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Last night, an enthusiastic audience joined us at Avalon Theater for the second sold-out UHF screening in as many years. While that’s certainly a tough act to follow, we think you’re going to have a ball at next month’s screening. Join us a the Bay View theater on Wednesday, August 21 for a special presentation of A League Of Their Own.

The 1992 baseball blockbuster follows the Rockford Peaches, a real-life team that played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League during World War II. Led by star catcher Dottie Hinson (played by Geena Davis) and disgruntled former big leaguer-turned-manager Jimmy Dugan (Tom Hanks), the Peaches travel the Midwest as they take on the likes of the Racine Belles, Kenosha Comets, and South Bend Blue Sox. Joining that potent battery of leading actors is an all-star supporting cast that consists of Lori Petty, Madonna, Rosie O’Donnell, Jon Lovitz, Bill Pullman, and many more.

Even through the Penny Marshall-directed sports comedy classic grossed more than $132 million box office (compared to a comparably modest $40 million budget), there’s a good chance you haven’t seen it on the silver screen in decades…if ever. Tickets to the 7 p.m. screening cost $5 and they’re available now! As always, our teammates at Lakefront Brewery will have some delicious beers on draft. We’ll see you there.

A League Of Their Own (HD) Trailer - YouTube

The post Batter up! We’re screening ‘A League Of Their Own’ at Avalon Theater appeared first on Milwaukee Record.

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Though Milwaukee seems to have every weekend covered in terms of entertainment, it’s always refreshing to see bands perform in the city’s collection of weeknight concerts. Events like Chill On The Hill, Jazz In The Park, Tosa Nights, River Rhythms, Musical Mondays, and Washington Park Wednesdays help tide over weekend warriors and satisfy suburban commuters who want to some enjoy some of the city’s talent before Friday rolls around.

Adding to that weekday tradition is The North End‘s Denim Park summer concert series. Every Wednesday between July 17 and August 28, a diverse collection of performers will take the stage on the corner of Water and Pleasant streets to play free, family-friendly shows. This year, a total of seven bands will play over the course of as many nights.

From the zydeco sounds of Vitrolum Republic to the formidable indie-folk stylings of Listening Party and the undeniably awesome Extra Crispy Brass Band, there’s a reason to head to Denim Park at 6 p.m. each Wednesday between now and the end of August. Here’s who’s playing this year’s Denim Park Summer Concert Series:

July 17: Mera Storm
July 24: Listening Party
July 31: Sweet Sheiks
August 7: Beautiful Collide
August 14: Virtolum Republic
August 21: Logan’s Run
August 28: Extra Crispy Brass Band

The post Here’s the Denim Park Summer ’19 Concert Series lineup appeared first on Milwaukee Record.

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The Milwaukee Brewers’ long grand slam crisis came to an abrupt end Tuesday night when Christian Yelich (who else?) plated four runs with one swing of the bat to blow open what eventually became a 13-1 win over the Braves. Both the slam and the blowout are rare occurrences for the Brewers’ lately: As Curt Hogg noted on Twitter, the Brewers’ previous nine wins had come by a combined 14 runs.

The Brewers went so long between grand slams that the last player to do it was no longer in the organization: Jonathan Schoop hit one off Madison Bumgarner on September 9, 2018. It was the 174th slam in franchise history, and the wait for #175 stretched longer than anyone likely anticipated.

Yelich hits grand slam in Brewers' 13-1 win | Braves-Brewers Game Highlights 7/16/19 - YouTube

Before Yelich took Huascar Ynoa deep with the bases loaded in the seventh inning on Tuesday, the Brewers had gone 113 games between grand slams, the 11th longest streak in franchise history and the longest since 2008. During that span the Brewers logged 123 plate appearances with the bases loaded, averaging slightly more than one such opportunity per game. Lorenzo Cain had 15 of those appearances, going 3-for-14 with a walk and three doubles. Christian Yelich and Orlando Arcia also each came up 13 times with the bases loaded during the streak.

While 113 games between slams felt like a long time, this streak barely even approached the Brewers’ franchise record for bases loaded home run futility. Here are the organization’s five longest streaks:

June 17, 1975 to June 25, 1977: 334 games

Gorman Thomas’ first full season in the majors wasn’t exactly one to remember: He batted just .179 with a .268 on-base percentage in 121 games in 1975, but he did connect for 10 home runs and one of them was a grand slam off Yankees lefty Rudy May. Thomas was one of just nine batters to homer off May all season, as he led the American League with just 0.4 long balls allowed per nine innings.

More than two years later, Thomas was back in the minors (and about to be traded to the Rangers) when Cecil Cooper came to the plate trailing by two runs with two outs and the bases loaded in the bottom of the ninth inning against the Mariners. Seattle brought in veteran lefty Mike Kekich to face Cooper and lived to regret the decision, as Cooper hit the first walkoff grand slam in Brewers franchise history.

All told, the Brewers had gone 266 consecutive plate appearances with the bases loaded (about .8 per game) without a grand slam. Don Money had 23 of those opportunities and went 6-for-20 with three walks and a walkoff bunt single, but no homers.

August 16, 1985 to August 3, 1987: 315 games

Cecil Cooper’s first Brewers grand slam snapped the longest drought in Brewers franchise history and his final slam started the second longest: He untied a 3-3 game in the seventh inning with a slam off White Sox lefty Floyd Bannister. It was Cooper’s ninth home run of the season, but the Brewers’ last slam for nearly two years.

Steve Kiefer is a much less memorable Brewer: A utility infielder, he appeared in just 37 games over three stints as a Brewer from 1986-88. He hit just five home runs during his time in Milwaukee but one of them came in a wild game on August 4, 1987, when he drove home Paul Molitor, Rob Deer, Greg Brock, and himself to give the Brewers a 6-5 lead over the Orioles in the third inning of a game they went on to win 9-8 in the 12th.

Over the course of the streak Brewers batters had 263 opportunities with the bases loaded (again, about .8 per game). Kiefer had been up three times in similar situations in the previous two weeks and gone 0-for-3 with a double play. Six different Brewers had walkoff RBI with the bases loaded during the streak, but none had bases loaded home runs.

Brewers jump out to a hot start in 1987 - YouTube

September 8, 2005 to April 15, 2007: 195 games

J.J. Hardy’s grand slam on September 7, 2005 didn’t draw a lot of attention. It was the sixth home run of his rookie season and it came in a relatively low-leverage situation, as the Brewers were already leading 9-3 in a game they went on to win 14-5 against the Reds. It came against reliever Chris Booker, who eventually retired with a 14.29 earned run average in 17 MLB appearances. After that game, however, fans had to wait well over a year to see the feat repeated.

The Brewers’ longest slamless streak during their National League tenure ended on April 16, 2007, and the drought both started and ended in Cincinnati. This time it was Bill Hall taking reliever and future teammate Todd Coffey deep to help the Brewers open up a game they eventually won 10-6. Hardy was one of the Brewers teammates that Hall scored with the blast.

The Brewers have endured three seasons in franchise history with no grand slams: 1976, 1986, and 2006. This streak included 177 opportunities with the bases loaded (about .9 per game), including 17 for catcher Damian Miller. He went a combined 2-16 in those plate appearances with one hit by pitch.

September 19, 2007 to September 24, 2008: 170 games

The Brewers hit eight grand slams in 2007 before going a while without one again. Johnny Estrada hit the last one of that season, a fourth-inning shot off Astros hurler Felipe Paulino to give the Brewers a 5-1 lead.

Estrada’s homer may not have been all that memorable, but the one that snapped the streak certainly was: On September 25, 2008, with the Brewers in their first pennant race in over a decade, Ryan Braun hit a tenth inning walkoff slam off of Pirates reliever Jesse Chavez to give the Brewers a 5-1 victory.

This was the sixth time the Brewers had gone a full calendar year without a slam, but one of the others had unusual circumstances: The Brewers didn’t homer with the bases loaded from May 29, 1981 until July 1, 1982, but that streak was only 140 games due to the strike-abbreviated 1981 season.

Milwaukee Brewers Keep Turning Up The Heat 2008 - YouTube

May 16, 1992 to May 20, 1993: 167 games

Braun’s extra inning, walkoff grand slam was the second in Brewers history. The first was the start of this streak: First baseman Franklin Stubbs hit a tenth inning slam off Kenny Rogers and the Rangers to give the Brewers a 7-3 victory at County Stadium on May 15, 1992.

Just over a year later the Brewers finally connected for a slam again: This time it was Kevin Reimer going deep off of Orioles starter and 2019 Hall of Fame inductee Mike Mussina in the third inning of a 9-3 victory on May 21, 1993. Mussina allowed two grand slams that season, then just two more over the remaining 15 years of his MLB career.

The Brewers sent 119 batters to the plate with the bases loaded during this streak, about .7 per game. Darryl Hamilton had seven such appearances in September of 1992 alone. Greg Vaughn came up with the bases loaded 17 times during the streak but managed just one single and three walks in those opportunities.

Others of note:

• The ninth and tenth longest grand slam droughts in franchise history occurred back-to-back: The Brewers went 139 games between such events from 1989-90 and 132 games from 1990-91. Darryl Hamilton put the exclamation point on a 20-7 win over the Angels on July 8, 1990 as part of a 13-run inning that produced the Brewers’ only slam for nearly two calendar years.

• Before their most recent drought, the last time the Brewers went 100 games between grand slams was July 5, 2011 to May 11, 2012. It’s hard to find a pair of more unlikely heroes than the tandem that bookended that streak: Pitcher Shaun Marcum hit a grand slam in a game the Brewers lost anyway on July 4, 2011, and utility infielder Edwin Maysonet’s slam was his only home run or RBI as a Brewer on May 12, 2012.

• Fans had to wait a while for the Brewers’ first grand slam in Milwaukee. The Seattle Pilots and Brewers had combined for 93 consecutive games without a slam before Roberto Pena hit an inside-the-park slam, one of just two in franchise history, on May 30, 1970.

Go Go You Pilots (BaseballHistoryShorts.com) - YouTube

The post A brief history of Brewers grand slam droughts (and how they ended) appeared first on Milwaukee Record.

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Last December, Iron Pizza called it quits after more than five years as a band. The synth-rock band with a proclivity for partying was a supremely fun and well-liked fixture at Riverwest and Bay View bar shows. The project’s end left listeners wondering what Iron Pizza’s members would do next. Fortunately, the wait wasn’t long.

In late May—roughly six months after the band had its swan song at Bremen Cafe—former Iron Pizza members Rachael Thompson, Jake Brahm, and Bryce Kedrowicz played their first show with their new, markedly different project known as “Tell Me.” With the addition of Taylor Campbell (of Suffer Head and One More Final I Need You) on guitar, the young project—which also has current a former ties to Canopies, Appleseeds, Hughes Family Band, Faux Fir, Pussy Collector, and a variety of other projects—is poised to take a more mature, more serious, and decidedly prettier approach this time around.

Prior to Tell Me’s performance at Bremen Cafe on Thursday, July 18, Milwaukee Record sat down with members with the hope of learning more about this exciting new project.

Milwaukee Record: Where did this all start? Most of you were in the band Iron Pizza, which ended late last year. What prompted the band and all of you playing together again?

Rachael Thompson: Well, we were all messing around during Iron Pizza. We started a different band with Taylor [Campbell], and that fell off because we were all busy.

Jake Brahm: Yeah, we had tried for about a year to get another band going, but for one reason or another, it just didn’t work out or it would fizzle out. When Iron Pizza ended, we knew that we still wanted to play and make music together. Knowing Taylor and with him being such a great songwriter, it all finally fell into place and we were able to make it happen.

MR: Taylor, what’s it like to be in a project with three people who’ve played together in another band before? Was it hard to acclimate or did you fit right in?

Taylor Campbell: Well, I did play with Iron Pizza for two shows when Jake broke his wrist, so I have at least some connection with them musically, but I really like the connection they bring to the table. Plus, having that trust and familiarity goes a long way for band dynamics, so there was never a period of feeling each other out or being scared to voice an opinion, which I really appreciate and makes the writing process so much smoother. They’re all great musicians, so it’s been awesome playing with them.

MR: What is the basis of the name Tell Me?

RT: I had a one-word generator app on my phone that I would constantly use because we could never settle on a name. Then one day, I just thought of Tell Me. It’s just a simple thing that kind of goes with our sound. It’s kind of random. I just said it was they were like “Okay.” [My son] wanted us to be called “Excuse Me But I’m Sorry.”

MR: The most Midwestern band name of all time! So yeah, I know it’s a little early to define your sound and I’m not asking you to nail down what you’ll sound like until the end of time, but where has the early output landed sonically? What do you sound like so far?

JB: Less party. I feel Iron Pizza kind of ran its course on being a crazy, wild band.

RT: I’ve always wanted to be in a band that was prettier and not so aggressive. Getting to experiment with my vocals in a prettier, calmer way has been interesting and I think we want to take it in that direction. We’re actually ready to do some cool stuff and be a little more professional.

Bryce Kedrowicz: I think the songs are a little more structurally complex than Iron Pizza. I feel like they’re still aggressive in parts, but there’s a good dichotomy between that and the pretty pop.

TC: I think it sounds like a mixture of shoegaze and other melodic, pretty ’90s rock. but has a jazzy undertone to it all with the chord voicings and some of the progressions within the songs. We’re definitely trying to write songs that people can easily listen to and like and sing to, but man, I’m sure happy when we can do that while also having a chorus with an E-Flat Major 7 Sharp 11 chord snuck in there.

01 Come Home - SoundCloud
(192 secs long, 10 plays)Play in SoundCloud

MR: What has the live response been like at your first few show?

BK: I think the only show was at Cactus Club, and people seemed to dig it. They seemed to like it, which was encouraging to be well-received.

RT: I was definitely surprised by the reactions we got. And it helped me because I am still very self-conscious about the different voice that I use in this band. It definitely helped me to be want to keep going because I was really scared.

MR: You have a show on the 18th, but beyond that, what’s coming up in the near future and where are you hoping to take this project?

BK: I think just focusing on writing more songs.

RT: Yeah, just writing more and actually sticking to practice and not getting drunk at practice. Actually writing stuff is cool. We practice at a mental health clinic that Taylor works at, and we can’t bring beer in there, so this is a first time for us getting together to practice without having a beer in our hand. This might be why we’re taking it in a different, more mature direction.

MR: And what are some long-term goals?

JB: We have three shows lined up right now, one in every month. We’d like to keep playing shows. We’re releasing an EP shortly, and then hopefully we’ll keep writing and put out a full-length album.

Tell Me will play a free (21+) show at Bremen Cafe on Thursday, July 18. Weird Night, Shutups, and Brain Viper will also perform. The show begins at 9 p.m.

02 Swollen Sky - SoundCloud
(181 secs long, 9 plays)Play in SoundCloud

The post Members of Iron Pizza, Canopies, and Appleseeds resurface in Tell Me appeared first on Milwaukee Record.

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From August 1-4, a total of 10 Milwaukee (or Milwaukee-adjacent) bands and solo artists will make the 100-mile trek north on US 41—or I-43, if they want to take the scenic route—to partake in the fifth annual Mile Of Music festival in downtown Appleton. Despite the distance, Milwaukee acts are sure to account for a few dozen of the event’s approximately 900 shows that will be taking place over the course of the four-day, 220-act, 70-venue event.

Apparently, while we were busy covering stuff like Summerfest and Netflix-inspired ice cream pop-ups, Mile Of Music finished booking its 2019 lineup. For those planning to head up the Fox Cities for Mile 7, here’s a listing of Milwaukee musicians who will be performing at this year’s Mile Of Music. Show dates, times, and locations will be updated as information becomes available.

Nickel&Rose
Hugh Masterson
Brett Newski & The No Tomorrow
The Belle Weather
No No Yeah Okay
Driveway Thriftdwellers
Jon Knudson
Bootleg Bessie
SistaStrings
Keith Pulvermacher

Public Domain: SistaStrings perform "Ave Maria" and "Deep River" - YouTube

The post A Milwaukee guide to Mile Of Music appeared first on Milwaukee Record.

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By now, most of you have certainly made you way through the entire third season of Stranger Things. For those of you who haven’t, prepare for a small and mostly-insignificant spoiler: Steve Harrington works at an ice cream parlor. Yes, the teenage heartthrob—expertly played by occasional Cactus Club visitor Joe Keery—spends his first summer after graduation toiling away at Scoops Ahoy, an ice cream shop in the brand new Starcourt Mall.

Even though the food court hot spot where Steve and Robin served sundaes and cracked Russian codes is fictional, one Milwaukee bar will temporarily turn into a Scoops Ahoy and offer boozy takes on items served up in the latest season of the Netflix series. On Thursday, July 18, Don’s Diner (home of “The 10-cent Martini Lunch!”) will celebrate the new season of Stranger Things by hosting a Scoops Ahoy Pop-Up in the Walker’s Point restaurant’s Naughty Angel Back-Bar. There, costumed staff members will serve fans of sci-fi shows and boozy desserts alike floats, shakes, and cocktails based on the show from 5-9 p.m.

As you anxiously wait for season four to drop, Don’s Diner can help you set sail on an ocean of flavor. At least for one night. Ahoy!

STRANGER THINGS Season 3 Trailer TEASER (2018) Netflix TV Show HD - YouTube

The post Don’s Diner will serve “boozy ice cream” at ‘Stranger Things’-themed Scoops Ahoy pop-up appeared first on Milwaukee Record.

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Awful, awful news for fans of local public television and hypnotically watchable auctions: Milwaukee PBS plans to drop its long-running Great TV Auction, which has been a delightfully homegrown staple since 1969. This awful, awful news comes courtesy of a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel article that details the station’s new strategic plan to create more local programming and get in on the sweet, sweet 2020 Democratic National Convention action.

But Milwaukee PBS’ strategic plan also includes some addition by subtraction — specifically, the Great TV Auction. The TV auction that aired in May will be Milwaukee public TV’s last.

[…]

“It’s the kind of activity that’s terrific” for connecting with viewers, [Milwaukee PBS General Manager Bohdan Zachary] said. “But at the end of the day, when the economics are showing something else, there’s no denying that.”

The piece notes that “a review of costs and revenues showed the auction generated a net loss.” Ugh.

Great TV Auction 2019 | Thank You 2019 - YouTube

In memoriam of the Great TV Auction, here’s a piece we published in 2017. Oh, and let us know when someone sets up a Change.org petition. R.I.P.

I WATCHED 8 HOURS OF THE MILWAUKEE PBS GREAT TV AUCTION
By Kevin Mueller

If you haven’t noticed, it’s springtime in Milwaukee. Trees have begun to blossom, the hardened blocks of snow pushed from plows into parking lots have finally thawed, and, at the moment, it won’t stop raining (oh, and there was a pretty awesome local music festival last weekend, too). But to me, this season of renewal has come to bring about only one thing: the finest event on the local television calendar, the Great TV Auction.

This annual tradition, now in its 49th year, serves as a fundraiser for Milwaukee PBS, a cash-generating campaign that helps bankroll the budget for national and local programming. Its cadre of syndicated cooking shows and small-town delights like Around The Corner With John McGivern couldn’t exist, as they say, without viewers like you.

While many people grumble when on-air benefits interrupt regularly scheduled programming, the Great TV Auction is actually one of the most watchable programs the station produces. In years past, I have become absolutely fascinated by the show, getting sucked into watching for hours at a time. I catch myself shouting “Overbid!” after a three-hour binge where my shirt is stained with Cheeto dust, an empty pizza box lays on the floor, and my ego has experienced irreparable damage.

To get a true understanding on the insatiable magnetism of the program, I set out to do something (not-at-all) brave (and actually quite pointless). I watched an entire eight-hour block of the Great TV Auction. Here’s what I learned.

“We’ll show you an item. You bid on it.” That’s the opening host explaining the straightforward rules of the auction. Viewers are encouraged to call in and place bids, starting at $10. An estimated value for each item is provided for perspective. The bidding closes on each table after about 10 minutes. By that time, they have already shown another table of goods.

Hosts cycle in and out every two hours or so. They’re in charge of keeping the action flowing but often find themselves mitigating some disaster—either trying to make sense of a mix-up in copy or figuring out what table to throw to next. “Table A is closing in three minutes,” a host says. “Table X!” is shouted from off-screen. “Oh, Table X is closing in three minutes. And now let’s see what’s at Table C,” the host corrects. “Table A!”

The auction itself moves quite swiftly, which most likely generates the constant confusion. The host throws to someone standing at a table full of biddable items and this person goes through these eight items with a guest “table captain”—usually a volunteer plucked from answering phones and put in front of the camera. While the former reads flowery pre-written copy on each item (the word “arresting” is invoked excessively here), the table captain models each offering, usually running their hands along the edges of the item. But sometimes the model engages in more cavalier gestures like caressing or pointing, and in extreme cases, accidentally knocking the item over.

The options range from staid art prints to chiropractor sessions to Sprecher hard sodas to single episode DVDs of the aforementioned Around The Corner With John McGivern (estimated value: $15). “A trio of wolves, one of them is calling for more meats,” a table host sight-reads from a piece of paper, detailing the one of many wolf paintings seen throughout the day. But if there’s one category that keeps MPTV afloat throughout the year, it’s Green Bay Packers merch. About every other table features some gaudy print of Aaron Rodgers, Clay Matthews, and Jordy Nelson. It was created for the auction by a featured artist and each copy of the 100-made prints is given an estimated value north of $200. Almost every time the print appears on a table, it rakes in more than the assessed worth.

The show is an “arresting” showcase of eccentric characters, trite art pieces, and many, many blank, uncomfortable stares directly into the camera. It’s like watching something from the Found Footage Festival—except, of course, you’re watching all the madness unfold live.

Murphy’s Law cycles at a rapid-fire pace on the Great TV Auction. (Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong about every 15 minutes). That’s really what keeps you going after watching eight straight hours of this perpetual process. When you can’t stand looking at this glowing screen for one more table, a crew member is too eager to pull down a print, the camera lingers on the mishap, and it’s the funniest shit ever.

I had to stop watching at some point—the show only airs from 3-11 p.m., thankfully. At the end, I was exhausted and relieved and somewhat surprised that I made it from sign-on to sign-off. The following day I tried but couldn’t bear to watch more than a couple hours. Even though I was burnt out, I got the feeling that I was missing something extraordinary. Was there an overenthusiastic and gaudily dressed table captain that I needed to see? Did a table accidentally fall over? How many times did they say “arresting”?

I couldn’t help but feel miserable about all of this. Here are nice people—volunteers, even—offering their time to save the untenable future of public television, trying with all their might to produce good live television. And all I cared about was finding humor in their disarray.

Somehow, watching this ungodly amount of the Great TV Auction forced me to discover the humanity in these people. I now find myself wanting them to create the greatest show possible, bereft of errors, in order to avoid the cynical laughter of viewers like me. I want the transitions to be smoother; I want the copy to be read more easily; I want the production to be pristine.

This all left me with one lasting conclusion: I’m going to volunteer next year.

The post The final overbid: Milwaukee PBS is dropping the Great TV Auction appeared first on Milwaukee Record.

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Milwaukee has a thing for Woody Guthrie. In February 2018, an all-star cast of Milwaukee musicians (led by Johanna Rose) paid tribute to the folk icon with the GuthrieUNCOVERED show at Turner Hall. In November 2018, Rose and fellow Milwaukee musician Klassik recorded Guthrie’s “Ship In The Sky” for the American Klassiks record. Now, another all-star cast of Milwaukee musicians is getting in on the Woody action. On Friday, July 19 at Company Brewing, new band The Hatchets will celebrate the release of The Uncounted Blue Jillions, a “concept album of sorts based around the life and work of Woody Guthrie.”

Press materials for the record explain that Guthrie led a hard life, and that he suffered from an inherited degenerative nerve disease “that robbed him of many aspects of his identity.” Furthermore:

While this is admittedly an obscure topic to make a rock record about, it serves as a lens through which to examine how the complicated legacy of American history is in our blood. The record is an attempt to grapple with that legacy; ultimately asserting that even as the ghosts of the past live on, hope proves equally durable.

Justin Otto leads The Hatchets on guitar and vocals. He’s joined by guitarist James Sauer (L’Resorts, Ladders), bassist Allen Coté (Peter Mulvey, Lyric Advisory Board), and drummer Nick Lang (Buffalo Gospel, everything). The album was recorded at Midwest Sound in Rockford, Illinois, and The Chair Company in Milwaukee. It was engineered by Ian Olvera and produced by Lawton Hall.

The one and only Caley Conway also appears on Blue Jillions, reading excerpts from Guthrie’s lyrics and poems. Take the otherwise rollicking “Love Will Heal You,” which Conway opens with a calming voice of peace, tranquility, and hope:

The Hatchets - Love Will Heal You - SoundCloud
(250 secs long, 2 plays)Play in SoundCloud

The whole album is like that: bright and clear-eyed roots rock made even clearer by words from Guthrie himself. It’s a summer record, but a summer record that will likely linger long after the season ends.

The Uncounted Blue Jillions will be available on vinyl at the July 19 release show; one dollar from every album sold will be donated to The Woody and Marjorie Guthrie Fund to assist people with Huntington’s Disease.

RELATED STORIES

Johanna Rose and friends reimagine the relevance of Woody Guthrie with GuthrieUNCOVERED

Hear Klassik and Johanna Rose turn Woody Guthrie’s “Ship In The Sky” into an “American Klassik”

Nick Lang sets the tempo for Milwaukee drummers

Get warmed up for Caley Conway’s forthcoming EP with new single, “Cold Hymn”

The post Listen to a cut from The Hatchets’ Woody Guthrie concept album, ‘The Uncounted Blue Jillions’ appeared first on Milwaukee Record.

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Each August since 2016, Milwaukee Fringe Festival has showcased live acts from the worlds of theater, music, dance, and visual art. This year, between Saturday, August 23 and Sunday, August 25, close to 30 theater troupes, musical acts, visual artists, and dance groups will take to Vogel Hall, Peck Pavilion, Todd Wehr Theater, and the Fringe Stage as part of the fourth annual Milwaukee Fringe Festival.

On Tuesday, organizers released the full performance schedule. Here it is:

SATURDAY, AUGUST 24

Todd Wehr Theatre

1:00 p.m. Bob Balderson, The Great Songs of Harry (Who?) Warren // Don Russell, Ziggy the Clown
3:30 p.m. Theatre Gigante
6:30 p.m. Tyler Anthony Smith, Out, Darn Spot!
8:30 p.m. Angry Young Men, Shakespeare? I Hardly Know Her!

Vogel Hall

12:30 p.m. Dasha Kelly Hamilton Makin’ Cake
2:30 p.m. Water Street Dance Milwaukee Live // spacejunk dance little city
5:30 p.m. Neville Dance Theatre Exposed // Zach Schorsch & Brett Sweeney Woofs and Other Metrics
7:30 p.m. Karl Baumann and Selena Milewski Tread Lightly

SUNDAY, AUGUST 25

Todd Wehr Theatre

12:00 p.m. Showgirl Awakening I K(no)w
2:00 p.m. Outskirts Theatre Disenchanted
5:00 p.m. Abby Skowronski // La Résistance The Little Glass Slipper
7:30 p.m. The Valentine 5: Death Be Not Proud

Vogel Hall

12:30 p.m. Catey Ott Dance Collective SYNAPSE // TEG and Artists Unhung Gold
2:30 p.m. The Field Milwaukee
5:30 p.m. The Lucchesi/Kietzman Project The One Act Suite
7:30 p.m. Lake Arts Project HeART of War

Peck Pavilion

1:30 p.m. Lindsey Ruenger Dance A Red Shift and Twist // Wingspan Dance Greet // Lexie Kaufmann Dance Hivemind
4:00 p.m. NINETEEN THIRTEEN Cello and Drums Forever
6:00 p.m. Filament

Roving & Visual Artists

BeingNau Art
Kathryn Cesarz
Mad Rogues Shakespearean Scavenger Hunt
Mezclando Dance
Tamarind Tribal Belly Dancers
The Ox
Tum Tum Tree Studios
Voices Found
Warped Dance Company

Also, per Milwaukee Fringe Festival:

Attendees should see the published schedule to start planning their Fringe 2019 experiences now! Stay connected with the Fourth Annual MKE Fringe through mkefringe.com and @mkefringe on Twitter and Instagram to know when tickets are available.

Fringe Fest 2016 - YouTube

The post Here’s the performance schedule for the fourth annual Milwaukee Fringe Festival appeared first on Milwaukee Record.

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During a brunch at Honeypie in July of 2015, my boyfriend and I decided we wanted to get married. No, this wasn’t a regular engagement. I never wanted an engagement ring, so I had him put the jalapeño ring from his Bloody Mary on my finger. We had been talking for some time about how we wanted to get married on our four-year anniversary and drive down to New Orleans for Halloween. As this was only three months away, many brides-to-be may have thought there was definitely not enough time to plan a wedding. But hey, if a jalapeño engagement ring was up my alley, I think anything I could whip up in three odd months would do.

So the time came to plan our wedding. We both only ever talked of having a courthouse wedding. Seemed fast, easy, and would get the job done. As I was putting more thought into it, however, it started to not feel it was the right fit for us. I’d rather have a wedding officiant meet us wherever we wanted. I was back at square one. Where the heck could we get married at on a Thursday only three months away? I was scrambling and scrambling in my mind and, like an epiphany, I thought Pizza Shuttle. Yeah, you heard that right. Pizza Shuttle.

Pizza Shuttle - "Shuttle Culture" - YouTube

Oh, how we love Pizza Shuttle. We both sought comfort at this Milwaukee staple too many times to count. Good day, bad day, we always ended up at Pizza Shuttle. Some of the coziest winter nights were spent huddled inside Pizza Shuttle. I always felt warm and safe there, as if I was wrapped inside a calzone.

I called my boyfriend, and after a “hell yeah” from him I made the call. One of the employees picked up asking what my order was. Without hesitation, I ordered a wedding and asked how I would go about getting married there. The employee, obviously very confused, said someone would give me a call back. A bit later, I got a call from Jackie Gold of Pizza Shuttle. Although I don’t remember this conversation verbatim, I recall a cheerful, “Well, this is a first for us, but we’ll be happy to have you!” The wedding was set for October 29, 2015 at Pizza Shuttle.

The morning of the 29th of October, we woke up and immediately packed the car. We got ready and headed over to the Shuttle. I wore my mother’s ’80s white suit dress which was given to her by my grandfather when she turned 18. Sadly, my grandfather passed away a month prior. It was so special to wear that as my wedding dress. I did have my grandmother take the shoulder pads out, though.

We had a beautiful and intimate ceremony in front of close family and friends outside the parking garage in front of the “Before I Die” wall. We had written in chalk on every line, “Before I Die I want to…Say I Do.” After the ceremony we went inside to enjoy some beer and an enormous pizza, with pepperonis shaped into a heart. My husband and I cut the pizza like how a bride and groom would cut a wedding cake, and we shoved pizza into each other’s mouths. Once the pizza party was wrapping up, we got ready for our sendoff. We got into our car and our friends and family waved goodbye as we left the Shuttle for our New Orleans Halloween honeymoon.

We would like to thank everyone at Pizza Shuttle from the bottom of our hearts for making our day so special. Thank you to Jackie Gold for being the best wedding planner ever, and to everyone working at Pizza Shuttle on October 29, 2015. We couldn’t have asked for a more perfect pizza wedding.

The post I got married at Pizza Shuttle appeared first on Milwaukee Record.

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