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Written by Ayesha Khan.The views expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

It’s only February, and 2018 is already turning out to be a big year. Recent volatility in the U.S. stock market, anticipated change in the job market and the unique geopolitical position occupied by many Muslim countries calls the current global economic situation to our attention. Since the economy often becomes the bedrock of our communities and gives rise to many political tensions that affect us, it is important to pay attention to any apparent volatility and plan for the future.

For the rest of this year, it seems we can expect greater income inequality, a transformed workplace via artificial intelligence, a stagnant workplace for women of color, multiple landmark political decisions and the continued rise of China as an indomitable economic force.

Here are the changes you should expect from the global economy for the rest of this year:

1. America’s income groups will bifurcate further

Image/The Judiciary Report

According to Ray Dalio (author of Principles, Chairman and Chief Investment Officer at Bridgewater Associates), the U.S. currently has 2 economies – the top 40 percent and the bottom 60 percent. Dalio argues that real incomes have been flat to down slightly for the average household in the bottom 60 percent since 1980, and the top 40 percent have approximately 10 times as much wealth as their counterparts. Trumponomics (see below) will not do much to change this. Instead, a greater diffusion of knowledge and skills relevant to the new economy will enable social mobility for the bottom 40.

2. The new economy: Trumponomics, Amazon and artificial intelligence

Image/ArsTechnica

2018 will usher us further into the “new” economy of artificial intelligence, data analytics and digital everything. What does this mean for us? We need to prepare readily for a new job market: Amazon and the like are the new economy and artificial intelligence (A.I.) is here to stay. From a macro perspective, the global technology Cold War is already underway. According to Eurasia Group, the U.S. and China will move into the A.I. technology arms race with guns blazing in 2018. While the U.S. has more talent, China is deploying more capital in local laboratories as the race to gain technological dominance over Africa, Brazil and Europe continues.

From a citizen’s perspective, the new economy will bring harsher realities. Good middle-class jobs are quickly becoming obsolete. According to McKinsey’s recent Future of Work study, 800 million jobs could be displaced. The elimination process is underway this year. Going out are jobs that require physical or basic mental work and can be automated. These include manufacturing jobs, fast food jobs, data collection jobs and classic back-office jobs. Coming in are managerial jobs that require emotional intelligence not possessed by machines, home health aides, doctors, nurses and personal aides to serve our aging population.

If policies enforce investment in infrastructure and green energy, then manufacturing jobs as construction workers and installation engineers will be in demand. Professions such as data scientists and algorithm developers will be hotter than ever in the A.I. economy and, according to McKinsey, U.S. job growth will be in the high wage bracket. This coupled with the first trend demands urgent reskilling of labor and democratization of next-generation job market skill.

Businesses have to get with the Amazon program to survive. With Amazon’s acquisition of Whole Food’s last year, the recent uptick in Prime membership fee and its ubiquitousness, consumer and retail is turned over its head.

All this volatility coupled with President Trump’s America first economic agenda will make 2018 a year to be closely watched by economists. Eurasia Group’s 2018 outlook identifies Trump’s nationalist economic leaning with threats to pull out of NAFTA and buff trade against China, as inequitable globalization.

 3. China will get stronger

Image/AFP

Trump’s “America first” policy has created a vacuum in the global political order and China is well placed to replace it. With leadership in technology, a growing economy and a visionary president, China could use 2018 to accumulate more soft power.

 4. Brace yourself for pivotal political decisions: 

Image/Daniel Leal
  1. Results of the Mueller investigation
  2. NAFTA renegotiation
  3. Survival of the JCPOA and US-Iran relations
  4. Article 5 Brexit negotiations

5. Women, especially women of color, face unprecedented challenges in the workplace

Image/Emma McIntyre

The #MeToo movement, Larry Nassar’s trial, Harvey Weinstein’s defamation and the sea of black dresses at awards shows have all made clear: women will not take it anymore. While the momentum is positive and empowering, 2018 requires much ground to be covered. According to McKinsey & Company’s latest women in the workplace report, one in five C-suite leaders are women and fewer than one in 30 are women of color. Entry-level women are 18 percent less likely to be promoted than their male peers. Black women are the most likely of all groups of women to report they never get senior-level contact, affecting the advancement opportunities they are likely to receive. The report warns against conflating diversity and gender as one issue as all women are not having the same experience. Women of color are facing and will continue to face double discrimination which demands new problem-solving strategies in the workplace.

2018 is grim, and yet full of possibility. Let’s hope the dominoes fall positively.

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We have all done things in the past that we aren’t proud of–things on which we look back and feel shame or can’t believe we ever did. My shameful past is my history of being a mean girl.

To be fair, at the time I thought I was being cool and that I was making power moves. In retrospect, I was being a jerk; I was insecure and seeking validation from my peers.

Growing up, I was always a shy child–some might say quiet or even scared–and rarely responded when I was spoken to. Overtime, my reputation as “that quiet girl” who didn’t have any friends solidified. I felt invisible, lonely and I hated school – so I stopped going. Needless to say, I wasn’t doing so well socially or emotionally and felt a strong case of alienation and isolation. While I didn’t know what those things were at the time, I knew that I had no friends and I hated it.

Fast forward two years later. At this time I was about 15-years-old and somehow managed to gain friends. I was even somewhat popular among my peers. What changed?

I was mean to the people around me.

I was putting other girls down and slut-shaming them while constantly seeking validation from my audience.

It started out with a few snarky comments (some of them were funny) that amused my friends. Eventually, sassy comments snowballed into something a lot more toxic than I ever expected it to become. I was putting other girls down and slut-shaming them while constantly seeking validation from my audience. I watched “Gossip Girl” and idolized Blair Waldorf (she’s not a positive role model, girls!), and thought I was everything!

Like a scene right out of “Mean Girls,” my life and the circle of people I associated with began to grow into something way too big for myself. I surrounded myself with people who were catty to each other, and I with them – all to make ourselves feel better about who we were.

The weird thing was, I was still that shy person, I didn’t know how to interact with people without overcompensating for my insecurities.

Being a teenager is hard–you’re going through mental and physical transformations all while experiencing emotions that may be difficult to deal with. It was during these years that I allowed my newfound popularity get to my head.

You see, girls are told that we must be a certain way to be respected or liked – we are made to believe that other girls are our competition.

I know now that it stemmed from a place of insecurity, and maybe even a whole lot of internalized misogyny. You see, girls are told that we must be a certain way to be respected or liked – we are made to believe that other girls are our competition instead of support. I learned this along the way, though: Comparing yourself to other people will always bring you down and lead you to act in ways that aren’t healthy or nice. In my case, I put up a hard exterior and hurt other people to feel good about myself. I was far too young to process any of this at the time, and I didn’t realize that I was hurting myself along with those around me.

It was when I loathed the person I was becoming that I realized it was important to break away from all that negativity. Luckily for me, I was able to move out of there and got a chance to reinvent myself into the person I knew I could be – a kinder and stronger being that could nurture and build up people rather than break them down.

Here are five things I learned along the way to becoming a better person and ditching the mean girl attitude:

1) Other girls aren’t your competition.

Try to be the best you can be, but don’t compare yourself to other people. You’ll find yourself in a constant race with no real prize at the end. Working together to empower and uplift our sisters is a much bigger prize than standing alone at the finish line with no one to celebrate with.

2) Be true to yourself.

Don’t lose sight of who you are, and don’t try to be someone you’re not just to feel accepted. There’s someone looking up to you out there for who you authentically are. Stay true to yourself.

3) Surround yourself with people who support you.

These people will always bring the best out of you, inspiring you while allowing you the opportunity to inspire them and others. And really, who doesn’t love the ultimate power squad of girls who run the world with kindness and motivation!

4) There’s no room at the table for judgement.

“Live and let live!” Or so, that’s how the saying goes. Who are we to judge others? I could probably go on with quotes for this one. “Those who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.” Oh! And don’t forget, “Walk a mile in my shoes…” The thing is, we really don’t know what others are going through in life. Who are we to judge?

5) Don’t try to please other people.

When you try to please other people, you end up doing things that you might not be proud of later on in life. So just keep doing you – and if someone doesn’t like it, so what? You’re still a boss, it’s your life – it’s your narrative. Tell your own story.

I now know, years later, that I don’t need to put others down to feel superior, and I don’t feel the need to compare myself to those who are doing great in life. This doesn’t mean that I don’t get insecure every now and then, because I do. I just know how to cope with it better now and have a better understanding of who I am and who I want to be.

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After the election of Donald Trump, a wave of pink feminist “pussy hats” hit the markets in protest. These anti-trump “pussy hats” spearheaded by The Pussyhat Project were meant to be a part of the greater Women’s March and the feminist movement, born in response to Trump’s remarks about “grabbing women by the pussy.”

The hats are propagated by the project as being representative of all women.  “Millions of women, men and children at over 600 rallies in countries touching virtually every continent,” boasts The Pussyhat Project’s webpage. “Young and old, rich and poor. Educated and not, religious and secular. Straight and LGBTQ, every race and color.”

Yet, this promise of inclusivity couldn’t be farther from the truth. Here are some reasons the pink feminist hats aren’t what they are meant to represent:

1) The LGBTQ+ community is excluded

The hats exclude trans women and/or non-binary people who do not have the genitalia represented by the hats.

2) Not all genitalia are pink

Others argue the hats are dividing communities of color because “their genitals are more likely to be brown than pink.”

3) It’s not just about White feminism.

Many go so far as to argue that the hats embody a culture of White-focused Eurocentrism, and are further pushing the agenda of “exclusionary White feminism.”

4) It’s divisive.

They show a distinct lack of unity and disconnect between communities of color and white communities during a time when these two communities need to come together as allies in a movement.

The hats were clearly created, even if subconsciously, with only white cis-women in mind and represent a larger gap in the feminist movement. Racial and gender equality begins at the most basic level, and the pussy hats are a reminder that we are far from including all races and genders in the pro-feminist conversation.

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While your Twitter feed and Instagram timeline today will be flooded with sentimental posts about how in love your friends are with their significant other, here are five forms of quality content you can use to remind the world exactly how single you are on Valentine’s Day.

1) When discussing Valentines Date night plans…

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Let’s be honest. No one knows our struggle better than ourselves.

2) When someone asks if you have a Valentine today…

Twitter

… We’ve all been waiting for the moment to use that line, and here it is.

3) When you realize you’ve been swiping left on Tinder/Minder/Bumble (all of the above) for so long that your Sea Salt Caramel Talenti melted…

4) When you have to go to the dreaded gym…alone!

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You’re forced to go to the gym for the first time in months, even though you’d rather do anything else – but you’re the only single one left in your friend group.

5) When you are preparing for the major sales on chocolate… 

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Finally,  February 15th arrives just in time to provide you with access to the candy aisle of any store. It’s the Valentine’s equivalent to Black Friday –  and you are MORE than ready for it!

#MGValentines

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Latinas, like any other culture, have a slew of stereotypes associated with us. We’re expected to be these fiery, loud women with long hair and sensual curves that love to cook and dance and bare children. We’re either sashaying our hips to salsa in the kitchen, praying with our rosaries or over our candles to Santa Barbara for guidance or even doing brujeria (witchcraft) on a neighboring woman who has wronged us in some way. At least that’s what we see in telenovelas. I’ve come to realize that’s how a lot of the world sees us, actually. Whether we’re Boricua, Dominicana or Mexicana, we’re expected to have some semblance of these standards.

There is one very stark difference now, though: I’ve traded in the rosary for tasbih and I only pray to Allah (SWT.)

I won’t lie, I uphold several of these stereotypes: I dance salsa, I love cooking, and in high school I was known for my long hair. There is one very stark difference now, though: I’ve traded in the rosary for tasbih and I only pray to Allah (SWT.) All that may have been well and good, except I decided to cover my hair. With this very apparent change in my faith, I started to get some very interesting questions.

Here are 5 common questions I commonly receive as a Latina revert, and the answers I give (most of the time.)

1) Why did you convert?

Anytime I bump into someone from my past or the topic comes up that I haven’t been a Muslim for very long this question pops up. To be honest, I haven’t pinned down my speech yet. Sometimes the question comes out of nowhere and I’m not fully sure what to say. Sometimes I’m not particularly close to a person and I don’t know how deep I should go into my journey. I’m afraid I’ll disappoint the masses by giving them what may seem like a generic answer: “I became a Muslim because Islam is beautiful” or “I became a Muslim because Islam changed my life.” Often times I try to give a few sentences just to make sure they feel fulfilled by my response.

The truth is I’ve always loved Islam, even before I ever decided I should apply it to my own life. I’ve been reading books on Islam by Muslims since I was 10 years old. I studied it in high school. I had Muslim friends. My “reverting” wasn’t exactly a surprise to me, but I guess no one ever really knows you like you. Still, I’m working on my reversion story spiel in order to tone down what may come out as very dramatic, maybe even appearing like I’m acting in a novela.

2) Did you convert for your spouse?

My husband was raised in Islam and he is Puerto Rican, just like me. Before I met him I wasn’t Muslim. Islam came to me later.

I can see where the question comes from and I’m never surprised when I get it, but try to be very careful when answering. Not because I did convert eventually, but because I know there’s a perception of Muslim men controlling women and I don’t want to perpetuate this stereotype.

The honest answer is no, I did not convert for my husband. In fact, I kept the fact that I was reading the Qur’an and looking into Islam a secret for several months in the beginning because I didn’t want him to question whether I was doing anything for him. I wasn’t sure at the time where my journey would lead and I didn’t want anyone to discourage or make me more afraid than I already was.

I was also intrigued by the fact that my husband was both Muslim and Puerto Rican. I had never met a Latino Muslim before him, and certainly not a Puerto Rican Muslim. Like I said earlier, my people have santos and rosaries all over the place, not Qur’ans and prayer beads.

Meeting him prompted me to look into Islam in Puerto Rico. What I found was not only are there several mosques on the island, but there are actually thousands of Puerto Ricans in the world who are Muslim. It was after finding this information that I became curious as to the connection between my people and Islam which prompted me to read the Qur’an. This was where my journey into Islam actually began.

3) Are you Arab/Do you speak Arabic?

This question is another one I’m not too surprised by. Even in high school, way back before I was ever thinking about Islam as part of my life, people would ask me if I was Arab, Indian or even Bengali. Maybe it’s the shape of my my nose or my cheekbones. Now that my hair is covered, cultural expectations are becoming more prevalent. I’m never offended by this question, and it’s always kind of fun to let people guess what I am. Puerto Rican is never their guess unless they’re Hispanic (and if they are Hispanic and they guess what I am, we go back to question number one on the list.)

As for my Arabic, I’m trying to learn some beginner’s prayers and how to pronounce words properly. Spanish and Arabic have and use similar sounds in a lot of their words, but sometimes my Arabic can have a very Spanish accent, which I’m working on.

4) Will you change your name to an Arabic one?

This question is not asked too often, but I do get it. The shortest answer is no. I love my name and I am proud of my name, it is who I am and I don’t expect to change that for anyone. I try to emphasize to people that I am not a completely new person, just working to be a better version of myself. That means I am a Latina and a Muslimah.

5) Are you bald under there/why do you care about your hair if none can see?

I absolutely love these questions because they’re so outlandish to me. What I find most interesting is that it’s people I knew before who ask these things and whether they’re asking out of genuine curiosity or sheer ignorance it’s always a fun time. Usually my response corresponds to their level of genuine curiosity. I explain I’m a human who has hair and hair can be quite messy, even when others can’t see it. I also tend to emphasize that I wear hijab for God and for myself and that even when I didn’t, I did my hair for myself.

Islam truly has changed my life for the better, and although it hasn’t been easy, it’s always been beautiful.

This road has definitely been an interesting one and I know I have a whole lot left to learn, but I am so thankful that I am able to experience what I have thus far. Islam truly has changed my life for the better, and although it hasn’t been easy, it’s always been beautiful.

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Image/White Star

Asma Jahangir was nothing short of an icon. The Pakistani activist and human rights lawyer passed away at the age of 66 in Lahore due to cardiac arrest. Her passing on Feb. 11 is being mourned as a huge loss for Pakistan with and leaves behind a greater sense of uncertainty in the country.

Heartbroken that we lost Asma Jahangir – a saviour of democracy and human rights.

I met her a week ago in Oxford. I cannot believe she is no more among us. The best tribute to her is to continue her fight for human rights and democracy. pic.twitter.com/Tf7VOYfvq5

— Malala (@Malala) February 11, 2018

Here are five things you need to know about her:

1. She was a trailblazer from an early age 

Her first job as a lawyer was setting up her own firm in family law in 1980. Joining forces with her sister Hina Jilani and a couple of friends, the firm focused on divorce, maintenance payments and custodial cases.  

Image/Carlos Osorio

2. Her activist spirit was also born young

The daughter of liberal politician Malik Ghulam Jilani, Jahangir was drawn to the courtroom since she was a teenager. After her father was taken in detention during General Yahya Khan’s military control of Pakistan in 1971, she filed a petition as a teen in the Lahore High Court. Despite her case being dismissed, she appealed to the Supreme Court. After Khan’s dictatorship ended, her father’s detention was announced illegal.

3. She broke barriers

Jahangir became the first woman to lead Pakistan’s Supreme Court Bar Association. She also co-founded the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan and the Women’s Action Fund.

Asma Jahangir was the bravest person I knew. She fearlessly stood up to dictators, thugs, misogynists. She was never daunted by the attacks that came her way. She never wavered from her principles. Her loss is incalculable.

— Omar Waraich (@OmarWaraich) February 11, 2018

4. Her fearless attitude got her nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize 

As an activist, Jahangir fought for women’s rights and democracy in Pakistan. She fiercely opposed the country’s infamous blasphemy laws. Whether it was for Ahmadis, who are a taboo even for the most liberal Pakistanis, or Christians and Hindus, Jahangir was never afraid to defend and stand in solidarity with fellow Pakistanis. She was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2005. 

‘Speaking truth to power’ a phrase, we often use. #AsmaJahangir lived,practiced till her last breath. Questioned mullahs, military, judges, politicians, all the powerful;defended downtrodden. Faced threats &
attacks. Was never afraid.What a hero. We have to contend with a void. pic.twitter.com/NFamtObL0s

— Raza Ahmad Rumi (@Razarumi) February 11, 2018

5. Her sense of justice and human rights irked the Pakistani government

Jahangir was arrested in 1983 while campaigning against military dictator General Zia-ul-Haq. She was arrested in 2005, under the leadership of President Pervez Musharraf, at an event for women’s rights and again in 2007 when she was put under house arrest for her stance against his dismissal of former Chief Justice Iftikhar Mohammad Chaudhry. Her criticism of the military led to an assassination plot by Pakistani officials, according to U.S. intelligence groups who apparently found evidence of a plan in 2012.

Rest in peace dear Asma. To God we belong and to Him we shall return.

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Alexander Wang has always captivated my interest. His sense of minimalism, unique craftsmanship and eye to detail are unmatched. He began his journey in fashion as an intern at Teen Vogue and eventually moved on to Vogue magazine. His interest in fashion is genuine and pure – and he built his career from the ground-up.

My interest in his designs were limited by how much of his collection could accommodate me when I prefer to dress modestly. As Wang descended into the current trend of street-wear (Sweatpants, jackets, baggy tunics) I began to have more of a range in my options.

Whether you’re a hijabi or not, whether you prefer to adhere to a more conservative definition of modesty or not – this collection has something to offer you.

His latest collection, however, completely shocked me. There was a piece in every single outfit featured on the runway that I could see myself styling into my typical modest-wear as a Muslim woman. Whether you’re a hijabi or not, whether you prefer to adhere to a more conservative definition of modesty or not – this collection has something to offer you. It was made for the modern, stylist woman who knows how to make her clothes speak for her. From this collection, you really get the vibe that, “Less is more.” And we are definitely here for it.

Keep reading to see how I break down these Alexander Wang looks that promote modest wear:

1) 50 shades of black and grey.

The shades of black and grey at play here create an alluring look that draws you in and leaves you wanting more. The vest over the jacket proves that outerwear in the colder weather does not mean you need to hide your outfits but instead can incorporate what keeps you warm into the rest of your look.

2) Get the layered look down.

Layering has been a technique that modest dressers practically invented. This is the cool girl version. Putting a turtleneck under something as simple as a button-down accentuates the neck and makes the overall look complete and polished. The length of this button-down works better as over-sized because the tightness of the turtleneck has it’s own dimension and the two pieces strongly compliment one another.

3) Get with the texture, ladies.

TEXTURE! When I saw the fur sleeves coming through from underneath the sweater-vest I knew I needed it. Not only because there’s a classic contrast between black and grey. But because this would go with anything while still keeping me warm. The colors are so neutral I could pair this with jeans, a-line pants, a skirt and tights, and the list goes on. You don’t need to overthink what you pair it with because this sweater combination does it all for you. It’s a statement piece.

4) The trench coat is ev-er-y-thang!

While this entire outfit is incredible, I need to address the trench coat specifically. The slimming accents on the waist of the coat give a hint of detail but still let the focus remain on the trench as a whole. This coat is essential for anyone who needs something to wear when it’s colder in the evenings. Imagine this with a white tee and blue jeans. Or a navy blue a-line dress. It’s such a versatile piece but gives you the length and coverage you need that would allow you to still wear it with a hijab or a more conservative style.

5) Get stylish with fur and leather.

Get an oversized fur coat and then clench it at the waist with a leather belt. You are covered, you are warm and it is upto you how tightly you wish for the belt to hold. Depending on your style, you can tighten the belt to give a chic, trendy look with heels or you can loosen the belt and let it hang off more to feed into a laid-back, casual style. Or you can do whatever you want because each person has their own individual style and the main purpose of the fashion industry is to produce clothing that people can truly personalize and make their own.

Props to Wang for incorporating modest-wear whether it was intentional or not. This is a major step in the high-fashion industry.

All images taken from Intsagram @alexanderwangny

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It shouldn’t come as a surprise to say that the 90’s have been slowly and steadily making a come back for the last few seasons. From Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid prancing around New York city in high-waisted denim to mini backpacks at Louis Vuitton, we’re clearly in the midst of a 90’s fashion renaissance: Mom jeans, overalls, velvet styles, and earring hoops. Even Cindy Crawford’s daughter, Kaia Gerber, is one of the freshest faces on the runway. It’s like we’re living a similar version of our childhood as adults.

From Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid prancing around New York city in high-waisted denim to mini backpacks at Louis Vuitton, we’re clearly in the midst of a 90’s fashion renaissance:

The only difference between now and then is that we’ve left the beauty faux pas of the past behind us. Gone are the days of tweezing our eyebrows into extinction, cucumber melon body splash, and blue eyeshadow overload.

Or so I thought, until I saw this beauty shot from yesterday’s Alexander Wang show at NYFW:

Source: Instagram, @jennarosenstein

And this on Mansur Gavriel’s Instagram:

Source: Instagram, @MansurGavriel

Can it be? Are hair claws and scrunchies our next must-have beauty accessories? Images of the Olsen twins dawning the covers of movies at Blockbuster and Rachel Green from Friends season 1 come to mind. Have we really thought of everything in the fashion industry that we have to revive these trends?

It’s clear that the 90’s resurgence is just getting started. Bella Hadid was just spotted in Times Square paying homage to the Matrix with tiny sunglasses and a leather get up. With fashion week only half way through, stay tuned for other notorious 90’s trends just waiting for revival.

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Mennel Ibtissem recently quit the “The Voice” after she received backlash for some old Twitter posts where she condemned the Israeli occupation of Palestine, and the French government. She announced she was leaving the show on Friday via a video shared on Facebook. In the video, she apologized to anybody she may have upset. This comes a week after Amena Khan stepped away from the L’Oreal due to similar circumstances and expressed her regret regarding the old posts.

It is incredibly heartbreaking to see another person having to apologize and end expressing her support for basic human rights for Palestine.

Mennel was harassed online and in the media; she was called a terrorist, a radical and an anti-Semite. Standing up for the rights of the Palestinian people, and not speaking out against the violent actions of the Israeli government does not equate to being an anti-Semitic bigot. It is incredibly heartbreaking to see another person having to apologize and end expressing her support for basic human rights for Palestine.
It never fails – voicing support for Palestinian rights and freedom always results in the person being accused of anti-Semitism.

Newsflash: It is not an attack on Judaism if you stand against oppression and occupation. Palestinians are not afforded the liberties that they deserve as human beings. Homes are literally condemned to the ground into rubble, children are killed and families are torn apart due apartheid walls and checkpoints manned by Israeli soldiers. Shedding light on these issues and condemning oppression shouldn’t be a reason why someone would have to face criticism or end an opportunity of making a dream a reality.

Palestinians are not afforded the liberties that they deserve as human beings. 

This highlights a disturbing trend in which Muslim women in the mainstream media have to give up their platforms due to their opinions, and beliefs. There is already very little visibility of Muslim women in the media, and women being forced to step down erases the very little visibility we have.

In her video on Facebook, Mennel assured that her musical career was not ending, and she said, “A lot of tension has hidden my desire to spread peace, love and tolerance. I have never meant to hurt anyone and only the idea that I would do it on purpose pains me a lot.”

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Influencers are making major waves on day 2 and 3 at NYFW, even with the cold, rainy weather. We’ve had both Halima Aden and up-and-comer Kadija Diawara take over the runways. It’s total #MGTakeOver and we are loving every moment of it!

Check out the rest of the highlights of our favorite hijabi looks from NYFW from days 2 and 3:

Influencers are making major waves on day 2 and 3 at NYFW, even with the cold, rainy weather.

1) Stop the presses, fashionistas!. Yesterday we spotted a hijab-clad beauty in Danielle Cathari’s collection for Adidas Originals. After further research we found out it was Kadija Diawara.

@daniellecathari

2) Kadija in all her glory

Source: @unwrinkling

3) Queen Halima showing off her silky tresses-er, hijab.

@halima

4) Day 2 with Yasmeena!

@y.asmeena

5) Not your typical mirror selfie, hey Bella!

@bellahadid

6) Oumayma El Boumeshouli photographed by @thestreetvibe

@oumaymaboumeshouli

7) Pink on pink on pink

@hajra_aaa

8) And then black on black on black

@noore

9) @sallyomo’s fur game is perf…

@sallyomo

10) Just like Melanie El-Turk’s!

@hautehijab

11) Where do we begin with @tk_wonder’s fab look?

@tk_wonder

12) Halima with E! News host Zuri Hall

@halima

13) Love love the earrings and turban look

@mariaalia

14) @hautehijab had two stylish looks in one day…how?

@hautehijab

15) Our favorite fashion duo

@noore

16) Backstage pass to Hana Tajima’s Uniqlo collection thanks to @lililand

@lililand

17) @sallyomo taking some downtime after the shows

@sallyomo

18) Stud muffin

Source: Fashionista

19) C’est chic…Parisian chic

Source: Fashionista

20) Bring that blanket out with you, no one’s judging.

Source: Fashionista

21) Mademoiselle Meme x Gucci Gang

Source: Fashionista

22) Two kinds of people on a cold day

Source: Man Repeller

23) Halima Aden backstage at Philip Plein!

@philippleininternational

24) Kadija Diawara on the runway for Chromat

@kadijadiawara

25) Fashion’s hottest accessory: the Cheeto bag.

@teenvogue

26) Marwa Atik- forever a gamechanger

@marwaatik

27) Turned the roadway to a runway

@hautehijab

28) Stone cold foxes @indoanisa and @marwaatik

@indoanisa

29) Halima’s full look for Phillip Plein. We love an icon.

@halima

30) Girl gang.

@rachaelrobinphoto

31) Kadija Diawara walking for Pyer Moss- total showstopper.

@firstviewphoto

32) Love! Love! Love!

@hajra_aaa

33) Idk how we feel about this sunglass trend, but @mariaalia may be changing our minds.

@mariaalia

34) When your popular friend puts you on her Snapchat story… Guhhh! Ahhhh-mazing!

@sallyomo
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