complicated and long winded than they actually are.
  • Leek and Caerphilly Cheese Chickpea Flour Tart. I’m finishing off my top ten with a recipe that isn’t a warm salad, and without a speck of pink, but it does have a Welsh influence so is still a class Ceri dish. This recipe is on my app and the best way to describe it is a cross between an Italian farinata and an egg-based frittata. I’ve played around with this recipe many times since creating it, and you can even make an egg-free vegan version by replacing each egg with 60mls (4 tablespoons) of soy yoghurt, and adding more veg instead of cheese. You’re welcome.

Leek and Caerphilly Cheese Chickpea Flour Tart

Well, I’ve reached my self-imposed limit of 10 recipes and I haven’t even included anything with parsnips, the bitter leaf radicchio, or nearly enough blood orange recipes. I will just have to leave you seek them out for yourselves.

What are your favourite winter recipes or ingredients?  Let me know in the comments below.

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A bright and colourful romanesco salad with beluga lentil and rainbow carrots, is just what I need to start off 2019 with a vegetable loaded bang.

Happy new year one and all.  I thought I’d start off 2019 like I mean to go on and fill it with fruit and vegetables. Not as many of them as usual were eaten over the Christmas period you see (a chocolate orange doesn’t count), and so, now that life and work is back to normal it’s time for normal service to resume.

But first, I want to remind you about my London based supper club which is happening next month. The Seasonal Suppers comes back for its winter instalment on Friday 1st February when I’ll be doing my best to showcase my favourite seasonal produce from this time of year. We’re returning to the Pill Box Kitchen in Bethnal Green for the supper since my autumn event wen’t down so well there last November. You can check out all the info and grab yourself a spot over on this link HERE. Please come!

Now back to the recipe…

I hardly cooked at all for the last few weeks, and it’s taken me a few days into the new year to feel like I want to. The more I cook, the more I enjoy it it, so when I don’t do it (professionally and personally), I forget what I’m missing. I guess I have the same relationship to many things in life, reading, running, yoga, etc. Is this just me?

Today, I headed into the kitchen with the desire to cook something veg-loaded and fairly simple, combined with a must to use up the beautiful vegetables I already had in the fridge.  Luckily my veg bag scheme (Lee Greens) resumed service last week, and we were spoilt at the start of the new year with the weird and wonderful looking romanesco as well as some rainbow carrots. I had a pomegranate left over from Christmas (bought them to add to prosecco), so all I needed to buy was some coriander. When I say needed, I mean wanted.

Romanesco at Borough Market, December 2018

I’ve not shared a romanesco recipe on the blog before.  It amazes me that almost seven years after I started blogging I can still find new things to share on here. Romanesco is from the cruciferous family, and is somewhere between a cauliflower and a broccoli. They’re not that common to be honest, but if you get the chance do seek them out.  A romanesco is so beautifully interesting to look at, and has a milder taste – less sulphurous perhaps – to the cauliflower.  Once broken up the florets tend to be smaller than those on a cauli, but I usually prepare it in the same way. As with most vegetables, I like to roast.

As for seasonality depending on where you live, you should be able to get a romanesco for much of the year (as you can,  cauliflower). I’ve also found them in Italian supermarkets in April and French supermarkets in June.

This salad is incredibly quick to make, and if you use pre-cooked lentils like I did (again, they were in my cupboard) then the only cooking involved is the romanesco, and that only takes 15 minutes.  If you prefer a warmer, heartier salad then you could also roast the carrots in small pieces.  These generally take 30-40 minutes in the oven to fully caramelise so if you have the time go ahead!  I’ve actually made something similar in the past using buckwheat or quinoa instead of the lentils, so as always you can mix it up.

The key to the flavour of this salad is the nigella seeds (also known as black onion seeds or kalonji), adding both texture and flavour to the dish, don’t skip them. The seeds pair so well with both cauliflower and carrots, and I’m loving sprinkling them on many dishes at the moment. 

You can serve this alongside all manner of main dishes – fish, slice of frittata, falafel, or just eat a pile of it on its own as I did. The salad is indeed vegan (as most salads are), and I’m only mentioning it if that helps you with your vegan January menu planning rather than telling you to eat it ‘cos its vegan. We don’t do dietary labels at Natural Kitchen Adventures (any more at least), we just like to eat what we fancy and tastes good.

—–

Romanesco, Beluga Lentil and Rainbow Carrot Salad

Romanesco, Beluga Lentil and Rainbow Carrot Salad
 
Prep time
10 mins
Cook time
15 mins
Total time
25 mins
 
A bright and colourful romanesco salad with beluga lentil and rainbow carrots, is just what I need to start off 2019 with a vegetable loaded bang. Serves 2 as a main, 4 as a side
Author: Ceri Jones
Recipe type: Salad
Serves: 2-4
Ingredients
Salad
  • 1 Romanesco, broken into small florets
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • pinch chilli flakes
  • pinch sea salt
  • 250g cooked beluga lentils
  • 4 rainbow carrots (use a variety of carrots if you can), peeled into ribbons using a peeler
  • handful of coriander, some leaves left whole, some roughly chopped
  • handful of pomegranate seeds
  • 1 tablespoon Nigella seeds
dressing
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon pomegranate molasses
  • ½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar
Salt and pepper, to taste
    Instructions
    1. Pre-heat the oven 10 180ºC
    2. Toss the chopped romanesco in the olive oil and add the minced garlic, cumin seeds, pinch of chilli flakes, and sea salt. Roast in the oven for 15 mins or until tender and slightly charred.
    3. Make up the dressing by combining the olive oil, pomegranate molasses, vinegar and season with salt and pepper.
    4. Meanwhile tip the cooked beluga lentils into a large mixing bowl and stir through the dressing. Add the carrot ribbons, pomegranate seeds, coriander and nigella seeds (reserve some of all of these for garnish).
    5. When the romanesco is cooked add that in warm and combine well.
    6. Transfer to a serving dish and top with the reserved carrot ribbons, pomegranate seeds, nigella seeds and coriander.
    7. Will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for 3 days.
    Notes
    If you don't have pomegranate molasses you can replace with balsamic vinegar
    3.2.2802

    If this has inspired you to get cooking with romanesco, here are some other recipe ideas

     

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    This meal in a glass pear almond kale smoothie is a great way of using up any leftover greens and ticks off a portion of veggies before 9am! 

    Yes, yes, I know it’s December and I’m meant to be blogging Christmas recipes, but ya know this is my 7th year of blogging, and since I peaked with my short recipe ebook back in 2014, is there really anything else I can add to all the Christmas recipe noise?

    I’ve been thinking about this a lot the last week, and realised that Christmas recipes are not really the core aim of Natural Kitchen Adventures. Christmas is about the classics, and well there’s plenty of them out there already. Yes I’ve been eating mince pies galore this last month, and yes I even made some myself, but in and amongst this I’ve just been cooking like I usually do, because man cannot live on advent calendar chocolate and mince pies alone.

    So, this week I’m sharing a pear almond kale smoothie I’ve been making on repeat for the last few weeks, another excuse to show off my new Froothie Optimum 9400 2nd generation froothie blender that I have just reviewed.

    I first came up with this smoothie recipe from a necessity of using up an excess of pears I bought for my autumn supper club pear and chocolate tart (someone  – err that would be me, did some bad maths).  I’m always very honest in saying that I am not regularly a smoothie girl, but the pears, they were getting a bit manky and a smoothie seemed like the best way to get through them over a couple of days. Smoothies seem to be something I only crave if I’m feeling a bit under the weather and my persistent colds of the autumn have left me feeling a bit less than 100% for quite some time.

    Anyway, as we learned from my chocolate tart, pears go well with almond, so I used almond milk as the base for this smoothie. I also added a good portion of almond butter for additional almond flavour. I’m if going to go to the effort of making a smoothie for my breakfast, I don’t want to have to make anything else too, so I like to make my smoothies sustaining by making them a ‘meal in a glass’ smoothie – usually by also inviting oats to the party.

    If you don’t want to put greens into your smoothie, there is absolutely no need and you are more than welcome to serve them for dinner instead. However, if you’ve got a top notch blender like me, it will make light work of making the texture of them disappear, just leaving you with a vibrant green colour. I’ve trialled this smoothie with curly kale, cavolo nero and chard too, all work brilliantly.

    I always feel a little smug about having a portion of veggies ticked off for the day before 9am.

    —–

    Pear Almond Kale Smoothie
    5.0 from 4 reviews
    Pear, Almond and Kale Smoothie
     
    Prep time
    5 mins
    Total time
    5 mins
     
    This meal in a glass pear, almond and kale smoothie is a great way of using up any leftover greens and ticks off a portion of veggies before 9am!
    Author: Ceri Jones
    Recipe type: Smoothie
    Serves: 1
    Ingredients
    • 200mls almond milk
    • 20g oats
    • 2 tbs Greek yoghurt
    • 1 tbs almond butter
    • 1 pear, roughly chopped, skin on, stalk and pips removed
    • Handful of curly kale, (if you have a strong blender, leave in the stalks)
    • Chunk ginger (option)
    Instructions
    1. You'll need a good blender for this, simply put everything in the blender, and keep blitzing until the smoothie is a gorgeous green colour, with no trace of bits of kale!
    2. If you want to cool down the smoothie, an ice cube or two can be added into the blend.
    3. If you want to sweeten it a little, a teaspoon of honey can be a good addition.
    3.2.2802
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    Disclosure: I am now an ambassador for Froothie and some links in this article may be affiliate links. The above product reviews is, as always based on my honest opinion. If you’d like to know more about Froothie health products, or this machine in particular, please visit the Froothie Website for more details. Any purchases made through this/these link(s) are at no extra cost to you but give Natural Kitchen Adventures a small commission. Thanks!

    The post Pear, Almond & Kale Smoothie appeared first on Natural Kitchen Adventures.

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