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Mrs Baldwin's Class Blog! by Mrs Baldwin - 1y ago

We have started learning and practising our times tables each week this Term.

Times Table is actually another word for multiplication table. It is a table that shows the results of multiplying two numbers together.

Learning your times tables is very important because you use them in many different types of real life problem solving situations.

FOR EXAMPLE…

When your shopping for food and you need to work out how much it would cost to buy more than one of the same item.

Or…

If you are cooking you might need to make a double batch and would need to multiply the ingredients to find out how much you would need.

When we feel we have practised and learnt one of the times tables we can place our name on the chart to show we are ready to be tested. Mrs Baldwin will then sit with us and test our recall on our chosen times table. If we are able to say the times table in order and then answer set questions that mix up the order, we pass the test. Our name gets ticked off the Times Table Chart for that particular table that we were tested on.

Once we have been tested for all the times tables from 2-12 and we pass each one we can then move onto the Times Table Challenge.

In the challenge there are many different levels  beginning with Level A (0-2 times tables) all the way up to the level called ‘beyond extreme’ where we have to multiple 3 numbers together. There are 50 questions for each level and we have 5 minutes to complete it. Once we have completed a level successfully our name is ticked off and we move up to the next one.

Below are some tips for learning your Times Tables.

Order does not matter– When we multiply 2 numbers together it does not matter which number is first or second, the answer is always the same. So don’t memorise both 3×5 and 5×3 just memorise that 3 and a  5 make 15 when multiplied.

Every multiplication has a twin – For example if you forget  8×5 it might be easier to remember 5×8. This way you only need to remember half of the times table chart.

x2 Tables: Is just doubling the number, the same as adding the number to itself.

x5 Tables: Have a pattern: 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 etc. It ends in either a 0 or a 5.

x6 Tables:  When you multiply 6 by an even number, they both end in the same digit. Example: 6×2=12, 6×4=24, 6×6=36, etc

x9 Tables:  Have a pattern  9, 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81, 90

Now notice how the “units” place value goes down 9,8,7,6,5… and at the same time the “tens” place value goes up 1,2,3, 4…?

Use your hands to help. For example for 9×8, hold down your eighth finger and you can count 7 and 2 which is 72.

courtesy of mathsisfun.com

Also when you add the answer’s digits together, you get 9.
Example: 9×5=45 and 4+5=9. (But not with 9×11=99)

x10 Tables: Are the easiest of them all, just add a zero after it eg: 10×2 = 20, 10×3 = 30

x11 Tables: Up to 9×11: just repeat the digit (Example: 4×11 = 44). For 10×11 to 12×11: write the sum of the digits between the digits; Example: 12×11 = 1(2+1)1 = 132

x12 Tables: You can x10 add x2 eg: for 12 x 4 you can go 10×4 = 40 and 4 x2 = 8, add those answers together to get 48.

There are loads of fun games and songs that you can listen to and play to help you learn your times tables. Some examples include:

Website

App



Chart

Can you think of an example in everyday life where you might use time tables to solve a problem? What have you used, played or listened to that has helped you learn your times tables? Why do you think learning your times tables is important?
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This year we have looked at Narratives as a text type and our class all wrote individual stories using our imagination.

This week was the final week to complete the Mayoral Make-A-Book Competition and everyone worked very hard to complete them. We all designed our own front covers and blurbs which were laminated and we typed up each page of our story and drew our own illustrations. Mrs Baldwin then bound them professionally and they have now been entered into the competition.

We enjoyed reading each others books this week and to our C.A.T Buddies. Everyone was really excited to see all our books put together professionally and looking like a real book that you could borrow from the library.

What is a blurb?

A blurb is a short summary or description of  a book. The blurb does not tell the story: it tells the potential buyer or reader about the story

As a class we discussed why most authors include blurbs at the back of their books.

What is the purpose of a blurb?

A blurb is a great way to promote a book and make a person want to read or even buy it. Without a blurb it can be very hard to find out what a particular book is about without having to read the entire story.

Check out some of the blurbs below….

You can read some of the pages from some of the groups stories below

Well done everyone on such a great effort, you all worked so hard and Mrs Baldwin is very proud of all of you!

In early November the winners will be presented with their prize by the Mayor.  Each winner will receive a lovely book with commemorative bookplate and a certificate. One lucky winner from each year level will also be chosen to have their book featured on the Charles Sturt website as an ebook for a whole year!

Good luck everyone and well done again!




What did you enjoy most about making your book? What did you find the most challenging about writing and making your book and why? Which book did you enjoy reading and why?
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Mrs Baldwin's Class Blog! by Mrs Baldwin - 1y ago

This year, with the help of Mr Philbrook, we were introduced into the world of coding using Spheros.

What are Spheros?

A Sphero is a spherical robot designed by Sphero. It is a white orb wrapped in polycarbonate, capable of rolling around, and controlled by a smartphone or tablet. A Sphero can roll at a speed of up to 7km/h in any direction and change colour. Using a range of Apps, students can accurately direct the movement of the Sphero using code.

Why do we use them?

Creatively designed lessons incorporating Spheros can develop many of the attributes. We can design and create a code to direct the Sphero while connecting, communicating, collaborating, problem solving, testing, failing, and retesting. It is one of the first ways that we are introduced into the world of coding.

What do we need?

Our school is lucky enough to have a set of Spheros in the library that we can borrow.

We also need our device with the Sphero Edu app which is free to purchase in the App store.

Our first task was to work in small groups to create a code so that the Sphero would create a square by moving around on the floor. This was quite challenging as we needed to make sure that we chose a good speed and distance that the Sphero would travel to make sure each side connected together. We also needed to select the correct degree or angle that the Sphero needed to turn to create each corner of the shape.

For our next task, Mr Philbrook taught us about the “If/Then, Else” code using the blocks program type on the Sphero Edu App. We used this code to create and play ‘The Toss Game.’ For this game we needed a group of 4. The aim of the game was to throw the Sphero to each other. When we threw the Sphero, it would make an animal sound. The person who catches the Sphero must guess the animal sound correctly. If we didn’t we had to act out that animal instead.

BUT….

Before we could play the game we had to create the “If/Then,Else” code CORRECTLY! If one piece of the code was missing the game would not work. This was quite challenging. Mr Philbrook demonstrated how to use the code up by watching the video below. It really showed us how important it is to have a correct code.

Blocks 2 - Step 4 - If/Then, Else - YouTube

The game was so much fun and it was a great reward at the end of the activity once we worked really hard to create a code.

What did you find challenging about this task and why? What did you enjoy the most about this activity? If you could create a game using the Sphero, what would your game be and how would you play it?
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Mrs Baldwin's Class Blog! by Mrs Baldwin - 1y ago

To begin the year we have been talking about the difference between a fixed and growth mindset.

Mindsets are beliefs about yourself and your most basic qualities. Think about your intelligence, your talents, your personality. Are these qualities simply fixed traits, carved in stone and that’s that? Or are they things you can grow throughout your life?

We started by writing down something we feel we can not do, or are not good at.

We then looked at the two different mindsets.

Fixed Mindset

Refers to the belief that our basic qualities (intellegience and skills) are fixed traits which can not be changed. The way the students feel about their comment is a fixed mindset approach. People with a fixed mindset believe they are born with whatever smarts or talents they have and if your not good at something naturally you can’t develop it much.

Growth Mindset

People with a growth mindset, see their qualities as things that can be developed through their dedication and effort. They’re happy if they’re brainy or talented, but that’s just the starting point. They understand that no one has ever accomplished great things without years of passionate practice and learning.

We then brainstormed some words people might use and say to themselves if they have a fixed mindset. These sayings are often negative and make us feel sad and sometimes even angry.

Mrs. Baldwin explained that it is ok to make mistakes and they are important to make because that shows we are learning and challenging ourselves. The key is we need to be persistent and patient and never give up. This is the only way our brain will continue to grow and allow us to the best possible versions of ourselves.

Next we got our phrases we wrote and ripped them up because when we have a growth mindset we will achieve whatever it is that we write down, we just need to keep trying and be persistent!


We have been watching a series of videos on the Class Dojo site that have explained to us about growth mindset. Check the first episode out here!

Growth Mindset for students - Episode 1/5 - YouTube

Finally we worked with Ms Abela’s year 4 class to answer the following questions

What is Growth Mindset? Why is Growth Mindset important in our classroom?

We all had to write our own answers first and then join in a group of 4 to create one answer combining all our ideas. We also created some posters to place around the room.


Below are some examples of some famous people who have had failures in life, but had a growth mindset to persist and succeed. Check out some below

Imagine a world without Harry Potter, Dr Seuss or even the taste of KFC chicken!

Why do you think it is important to have a growth mindset? What words or phrases can you say to yourself when you are stuck or make a mistake? Can you give an example when you have made a mistake and never gave up until you succeeded? How did you feel?
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Mrs Baldwin's Class Blog! by Mrs Baldwin - 1y ago

This term our class have been lucky to have Alan visit us for a lesson each week to teach us about Chess.

Chess is a two player strategy board game played on a checkered game board with 64 squares arranged in an 8 by 8 grid. It was thought to be the first ever game that was played on a board with squares that had different types of pieces.

The game originated in Northern India in the 6th century AD. Back then it was called Chaturanga which translates to “four divisions” which is in reference to the four divisions of the military. Below is a list of the chess pieces and what their original names were:

 Original Name              Current Name

king                                              king

adviser                                       queen

elephant                                    bishop

horse                                          knight

chariot                                       rook

foot-solider                             pawn

The first World Chess Championship was held in 1886 and was won by an Austrian called Wilhelm  Steinitz.

Our first session with Alan involved him explaining the moves each chess piece can make and where they begin on the board. From there he demonstrated some strategies that are used when playing. Mrs Baldwin was extremely impressed of the knowledge that most students had, especially with the strategy moves!

Alan and Mrs Baldwin have also signed us up to the website Chesskid where we can practice the game against each other anytime we want. In our computing lesson we decided to try it out and it was a lot of fun playing against each other and also students from around the world!

Check out more information about how to play chess by watching this video!

ChessKid Lessons: The Magic Of Chess - YouTube

What do you enjoy most about playing chess? What have you learnt from Alan over the past few weeks? Do you play chess outside of school? If so who do you play with?
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