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Where is the city going? What is the future of “urban?” How can we increase quality of life, solve transportation and energy issues, and provide affordable housing for millions of forthcoming city dwellers? MIT and China are partnering to find answers with the new Future City Innovation Connector (FCIC), which will be headquartered in a new space called the MIT China Future City Lab.

MIT and Tsinghua University in Beijing have established this revolutionary collaboration to support research and startup teams that will develop leading-edge ideas that address the challenges presented by China’s rapidly growing cities. As a result, the partners hope to develop new models for urban living and infrastructure that address issues of urban resilience, health, housing, environmental sustainability, responsive urban management, and the development of smart cities.

The FCIC will draw upon MIT research to identify innovative concepts and technologies that can be implemented in China. The program’s founder and faculty director Siqi Zheng is the Samuel Tak Lee Associate Professor of Real Estate Development and Entrepreneurship in MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning and Center for Real Estate. She is also a visiting professor at Tsinghua University.

Zheng believes that research teams and startups face a distinct set of challenges when they work on urban problems in China. “Partnerships with city governments are most critical to the success of these teams,” she says. “The MIT-Tsinghua Future City Innovation Connector will help the innovative urban research teams and startups at MIT and Tsinghua engage with the Chinese market and government resources to realize their societal impact and economic success.”

The first program of its kind to apply the frontiers of urban research and technology to the extraordinary urbanization occurring in China, the FCIC will work extensively with municipal governments and industry leaders in China in conjunction with the MIT School of Architecture and Planning’s entrepreneurship accelerator DesignX.

“I am thrilled to see the launch of this new collaboration,” MIT Provost Martin A. Schmidt told MIT News. Under the leadership of Professor Zheng, the MIT-Tsinghua Future City Innovation Connector will become the new starting point of a series of engagements between MIT and Tsinghua in entrepreneurship, education, and urban research.”

Learn more about this historic partnership.

Read about tackling air pollution in China.

The post MIT and China partner to plot the growth of future cities appeared first on Leadership Blog.

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What is the secret to building a team around a superstar? What is the future of ticket selling at sporting events? What’s the best way to engage the modern sports fan? These are just three of the dozens of topics to be explored by leaders in the realm of sport at the upcoming MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference February 23 and 24 at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center in Boston.

A limited number of tickets are still available for this annual event, which has grown over the last decade to become the premier confab of sports movers, shakers, and innovators. Founded in 2006 by Daryl Morey ’00 and HBS alumna Jessica Gelman, the conference is chaired by Gelman and organized by MIT Sloan students. Its goal is to provide a forum for industry professionals and students to discuss the increasing role of analytics in the global sports industry. Now more than ten years old, the conference delivers rich opportunities to learn about and innovate the sports business world.

Nate Silver, statistician, author, founder
FiveThirtyEight.com

The conference attracts the most influential figures in the field. This year, that roster includes Michelle Roberts, Executive Director of the National Basketball Players Association, Nate Silver, founder of FiveThirtyEight, Gary Bettman, Commissioner of the NHL, Sue Bird, point guard for the Seattle Storm, Nick Caserio, Director of Player Personnel for the Patriots, Tom Dundon, Owner of the Carolina Hurricanes, Laura Froelich, Global Head of Sports Partnerships at Twitter, Steve Pagliuca, co-owner of the Boston Celtics, Kim Pegula, CEO of Pegula Sports and Entertainment, and Shira Springer, journalist for the Boston Globe, NPR, and WBUR. Read the full list of speakers.

Fantasy Challenge

The 2018 conference will spotlight the finalists of the Daily Fantasy Challenge. Organized by DraftKings, the sports-tech media and entertainment platform, the competition is open to graduate students around the globe. Their task: to create and present a new sports concept to DraftKings executives. The finalists will present their ideas during the conference and be awarded with cash prizes and event tickets.

The conference also will bring back its popular Hackathon. Participants select a prompt, analyze data, and propose potential solutions that advance the application of data analysis and visualization in sports analytics. Industry experts from both ESPN and Ticketmaster will provide mentorship. The event culminates with participants presenting their work in a brief presentation to a panel of distinguished judges.

Learn more about the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference.

The post Shaping the Commerce of Sport: MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference starts February 23 appeared first on Leadership Blog.

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Two of the world’s leading artificial intelligence pioneers are joining forces in a formal collaboration to advance AI hardware and software. The new MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab, which is staffing up now, will be one of the largest university-industry AI partnerships ever forged.

IBM will make a 10-year, $240 million investment to create the partnership, which will integrate the talent of MIT professors and students and more than 100 MIT and IBM scientists. Together, they will pursue joint research at IBM’s Kendall Square research lab, near the MIT campus. The complex is also the headquarters of the IBM Watson Health Lab and IBM Security headquarters.

MIT President L. Rafael Reif and John Kelly III, Senior VP, Cognitive Solutions and Research at IBM

Dario Gil, IBM Research VP of AI and IBM Q, and Anantha Chandrakasan, dean of MIT’s School of Engineering, will co-chair the lab. The team is planning to issue a call for proposals to researchers at the two institutions to submit their ideas for joint research that pushes the boundaries in AI science and technology. One objective of the partnership is to encourage MIT faculty and students to launch companies that will focus on commercializing AI inventions developed in the new lab.

“True breakthroughs are often the result of fresh thinking inspired by new kinds of research teams,” MIT President L. Rafael Reif said about the collaboration. “The combined MIT and IBM talent dedicated to this new effort will bring formidable power to a field with staggering potential to advance knowledge and help solve important challenges.”

A legacy of AI research at MIT and IBM

The roots of AI at MIT extend back to the research of Vannevar Bush and his development of the differential analyzer, a mechanical analogue computer designed to solve differential equations in the late 1920s. In the 1930s, work continued at the MIT Radiation Lab, which was devoted to the development of radar and other electronic innovations.

The Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) and Lincoln Laboratory continued AI-related research into the 1950s when Institute researchers were among those who coined the phrase “artificial intelligence.” MIT made significant progress in the subsequent decades led by Marvin Minsky, a founder of the discipline. Along with Seymour Papert, Minsky built the first neural networks and advanced learning algorithms. Today, several departments, lab, and centers at MIT are working on AI, including the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), the largest research laboratory at MIT and one of the world’s most important centers of information technology research.

For its part, IBM has been exploring the application of AI across myriad areas and industries for more than two decades. IBM researchers invented the versatile Watson, a cloud-based AI platform now being used around the globe to fight cancer, enhance classroom learning, minimize pollution, enhance oil and gas exploration, better manage financial investments, and more. Beyond Watson, IBM scientists worldwide are working on fundamental advances that they hope will pave the way for the next generation of AI.

Learn more about the MIT-IBM collaboration.

Read a Q&A with MIT co-chair Anantha Chandrakasan.

The post AI pioneers MIT and IBM partner for a smarter future appeared first on Leadership Blog.

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Robots have their limits. They’re not good, for example, at thinking outside the box. Humans have it all over robots when it comes to discernment and adapting to changing circumstances, but a team of engineers at MIT is working to improve a robot’s soft skills. One of those soft skills is learning to be a good pedestrian.

Yu Fan Chen, the graduate student at LIDS (MIT’s Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems) who is heading the research, says that socially aware navigation is critical for robots moving around in environments that require frequent interactions with pedestrians. The challenge is that pedestrians are a highly unpredictable force. Robots are programmed to adapt to certainties, as a rule, and are not traditionally equipped to deal with chaotic conditions.

Chen and his team are developing a robot designed to navigate and blend in with the crowd. The squat, waist-high robot sports a LIDAR array on top for high-resolution environment sensing. LIDAR (light detection and ranging) works on the principle of radar, but uses lasers to measure distances. The robot also uses webcams and a depth sensor to understand—literally—its place in the world.

Teaching a robot to respect personal space

The researchers used reinforcement learning, a type of machine learning approach, to train the robot to choose paths that take into consideration the speed and trajectory of other objects in the environment. The team also incorporated social norms into the training phase, encouraging the robot to pass on the right and penalizing it when it passed on the left. In tests, the robot has shown an ability to move along on its own for 20 minutes without incident.

The project is focused on the intertwined goals of creating a robot that can navigate busy pedestrian situations and be accepted by the crowd in which it is moving. Chen and his team feel it is important that people feel comfortable sharing the sidewalk with robotic pedestrians. “We want it to be traveling naturally among people and not be intrusive,” Michael Everett, Chen’s teammate told MIT News. “We want it to be following the same rules as everyone else.”

Chen and Everett believe that with these new capabilities, such robots soon may be delivering pizzas and packages or transporting people through airports and hospitals. The researchers have detailed their robotic design in a paper that they presented at the recent IEEE Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems in Vancouver.

Read more about Yu Fan Chen’s work with robots.

Watch video of the robots in motion.

The post Will a robot be delivering your next pizza? appeared first on Leadership Blog.

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A leader who isn’t a good listener isn’t a good leader, says Margot Murphy Moore, SF ’07. President and chief strategy officer of Standard Homeopathic Company, Moore says she kicks off every turnaround situation with a listening tour, sitting down with each of the key players one by one and giving them the airtime they need to talk about the strengths and weaknesses of the company and the culture.

The aggregate value of these conversations is a big picture that reveals the operational issues, the cultural and political issues, and the strategic issues that are challenging the organization. “In my experience, when you sit down with stakeholders individually, you find they often have greater insight than you expect into complex challenges and innovative solutions. The issue often is not a lack of awareness about the source of a problem but multiple failures to act on that awareness. The goal is to find out what systems, perceptions, or individuals are preventing action.”

Realize that you can’t salvage every troubling personnel issue

Resolving personnel issues, Moore believes, is an essential precursor to driving change. And sometimes that change means termination. If one person is a stumbling block to productivity and is souring the organizational culture, their termination might be key to salvaging the situation. “I can recall one turnaround situation in a remote plant. I was flying there every Monday to resolve an acrimonious situation. By Wednesday, I would pretty much have resolved the issues and, on the flight home, would be feeling relieved and optimistic. But on Thursday, I would get a few disgruntled calls and emails, then on Friday a few more. By the time Monday rolled around, we were back to square one.” Finally, termination was the only answer.

Turnarounds, Moore says, can be thankless work if you’re in it for the glory. “It takes a strong stomach and a level of unrelenting optimism to make a career of rescues. Success is often not viewed as gloriously as it merits, so the satisfaction of facing the challenges and reaching success must be enough. Bottom line: turnarounds are not a sport for the weak-spirited or for souls seeking affirmation.”

Read more from leaders about successful turnarounds.

The post Need to turn around an organization? Turn up your listening skills. appeared first on Leadership Blog.

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MIT Sloan Leadership Blog by Mit Sloan Fellows - 2M ago

Increasingly artificial intelligence drives every tool and every service we encounter in our daily lives. Leaders who don’t fully appreciate how to harness its value are not tapping the full potential of their organizations. But AI also has its limitations. The phrase Moravec’s Paradox was coined in the 1980s by artificial intelligence pioneers Rodney Brooks and Marvin Minsky of MIT and Hans Moravec of Stanford to capture the irony of AI—it’s as clueless, in some ways, as it is brilliant.

Computers can out-think most adults at playing chess, but ask it to join you at the dinner table, and it will be flummoxed. A toddler, on the other hand, would simply pull out a chair and sit down. High-level reasoning requires only basic computation from robots, but low-level sensory motor skills demand extraordinarily complex computational resources that robots have yet to master. So the moral of the story is know what to expect from AI. Its benefits are remarkable when it comes to mining and manipulating data, but it can’t perform simple tasks that require deft movement, intuition, or empathy.

(Image: SMART’s self-driving golf carts)

Introducing a series of AI posts

Over the next few months, the MIT Sloan Fellows Leadership Blog will focus on the impact of artificial intelligence on the global marketplace—its remarkable promise and its surprising limitations. We’ll find out how MIT Sloan Fellows faculty and alumni around the world are tapping into AI’s sweet spots to revolutionize industries. We’ll also look at pioneering work happening all across MIT. Here are just a few of the labs and centers across the Institute that are shaping the direction of AI:

MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL)
For more than 50 years, CSAIL has pioneered new approaches to computing that improve how people work, play, and learn.

Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART)
SMART is doing important research on self-driving cars and involved in other influential projects that will have an impact on quality of life in urban areas.

MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab
MIT and IBM have just announced the establishment of a new lab dedicated to propelling scientific breakthroughs by advancing AI hardware, software, and algorithms.

The Laboratory for Social Machines (LSM)
LSM develops data science methods to map and analyze social systems and designs tools that enable new forms of human networks that will drive positive change.

The Moral Machine
From self-driving cars to self-piloting rockets and self-sailing ships, AI is taking over more and more complex human activities. Researchers here examine the implications.

The Machine Learning Group (MLG)
MLG researchers are exploring theoretical foundations, optimization algorithms, and applications involving vision, speech, healthcare, materials science, biology, and more.

Watch these pages for late-breaking research on AI and its impact on organizations and marketplaces around the world.

The post AI: The quiet revolution appeared first on Leadership Blog.

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MIT Sloan Professor Emeritus Arnoldo Hax knows what makes an organization work, and he knows how to turn it around when it doesn’t. Hax has been a major player in transforming companies—even the government of Chile. Generations of his students, scores of colleagues, and loyal readers of his seminal books on business strategy consider him a sort of enterprise whisperer.

So when MIT Sloan alumnus Richard “Skip” LeFauve took the helm of Saturn as CEO, he asked Hax, his former professor, to consult on strategy. “Skip looked at the corrosive relationship between the unions and management at GM, the financial losses, and the disgruntled workers and said, ‘We can’t run Saturn that way.’”

General Motors, says Hax, “was a huge organization, the largest in the country, but the company was beginning to go off the rails. The catalyst was the entrance into the market by Japanese carmakers. Toyota and Honda were creating cars that were affordable, dependable, attractive, and fuel-efficient. And those vehicles appealed to an enormous segment of the American market.”

GM’s solution was to develop the Saturn, the first compact car to be introduced into the American market. The Saturn operation was a kind of skunkworks for GM, a sub-brand with its own management and its own management style—a completely out-of-the-box and un-GM style.

Moving the skunkworks to the sticks

Location, LeFauve thought, was crucial—far enough away from Detroit that the enterprise could be truly independent from its parent company. He decided to move the entire operation to Spring Hill, Tennessee. “We wanted to invent a wonderful car,” Hax says, “but just as important, a wonderful culture, and we wanted to create a new management style, a new way to run a car company.”

Saturn’s counter-culture labor agreement gave the union workers a greater say in plant decisions. “We started out determined to avoid any us-against-them vibe. Our premise was that we all share the same bottom-line goals, so let’s work together to achieve them.” That human-centered approach extended to all areas of the company—internal and external. LeFauve created an image for Saturn as a customer-focused organization that put service and personal attention before profit. Perhaps most famously, he instituted Saturn’s groundbreaking “one-price, no haggle, no hassle” policy.

As it turned out, the approach was phenomenally successful. LeFauve was promoted out of Saturn, but a few short years later died of a heart attack. Eventually, GM took the renegade brand under its own wing and absorbed it into the larger company culture. “The rest,” Hax says ruefully, “is history.”

Read more about organizational turnarounds.

The post Running Rings Around Saturn: A Turnaround Tale appeared first on Leadership Blog.

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Fabric innovators convened at MIT recently to bring new significance to the term “smart dresser.” Uniforms made with materials that deliver cool or warm airflow. Augmented-reality headgear that can help field medics quickly identify and diagnose injuries. Lightweight body armor that protects the heart and neck. The three-day hackathon at the MIT Media Lab challenged engineers, designers, researchers, and product developers to create functional fabrics that address the inherent needs of emergency responders in volatile environments such as war zones and natural disaster sites.

The hackathon, hosted by the MIT Innovation Initiative, MD5 (the National Security Technology Accelerator), the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the AFFOA (Advanced Functional Fabrics of America) gave participants the opportunity to work with leading-edge fabric technologies as well as with tech experts and seasoned entrepreneurs who could help them refine their new-product pitches.

Participants also had the opportunity to learn about the revolutionary AFFOA, a consortium of which MIT is a partner, and to learn about new and different ways that fiber can deliver electronics, optics, photonics, and other digital support systems.

The prizewinning products of the hackathon included VITAL, an integrated system that allows for rapid remote triage and transfer of crucial information among soldiers, field medics, MEDEVAC, and hospitals. VITAL’s goal is to incorporate existing technologies into frontier solutions, such as personalized machine-learning algorithms and wearable physiological sensors.

Sharing the top prize was Security Blanket, a multipurpose wrap that will protect refugees and disaster survivors. The outer layer of the double-sided, multifunctional blanket would be made of a durable, water resistant, puncture-proof, and abrasion-resistant material. The inner layer would consist of Tensel microfibers, which are ultra-light, soft, quick drying, highly absorbent, and naturally antimicrobial. The team estimates the cost for the blanket to be about double the cost of a basic fleece blanket (about $10).

Bill Kernick, technology and partnership development executive for MD5 told MIT News that the idea behind the hackathon was “getting the sparks of these ideas moving and creating a relationship with innovators who may have not thought about working with DoD to help solve some really hard problems.” MIT Professor Vladimir Bulović, codirector of the MIT Innovation Initiative, added that the event is a manifestation of one of MIT’s core goals: developing innovations for real-world impact.

Read more about the Hacking Emergency Response hackathon.

The post Saving lives with smart fabrics appeared first on Leadership Blog.

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Global expansion is a core goal of many major corporations, but some are beginning to rewrite the multinational rules of the road. With 300 locations around the world, General Electric (GE) is one such pathfinder, recently rethinking which functions should be regionalized and which should remain local.

Global Operations Executive Leader, Oleg Bodiul, SF ’13 took on the vast transformation role as part of a GE leadership team tasked with creating a global shared-services organization that would centralize many of the company’s key functions, including accounting, finance, and commercial operations.

Among the top 100 firms in the world, GE is a digital-industrial player providing software-defined machines and solutions for markets ranging from aviation, power generation, and oil and gas to renewables, healthcare, and financial services. “Historically, functions like accounting and order management were performed in hundreds of locations around the globe. The objective was to centralize, where possible, into a few locations to leverage scale and deliver better outcomes for our customers, employees, and shareholders.”

Building a bustling hub in Budapest

Bodiul, who is based in the Netherlands, recounts that fragmentation and lack of enterprise-level process standards had led to operational inefficiencies. The multifunctional shared-services organization he and his team created consolidates work that benefits from scale, breaks down process silos, and provides more robust career opportunities. In just over two years, Bodiul has led the European transformation and overall program management to create a new center in Budapest with 1,500 employees.

“This was a one-of-a-kind experience,” Bodiul says. “The task was to migrate work from more than 120 locations in Europe to a new team in Hungary, an undertaking that required significant coordination with a strong focus on talent, training, organization design, culture, and change management.” Four regional shared-service centers in Hungary, China, Mexico, and the U.S. are now up and running, and the turnaround has been even more successful than projected.

Today, Bodiul reports, GE Global Operations is delivering superior process quality and efficiency at levels that were very difficult to attain under the old local model. In addition to simplifying the operations, the change has delivered more than $300 million in savings globally—and counting.

Read about other organizational turnarounds in the MIT Sloan Fellows Newsletter.

The post More than one way to be multinational appeared first on Leadership Blog.

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“No smart business strategist would start a business in the small diesel engine marketplace,” says Tana Utley, SF ’07. But that’s exactly the project she was charged with turning around at Caterpillar, Inc. recently. Utley is vice president with responsibility for the large power systems division at Caterpillar, one of the world’s leading engine manufacturers.

What’s so bad about small diesel engines? The list is long. Small diesel engines are being made all over the world and the competition is stiff as companies in emerging markets try to gain a toehold by keeping their prices at rock bottom. “It’s almost impossible for us to sell our equipment at prices that low,” Utley says. “On top of that, there’s an overcapacity of small diesel engines in the global marketplace, bringing the market price even lower.” Getting out of the business was not an option, however. Caterpillar needs those small engines; they power a variety of the company’s machines, generator sets, and some external applications.

Get in and make a difference as quickly as you can

Utley knew that coming in as the new leader charged with a turnaround would put her up against a wall of challenges and that time was of the essence. Her leadership strategy is to make visible change within the first 100 days—both for the sake of morale and for the health of the business—and to establish a path to measurable progress within a year. “A change agent has a limited window to bring about transformation. Once you become a fixture, you lose your objectivity and can become part of the problem. It’s imperative to remain focused on your goal while demonstrating compassion for those for whom the business is a lifeline.”

Momentum, Utley says, is therefore crucial. “I adhere to what Jim Collins calls the ‘Flywheel Effect’ in his business bible Good to Great. Get the flywheel going in the right direction at the start and keep it going—don’t let it lose steam. Your actions as a transition leader are what keep that flywheel spinning.”

Once employees who were affected by the change saw it working, Utley recounts, “the progress became tangible—exciting, even—and it gave them confidence that the plan was working and that they could achieve the larger goals going forward.” Employees then embraced the turnaround and the changes it represented. They even became eager to take the business to the next level. “At the start, I don’t think they were confident that we could turn the business around, but we did, and nobody was happier about that success than the employees who are running the small engine business today.”

Read more about organizational turnarounds in the MIT Sloan Fellows Newsletter.

The post Impossible turnaround? Keep that flywheel spinning. appeared first on Leadership Blog.

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