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If you were old enough in the early 1990s to enjoy the Cranberries then you probably paid attention when the world found out that Dolores O’Riordan had died on 15 January 2018. This is a pencil drawing of Dolores O’Riordan from when the Cranberries performed “Zombie” on Late Show with David Letterman – in November 1994.

Please enjoy!

Dolores O’Riordan: 1971 – 2018
“Zombie!”

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Weeks: 1 | 2

The quest continues…

This week I’m continuing with the motorcycle I started drawing last week. This week I’m spending time reviewing YouTube tutorials on how to draw life-like or photorealistic images. There is lots of great information out there. The most important thing I learned was that there is a place for graphite pencils and there is a place for charcoal pencils. I think it’s time to invest in an art kit to have the right tools to succeed in this quest. I learned that for those really dark areas on a drawing, graphite doesn’t work because it creates a shiny appearance. The best option is using a charcoal pencil for really, life-like dark areas.

Enough talk, let’s see some of your drawing, Rick.

Ok, here’s a progression from last week to today. With the sketch of the motorcycle done, it was time to start the shading process to attempt to present a life-like appearance.

Started week 3 with continuing the sketch from week 2

Week 3 – getting the rear tire done

Week 3 – finishing the rear tire and shading the fairing

Week 3 – How about the seat and some of the frame?

Week 3 – working on the tank and handlebars

Check back for a status update. I hope to complete this motorcycle in week 3, but shading, I’m finding, is an arduous process and takes a long time. I may have to finish this thumper in week 4.

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Weeks: 1|2

So week 1 came and went and while I didn’t produce a finished motorcycle drawing, I walked away with some insights into what I needed to improve on. Some of my biggest challenges included drawing tires in perspective, spacial layout of the motorcycle parts, developing a consistent starting point, sketching the entire concept before diving into details of individual parts and focusing on the concept of 2-point perspective to ensure the motorcycle’s lines all make sense. So, where do I go from here.

The end result of my week 1 efforts

To effectively eat an elephant one must eat one bite at a time. I need to use this concept in my 52-week quest to become good at drawing photo-realistic motorcycles. So this week I will focus on tires. I will focus on understanding the typical parts of a tire and how to draw them in perspective. In week 3 I will focus on spacial layout of the motorcycle parts.

Drawing tires presents a challenge allow two planes: perspective and lean. Often we’ll see a motorcycle on its side stand and at an angle. It’s these two plans that make drawing motorcycle tires so challenging. Here we go.

Here’s this week’s motorcycle that I’ll use to practice on drawing tires. You’ll notice that I have 2 planes or axes that I need to be concerned with. First the bike’s lean angle – identified with the top-to-bottom diagonal red arrows. The second axis to deal with is the perspective axis – identified with the green left-to-right diagonal arrows.

Drawing motorcycle tires requires understand the bike’s lean angle (red arrows) and the perspective view (green arrows).

First, I’ll work with the green arrows – or perspective. The concept is this: when looking at a wheel in a perpendicular view (directly at the tire from the side view) the tire is a perfect circle. The further you move your view to the front or the rear of the motorcycle, the more oval the tire’s shape becomes. Here’s my first attempt at sketching tires in the perspective axis (no bike angle).

First sketch attempt – tires in perspective with no bike lean angle.

This was a very helpful YouTube video:

How to Draw Car Wheels (Perspective + Practice) - YouTube

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Artistic ability has always lingered beneath the surface. I was often drawing as a kid and took several years of fine art in high school. I even completed a two-year associate’s degree in architectural engineering after high school. I am in awe of those who can seemingly effortlessly produce stunning art. I’ve tried on many occasions to continue with my art, but the perfectionist in me always points out the flaws – leading me to quit

I have a new plan.

My goal is to become proficient at drawing photo-realistic motorcycles. I love riding motorcycles and want to be able to reproduce photos of motorcycles using pencil. My approach is to draw 1 motorcycle or motorcycle part each week for the next 52 weeks and post my progress on MotorcycleMelee.com. I will find random motorcycle photos on the web and attempt to draw them. My hope is that by the 52nd week I’ll be really good at this stuff.

I will be constantly wrestling with the inner perfectionist who will relentlessly try to convince me I’ll never achieve my goal. I promise to fight back vehemently!

Here’s week one. This is a BMW motorcycle I saw on Instagram.

Here’s the motorcycle.

The first motorcycle I’ll draw

Here is a sequence of drawings I’ve done so far.

Starting off. No I don’t know why I started at the rear wheel.

Adding more motorcycle bits.

Working on some shading techniques

It gets harder trying to capture the shapes.

Filling in some missing pieces.

A bit more to do to call this one completed, but you get the idea. Anyone who draws can obviously find the flaws in these sketches — I see them too. But … I’m not giving up (yet). I’ll forge ahead and continue to improve.

If you have any tips on drawing with pencil, please feel free to comment below.

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Short Riders and Commuters Rejoice – 2015 Yamaha FZ-09 20,000 Mile Long-Term Review

I bought my 2015 Yamaha FZ-09 in March 2016 and it had about 10 miles on it. I ride about 450 miles a week – mostly commuting – so I wanted to offer my perspective on this bike in 2 primary areas. First as a short rider (I’m 5’ – 5” with a 28” inseam) and second as a long-distance commuter (I commute about 100 miles a day to and from work).

Short Riders and Commuters – This is a great bike!

For short riders: This bike works well for a short rider. The seat height, foot pegs and handlebars combine to create a comfortable riding position. With my motorcycle boots on (they have about a 3/4 inch sole) I can flat foot both feet. I tend to sit at the front of the seat hugging the gas tank so that may be helping. With sneakers on, I can place the balls of both feet firmly on the ground.

For long-distance commuting: the FZ-09 is nearly perfect. Let me get my two gripes out of the way first.

The stock seat is the main complaint I have. The seat’s material does a marvelous job gripping my jeans which ends up causing me some discomfort after about 20 to 35 minutes of riding. What happens is the seat material grips my jeans while I tend to slide slightly forward. This causes a bit of congestion in my groin. The seat also creates hot spots under my buttocks about 35-40 minutes into my ride. I find myself having to stand on the pegs for a few seconds to let some air flow under my butt to provide some relief. If I was to spend any money on upgrades it would probably be to replace the seat.

Another challenge I have with the bike is what I consider a sort of rattling vibration coming from the area of the automatic cam chain tensioner (ACCT). This was replaced as part of a safety recall, but I still feel like – especially at lower speeds (second gear around 25 MPH) the ACCT isn’t providing the proper tension. I imagine that the cam chain has too much slack causing the sound and vibration.

I feel vibration and hear a rattling noise from this area.

Two separate dealers tell me there is no problem. I bought a second-year extended warranty from Yamaha so if it does cause any damage, I’m hoping it’ll do so before March 2018. If anyone has a similar experience, I’d really appreciate you telling me. I imagine that if it was going to cause damage it would’ve done so by now. This could be psychosomatic because I know they replaced the ACCT for some reason.

Dashboard: The dashboard offers both a gear position indicator and a gas gauge which I really like. The tachometer is a bit hard to read, but frankly after a few months I don’t spend much time looking at that. I find that the gas gauge is a bit peculiar. I’ll get all the way to work (about 45 miles) and the gas gauge will still show a full tank. Then by the time I get home, I’m down to 2 or even 1 bar. I would expect that at work I’d be down 2 bars, then down 2 more bars by the time I get home.

Suspension: I’ve seen reviews where the front forks were given low marks because in cornering or hard braking they dove. I did adjust the front forks so they were a bit stiffer and for my height and weight (175 LBS) they are just fine now. At highway speeds cornering is fine. Sure there is a little dive under severe braking, but manageable. I didn’t adjust the rear shock at all. For my use the suspension works well.

Brakes: I find these brakes work well. I’ve had to do some emergency braking on the highway and they (particularly the front brakes) complied with my wishes to stop quickly. I practice emergency braking every morning, so I’ve grown used to the brakes. The rear tire locks up quickly when applying firm pressure to the rear brakes, so I rely heavily on my front brakes.

Seating Position: The seating position which is upright, but not quite supermoto upright, makes for an effective long-distance commuting position. When I merge onto the highway, the upright position makes it easier than my previous bikes (on which I installed drag bars for a lower hand position) to look over my shoulder for approaching traffic.

Great seating position for short riders!

The foot pegs are slightly set back under my butt so it offers a bit of a sporty feel when riding – especially because I put the balls of my feet on the pegs for a more athletic, balanced feel. When I ride on the highway I like to bend my elbows and lean forward slightly which, combined with the slightly rear foot pegs, offers a nice sporty feel.

Torque: The torque is just flippin’ awesome. This bike is famous for its torque and infamous for its sometimes snatchy throttle. I have noticed that sometimes if I let off the throttle too quickly then get back on the throttle that there’s a surge of power that causes the bike to lurch forward. I’ve grown used to the throttle and added a “cramp buster” on the throttle that allows me to rest the padding of my hand on it. This seems to help with any throttle snatchiness. I also removed much of the throttle slack which also seems to have helped with this. Besides the occasionally throttle challenge, the FZ-09’s throttle will get you out of trouble very quickly. It will also get you into heaps of trouble if you abuse it. Whether riding on city streets or on the highway, there is power on demand. When you need to get up and go, give it some throttle and away you go! What I appreciate most about the FZ-09’s torque is the ability for me to get out of dangerous situations – especially when riding on the highway. Sometimes when I feel like I’m getting boxed into traffic, the FZ-09’s torque allows me to get out of that dangerous situation very quickly then settle back into a safer highway speed away from the traffic congestion. Even after 22,000+ miles this bike is a blast to ride. The fastest I’ve gone is about 105 MPH and getting there is dangerously easy to do. In a few situations when I need to get out of a potential boxed-in position, I throttle to get around traffic and look down to see 100+ MPH on the dashboard. You simply don’t feel like you’re going that fast. This can get you in deep trouble – a warning to anyone who likes to let loose their inner hooligan.

The front fender, while I don’t really like the batman ears look, does a fabulous job of keeping dead bugs from accumulating on the forks. On my previous bike (2011 Bonneville) the forks were exposed and after around 8K miles I had to replace the fork seals because the dead bugs calcified and cause wear on the seals.

Modifications: I’ve really only done one modification. I removed the stock mirrors and added bar end mirrors. I did this for two reasons. My primary reason for the bar end mirrors was to get better visibility and my secondary because I like the open look above the handlebars. I also added a small fairing and painted it. I added this small fairing because there are a lot of exposed cables and wiring above the headlight housing and with riding so many highway miles I kill a lot (I mean a lot!) of bugs. Those bugs would’ve gotten trapped in the exposed cabling and wiring making it difficult to remove them.

Killing bugs is easy – cleaning the mess isn’t

Now the bugs die on the small fairing which is a bug ugly, but easier to clean up. One problem I have is that the fairing gets hit by road debris which has chipped the paint job. I’ve had to do some touch up painting to fix some of the larger chips. One more thing I added to help with my commuting was a pair of soft saddle bags. They do detract a bit from the sporty look of the FZ-09, but they also allow me to carry tools and store my cold riding gear (yes it gets down to 30 degrees F here in Arizona in the winter). You can read my initial review of these saddlebags here. They have been discolored from the sun, but they still function very well after all this time. I also attached two ROK straps so I can put my backpack on the back seat. I do this mainly in the summer in the 100+ temperatures. Wearing a backpack makes it very hot and prevents airflow. I’ve been testing a cooling jacket and it works much better when I don’t wear the backpack. The challenge is this unkempt look of the crisscrossing straps and the excess strap material. But, for me it’s acceptable for a quick way to attach my backpack.

Tires: I went through the stock tires in about 8,000 miles and put on the Michelin Pilot Road 4 tires. These tires are getting close to needing to be replaced also, but they’ve given me 14,000 miles so far. They are great tires because of their dual-compound construction. There is harder rubber in the center for the highway riding with softer rubber on the edges for cornering. The combination works well for reducing wear, but the rear tire locks up quickly in hard, straight line braking.

Fun Factor. The fun factor for this bike is pegged at a 12 (on a 1 – 10 scale; 10 being “Can’t believe how much fun this is”). The bike flicks so easily into corners and is as fast as you’ve heard in all the other videos. Not only does it accelerate at an awesome rate, but top speed is so very (dangerously) easy to achieve. After 22+ thousand miles I still look forward to riding this bike to and from work.

Summary: This bike is excellent for both short riders and for those who commute daily long distances. The seating position makes for easier traffic management while the power is unbelievably useful in any situation.

2015 Yamaha FZ-09 22,000-Mile Review - YouTube

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When you’re riding, nature is exaggerated.

- Bill Davidson (great-grandson of Harley-Davidson co-founder)

Bill Davidson – great-grandson of Harley-Davidson co-founder – talks about the uniqueness of the Harley-Davidson brand

The folks over at Man of Many had a chance to ride the Harley-Davidson Low Rider S and chat with Bill Davidson about the Harley-Davidson brand.

Feast your eyes on the Low Rider S in the video below and hear what Mr. Davidson says about what differentiates the Harley-Davidson brand.

Testing out the Harley-Davidson Low Rider S - YouTube
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2017 KTM Duke 690 – Ride Review If you don’t have a blast when you ride this, check your pulse…you’re probably dead!

Orange and Black looks good on this 2017 KTM Duke 690

I’d like to offer a special thanks to the team at GO AZ Motorcycles in Scottsdale Arizona. The GO AZ dealerships are the only 2 dealerships in the Phoenix Arizona area that allow test rides on their motorcycles. It’s always great to be able to get first-hand knowledge on motorcycles I’ve grown fond of. In Particular I’d like to thank Mike Horvath who set me up with the 2017 KTM Duke 690 – Thanks Mike!

I’ve wanted to ride this motorcycle for quite some time and when the 2017 version came out, several vloggers indicated that the vibration was nearly non existent. “From a single?” I asked myself, skeptically! Having the opportunity to ride this 2017 KTM Duke 690 and write a review on it was very exciting. Spoiler Alert: Vibration! What vibration!

I think it’s important that you read the context within which I do my ride reviews (see the bottom of this article). When I review motorcycles I address these areas on a scale of 0 to 10: (1) Fun Factor, (2) Cool Factor, (3) Utility/Functionality Factor, (4) Value Factor.

Fun Factor (0 = no fun; 10 = fun meter pegged) (10)

Holy Fun Factor Batman! This bike oozes fun! It feels light (it’s only 328 pounds dry); has a silky smooth clutch (I mean it is a you-won’t-believe-how-smooth silky smooth clutch!); has a smooth, linear throttle response and will get up and go when you give the throttle a good twist. The seating position begs for hooliganism with the upright seating position you can flick the KTM Duke 690 left and right and it responds immediately. If you ride this Duke 690 and don’t have a blast – check your pulse, you’re probably dead!

View of the 2017 KTM Duke 690 handlebars and dash

Cool Factor (0 = not cool; 10 = People-will-want-to-be-you cool) (10)

Riding the 2017 KTM Duke 690 will draw attention. KTM has a knack for unique geometric lines in their bikes and the Duke 690 has these unique lines. The curves of the gas tank, the side panels, the flattened headlight assembly and bikini type fairing—they all work together to give a unique and appealing aesthetic. Even during my demo ride, while stopped at a red light, a truck full of people all looked at the bike. You feel cool riding this bike and even at 56 I had a bit of hooliganism surface.

Utility/Functionality Factor (0 = useless as a commuter; 10 = the ultimate commuter bike) (9)

This bike did everything I could ask of it as a commuter bike. Responsive acceleration, great highway speed, easy to maneuver, good gas capacity (around 3.7 gallons) which should allow a 100-mile commute, very light at only 328 pounds dry, comfortable commuting seating position and a holy-cow fantastically smooth clutch. The only drawback I encountered was when the sun was behind me it reflected so much on the dashboard that I couldn’t see it unless I leaned way forward. With that said, this bike seems like it would be a great commuter bike while offering tons of smiles.

Waiting to show me the fun!

Value Factor (0 = Too much $$ for what you get; 10 = Superb bang for the buck) (10)

The 2017 KTM Duke 690’s MSRP is $8,999 and for that price you get an awesome commuter bike that offers so much fun. You will look forward to going to work and coming home from work – simply because you will get to ride this motorcycle.  The dashboard has everything you need including but not limited to gas gauge, gear indicator, speed, tachometer, and outside temperature. The engine is remarkably smoother than you would expect for a 690cc single. A close competitor is the Yamaha FZ-07 with ABS which has an MSRP of about $1,500 less than the Duke 690.  I think the Duke offers more fun factor, but both of these bikes will be good choices for commuters.

Summary:

The 2017 KTM Duke 690 pleases your inner hooligan and outer commuter. It seems like it will work both for in town riding – with its overtly super smooth clutch making navigating in traffic a breeze – and for riding on the highway back and forth to work. It sounds really cool with the stock exhaust as a thumper should.

2017 KTM Duke 690 - Demo Ride Full Review - YouTube

Ride Review Context: I want to give you some context within which I do my motorcycle test rides. I don’t profess to be a person who knows all about motorcycles, so I won’t tell you about the horsepower or the torque numbers. I also won’t try to explain the inner workings of the engine. What I will do is give you my perspective as a short rider (5’ – 5”) who commutes about 100 miles each day (80% highway and 20% suburban streets) back and forth to work. From this perspective I will try to help you understand the pros and cons of the motorcycle I’m test riding. I will offer my opinion which you can take or leave.

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This bike will make you smile – a lot! 2017 Ducati Scramber Café Racer – Ride Review

Ride Me You Hooligan!

I’d like to offer a special thanks to the team at GO AZ Motorcycles in Peoria Arizona. The GO AZ dealerships are the only 2 dealerships in the Phoenix Arizona area that allow test rides on their motorcycles. It’s always great to be able to get first-hand knowledge on motorcycles I’ve grown fond of. In particular I’d like to thank Tommy Irvin who let me set up the demo ride and Jennifer Duarte who took great care of me when I arrived at GO AZ to ride this new motorcycle.

I’ve had my eye on the 2017 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer since I first heard about it. I think it’s important that you read the context within which I do my ride reviews (see the bottom of this article). When I review motorcycles I address these areas on a scale of 0 to 10: (1) Fun Factor, (2) Cool Factor, (3) Utility Factor, (4) Value Factor.

Fun Factor (0 = no fun; 10 = fun meter pegged) (10)

It took me nearly 30 minutes after I finished my test ride to wipe the grin off my face. The 2017 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer exudes fun. It has the right amount of pep to make you want to ride this thing all day long. In urban/suburban street

You Lookin’ at Me!?

riding this motorcycle begs to be a bit of a hooligan. Leaning over to grasp the Ducati hand grips you immediately imagine how much fun you’ll have once you twist the throttle and release the clutch lever—and this bike doesn’t disappoint. The smooth clutch and the enjoyably smooth throttle response keeps you from focusing on the mechanics of riding and let’s you simply enjoy the riding. The aggressive seating position adds to the fun of popping in and out of corners.

Cool Factor (0 = not cool; 10 = People-will-want-to-be-you cool) (10)

You will turn heads when riding this motorcycle! The paint, mini front fender, fat forks, gold rims and accents, number plate, exhaust note, aggressive riding position, bar-end mirrors, and headlight housing all work together to create a cool factor that would even have Fonzie turning to look at you! The brown seat induces a nostalgic feeling of motorcycles from the past. The retro café racer style harkens back to the maddening races of the original café racer motorcycles. And, when riding it, you can imagine being one of those original hooligans tearing up the roads around London in the 1950s. This bike simply looks spectacular.

Utility Factor (0 = useless as a commuter; 10 = the ultimate commuter bike) (8)

Riding the 2017 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer is indeed a blast, unless maybe you are commuting long distances. At the end of my demo ride, I experienced some minor cramping in my left wrist. I would think that riding this for my entire 45-mile commute might increase that discomfort. Granted, I’m a 56-year-old guy riding a bike that I imagine a rider half my age would be better suited for, but nonetheless, the lower clip-on handlebars may offer you a bit of discomfort should you be traveling more than 20 miles or so.

That Exhaust Sound – bellissimo

The second thing that makes this a less-than-optimal commuter bike is the seat – or more specifically, the apparent lack of places to put any sort of saddlebags or seat pack. With the seat cowl covering the rear of the seat, removing it for traveling will diminish the cool factor and may be challenging to attaching anything to due to seat hump beneath the cowl. You may get away with a back pack for some trips, but for me, during the winter, I need a place to put my 4:30-in-the-morning-riding cold weather gear in something and my backpack is my mobile office so I need secondary storage. On a positive note, the 2017 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer provides plenty of power for maintaining highway speed. The fuel capacity also offers some challenges with only 3.57 gallon (13.5 liter) capacity. For daily long-ride commutes, you will need to fill up at the beginning or end of each day.

Value Factor (0 = Too much $$ for what you get; 10 = Superb bang for the buck) (7 or 8)

The 2017 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer’s MSRP is $11,395 and it lacks some amenities I would have expected on this bike. First it doesn’t have a gear position indicator. I have grown used to being able to look down at my FZ-09’s dashboard and know what gear I’m in. I would like to see a gear position indicator on the Ducati because it’s nearly $3K higher than the FZ-09. Second, there’s no gas gauge. Coupled with the smaller tank, the lack of a gas gauge reduces the value factor for me. Third, getting into neutral was a real challenge – whether going up from first gear or down from second gear while stopped or in motion – I missed neutral more than I found it. Fourth, the mirrors had a cheapness feel to them. When I tried to adjust them they seemed to give when I pressed my thumb onto the mirrored portion. They didn’t seem like they were glass, but rather more like that non-breakable material that is sometimes used in full-length bathroom door mirrors one might buy in the home section of Wal-Mart. Fifth, the kickstand was hard to get down. There was no little tab that you could simply heel down to open the kickstand. I had to dig my heel underneath to grasp the kickstand. While this is a Ducati and with it you get some solid engineering, I feel that compared to other motorcycles in its class, the Scrambler Café Racer was a bit high-priced. The FZ-07 is less with nearly as much fun factor and the most-comparable bike – the Triumph Street Cup – comes in at $10,500.

Summary:

The 2017 Ducati Scrambler Café Racer will provide so much fun that one might easily overlook the few drawbacks I mentioned. A motorcycle should be more than just function and this bike excels at its fun factor and its cool factor. This bike will gladly overcome nearly all traveling challenges you will throw at it and keep asking for more.

2017 Ducati Scrambler Cafe Racer Demo Ride - YouTube
Ride Review Context:

I want to give you some context within which I do my motorcycle test rides. I don’t profess to be a person who knows all about motorcycles, so I won’t tell you about the horsepower or the torque numbers. I also won’t try to explain the inner workings of the engine. What I will do is give you my perspective as a rider who commutes about 100 miles each day (80% highway and 20% suburban streets) back and forth to work. From this perspective I will try to help you understand the pros and cons of the motorcycle I’m test riding. I will offer my opinion which you can take or leave.

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At that intersection, what can oncoming traffic see?

When approaching an intersection are you aware of your position behind traffic – from the perspective of oncoming traffic? You have seen many intersection crashes that typically are a result of a left-turner make a bad decision. We see this all the time. An impatient driver, waiting anxiously at their left turn lane rolling into the middle of the intersection anticipating that one opportunity to rip through traffic to take the left.

What can oncoming traffic see? Can they see you approaching?

The danger for motorcyclists is we are harder to see – especially when that impatient left-turner is focusing on what they perceive as empty space. Here’s how it can play out badly for motorcyclists.

You’re approaching an intersection in the middle or right lane – following behind a couple of cars. Behind you – nothing. There’s that impatient left-turner who sees it – a clear path in which to take their left turn. They are focusing on the empty space behind you and don’t see you because you’re obscured by the cars you’re following. Before you know it, the left-turner is right in front of you – bam!

As motorcyclists we need to be aware of where we are in respect to that oncoming traffic. In the case above we can do one of two things – when we see that there’s an impatient left-turner. We could (1) slow down so the left-turner sees you and realizes they don’t have room to turn or (2) accelerate to a position where you get through the intersect before the left-turner plows into you. Check out the animation below.

Avoiding Motorcycle Collisions at Intersections - YouTube

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Cute!

There, it’s done! I said “Cute” in a motorcycle blog.

These are some motorcycle loving Monkeys!

Wait, come back here, yeah you! When we’re talking about Mimi and Moto who, by the way, are monkeys who love motorcycles, you can indeed and should say “cute” in a motorcycle blog.

If you have kids or grand kids, The Adventures of Mimi and Moto the Motorcycle Monkeys is a book you should consider buying. Why, because you guessed it — it’s cute!

This is an easy-to-read book that entertained my 3-year-old grandson and gave my 8-year-old granddaughter some nifty practice reading to both me and her little brother. And…if you’re like me and motorcycles are ingrained in your life, you’ll appreciate the cute motorcycle indoctrination that Mimi and Moto offer to your kids.

In “Mimi and Moto,” Nancy Gerloff and Mark Augustyn take you on a journey of motorcycle love with these two monkeys. Mimi and Moto each have their own unique type of riding they like to do from Moto getting “dirty and muddy” to Mimi’s love of riding when it’s “warm and sunny.”

The Motorcycle Monkeys

We follow these motorcycle monkeys in the dirt, on the street, into the mountains and to the beach while they sometimes ride together and other times ride their own motorcycles.

The illustrations by Esteban Alvarado show us how safety conscious Mimi and Moto are, too. We see them wearing helmets, gloves and boots — which we at Motorcycle Melee appreciate. The illustrations are crisp, bright and fun to look at making the book even more fun to read. The nifty thing about the illustrations is how they show Mimi and Moto riding all different sorts of motorcycles — showing their juvenile readers that motorcycling can be fun on any sort of motorcycle. Finally, just like we do, Mimi and Moto dream of riding on motorcycle adventures forever.

For those of you who read to your kids, I recommend you add “Mimi and Moto” to your children’s reading library. They’ll enjoy the simple story and the vibrant and fun illustrations and get to see early just how much fun riding can be. Click below to purchase “Mimi and Moto” from Amazon.com.

They dream of riding forever

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