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Getting your message across at a Trade Show is hard with so many other competitors competing for attention. Video presentations or printed literature will only get you so far. With all the exciting technology available, visitors need something more engaging that will leave a lasting memory and stand out.

That’s why immersive experiences, such as Augmented Reality (AR) could be just the thing to bring your visitors in. AR is an interactive experience combining real and virtual worlds. A device, such as your phone or wearable glasses “augments” what is already a real world image, with an extra layer of digital animation. Through AR, you can create an experience that appeals and connects to a visitor on an emotional and physical level. Of course beyond that aim, there are also other benefits of using this immersive tech, such as for sales, implementing creative ways to showcase products & services and enhancing user engagement & understanding.

Don’t know how you can use it at your next event? We’ve come up with some creative ways to use AR to make your stand the main attraction at the show!

Product Demonstrations

Showcasing products at a trade show can be difficult for some industries. At car shows for instance, companies require hundreds of square feet to display all their vehicles at an event. Lugging all your cars to an exhibit and paying for a large venue space might just be too impractical.

This is where AR becomes the perfect tool. Visitors can explore and interact with all the company’s content on one device, such as a tablet, phone or through AR glasses. It’s that simple!

For example, Engine Creative created a car configuration app that places photorealistic 3D models of an Audi chosen by the user. The app lets customers explore different aspects of the car and configure different models to their liking. Users interact with the vehicle by opening the doors, changing colour combinations, and interacting with light displays.

The company also created an interactive tool for Delphi, a leading global supplier of automotive parts. Visitors at the Automechanika show in Frankfurt got to scan a Honda Civic car at the stand and interact with Delphi’s product range. The AR xray experience gives a 360 view of the car and lets you select individual parts to discover more about them.

Delphi AR App - Vimeo

These are great examples of how industries, such as car dealerships can use AR to showcase their products in a unique and simple way at a trade show. It becomes a personal experience for each attendee whilst seeing first hand what the business can offer in a way they’ve never been able to before!

Educating Visitors Through Gamification

With the rise of technology, gamification is becoming a hugely popular trend. By taking characteristics from games and adding them to everyday actions, you can make any topic more interesting!

For instance, Amazon asked us to create an educational immersive experience revolved around transportation risks that they could showcase at CES – the biggest technology trade show in the world. This isn’t really the most gripping topic to talk about at your stand. So we decided to create a fun AR mini-game that will entertain as well as educate visitors.

Amazon AR - Vimeo

‘Think Inside The Box’ teaches users about the different types of dangerous goods regulated for transport. When holding an iPad, users virtually x-ray an Amazon shipping package that magically reveals different goods. They are then asked which goods are dangerous and get a score to see how many answers they got right. This game is an entertaining way to educate and engage people with a topic that they might not find interesting. The immersive aspect of the game is also a fantastic way to interact with the business.

If you want to make your stand even more engaging, you can create a multiplayer AR game. Exhibitors can set up friendly competitions between users, which is not only a fun way to interact with the company’s product/brand, its also a great way to network!

AR Photo Booth/Mirror

An AR mirror is also a very popular and highly effective tool to attract and engage attendees to your trade show booth. It is a photo booth that lets viewers see themselves in a reflection with augmented components added in.

Noonah Experiential partnered with Cambridge University Press to create a fun immersive experience that would attract the attention of attendees. When standing in front of the Cambridge Yourself booth, visitors could take photos of themselves projected onto prominent landmarks in Cambridge, like punting down the river. You even got it printed out for you to take home, making it the perfect memento of the event!

Noonah Marketing - Cambridge Yourself - Augmented Reality Booth - YouTube

 The Cambridge Yourself booth was a huge success! Not only were visitors very entertained by the AR feature, it was also a fantastic way to promote the business, showing how Cambridge Uni Press is not just a print provider, but a digital one too.

Many other companies use the AR mirror at their trade show stand, especially those in the beauty or retail industry. Users can see what certain products look like by simply standing in front of the mirror. This virtual dressing room is a quick and fun way to advertise your brand.

Visual Entertainment Through Microsoft Hololens

The Microsoft Hololens is amazing for visual learners. These mixed reality smart-glasses developed by Microsoft can project 3D objects which are anchored into the user’s physical setting, blending aspects of virtual and real reality. It’s a fantastic way to showcase a product. This is because you can engage and interact with digital content through high definition holograms that come to life. Lufthansa and 3Spin did this at the worlds largest tourism trade show in 2017. When putting on the AR glasses, visitors saw a small version of the new Lufthansa A350, which they could then fly around the event space. Entertaining experiences such as this one definitely adds another dimension to an event. Wearable tech such as the Hololens has the potential to make big changes to product displays at trade shows and we’re excited to see how other companies use it next.

How to fit a plane into a trade show booth │ HoloLens Guerilla Marketing │ Lufthansa & 3spin - YouTube

The possibilities of using AR at trade shows are endless. It’s the perfect tool to educate, entertain and increase brand engagement. If you’ve been inspired and are considering using AR at your next event, why not drop us a line? Or maybe you want to see our work first? We’re experts in the field and would be happy to help! If you’re also interested in how to use virtual reality at a trade show, we’ve got you covered! Check out our article on the creative ways this technology can be used to attract an audience to your stand.

The post How To Use Augmented Reality At Your Next Event appeared first on Mbryonic.

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People are constantly looking for ways to improve education, to make learning more engaging and effective. In this digital age where search engines help us find information instantly, e-books keep us informed on the move, and mobile apps that teach us languages, why not learn through emerging technologies such as virtual reality?

Virtual Reality for education is predicted to be a $200 million industry by 2020. It is already being used in schools in the UK and US. Researchers at Warwick University found that VR headsets are the most stimulating method of learning out there. But what makes VR such a vital tool is how it enhances learning and memory recall – being immersed in virtual locations helps us organise and remember information spatially as you associate it with visual features in the environment. We also require less cognitive load to process it all.

So we’ve decided to give you a few reasons and examples of why & how VR can be a powerful tool for education that will make you want to keep learning!

Learning through Doing with VR

It’s much easier to learn something whilst experiencing it. Compared to reading a text in a book, when you put on a VR headset, you are immersed with the topic first hand. Inspiring students to discover and work things out for themselves. Letting them learn about the subjects through doing.

Unimersiv VR takes students on a journey back through time helping them visualize the places they’re learning about – perfect for history lessons! Travelling on-board the Titanic, the international space station or to ancient Rome. The visually appealing tours give students a better understanding of historical events/places in an effective and entertaining manner. It’s also a very useful tool for teachers when having to explain specific content that matches the experiences in the app.

Interestingly ‘Unimersiv VR’ has a VR classroom where professionals can present their own courses via a virtual avatar using PowerPoint slides and audio recordings. Whether this part of the app is engaging enough for students is uncertain, as it’s essentially recreating traditional teaching methods in VR.

Unimersiv - Learn through Virtual Reality - Gear VR & Oculus Rift - YouTube

This type of content translates well to foreign language students where animations and interactive features are easier to understand compared to listening exercises.

Increasing engagement through VR & gamification

Gamification of VR experiences can make any subject more entertaining! Take DELIVR IT, an education experience that shows students and job seekers the opportunities working in the Logistics industry. Users follow the journey of a mobile phone from the factory through the supply chain to the buyer. During the journey they get to perform mini-job tasks, such as operating a crane, operating a truck, and scanning packages.

A subject like Logistics may not seem interesting at first but the storytelling, attractive animations and interactions engage the user on the topic. Delivrit is already being used in schools across the south east of England. If you’re curious to try it, just go to the Oculus Go store and download it for free!

DELIVR IT - Vimeo

Reducing cost through VR training

Schools and universities constantly have to invest in equipment for their students, such as science lab apparatus, medical appliances etc. With tight budgets this means that the ratio of equipment to students is small and all this equipment needs maintaining and updating. VR training simulators allows educators to scale at a far lower cost, with only software licensing costs and some relatively inexpensive virtual reality hardware.

Arch Virtual creates VR medical training experiences that help students practice surgical operations. They practice medical procedures in virtual reality environments before conducting them for real. This works out to be far more cost and space effective than providing these facilities for every student.

Arch Virtual: Enterprise VR Development - YouTube

VR & Online Distance Learning

The potential for online distance learning is enhanced through VR, bridging the gap between the educator and student. Social and collaborative learning is important and experiential VR experiences enable online students and lecturers to transport themselves into the same virtual world where they are transformed into virtual characters. As the teacher guides the student through experiences, they get a sense of being in the same room.

This form of online learning gives opportunities for personal feedback as well as both people in the experience being actively involved. Also a major advantage is that people from anywhere in the world can come together in the same virtual space. Although many people still consider going to a traditional university or school as the principal way to educate themselves, this can be a great alternative.

Using VR to increase inclusivity

Every student loves a school trip- whether that’s going to a museum, theatre or exploring another country. Unfortunately for some it may be difficult to attend these trips due to a disability, lack of funds, transport problems etc. With VR, you won’t have to miss the fun, as you can experience these trips without the travelling.

Google Expeditions VR, available on cardboard and daydream, lets you go on virtual field trips to countries around the world, such as the great wall of China, Mount Everest or the Louvre. Obviously it’s not as fun as actually going on a real field trip but the technology allows experiences to happen that would otherwise be impossible for some people.

These examples show the amazing possibilities of VR as an education tool. Student’s ability to retain information is impacted positively as they are able to visualise concepts that were previously confined to a text book. Additionally, it brings about a fun alternative to online distance learning, can bring about inclusivity and is cost and space effective for schools. Overall, we’re very excited to see what the future of educational technology holds!

Curious to know how VR can be used in other sectors? Why not check out our other articles such as how VR is used in marketing or music!

The post Why VR Is The Perfect Education Tool appeared first on Mbryonic.

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In this article we are going to look at Augmented Reality and the various AR platforms available to create amazing AR experiences with.

If you are new to AR then please check out our AR guide first to learn more about this exciting new technology.

AR Technology Features

Before we go further, lets bust the jargon and explain the different features commonly found in augmented reality platforms.

Image Tracking

This is the ability to recognise defined flat images and then track them as you move about. It used to require special markers or QR codes to work, but now we can use almost any image (called Natural Image Markers). Image Markers can be almost anything distinctive – an image that is not part of repeating pattern, has sufficient detail and contrast.

Some platforms allow you to keep tracking the marker when it moves outside the view of the camera (called Extended Tracking), if not it means your virtual objects can disappear if the camera cannot recognise the image any longer which is jarring.

Use case: Point the camera at a poster and it comes to life with a beautiful animation.

Plane Tracking

Is the ability to detect pretty much any flat surfaces (usually horizontal ones). The simplest and most useful example is the floor. So you can place virtual objects on the floor without them appearing to ‘float’ above it – even casting shadows.

Some SDKs can track multiple flat surfaces like table tops and walls. Note there are two things going on here – one is detecting that there is a flat surface, and second is knowing when that surface ends (where the edges are). Most SDKs know where the floor is, but calculating table edges is harder and is less reliable and it can take time for the application to work this out.

Use case:
Simple – You place a dinosaur on the floor of your office and it roars at you.
Advanced – a little character is walking on the table in-front of you, gets to the edge and jumps off.

Lighting Estimation

The ability to know how much light there is in the environment. This allows us to place the same lighting to the virtual object as in the real world thus making it blend in the scene more realistically.

Note this is usually quite limited, usually it knows the amount of light but not the direction (so you can’t calculate the direction of shadows etc..). ARKit has a cool feature that allows you to build reflection probes up from the camera, so shiny objects can actually reflect their environment – which we used in our AR dance project 0AR.

Use case: A robot walks around in the office, but because it is indoors he isn’t overly bright and looks more natural. Outside the robot is brighter.

Shared Worlds

This is quite a new feature allowing multiple devices to share an understanding of the environment – enabling multi user experiences. This means each user can be looking at the same objects located in the same space and even interact with it.

Use case: AR users play a game of virtual ping-pong against each other, they can see the ball move between them.

Face Tracking

The ability to recognise and track features on human faces (and occasionally pets too!) like the eyes and mouth. This allows you to augment people’s face with virtual items or manipulate how people look – like all those funny camera effects in Snap and Facebook.

Use Case: User looks in a magic mirror and they have metamorphosed into an alien monster

Body Tracking

The ability to track a person’s body – e.g. arms, legs and hands. Although the technology has been around for a while (e.g. Xbox Kinect) – this is rare at the moment on mobile devices. Facebook can track hands allowing you to perform simple gestures and the application to understand it. Obviously this works better on wearable devices when your hands aren’t holding the phone.

Use Case: User uses their hands to cast a magic spell that sends off a fireball.

3D Object Tracking

The ability to recognise 3D objects e.g. cups, toys etc.. so it doesn’t matter what direction you are looking at the item from. This is harder problem than detecting just a flat image, so not all SDKs support it yet. You have to tell the app what the 3D object looks like as well, usually involving uploading a 3D model of it or scanning it with another app.

Use Case: User scans a toy car, in augmented reality, the car grows rocket launchers out of the side and fires them.

Occlusion

By default all virtual objects in AR are drawn on top or in front of the real world. This is fine if you have a virtual teapot on top of a real table. The problem comes when you want a virtual object to move behind a real object, because if it drawn on top the illusion is broken. Occlusion in AR is quite rare as it is technical hard to solve, but we will start to see this in future iterations and headsets like Magic Leap do this already. Spark AR also does this but only in the specific case of faces.

Use Case: Robby the robot walks behind the desk, and the desk occludes Robby allowing him to hide behind it.

Cloud Database

Some SDKs provide a way to update the images and objects that the app can recognise online. Although convenient for the developer, it usually isn’t that hard to build this functionality on top of SDKs that don’t – so its not a game changer.

Use Case: App users can tag and create their own markers and share with others

Geo-tagging

Placing augmented reality content in real locations on a map, like in Nintendo’s popular Pokemon Go. This uses GPS to work out where you are, so that accuracy of the tracking can be variable. In the future, AR devices will recognize where you are by seeing and understanding the environment, which will provide more accurate tracking, but that’s one for the future.

AR SDK Comparison

I’ve created a table of what features each of the AR technology providers offer. I’ve not included wearable AR (like Hololens and Magic Leap) for now, because availability of these devices are so limited currently so it’s not a mass consumer proposition yet. However we will update in the near future.

Please note these are always changing, so check back regularly.

ARKit vs ARCore

ARKit is Apple’s solution. It comes free as part of the Apple developer kit. This is probably the most complete solution on the market right now. The main caveat is that it only runs on Apple devices. Integration is done predominantly via app, so if you want your audience to access your AR content then they will need to download your app from the AppStore.

However Apple have also integrated AR into a lot of their apps including Safari, Messenger and Mail via their AR Quick Look feature. This means that you integrate simple AR content directly into websites and mails. You can only see simple animations, there is no support for image markers or custom interactivity. But still an exciting development to bring AR to a mass audience.

ARCore is created by Google and again comes free. It actually runs on Android and iOS, though it essentially wraps ARKit on iOS. The feature set is not quite as rich as ARKit yet, but has many of the most commonly used AR features built in. So a good option for developers.

Both provide integration into Unity – a popular 3D application development tool.

Spark AR & Lens Studio

Spark AR (formally called Facebook AR Studio) and Lens Studio are Facebook’s and Snapchats solution for building fun and engaging AR experiences right into the camera of their apps.

The big advantage of developing AR experiences for these platforms are that your audience doesn’t need to download a seperate app to access your content. If they have Facebook or Snapchat then they just need to click on a web link which will open the app directly into the camera.

Both platforms are very easily and quick to develop for, reducing cost, and they are surprisingly powerful. These are best suited for small bite-sized content – like face effects, as the overall content size allowed is very small (e.g. 2MB on Facebook).

Third Party AR APIs

There are a multitude of third party API’s out there for developers to integrate into. The most popular one is Vuforia which has been around for many years. But there is also Easy AR, Blippar, Kudan, Wikitude and others. We find Vuforia very powerful, however their license structure is opaque and if you are working on enterprise applications you can be left with a very nasty bill which is why we no longer recommend it for clients.

Instead our current pick is Easy AR – it has a very similar feature set with a clear license policy: Free for the basic version and $400 single payment for Pro. Their documentation and community are not as strong as Vuforia, but for experienced developers this shouldn’t be too much of an issue.

Conclusion

Augmented Reality is a very exciting area with rapid advances in technology. However it’s still best to work with developers with a proven track record, as there are lots of cavets and gotchas around this technology that can affect the end result of your campaign.

In the next article we will cover the mixed reality and various wearable headsets that are coming out.

If you have any questions or would like to explore what AR can do for your business, please do get in touch.

The post Which is the best AR technology? appeared first on Mbryonic.

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Right now there are over 2.5billion smartphone users in the world. Mobile technology is becoming an integral part of our lives, with many of these devices already capable of providing augmented reality (AR) experiences.

AR is already being used by forward thinking brands in the space of retail and marketing, as shown in our article ‘10 Best Uses of Augmented Reality in Marketing’. But did you know AR is being used in the world of the arts?

When we think of the arts, we tend to associate it with visiting an art gallery or taking a trip to a theatre. But when augmented reality and art collide, it opens up new artistic possibilities. This is not just to enhance a visitors experience but also to free the art from the confines of a gallery, subsequently reaching a whole new audience.

Here just a few examples of why AR arts is such an exciting space:

DAVID BOWIE IS VIRTUAL

If you missed the ‘David Bowie Is’ museum exhibition, fortunately the show isn’t over. You can still experience it, but this time virtually! The David Bowie Archive, Sony Music Entertainment, Planeta and the Victoria & Albert Museum have announced that they will release a digital version of the exhibition at the V&A in the near future. This will be as an AR arts experience on smartphones and also in VR. The experience will be filled with audio-visual spaces, showcasing 3D scans of Bowie’s artifacts and iconic work. You might even be able to virtually step into one of his legendary outfits! Furthermore, bringing this exhibition into a virtual space will allow the audience to engage with Bowie’s influential work in a new way and we’re excited to try it!

David Bowie and BMW Augmented Reality in The New York Times - YouTube

AR DANCE EXPERIENCE

We, at Mbryonic have developed ‘0AR’ for AΦE, an Ashford-based dance company that aims to create high-quality productions and experiences that are not bound by a stage. Through augmented reality, this unique experience transforms the way we see and interact with dance.

0AR is inspired by the dance performance Zero Degrees, premiered at Sadler’s Wells back in 2005. This is a collaboration between dancers Akram Khan, Sidi Larbi, sculptor Antony Gormley and composer Nitin Sawhney. It follows Akram and Larbi on a journey to seek the reference point, the source ‘0’ at life’s core. Inspired by their own dual identities, they search for this middle point through polar opposites, becoming/death, light/dark and chaos/order.

In the AR arts experience, 0AR, the audience watch adapted motion-captured performances via an iPad. It reveals virtual dancers moving around as they overlay on the real environment. The dancers additionally change form throughout the narrative, shifting between different states, which the audience explore and interact with. As the audience member’s devices connect to each other wirelessly, their actions have a unique influence on the piece, transforming the work into a communal experience.

The experience will be previewed at the 18th International Dance Biennale in Lyon in September. If you’re unable to attend but still curious to try out the app, luckily you still can. In October 0AR will also be on display at Sadlers Wells Theatre in London. To stay up to date with all our events, and other AR arts experiences we’ve created, follow us on twitter!

MoMAR Gallery

Moreover, museums are transforming into a digital playground through AR arts experiences. For instance, eight Internet artists created their own digital art gallery called “Hello, We’re From The Internet”. Based in The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the artists brought the unique paintings of Jackson Pollock to life. The paintings became virtual art pieces after audiences downloaded and used the MoMAR Gallery App on their smartphones, resulting in graphics, GIFS and interactive games being overplayed above the original artworks. Visuals included a loading progress bar stating “repairing garbage”, psychedelic optical illusions and skeletons climbing paintings to name a few. These digital illustrations were produced as a statement against the elitist nature and exclusivity of the museum, aiming to “democratize physical exhibition spaces, museums and the curation of art within them”. The augmented reality app is additionally available in the Google Play Store and Apple’s App Store.

Hopefully we’ve increased your appetite for just some of the creative possibilities of AR in the Arts and Culture space. What’s great is that anyone with a smartphone can engage with the arts in new exciting ways. If you are interested in learning more about this technology then don’t hesitate to get in touch!

The post Augmented Reality: Three Ways AR is Transforming the Arts appeared first on Mbryonic.

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Technology is inevitably changing art, revolutionising the way we engage and appreciate it. You might have read our article ‘Three Ways Augmented Reality is Transforming the Arts’, showing how AR opens up new artistic possibilities… But the virtual reality industry is also growing at a fast pace. Now, more than ever, virtual reality art is taking hold, allowing individuals to immerse themselves in new visual experiences.

A ‘must-try’ virtual reality art experience is Miao Ying’sHappily Contained’, co-commissioned by dsl collection and Art Night and collaborated on by Mbryonic, Somewhere Else and MMCD Studio. Through the medium of VR and Internet aesthetics, Ying depicts a sinister world of firewalls and Internet monsters. They aim to represent diverse concerns in digital society such as privacy issues, tapping of data and so on. She states:

“People are looking at their apps all the time, but they are not really looking at them. I don’t know if people fully realise how technology is changing or controlling our lives. The work deals with the integration of technology and the human spirit”.

Mbryonic and MMCD brought Ying’s world to life by translating her flat frame ideas into an immersive 360°, 3D environment. Through adapting, combining and manipulating ‘found’ 3D assets from the internet, we replicated her specific digital montage style. We subsequently created 8 compelling scenes that are available to view with the HTC Vive.

Moreover, the combination of her ideas and VR allows audiences to understand her representation of digital society and the reason she challenges contemporary modes of politics. It allows one to feel present in the art, as they fully immerse themselves into the narratives world.

‘Happily Contained’ VR art piece at Art Night 2018 - Vimeo

Tom, Founder of Mbryonic believes that artists should embrace technology in their art, “whether it be new types of paint, work processes or digital tools, such as VR and AR. Mbryonic have a proud history of collaborating with talented visual artists. We strive to combine their ideas with technologies… And we hope more artists start utilising this in the future for self expression”.

VR has not just become an art medium. It has created more possibilities for artists, such as Ying, to express themselves in a way that was previously not possible. We are thrilled to have worked with Ying and the other talented individuals involved in this virtual reality art project. We additionally hope this event will inspire other artists to look at VR as something they can utilise, as well as expanding and developing the conversation around digital / virtual reality art more generally.

The post ‘Happily Contained’: A Virtual Reality Art Piece at Art Night 2018 appeared first on Mbryonic.

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Inspiring uses of Virtual Reality in marketing

Hopefully you’ve already checked out our top ten marketing VR use cases article, and now you want to dig deeper.

So here are some more amazing virtual reality marketing case studies to get your creative juices flowing!

DP World – London Gateway
DP World VR (Virtual Reality Marketing) - YouTube

DP World is a leading enabler of global trade operating a portfolio of 78 marine and inland terminals. Their port, London Gateway is a state-of-the-art semi-automated deep-sea port terminal. It’s the UK’s most integrated logistics hub and situated just 30km from London, being the largest consumer market in Europe. The company commissioned Mbryonic to create a Virtual reality marketing experience to communicate the benefits of routing trade through the port. Mbryonic imagined London Gateway as a living tabletop model. We subsequently created the ultimate model city but one which is alive – conveying the buzz of activity on the site. Cranes pick up containers, ships come into port and lorries scurry around the site. You can explore the port by yourself or if you prefer a virtual guide can guide you through the experience.

You even get to visit space to view how the port links up to the international shipping routes!

Marriott – The Teleporter
Virtual travel 'transporter' - YouTube

Imagine being able to transport yourself to a beach paradise whenever you wanted?

Framestore VR Studio writes that it’s, “A Revolutionary 4D Tourism experience for Marriott Hotels, teleporting you first to a Marriott Hotel and then to the beach in Hawaii.” Inside a telephone booth-like structure, they used Oculus Rifts, heaters, and wind jets to take users on a trip to Hawaii and London. Whilst it’s not quite the same as actually being there, it might help you decide on your future trips. It also helped Marriott position themselves as a forward looking and relevant brand in the market. For more information, you can view the case study here.

The virtual reality marketing experience combined visuals with the other senses. We liked it because it’s more innovative than just showing a 360 video. Whilst, not a cheap campaign to produce it was successful enough for Marriott to commission a second experience. Showing VR is more than a one-off gimmick but something that can be core to a marketing strategy when used properly.

Michelle Obama’s VR Video
Michelle Obama 360 - YouTube

Moreover, the Whitehouse invited The Verge to do a video on Michelle Obama’s success with social media. She talks about her efforts to popularise healthy eating and exercise. The 10-minute video is a 360 video that has After Effects like animation on it to help illustrate Michelle’s point. The video is the best VR infographic explainer video I’ve ever seen. For marketers reading this right now, if you need to explain a company’s mission or a new service, this is definitely a video you should watch.

It solves the big problem marketers have with VR. Mainly, how to properly make use of the 360 space. It also creates a narrative flow that anyone can follow along with. This is a huge a challenge because it is difficult to capture someone’s attention when they can look anywhere. The Verge creates these infographic pop-ups that guide your attention. Even when you’re not looking at the speaker, they’ll reproduce Michelle’s face on the other side. This lets you continue to follow the story whilst exploring the space. This video masterfully engages you on Michelle Obama’s social media story.

Jaguar – Feel Wimbledon
Feel Wimbledon with Andy Murray - YouTube

This is an ambitious work by Jaguar as part of their Wimbledon sponsorship. In it you get to fly over an intricate CG reconstruction of the Wimbledon site before landing in center court to a highly charged moment in time. Andy Murray provides the voice over and describes the feeling of playing in such a prestigious venue. The experience ends with entering the body of Andy and slamming the final match point. The experienced toured around the country in the run up to tournament. It was also released as a 360 video for wider viewing.

If you are going to go big, then this is how to do it. A very cinematic experience that allows you to experience as close as possible what its like to score in front of a center-court audience at Wimbledon. It’s what VR is designed for!

MSI Electric City – MSI

Gaming hardware specialists MSI wanted something special to launch its new motherboard, so why not create an entire new city? MSI Electric City is a VR trip into a futuristic world, influenced by sci-fi film classics such as Bladerunner and Tron. It’s got neat gaming elements and the 21st-century marketing twist is that the MSI Electric City is based on the actual motherboard design.

With an uber-cool original soundtrack and some delicious visual effects powered by Unreal Engine 4, this is a very slick VR advert. We love the sensations of speeding round the Electric City and it’s a very neat way of making a usually invisible product (the motherboard) come vividly to life. Game on, MSI.

Reimagine – Etihad Airways
Reimagine Etihad A380 Virtual Reality experience featuring Nicole Kidman 360 video - YouTube

You might expect something special when a hugely ambitious airline wants to promote flights on the world’s biggest passenger aircraft, the Airbus a380. Etihad Airways pulled out all the stops to feature actress Nicole Kidman in an immersive VR film called Reimagine. In the film, Kidman takes a flight from New York to Abu Dhabi and viewers with Google Cardboard headsets are invited to step on board. It’s all about the luxurious experience! Viewers are invited to enjoy the company of characters including an opera singer, a film director and even a falcon travelling in first class. Stay a while and you’ll even get access to the private three-room cabin known as ‘The Residence’, complete with personal butler.

With its ability to transport you somewhere entirely new, travel marketing is an obvious fit with VR technology. But Reimagine, with its A-list star, takes the synergy to a new level. The sensations of sound, light, motion and conversation are all beautifully evoked. Special filming techniques were also used to create a seamless experience. For anyone who’s ever missed out on an upgrade, here’s your chance to fly in style.

Immersive VR – Apollo 11 Mission
OCULUS RIFT ON THE MOON - The UPDATED Apollo 11 VR Experience! - YouTube

The Apollo 11 Mission was the iconic mission in 1969 that landed Earth’s first human on the moon. Immersive VR Education decided to educate enthusiasts to re-create this event in virtual reality under the same name. The result is the best history lesson since Crash Course decide to start their amazing YouTube series. The project started on Kickstarter and has now published the final result to its backers.

This isn’t really a virtual reality marketing application, as it was made by fans. But we love it so much we think this is precisely the kind of project an organisation like NASA should be embracing!. Education is a big part of marketing and this gets props for the clever integration of education and awe. The use of historical audio throughout the experience sells the authenticity.

Disney – Star Wars

Disney released a 360 VR fly through experience of one of the locations in the new upcoming Star Wars movie. In it you feel like you are inside one of the speeders during an epic battle. This content was also released using Facebook’s new 360 videos feature, which got over 6 million views.

To be fair Star Wars probably doesn’t need any help marketing itself. However, we picked this because it gives users a taste of the movie in a different way than a trailer can. It’s also an intelligent re-use of assets that would have already been created as part of the production of the movie.

Paul McCartney – Live Concert

Jaunt produced a 360 Video Recording of Sir Paul McCartney’s performance at Candlestick Park. You can download the app on iOS or Android to experience the event (spot the 360 camera rig in the right corner of the picture).

Allowing the audience to go on stage with you as a musician is a great idea. This got no end of publicity – not that Mr. McCartney needs it of course!


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So you are planning to have an amazing VR or AR experience. How do you get it into the hands of your employees and customers? In this article we are going to explain how to distribute VR and AR experiences.

Know your audience

When we discuss new projects with our clients, one of the first things we ask is who is this content for? How do you want to use it? and who will be responsible for looking after this?

Often the experiences we build are for a specific trade show or event. In which case we can supply the headsets with the software preloaded onto the headset or device. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality devices can be purchased or rented, a decision you can take depending on how long you want them for.

If this is the route for you we have lots more tips and useful information in our Virtual Reality for Tradeshows and Exhibitions article.

However if you want to reach a wider audience then read on.

Distributing VR experiences online

If you want the widest possible audience then publishing online to one of the application stores is the best solution, they can also be used for limited distributions as well which we will touch on later.

You will be familiar with the App Store or Google Play for mobile apps and immersive content is very similar. Which store to sell on will depend on which devices you are supporting. We often build VR / AR content that runs on multiple devices, so publishing on multiple stores is not uncommon.

Google Cardboard content can run on most modern smartphones in conjunction with an inexpensive headset. These are great for BYOD occasions and you can even post a branded foldable headset to a client. Just publish your app on the Apple App Store or Google Play Store and just give your customer a weblink.


Another popular destination is the Oculus Store. This is the default way to distribute content on a range of devices such as the Oculus Rift, Oculus Go, the forthcoming Oculus Quest and the Samsung Gear VR. Users of these devices can browse the store whilst they are in virtual reality or via a web browser.

However if you want to create an experience for the HTC Vive or Vive Pro, then you’ll want to publish on Steam. Steam is the world’s largest online distribution platform for games – so your audience will be the predominantly gamers but they have a wide and varied VR content for Vive and Oculus on there.

Note that app stores have an approval process which you’ll need to plan into your release schedule.

Distributing AR Content

The majority of Augmented Reality apps run on the billions of AR capable mobile phones out there. In which case the app can be sold or distributed for free on the app stores much like any other mobile app.

The challenge can be to get audiences to download the content in the first place. For enterprise this isn’t so much an issue, but can be problematic for locational based AR experiences like in museums and attractions where internet connectivity may not be ideal and you want this to be a frictionless experience as possible.

Luckily almost everyone has Facebook and/or Snapchat installed on their phone and it is now possible to access branded AR content directly via the camera function in this app. See our article on the types of great augmented reality experiences you can publish via Facebook using their Spark AR platform.


VR/AR for Enterprise

Often our clients want virtual reality and augmented reality content for their employees (for training purposes), specific customers (e.g. for a sales demonstration) or a group of users (e.g. patients or students). In which case they may not want everyone to be able to access the content and these users are often situated globally. Importantly most public app stores have guidelines that can deny content doesn’t have sufficient value for the majority of their customers.


For virtual reality systems that run on a PC laptop or desktop – like the Oculus Rift or HTC Vive it can be simple as downloading the application file straight from a website.

Increasing the market is moving to mobile and stand-alone headsets. On these devices the manufacturers tend to insist content is distributed via their own channels. Fortunately Apple’s Appstore, Google, Oculus and Steam all provide ways for enterprises to distribute apps privately to specific groups of users. The other advantage of distributing on the application stores is that is simple to push updates.

Maximising ROI through longtail

Not everyone has a headset (yet) and if you’ve invested in creating immersive content, then it is worth considering how to make the experience more accessible.

Adapting content so it can be viewed online in a browser is a great way of maximising your R.O.I.
The simplest way to do this is to record the users experience as a first-person perspective video that can be shared on YouTube, Vimeo and Facebook – all of which support 360 video formats.


If you need interactivity, it is possible to adapt the application to run directly in a browser either as a mouse based experience or using WebVR – although there are limitations with this approach so it’s best to plan for this in advance.

Ready for action?

We hope you found this article useful and if you have any questions please get in touch.

The post How to distribute VR & AR experiences appeared first on Mbryonic.

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Inspiring uses of VR in marketing

Hopefully you’ve already checked out our top ten marketing VR use cases article, and now you want to dig deeper.

So here are some more amazing case studies to get your creative juices flowing!

DP World – London Gateway
DP World VR (Virtual Reality Marketing) - YouTube

DP World is a leading enabler of global trade operating a portfolio of 78 operating marine and inland terminals. DP World London Gateway is a state-of-the-art semi-automated deep-sea port terminal and is the UK’s most integrated logistics hub and situated just 30km from London, the largest consumer market in Europe. DP World commissioned Mbryonic to create a VR experience to communicate the benefits of routing trade through the port. Mbryonic imagined London Gateway as a living tabletop model. We wanted to create the ultimate model city but one which is alive – conveying the buzz of activity on the site. Cranes pick up containers, ships come into port and lorries scurry around the site. You can explore the port by yourself or if you prefer a virtual guide can guide you through the experience.

You even get to visit space to view how the port links up to the international shipping routes!

Marriott – The Teleporter
Virtual travel 'transporter' - YouTube

Imagine being able to transport yourself to a beach paradise whenever you wanted?

Framestore VR Studio writes that it’s, “A Revolutionary 4D Tourism experience for Marriott Hotels, that teleports you first to a Marriott Hotel and then to the beach in Hawaii.” Inside a telephone booth-like structure, they used Oculus Rifts, heaters, and wind jets to take users on a trip to Hawaii and London. Whilst it’s not quite the same as actually being there, it might help you decide on your future trips. It also helped Marriott position themselves as a forward looking and relevant brand in the market. For more information, you can view the case study here.

We like this because it combines visuals with the other senses, going beyond what it possible by just showing a 360 video. Whilst, not a cheap campaign to produce it was successful enough for Marriott to commission a second experience. Showing VR is more than a one-off gimmick but something that can be core to a marketing strategy when used properly.

Michelle Obama’s VR Video
Michelle Obama 360 - YouTube

The Whitehouse invited The Verge to do a video on Michelle Obama’s success with social media. She talks about her efforts to popularise healthy eating and exercise. The 10-minute video is a 360 video that has After Effects like animation on it to help illustrate Michelle’s point. The video is the best VR infographic explainer video I’ve ever seen. For marketers reading this right now, if you need to explain a company’s mission or a new service, you’ll definitely want to look into this video and use it as an example.

It solves the big problem marketers have with VR. Mainly, how to properly make use of the 360 space and it creates a narrative flow that anyone can follow along with. This is a huge a challenge because it is difficult to capture someone’s attention when they can look anywhere. The Verge creates these infographic pop-ups that guide your attention. And even when you’re not looking at the speaker, they’ll reproduce Michelle’s face on the other side so you can continue to follow the story while exploring the space. This video masterfully engages you on Michelle Obama’s social media story.

Jaguar – Feel Wimbledon
Feel Wimbledon with Andy Murray - YouTube

This is an ambitious work commissioned by Jaguar as part of their Wimbledon sponsorship. In it you get to fly over an intricate CG reconstruction of the Wimbledon site before landing in center court to a highly charged moment in time. Andy Murray provides the voice over and describes the feeling of playing in such a prestigious venue. The experience ends with you entering the body of Andy and slamming the final match point. This was toured around the country in the run up to tournament and also released as a 360 video for wider vieweing.

If you are going to go big, then this is how to do it. A very cinematic experience that allows you to experience as close as possible what its like to score in front of a center-court audience at Wimbledon. It’s what VR is designed for!

MSI Electric City – MSI

Gaming hardware specialists MSI wanted something rather special to launch its new motherboard, so why not create an entire new city? MSI Electric City is a VR trip into a futuristic world which is clearly influenced by sci-fi film classics such as Bladerunner and Tron. It’s got neat gaming elements and the 21st-century marketing twist is that the MSI Electric City is based on the actual motherboard design.

With an uber-cool original soundtrack and some delicious visual effects powered by Unreal Engine 4, this is a very slick VR advert. We love the sensations of speeding round the Electric City and it’s a very neat way of making a usually invisible product (the motherboard) come vividly to life. Game on, MSI.

Reimagine – Etihad Airways
Reimagine Etihad A380 Virtual Reality experience featuring Nicole Kidman 360 video - YouTube

You might expect something a bit special when a hugely ambitious airline wants to promote flights on the world’s biggest passenger aircraft, the Airbus a380. So Etihad Airways pulled out all the stops to feature Academy-award- winning actress Nicole Kidman in an immersive VR film called Reimagine. In the film, Kidman takes a flight from New York to Abu Dhabi – and viewers with Google Cardboard headsets are invited to step on board. It’s all about the luxurious experience, as viewers are invited to enjoy the company of characters including an opera singer, a film director and even a falcon travelling in first class. Stay a while and you’ll even get access to the private three-room cabin known as The Residence, complete with personal butler.

With its ability to transport you somewhere entirely new, travel marketing is an obvious fit with VR technology. But Reimagine, with its A-list star, takes the synergy to a new level. The sensations of sound, light, motion and the hubbub of conversation are all beautifully evoked; special filming techniques were used to create a seamless experience. For anyone who’s ever missed out on an upgrade, here’s your chance to fly in style.

Immersive VR – Apollo 11 Mission
OCULUS RIFT ON THE MOON - The UPDATED Apollo 11 VR Experience! - YouTube

The Apollo 11 Mission was the iconic mission in 1969 that landed Earth’s first human on the moon. Immersive VR Education decided to educate enthusiasts to re-create this event in virtual reality under the same name. The result is the best history lesson since Crash Course decide to start their amazing YouTube series. The project started on Kickstarter and has now published the final result to its backers.

Ok, this isn’t really a marketing application as it was made by fans rather than NASA. But we love it so much we think this is precisely the kind of project an organisation like NASA should be embracing. Education is a big part of marketing and this gets props for the clever integration of education and awe. The use of historical audio throughout the experience sells the authenticity.

Disney – Star Wars

Disney released a 360 VR fly through experience of one of the locations in the new upcoming Star Wars movie. In it you feel like you are inside one of the speeders during an epic battle. This content was also released using Facebook’s new 360 videos feature, allowing them to get over 6 million views.

To be fair Star Wars probably doesn’t need any help marketing itself but we picked this because it gives users a taste of the movie in a different way than a trailer can. It’s also an intelligent re-use of assets that would have already been created as part of the production of the movie.

Paul McCartney – Live Concert

Jaunt produced a 360 Video Recording of Sir Paul McCartney’s performance at Candlestick Park. You can download the app on iOS or Android to experience the event (spot the 360 camera rig in the right corner of the picture).

Allowing the audience to go on stage with you as a musician is a great idea. This got no end of publicity – not that Mr. McCartney needs it of course!


The post VR Marketing : Inspiring use cases of brands using virtual reality appeared first on Mbryonic.

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There are over 2.5billion smartphone users in the world, with mobile technology becoming an integral part of our everyday lives. Many of these devices are already capable of providing augmented reality experiences – a huge audience for brands, artists and storytellers to engage with. AR is already being used by forward thinking brands in the space of retail and marketing, as shown in our article ‘10 Best Uses of Augmented Reality in Marketing’. However, this article will show you how AR can be used in the world of the arts.

When we think of the arts, we tend to associate it with visiting an art gallery, exploring a museum or taking a trip to a theatre… But when augmented reality and art collide, it opens up new artistic possibilities, not just to enhance a visitors experience but also to free the art from the confines of a gallery, subsequently reaching a whole new audience.

Here just a few examples of why this is such an exciting space:

DAVID BOWIE IS VIRTUAL

If you missed the ‘David Bowie Is’ museum exhibition, fortunately the show isn’t over, as you will still able to experience it, but this time virtually! The David Bowie Archive, Sony Music Entertainment, Planeta and the Victoria & Albert Museum have announced that they will release a digital version of the exhibition at the V&A in the near future. This will be as an augmented reality experience on smartphones and in VR. The experience will be filled with audio-visual spaces that showcase 3D scans of Bowie’s artifacts and iconic work in great detail. You might even be able to virtually step into one of his legendary outfits! Bringing this exhibition into a virtual space will allow the audience to engage with Bowie’s influential work in a new way and we’re excited to try it!

David Bowie and BMW Augmented Reality in The New York Times - YouTube

0AR

We, at Mbryonic have developed ‘0AR’ for AΦE, an Ashford-based dance company that aims to create high-quality productions and experiences that are not bound by a stage. This unique experience is inspired by the seminal dance performance Zero Degrees, that through augmented reality transforms the way we see and interact with dance.

Zero Degrees, a collaboration between dancers Akram Khan, Sidi Larbi, sculptor Antony Gormley and composer Nitin Sawhney, premiered at Sadler’s Wells back in 2005. It follows Akram and Larbi on a journey to seek the reference point, the source ‘0’ at life’s core. Inspired by their own dual identities, they search for this middle point through polar opposites, becoming/death, light/dark and chaos/order.

In 0AR, the audience watch adapted motion-captured performances via an iPad, revealing virtual dancers moving around as they overlay on the real environment. The dancers change form throughout the narrative, shifting between different states, which the audience are able to explore and interact with. Each audience member’s device is connected to each other wirelessly, with their actions having a unique influence on the piece, transforming the work into a communal experience.

The experience will be previewed at the 18th International Dance Biennale in Lyon in September. If you’re unable to attend but still curious to try out the app, luckily you still can. In October 0AR will be displayed at Sadlers Wells Theatre in London. To stay up to date with all our events, follow us on twitter!

MoMAR Gallery

Museums have been transformed into a digital playground through augmented reality. Eight Internet artists transformed Jackson Pollock’s unique paintings exhibited in The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) into their own digital AR art gallery under the name ‘Hello, We’re From The Internet’. The paintings were brought to life after audiences downloaded and used the MoMAR Gallery App on their smartphones, resulting in graphics, GIFS and interactive games being overplayed above the original artworks. Visuals included a loading progress bar stating “repairing garbage”, psychedelic optical illusions and skeletons climbing paintings to name a few. These digital illustrations were produced as a statement against the elitist nature and exclusivity of the museum, aimed to “democratize physical exhibition spaces, museums and the curation of art within them” as stated by the artists. The augmented reality app is available in the Google Play Store and Apple’s App Store.

Hopefully we’ve increased your appetite for just some of the creative possibilities of AR in the Arts and Culture space, showing how anyone with a smartphone can engage with the arts in new exciting ways. If you are interested in learning more about this technology then don’t hesitate to get in touch!


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Technology is inevitably changing art, revolutionising the way we engage and appreciate it. You might have read our article ‘Three Ways Augmented Reality is Transforming the Arts’, showing how AR opens up new artistic possibilities… But the virtual reality industry is also growing at a fast pace, and now, more than ever, VR is taking hold of the art world, allowing individuals to immerse themselves in new visual experiences.

A ‘must-try’ VR experience is Miao Ying’sHappily Contained’, co-commissioned by dsl collection and Art Night and collaborated on by Mbryonic, Somewhere Else and MMCD Studio. Through the medium of VR and Internet aesthetics, Ying depicts a sinister world of firewalls and Internet monsters that represent diverse concerns in digital society such as privacy issues, tapping of data and so on. She states:

“People are looking at their apps all the time, but they are not really looking at them. I don’t know if people fully realise how technology is changing or controlling our lives. The work deals with the integration of technology and the human spirit”.

Mbryonic and MMCD brought Ying’s world to life by translating her flat frame ideas into an immersive 360°, 3D environment. Through adapting, combining and manipulating ‘found’ 3D assets from the internet, we replicated her specific digital montage style, creating 8 compelling scenes that are available to view with the HTC Vive.

The combination of her ideas and VR allows audiences to understand her representation of digital society and the reason she challenges contemporary modes of politics. It allows one to feel present in the art, as they fully immerse themselves into the narratives world.

‘Happily Contained’ VR art piece at Art Night 2018 - Vimeo

Tom, Founder of Mbryonic believes that artists should embrace technology in their art, “whether it be new types of paint, work processes or digital tools, such as VR and AR. Mbryonic have a proud history of collaborating with talented visual artists to combine their ideas with technologies, and we hope more artists start utilising this in the future for self expression”.

VR has not just become an art medium, it has created more possibilities for artists, such as Ying, to express themselves and their imaginations to an audience in a way that was previously not possible. We are thrilled to have worked with Ying and the other talented individuals involved in this project, and hope this event will inspire other artists to look at VR as something they can utilise, as well as expanding and developing the conversation around digital art more generally.


The post ‘Happily Contained’: A VR Art Piece at Art Night 2018 appeared first on Mbryonic.

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