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  Ever wondered what’s the key to happiness? It turns out you don’t need more money, you just need more sleep!

The Living Well happiness index, developed by Oxford Economics and the National Centre for Social Research in the UK, has found that sleep has the strongest association with a person’s happiness and wellbeing – well above money.

Researchers asked thousands of people across the country questions about their relationships, finances, and lifestyle with the goal of uncovering what it truly means to live well.

What they found was somewhat surprising: that being more rested is more beneficial to wellbeing than if your disposable income was increased five-fold.
[WATCH THE VIDEO HERE]

In short: getting a better night’s rest will have a far more profound impact on your happiness, than that pay rise you want!

For us at The Sleep Expert, this study highlights the need for a cultural shift in the way we perceive and prioritize the size of our bank account vs. the quality of our ZZZ’s.

The fast-paced, competitive world of our Western society where the hard working and constantly striving are rewarded and often glamorized, has conditioned us to believe that sacrificing our rest for the pursuit of material success is the way to a more fulfilled life. We are seldom taught to reflect on the consequences that this ‘sleep less, work harder’ mentality has on the things that really matter – like our productivity, health and interpersonal relationships. And, unfortunately, we often don’t learn the value of sleep until chronic insomnia, disease and burnout set in.

The results from the Living Well study offer crucial insights for us all and invite us to look at how we prioritize sleep in our everyday lives. All-in-all they are a simple and welcome reminder that, sometimes, all we need to feel better is just a little more sleep!

NEED MORE HELP?
Would you love a free 1:1 session with ME to get better sleep now?
Click here now

The post SLEEP IS MORE IMPORTANT TO HAPPINESS THAN MONEY appeared first on My Sleep Coach.

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When you wake up in the morning, your tone for the day is already set. The mood you wake up in will typically determine the quality of your day.

But what determines the mood you wake up in? It’s the quality of your sleep. We spend so much time and money enhancing our diet and fitness, but improving our sleep can be the single most important thing we do. Optimizing our sleep can revolutionize the quality of our life.

Improving your sleep can involve a number of steps, but here are 7 simple tips to a better night’s sleep – drug-free.

Change your values around sleep

In the west, we place a very high value on doing (rather than being). We often consider sleep to be a waste of time. However, it is during sleep that we heal and rejuvenate. Of course, while we are asleep we are not conscious to know what is going on. If we were, we would probably put sleep up as our number one priority.

While we sleep, we produce human growth hormone which keeps us young, as well as an array of hormones that make us feel happy and motivated the next day. Our brains are also effectively “cleaned out”, so we are on the top of our game cognitively the following day.

If we truly understood this, we would probably place quality sleep at the top of our list. By valuing sleep, we begin to prioritize it, and we do things better when we prioritize them.
Start to value sleep, rather than seeing it as a time burner.

Learn to read your stress signals

I have so many clients coming to me saying that they don’t believe their sleep struggles are stress-related, but when we look at their physiology, all of the signs of stress are there. If we have elevated stress levels every day, we may feel normal, even though our nervous system is saying something else.

We need to personally be aware of how stress manifests in our physiology so that we know when you are stressed.

Do you have short shallow breaths into your upper chest, or do you have long slow deep breaths into your lower abdomen? Do you have tight muscles, or loose, relaxed muscles? Do you hunch over or do you have a flexible and upright posture?

If you answered the former rather than the later to any of these questions, chances are you have elevated stress or anxiety levels. Lowering your stress and/or anxiety levels will help you to sleep better. But the first step in this process is knowing when you are stressed or anxious, so:

Learn to read your physiology so you are actually aware of when you are stressed or anxious.

Step into your Feminine

The daytime is more closely tied to our masculine energy – doing and achieving. It is the time we activate our sympathetic nervous system. At night, in order to sleep, we need to activate our parasympathetic nervous system – which is associated with the feminine (relaxation, simply being, etc)

The parasympathetic nervous system is connected to our “rest, digest and reproduce” functions. If we are still in fight or flight, we cannot drift off into a peaceful rejuvenating sleep. Regardless of whether we are male or female, we need to step into the softer feminine energy at night, in order to succumb to sleep.
Learn to let go and surrender, especially before bedtime.

Connect to Yourself

When mind, body, and spirit are out of alignment, it is very difficult to fall asleep. Connecting to yourself and living in alignment with your truth will help you not only to sleep more easily but will help you to achieve a better quality sleep.
Take a moment to be still, reflect on your day, and release any tension you are holding onto.  Where in your life are you living in misalignment with your higher purpose and values?

Get into a Whole Brain State

It is much easier to fall asleep when our left and right hemispheres of the brain are integrated. Most of us have a dominant left brain so we need to do more activities to activate the right hemisphere of the brain as well. This includes getting out of our routine and doing new activities, as well as activities which utilise the imagination. Children drift off to sleep with a nice bed time story.  They can be very creative, and it truly helps.
Try activating the right hemisphere of your brain by doing something creative before bed.

 Have Open Sleep

Most of us curl up when we go to bed. What we may not realize is that we are putting our body into a fight or flight posture. Studies show that when we are in fear, we automatically go into the fetal position.

If we go to sleep in this position, we may be signaling to our nervous system that we are in fight or flight, and that it is not safe to go to sleep. Starting tonight, try to sleep with an open posture instead. It can take some time to get used to, but in the long term, it helps.
Open up the lung area, so that you can take nice deep breaths.

Take a Smile to Bed

Experiment with different strategies that help you to get to sleep at night. Have one prepared – that you know works – so that you’re not lying there planning the next day. Different strategies work for different people. Find something that helps you switch off from the day and helps you to shift your state to something you find pleasant and relaxing. Whichever strategy you find, do it with a smile.

We are more likely to have positive thoughts if we have a smile on our face. This helps us to nod off faster.
Put a smile on your dial in bed.

There is so much more to sleep than the commonly written about topics of sleep hygiene (ie the sleep habits and “rules”) and the common answer of meditation/mindfulness. The tips in this article are just the tip of the iceberg. We are all unique. In order to create lasting and deep changes to your sleep, you will get the best results by working directly with your own sleep expert. Your sleep expert will work with you one on one to eradicate your sleep issues – so that you feel great and live to your true potential.

NEED MORE HELP?
Would you love a free 1:1 session with ME to get better sleep now?

Click here now

The post 7 Natural Alternatives to Sleeping Tablets appeared first on My Sleep Coach.

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Sleep comes naturally for all of us, so much so that we humans spend one third of our entire life sleeping. That means, if we live to be 75 years old and we’re sleeping at least 8 hours a day, 25 years of that is spent sleeping.

But has sleep really been given much importance or has it taken the sidelines and for some, maybe even considered just an option and no longer a necessity?

We’re past the era when people knew very little about the importance of sleep or what happens during sleep and have gone from thinking sleep was a form of death to actually being able to document different brain cycles during sleep – and yet we’re sleeping lesser or not at all either because of sleep issues or by choice.

Because of the significance of sleep in our physical, mental and emotional well-being, it is important that we don’t let sleep be just a nighttime ritual behind closed doors, but an open subject for all to discuss and celebrate and even share with others.

With people sleeping over an hour less than what we did 100 years ago, we have an epidemic of partial sleep deprivation in western society. This is finally being recognised. People are beginning to understand that sleep health is just as important, if not more important, than diet and exercise.  

Sleep Celebration

World Sleep Day is an annual event, intended to be a celebration of sleep and a call to action on important issues related to sleep, including medicine, education, social aspects and driving. It is organised by the World Sleep Day Committee of World Sleep Society and aims to lessen the burden of sleep problems on society through better prevention and management of sleep disorders. As of 2016, World Sleep Day had a total of 394 delegates in 72 countries around the globe. Source

This year, World Sleep Day will be celebrated on March 17, 2017 (today!) all over the world and will echo the message of “Sleep Soundly, Nurture Life.”

Celebrate Sleep Your Way

You don’t necessarily have to be a delegate to help spread the good message of sleep throughout the world, you can be a Sleep Ambassador in your own simple way and you can start with prioritising and improving your own sleep.

Here’s how you can help celebrate World Sleep Day:

  1. Check the quality of your sleep: are you waking up refreshed and rejuvenated or are you waking up groggy and with low energy? A good night’s sleep is comparable to charging your batteries to make you fully-charged to start another day. If you don’t sleep well, don’t  buy into the myth that there is nothing that you can do, and that you just have to “put up with it”
  2. Become aware of what affects the quality and duration of your sleep.  What does and doesn’t work for you? Don’t just look at your sleep habits – but what are you doing during the day that affects your sleep at night? If you can’t figure it out or need some help it might be time for a trip to a Sleep Coach.
  3. Be a living testament of good sleep: Waking up on the wrong side of the bed is an expression which might be linked to not being able to sleep soundly thereby affecting your mood and quality of life. If you get enough quality sleep, you’re affecting the world around you with your positivity and vibrance. Sleep more so you can smile more and live longer!

World Sleep Day is a celebration every first Friday of March but that doesn’t mean sleep should only be celebrated then. Sleep should be celebrated everyday and you can start now!

Good night and sleep tight! Don’t let the bedbugs bite!

The post World Sleep Day 2017: Sleep Soundly, Nurture Life appeared first on My Sleep Coach.

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We all need sleep to process and heal from the day, but for athletes sleep is especially crucial in order to recover from rigorous workouts and perform their best. Let’s look at why exactly sleep is so important for athletes:

Athletes need sleep for recovery

It is important for athletes to get not only enough sleep, but quality sleep. During the deep sleep phase, growth hormone is released in our bodies. Its benefits are many, including fat burning, bone building, muscle growth and repair – all of which are essential in helping athletes recover from rigorous workouts and build stronger bodies. Inadequate sleep duration and quality (not getting into a deep sleep) slows the release of the growth hormone (source).

Lack of sleep also results in elevated cortisol levels in our bodies, which causes stress – which in turn disrupts sleep and hence interferes with the muscle recovery process. In order to combat this endless stress cycle, it is necessary to get more sleep on a consistent basis.

Athletes need sleep to perform better

Our bodies rely on glucose and glycogen for energy. When sleep deprived, they are slower to store glycogen, which results in less fuel for us to use. While this may not impact the average person, it is detrimental to endurance athletes who need a full storage of energy to get through high intensity workouts and competitions.

What’s more, our glucose metabolism also slows down when we don’t get enough sleep. So not only are we unable to store enough glucose to endure rigorous physical activity, we’re also slower to break down this glucose into usable energy, resulting in sluggishness and impaired cognitive function (source).

Sleep deprivation is detrimental to athletes

The evidence is tangible. According to this infographic by Fatigue Science (source):

  • A lack of sleep over the course of 4 days has been shown to cause an athlete’s maximum bench press to drop in weight by 20 lbs (9 kg)
  • Tennis players getting adequate sleep can experience up to a 42% increase in hitting accuracy
  • Swimmers getting more than adequate sleep can have up to a 17% improvement in reaction time when starting a race

Further, there’s evidence that getting more than the recommended amount of sleep contributes to better athletic performance. A study conducted on the Stanford University NCAA basketball team from 2005-2008 showed that when players extended their sleep, they sprinted faster, reacted faster, and were more accurate in shooting, which suggests that “peak performance can only occur when an athlete’s overall sleep and sleep habits are optimal” (source).

As the evidence for sleep continues to accumulate, professional athletes are beginning to take sleep even more seriously these days. A recent study revealed that pro sports teams performed better in competition when they skipped their early morning practice in favor of sleeping in and instead practiced just once a day. Several NFL and NBA teams in the US have since altered their practice schedules to allow their athletes to get more sleep (source). And some of the most famous and successful athletes (e.g. Roger Federer, Lebron James) are known to spend nearly half of each day sleeping! (source)

The Bottom Line

Athletes need sleep to succeed in their sport and fitness endeavors. If you’re looking to exceed your fitness goals, getting both higher quality deep sleep and more hours of sleep each night will help you immensely.

The post Why Athletes Need Sleep To Succeed appeared first on My Sleep Coach.

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Sleep is an essential part of our daily lives as it helps us rest and recover from the daily grind but unfortunately, not everyone gets a full night’s rest and although a night of sleeplessness might have very little impact, the long-term effects of sleep deprivation could be detrimental to ones over-all health.

What’s even more concerning about the matter of sleep deprivation is the fact that not many people are even aware they have such a problem and how it negatively affects their health and lifestyle.

In this television interview, we talk to Denise Drysdale aka Ding-dong, co-host of the morning show on Studio 10 and two-time winner of the Gold Logie award for Most Popular Female personality on Australian television, while she takes us through her sleeplessness and we share with her some helpful tips on how to combat it.

Ding Dong Dozes Off? - YouTube

Here are some helpful key takeaways from the TV interview:

If it takes you more than 20 minutes to go to sleep, that is too long and it means something is out of balance. Awareness is always the first step and if you know this, then you know something needs to be done.

Adrenaline is a stress hormone and something that stops you from sleeping. So if you’re an active person and have an active mind, you need to start training your body and mind to start winding down so it is easier for you to fall asleep. When your body is in the “fight or flight”, your body doesn’t feel it is safe to drift off to sleep.  Even if the adrenaline pumping through your veins is from excitement, the message being sent to your body is “it is time to do more” rather than sleep.

Whilst some people’s sleep can be affected by excessive worry, there is another category of people whose sleep is affected by excessive excitement and the need for constant stimulation. I work with these people to remove the need for excitement. The trick is to learn to replace the excitement with the bliss hormones. Once you know how, It is well worth it!

Here are some quick sleep tips:

– Dim the lights a couple of hours before going to bed.

– If watching TV before bed, watch it from a screen that has an app that blocks out the blue light. Blue light acts like the sun does and our eyes recognize that and it suppresses the melatonin production. Melatonin is a hormone that is produced by the pineal gland, which relaxes us and helps us to fall asleep.

– If snoring is a problem, sleep on your side but if you still snore, you can try wearing acupressure rings that work on the meridian of the muscles which cause snoring at night.

– Download an app that records your sleep – measure how long it takes you to sleep, how many times you’re waking up, how deep your sleep is and how much you’re snoring during the night – the app records the sound so it knows how much you snore. By monitoring your sleep patterns, it is easier for you to pinpoint the specific problem and how to solve it.

Thanks for joining me today and sleep tight my lovelies.. Don’t let the bed bugs bite!

If you or anyone you know has sleep problems and need some help, feel free to send a note to elina@mysleepcoach.com.au so we can get you or your friend on your way to restful nights. 

The post TV interview with Denise Drysdale of Studio 10 appeared first on My Sleep Coach.

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If you’ve been following my blog or any of my social media accounts, then you would have noticed I was quiet for over a year. I know, that was quite some time right, but believe me, every minute was time well spent.

I always love to learn and expand my horizon and improve my skills and person; and last year, I did exactly that. I spent a lot of time in the US to study the latest in neuroscience, brainwave entrainment and holistic healing.

I believe that when you enable people to sleep, you wake them up to their full potential. I would like to be able to help more people – not just through face to face sessions – but to extend it to those I can’t reach physically. So my goal last year was to find awesome ways to take the sleep program to people across the globe, and have it be just as effective as those I work with in person.

Whilst hundreds more people have been through the sleep program in the last year, and are now sleeping well again, I took some time out of social media and blogging.  During this year of sleeping on social media, I gained new learnings, new experiences and new tools to add to my kit and even a new and wider direction for My Sleep Coach. We also ran our first international sleep retreat – which was a resounding success – with plenty more to come.

I am so excited to share with you how my past year has been spent but even more excited of the new things to come!

Here are a few snapshots of how I spent last year and the people I had the awesome chance to work with:

Learned holistic healing and brainwave entrainment from the amazing Dr Jeffrey Thompson, and spent time with his girlfriend Louise Hay

With the wonderful Anodea Judith while studying the latest in trauma release

Learning the energy system of the body with Dr Joe Dispenza

Aside from the above learnings, I also studied how to “de-armor” the body or remove the layers of tension in the body that build up over time with stress. I learned some fascinating techniques used in shamanic traditions. These and more are what I’ve been busy with and will definitely start to incorporate in my sessions moving forward.  

My social media sabbatical also allowed me time to work on my new sleep e-course, which is going to be launched very soon so be on the look-out for that!

The new year is bringing in so many new things for me and so I am sharing them with you as well so we all can have longer and more restful nights this 2017!

Sleep tight my sleep peeps and don’t let the bedbugs bite!

The post Why I hit the snooze button on social media appeared first on My Sleep Coach.

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There are many connections between sleep and having that big “O” moment. 
But did you know training yourself to sleep easier, and more deeply, could help to increase the intensity of your orgasm, and your sex life?

One of the core reasons for this link lies in the mind’s ability to detach from the external world, and move within.

We can gain great insight from a common occurrence for both men and women. Wet dreams, normally associated with men, are also a natural phenomenon for women. It was recently published in the Journal of Sex Research that 85 percent of women have experienced a nocturnal orgasm. In both cases, studies have shown the orgasm was much more intense during sleep, versus when the subject was partaking in sexual activates consciously. This is because while you are asleep, there is less inhibition and less conscious restraint. Studies of brain scans have shown that there is actually a ‘turning off’ of certain areas in the brain that process outside information, motor activity, and emotion at the time of orgasm. This may help explain why there are fewer barriers to intense sexual excitation during sleep than when a person is awake. (Source)

Re-creating this state of being that your mind and body experience during deep sleep, when you’re awake, can result in the same sexual intensity for your active sex life.

Some of the main practices involved are; the ability to surrender, letting go, being fully present, and being immersed in all of the senses. You can train your brain to become better at theses skills by practicing meditation, slowing down, and to increasing the value you place on being present. Something we are rarely do in this technological and fast paced society.

As a result of how our modern world operates, most of us have an overly developed left side of the brain. Its job is to study the past and rehearse for the future. However, it is the right brain that is in charge of present moment awareness, like when you have to catch a ball flying through the air.

Meditation, deep relaxation, or other similar practices force us to exercise our ability to go back and forth between the two hemispheres of the brain, thus helping to balance the two parts of our brain. If we practice often, then we strengthen our ability to be present when we want to, and the practice becomes more easily accessible. These same practices also help us to sleep better.

Having the skill to be present in both your mind, and body can have great results. This is true for your brain, but also for your orgasm. If you are able to control your mind (full presence) and surrender to what your body has to offer you, then you can achieve that state of bliss formerly only known to exist in your dreams.

Another area that significantly affects both our ability to sleep well, and our ability to orgasm, is our capacity to manage our stress levels. Stress decreases the production of the sex hormones, like oestrogen and testosterone, and ramps up your levels of cortisol. When your body releases cortisol, your system shifts from a relaxed state, to being on guard. Essentially, your “fight or flight response kicks in, redirecting blood flow to your muscles, and away from your sex organs, telling your body to prioritise survival over sex, making orgasm nearly impossible. In a study conducted by the University of Michigan, when the levels of cortisol in women reached over 40 percent, they were physically incapable of orgasm. (Source) Conversely, lower cortisol levels increase your both capacity for pleasure and better sleep.

If you can learn to go within, connect to your senses, and surrender, you will not only sleep more soundly, but orgasm more loudly.

“Sleep is the best form of meditation.” – Dalai Lama

If you can master the art of sleeping, what else might be possible?

The post Does Better Sleep Mean a Better Orgasm? appeared first on My Sleep Coach.

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Did you know that about 30% of adults suffer from insomnia? Considering we ideally spend about a third of our life sleeping (or trying to), that’s an awful lot of time to spend battling this beast. Whether it’s difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, more people than ever are not getting the quality and quantity of sleep they need in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

When did we lose our knack for sleeping? Here’s what recent studies have revealed about the trends in insomnia in the past 20 years:

Prevalence of insomnia has increased slightly

In the UK, prevalence of insomnia increased from 35.0% in 1993 to 38.6% in 2007 (source). However, the factors correlated with insomnia remained consistent during the 15 year period (i.e. with insomnia being more prevalent amongst women, those of older age, and those suffering from depression). In other words: insomnia has been gradually on the rise, but amongst the same demographic over time.

A similar study in Finland mirrors this finding: from 1995-2005 they observed a slight increase in insomnia amongst the working age population (source). 


(Photo source)

The use of sleeping tablets to treat insomnia has increased dramatically

A study by Medco Health Solutions revealed that from 2000-2004, use of sleeping tablets doubled amongst adults and increased by 85% in children and young adults in the US (source).

Another study had even more dramatic findings, citing that from 1994-2007, prescriptions for Nonbenzodiazepine Sedative Hypnotics (e.g. Ambien, Lunesta, Sonata) saw a 30-fold increase (540,000 to 16.2 million) in the US (source). Given that there are around almost 9 million Americans using sleeping tablets (source), this indicates that people are being prescribed multiple different kinds of sleeping medications to handle their insomnia.


(Photo source)

The Bottom Line

More and more people are using sleeping tablets to deal with insomnia, though the prevalence of insomnia itself has not increased anywhere near as fast in recent years. That begs the question: Are sleeping tablets effective?

The post Insomnia Trends appeared first on My Sleep Coach.

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Heading off to some far-off land on a long haul flight? Don’t sacrifice a good night’s sleep just because you won’t be horizontal.

Here are our best tips for how to sleep on a plane:

Choose a good seat

Be sure to select your seat as soon as possible. Some airlines let you choose your seat upon booking, while others open up seat selection once online check-in begins. Either way, pick your seat as soon as you can.

Now, which seats are best for sleeping on a plane? Assuming you’re flying economy class, your best bet is a seat in the emergency exit row: that way you’ll be able to stretch out your legs and won’t be disturbed by your seatmates moving in and out of their seats. Otherwise, try for a window seat: you’re less likely to be bothered, and you’ll be oh-so-thankful for being able to lean on the side of the plane for a little extra sleep room. Whatever you do, avoid booking seats that can’t recline (e.g. the last row of the plane)!

Bonus tip: Check out SeatGuru.com to examine the seating chart for your flight. It has notes marking which seats are more/less desirable, so you can see which seats are the best for sleeping on the plane!

Don’t drink

Thinking about knocking yourself out with a glass of wine on the flight? Think again – you may be regretting that decision when you wake up a few hours later needing to use the toilet. You’ll also feel the effects of dehydration more quickly while in a pressurized cabin, and that certainly won’t help you sleep. What’s more dehydration is one of the main causes of jetlag, so it won’t help you at the other end either.

Invest in some sleep accessories

Let’s face it: you’re not going to get the most comfortable night’s sleep on a plane. But you can make it much more bearable by bringing a few sleep aids on the flight with you:

  • Eye mask or baseball cap – If you have trouble falling asleep without total darkness, then covering your eyes on a plane is an absolute must! A comfortable eye mask should do the trick. Or alternatively, try wearing a baseball cap with the brim pulled all the way down over your eyes.
  • Earplugs or ear buds – It’s easy to be jarred awake by sudden noises in the cabin, from conversations to passenger movement to the overhead compartments slamming shut. If you’re a light sleeper, block out the noise with some earplugs. Or if you’re the kind of person who sleeps well with music on, pop in those ear buds and turn a sleep-friendly playlist on repeat. We recommend theta or delta brainwave music.
  • Neck pillow – These things may look borderline ridiculous, but they work some serious magic when it comes to falling asleep on a plane. They provide much-needed neck support so that you’re not suddenly jolted awake when your neck cramps up from being bent at an odd angle. Try wearing the neck pillow backwards so that your chin is supported from the front. And if bulkiness is a concern, look for an inflatable neck pillow that folds up small when packed in your carry-on bag.


(Photo source)

Dress for comfort

Rather than dressing to impress, board the plane wearing what you’d normally wear to bed (presuming you wear something to bed!). Comfortable loose bottoms and wooly socks. Make sure you have a blanket or shawl to wrap yourself up in. It gives us a nice feeling of being nurtured, which always helps with falling asleep.

Practice brainwave flexibility

Once you have learned how to increase your brainwave flexibility, it becomes much easier to sleep on a plane, because it is much easier for you to access the slow brainwave states at will. The noises won’t bother you as much, you will be able to relax more easily, and you may even begin to enjoy the challenge of getting a good night’s sleep on a plane. For tips on increasing your brainwave flexibility before your overnight flight, be sure to check out our post on brainwaves!

The post Tips For Sleeping On A Plane appeared first on My Sleep Coach.

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It’s a fairly widespread belief that working out first thing in the morning is best, but is there any truth in this claim? Assuming that morning people prefer to work out in the morning while night people tend to work out later in the day, does this mean that morning people have better workouts than night people?

According to our research, no – your sleep schedule does not determine the quality of your workouts, particularly for professional athletes who train hard.


(Photo source)

Morning vs Nighttime Workouts

There are a couple of major drawbacks to early morning workouts. First, your training may be impacted by some level of grogginess if you haven’t given yourself enough time to fully wake up in the morning. This is more likely to occur if you have arisen to an alarm which has woken you during the deep sleep phase of a sleep cycle. And second, a hard workout early in the morning will leave you exhausted for the remainder of the day (source).

Conversely, working out late in the day is also not a good idea: both because you’re too tired from the rest of the day’s activities to perform your best, and because you’ll be too aroused to fall asleep for several hours after the workout (source).


(Photo source)

What Time of Day is Best?

So then what time of day should you be working out? If history’s any indication, more world records have been set between 17:00-18:00 than any other hour of the day (source).

Alternatively, there is some evidence that one’s biological clock affects athletic performance: i.e. morning people (“larks”) perform better early in the day, while night people (“owls”) perform their best late in the day. A study on MLB players’ performance in 2010 revealed a staggering difference in batting average between larks and owls at different times of day (source):
Early play: Larks, 0.267; Owls 0.259
Mid play: Larks 0.252; Owls 0.261
Night play: Larks 0.252; Owls 0.306


(Photo source)

The Bottom Line

There is no one right time of day to work out: it largely depends on whether you’re a morning person or a night person (or somewhere in between). There is no evidence that morning people have better workouts than night people do.

Work with your circadian rhythm, rather than against it, when scheduling workouts. If you’re an athlete required to perform or compete at certain times of day, consider altering your sleep schedule slightly so that you’re able to perform your best.

The post Do Morning People Have More Effective Workouts? appeared first on My Sleep Coach.

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