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Exams are coming. Doing some night shifts while nobody’s at the library gives me still some peace. It’s just me and physics during these hours :D

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“How does one get this idea [for the proof of Sylvester’s Theorem]? The answer is: I don’t know! It is like asking: How did Michelangelo do this?”
- Linear Algebra Professor
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“Mathematics is not about answers, it’s about the questions you ask.”
- Linear Algebra Professor
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11 pm // After procrastinating all day, now I truly enjoyed the enlightening moment of realizing that a catenary has the form of cosh(x). Loving the beauty of theoretical mechanics.

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“Mathematics is the taming of the infinite”
- Linear Algebra professor
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Sunday 5.5.19, 9:00 am. The best moment of the day when you’re arriving at the library for doing some thermodynamics and you’re still alone.

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humanoidhistory:

Yuri Gagarin, first human in space, working in his study, 1966.

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cosmicvastness:

Astronomers Capture First Image of a Black Hole

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) — a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration — was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers revealed that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

The image reveals the black hole at the centre of Messier 87, a massive galaxy in the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster. This black hole resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the Sun.

Supermassive black holes are relatively tiny astronomical objects — which has made them impossible to directly observe until now. As the size of a black hole’s event horizon is proportional to its mass, the more massive a black hole, the larger the shadow. Thanks to its enormous mass and relative proximity, M87’s black hole was predicted to be one of the largest viewable from Earth — making it a perfect target for the EHT. 

The shadow of a black hole is the closest we can come to an image of the black hole itself, a completely dark object from which light cannot escape. The black hole’s boundary — the event horizon from which the EHT takes its name — is around 2.5 times smaller than the shadow it casts and measures just under 40 billion km across.

Credit: ESO

I’m just mindblown.

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humanoidhistory:

Albert Einstein at home in Princeton, New Jersey, in a 1947 photo by Philippe Halsman. (Magnum Photos)

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