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Move Osteopathy by Move Osteopathy - 1M ago

The importance of resistance training – by Osteopath Dr Shehan Kariyakaranage

Running and walking are popular forms of exercise that we all enjoy and use to help us improve our overall health and well-being! However a form of exercise that is often neglected and avoided, but that’s just as important, is resistance training. Resistance training comes in many forms; whether that’d be normal weights, body-weighted exercises or even in other forms such as bands and medicine balls. Resistance training is defined as any exercise that that forces the muscles to contract against an external resistance with the purpose of improving muscular strength, mass and/or endurance.

There are many benefits of resistance training for all age groups. Despite previous concerns regarding safety, resistance training in children has been proven beneficial and is now endorsed by governing bodies. Benefits in children include:

· Improving body/limb control

· Improving joint stability

· Improving strength endurance

· Improving the integrity of bone structure/decrease risk of fractures in growing children

· Improving fitness levels

· Improving mood & self esteem

· Improving muscular adaption to prevent future injuries

· Laying foundations for maximal strength, power and sporting performance in the future

Resistance training is not be confused with bodybuilding and powerlifting. Children are in fact encouraged to participate in supervised resistance training at least 3 times per week in accordance to ‘Australia physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines’ [1]. Many injuries that occur in children are due to accidental weight contact injuries (e.g. plate falling onto a toe). However resistance training is very much safe, as long as the program is well designed (based on age, size, and existing strength levels) and is supervised.

Children are initially recommended to begin resistance training with bodyweight exercises. Once they display control of over their body weight and limbs, they can progress onto soft resistances (e.g. bands, sand tubes, medicine balls). After this is accomplished to an advanced level, children will then be allowed to commence harder/heavier barbell training.

In adults/elderly the benefits are similar. However programs are designed to focus on:

· Increasing muscle mass, strength and endurance (beneficial in elderly)

· Improving cardiovascular health & preventing chronic conditions (e.g. diabetes, arthritis)

· Improving posture

· Decreasing stress levels

· Increasing bone density and strength and reduce risk of osteoporosis

· Improving mobility, balance and motor control

To maintain general health, adults are encouraged to partake in resistance training at least 2 times per week, in accordance with the ‘Australia physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines’ [1].

Programs should involve all major muscle groups and a combination of single joint and multi-joint exercises is encouraged.

Dr Shehan Kariyakaranage (Osteopath)

Shehan Kariyakaranage is a registered osteopath and a level 1 accredited strength and conditioning coach. He is able to provide specific exercise prescription and develop programs to rehabilitate and prevent injuries.

Where can you find me?

Alexandra Hills: 1 Bluebell St, Alexandra Hills QLD, 4161 (Mon, Thurs, Sat)

New Farm: 11/65 James St, Brisbane QLD, 4005 (Wed, Fri)

REFERENCES

[1] Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines [Internet]. Physiopedia. [Cited 1 March 2019]. Available from: https://www.physiopedia.com/Australia%27s_Physical_Activity_and_Sedentary_Behaviour_Guidelines

The post Resistance Training appeared first on Move Osteopathy.

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Move Osteopathy by Kellie Rawlings - 7M ago

Nothing says Christmas quite like mince pies.

These pies are completely vegan, are super easy to make and will keep for up to 5 days in an airtight container.

Ingredients

  • 1 large apple
  • 280g dried fruit mix
  • Juice and zest from 1 orange
  • Juice and zest from 1 lemon
  • 30ml dark rum or single malt whiskey
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1 ½ tsp mixed spice
  • 150g brown sugar
  • 40g vegan butter, melted
  • 2 sheets shortcrust pastry (most frozen pastry will be vegan)

Method

  1. Finely chop apple
  2. Add apple and all other ingredients (except pastry) to a large bowl and stir to combine
  3. Cover and leave in the fridge overnight
  4. Preheat oven to 180 degrees
  5. Take your thawed shortcrust pastry and use a cookie cutter to cut out 8 large circle
  6. Take circles and and gently press into cupcake moulds
  7. Fill each pastry case with mince filling
  8. For the pastry top, cut 8 large circles out of the pastry sheet. Use a star cutter to make a star in the middle of the circle. Place on top of pie
  9. Place in the oven for 15-20 minutes 10.

Allow to cool and enjoy!

The post Vegan Fruit Mince Pies appeared first on Move Osteopathy.

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So you want to do Pilates …… but where do you start???

Should I do Clinical Pilates?? Studio Pilates?? Whats the difference??

We answer the common question about what’s the difference between clinical and Studio Pilates.

Clinical Pilates

Clinical Pilates is an individualised, tailored program which takes into account the individual’s clinical picture, injury history,  and specific goals. Perhaps you have a knee or back injury or have had some surgery or need to do some specific rehabilitation. Perhaps you have sought treatment and have been referred to Clinical Pilates as a part of your treatment, rehabilitation and recovery.

It can be a little scary starting a movement program post injury or if you are returning from surgery or a serious illness, and we understand you may feel vulnerable about your recovery, but rest assured we are here to make your movement journey a positive one and even enjoyable! The popularity of Pilates in a clinical settings is because;

  • It focuses on control and precision of movement to promote healing, strength and mobility.
  • It allows the opportunity for correction and repatterining of poor movement habits it consists of low numbers of thoughtful repetitions to avoid pain and undesirable reinforcement of poor movement patterns
  • It consists of methodical progressions, within each exercise and within the sequences as a whole to foster change and growth without risking injury
  • It has a powerful calming effect on the mind
  • It enables patients to move from acute injury recovery all the way to a high level fitness and performance programs
  • It provides a positive, pain-free movement experience that can exceed the patient’s expectations and promotes healing, confidence and happiness.

Our Clinical Pilates classes are taught by appropriately Pilates trained manual therapists, such as an Osteopath, Exercise Physiologist or  a professional Pilates teacher with advanced training.

A Clinical Pilates program commences with a one-on-one Initial Consultation where your teacher will take some time to discuss your issues and concerns with you prior to commencing with some gentle pre-Pilates or specific rehab type exercises. If you have been referred from another MOVE practitioner your teacher may have already consulted them (with your consent) to ensure continuity of treatment with the aim to return you to normal daily functions as quickly as appropriate.

Typically Clinical Pilates sessions continue as private classes to ensure movements remain focused, precise and controlled, and allow plenty of opportunities for feedback and consultation of how the movement and overall session is feeling. The total number of private classes required to reach a satisfactory level of recovery varies greatly from person to person depending on type and severity of injury, commitment to weekly sessions and other individual factors.

Consistency is key in this type of training and we recommend regular weekly sessions from one to three times per week. Your teacher will continue to liaise with your manual therapist to ensure your journey is a positive, pain-free experience to get you back on your feet as soon as possible. Once you have reached this milestone we recommend you continue your Pilates training in one of our Studio Pilates classes where you will continue to be guided under the watchful eye of professional Pilates teachers, in a small group environment with a maximum of three students where you will gain further strength and mobility whilst enjoying the full Pilates experience.

* Please check with your private health insurer as private health fund rebates may be available with some of our teachers and for those with extras cover *

 

Studio Pilates

In contrast, Studio Pilates usually consists of non-specific exercises, which are generally suitable for most people. Studio Pilates classes are great if you don’t have specific injuries that require specific rehabilitation. Studio Pilates Classes are a great way to keep fit, perfect and control the way we move and to add strength and tone. They are fun to do with a friend to in a small group.

Our Studio Pilates classes are taught by professional Pilates teachers with a minimum of a Diploma of Pilates qualifications. Some of our studio teachers may also have advanced training and training in specialist fields. You may even find a manual therapists or two who also teach Studio Pilates class. We have hand picked our teachers to ensure we have the best teachers Brisbane has to offer, and their passion and dedication to sharing the method makes for enjoyable and powerfully effective classes suitable for all levels.

Our Studio Pilates classes are conducted in small groups of up to three students only. We have purposefully designed our classes to be small so that we can achieve better results for our students, allowing the teacher to spend ample time with each one to make the appropriate corrections, but still enabling the student some time to work independently and at their own pace.

As with our Clinical Pilates classes our Studio classes are conducted in a way to ensure;

  • All exercises are performed with precision and control
  • Poor movement patterns are corrected quickly to prevent bad habits from forming.
  • Repetitions are maintain at the appropriate number to maintain correct muscle recruitment patterns for maximum benefit.
  • Exercises and overall programs are appropriately progressed over time for maximum growth with minimum risk of injury, moving seamlessly from the beginner to advanced repertoire.
  • A mindful movement practice is maintained at all times for physical wellbeing, mental stillness and spiritual peace.
  • Positive, pain-free movement experiences that can exceed the student’s expectations and promotes supreme wellbeing and happiness!

Private Studio and Duet classes may also available upon request.

If you have any questions or  would like more information please feel free to e-mail our clinic manager erica@moveosteopathy.com.au

 

The post Whats The Difference Between Studio & Clinical Pilates? appeared first on Move Osteopathy.

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Move Osteopathy by Kellie Rawlings - 11M ago

Chickpea Dahl
Beautiful vegan winter warmer full of fiber and anti-inflammatory spices
  • 1 tablespoon Olive Oil
  • 1 onion, finely diced
  • 2 Cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 2 birds eye chilli, finely diced
  • 2 coriander roots, trimmed
  • 1 tablespoon ginger, finely grated
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon powdered turmeric
  • 1 tablespoon Thai red curry paste
  • 1 cup Chickpeas, soaked overnight
  • 1 cup red lentils, soaked
  • 2 cups vegetable stock
  • 1-2 cups boiled water
  • 4-5 green cardamom pods
  • 3-4 star anise
  • 200g diced tomato
  1. Heat olive oil in a large pot and add onion, garlic, chilli, coriander and ginger – fry briefly until fragrant. Stir through curry paste. Add chickpeas and lentils and stir to coat.
  2. Add stock and water bring to the boil and leave uncovered on a low simmer for 2 hours – stirring occasionally. Add diced tomato.
  3. Serve with cooked quinoa and garnish with mint leaves and pepitas

The post July Recipe – Chickpea Dahl appeared first on Move Osteopathy.

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Move Osteopathy by Kellie Rawlings - 11M ago

Don’t take the warm weather for granted, cold and flu season is just around the corner! Being as it is that the weather is too warm for soup, why not try this delicious immune boosting Papaya and Avocado smoothie?
Just throw everything in a blender and enjoy! If you can handle the spice, throw in more ginger and turmeric for better therapeutic effect. To increase the fibre add a tablespoon of ground flaxseed or chia. INGREDIENTS ½ ripe papaya
½ ripe avocado
1 teaspoon of Manuka honey
¼ teaspoon organic ground ginger/1.5cm piece of fresh
¼ teaspoon organic ground turmeric
Dash of coconut cream
Pinch of ground black pepper

The post May Recipe – Papaya Smoothie appeared first on Move Osteopathy.

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Nick has been in the Fitness Industry for over 9 years after completing his Fitness Certificates at Queensland Academy of Fitness. He has worked with a range of patients from Sporting Teams, Injury Rehabilitation Patients to Weight Loss Patients. He has recently moved into Clinical work, whilst he finishes off his Bachelor or Exercise Physiology at QUT.

He is a committed and understanding Personal Trainer who caters for all of his clients needs, currently working with patients with needs relating to all things from Injury Rehabilitation to Strength and Conditioning.

Nick has gained experience from owning and operating Fitness Centre’s and mentoring new members to the Health and Fitness Industry. He appreciates the challenge and diversity that all of his patients have and is always seeking the best solution for each individual patient.

He believes the most basic movements we make every day are the most important to a Strength Program and progression is made beyond the Biomechanics of those movements.

To make a booking, call our New Farm clinic on 07 3854 0087 or click the ‘book online’ button:

The post Introducing Nick Leask – Personal Trainer appeared first on Move Osteopathy.

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