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Egypt’s celebrated its 6th National Revolution of June 30, 2014 which led to the removal of the late president Morsi.
This Revolution let to the creation of a new agenda of economic growth and development.
I will be very difficult to provide a complete survey of what has been accomplished since 2014, under President El Sessi.
I would like to begin this post by saying that President El Sessi is “God Gift to Egypt.” This statement might  be sarcastically viewed by some.
But, no one can deny the President’s accomplishment during the past five years. It is a fact recognized world-wide.
I will summarize such achievements;
1.   Development of the infrastructure, where more hat 5000KM of new paved roads, and more than 1100 new bridges were constructed. The new road network connects all governorates with each other which allows transportation, especially for the construction of new industries.
2.   Construction of a new sewage system in villages and cities as the old ones were renovated.
3.   Recycling of swear water to be used for drinking and irrigation.
4.   Desalination of sea water for drinking in communities along the Red Sea as well as the Mediterranean Sea.
5.   Reclaiming 1.5 million feddans that have been added to the cultivated land.
6.   Production of electrical power which doubled in three years from 15,000KW to 29,000 KW. The German government stated publicly that no country in the world could double the productivity of its electrical power like  Egypt in three years. Furthermore, massive sun generating power construction as well as winds mils were built. The two sources generate 20% of the electrical power in Egypt. The Egyptian government has begun building lines to transfer electrical power to Cypress and in the future,  it will be transferring to other part of Europe as well.
7.   Converting the Suez Canal into two ways traffic instead the one-way traffic as it used to be. This huge project was completed in one year. The revenue per year exceeded $5 billion per year.
8.   Wide expansion of new towns, and construction of new homes, especially homes for middle- and low-income families. One fourth of the Egyptian labor is unemployed in this sector of the economy. The majority of slums housing projects around big cities has been removed and where more than 10 million people live.
9.   New discovery of Gaz and petroleum led Egypt to become self-sufficient in natural Gaz as of 2019. This led to the expansion of petro-chemical industries. Now, Egypt is an exporter of natural Gaz.
10. Egypt’s economy has been growing from 2% per year prior to 2014 to 6% per year by the end of 2019.
11. Last but not least the government is focusing on the population health condition. It began a national exam of the population to check on virus C which has been spread among Egyptians. More than 60 million Egyptian were checked and those infected by virus C have been treated freely.
In addition to the health program, the government has initiated a National Health Program which has already started in five governorates.
The above accomplishment is impressive in light of Egypt population growth which has been increasing at the rate of 2.5 million people per year. Its total population now exceeds 100 million people. It has been projected by international organization that if the rate of economic growth will continue, Egypt will be the 7th economic power by the year 2030.
I would like to conclude by saying that the 30th of June Revolution saved Egypt from a total destruction.
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Recently the Arab World Council on Water met in Cairo on February 8, 2019 to discuss the present water shortage in Arab countries. Egypt which is the most populated country in the Arab world, is classified as water poverty stricken. Most of its water, 95%, come from the Nile River which starts beyond its national borders.
The other two major rivers in the Arab world, the Euphrates and Tigers rivers, start in Turkey and flow into Syria and Iraq. Both countries also experience shortage of water. Keep in mind that the Arab world present population exceeds 400 million and is projected to reach 700 million by the year 2050.
Dr. Mahmoud Abu Zeid, the chairman of the council, focused on the negative impact of the global weather changes which has already began in the region. Those changes are reflected in the increase of temperature, less rain fall, desertification in the region and decreasing agricultural productivity.
According to scientific experts who participated in the conference agreed that the temperature increase, and the decrease in rain fall will cause a decrease in agricultural productivity which will be 5% -12% by the year 2030 (el masry el yom, 2/8/2019).
Furthermore, the global weather changes will increase the sea water level.
Egypt has already begun to experience such problems.
Moreover, the participant experts stated that the Arab world needs to spend at least $75 billion during the next ten years to minimize the negative impact of the global weather change which will cause half of the population to starve.

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Recently, Egypt sponsored an internal conference “Cairo Water Week” which began on October 14-18, 2018.
Seventy nations participated represented by high officials, as well as the United Nations,  and the FAO. In addition, water experts and scientists took part in the conference.
The objective of the conference was to create awareness on water shortage in the Arab World and to discuss the possibility of conserving water in light of the high population increase.
The attendees also discussed the negative future consequences of Global weather changes and its impact on the region.
The director of the Arab League, Mr. Abu el Gheet, and the head of the Arab Water Council, Dr. Abed Ilati, they both recognized the water shortage in the Arab World and called for its conservation.
Six Arab countries are classified as water poverty stricken. The individual water share in those countries is 500cu.m/year. According to the UN scale, the average water need is 1000cu.m/person/per year.
None of the Arab states can be classified as self-sufficient in food production. Sudan is the only country that can be classified as self-sufficient in food production. It can be the bread basket of Africa. Ironically, Sudan rely on the import of wheat. This is due to the corruption of its government.
Egypt is classified as the number one nation in wheat import due to the fact that more than 90% of its land is barren desert, and also due to water shortage.
Egypt gets 56 million cu.m. of water from the Nile River. This equals to 90% of the water consumed annually in Egypt. In addition, another 1.2 billion cu.m. per year from rain fall.
According to the Egyptian minister of irrigation and water resources, Dr. Aded Ilatti, Egypt is water poverty stricken. The average water consumed is 500 cu.m. per person in a year.
The discussion should also be viewed in light of Egypt population increase (Masrawi.com 10/18.2018).
Experts at the Conference provided technical information and discussed the possibility  of water management.
The second focus in the conference was the UN report, that global weather changes will negatively impact North Africa and the Arab World regions the most.
In the next fifty years, the temperature will increase, rain fall will decrease, desertification will increase. Furthermore, the sea level will rise causing flooding to countries where the land is below sea level.
Egypt will be among the countries where part of the country will be covered by sea water.
Kolne university in Germany issued a scientific report stating that more than 49  cities along the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean will disappear from the rise of water level, Turkey, Greece and Britain are among the countries that will be affected (al nahar 10/19/2018).
The Conference provided important information, specially to the Egyptian public.

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