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It’s hay fever time again and whilst Mother Nature can be cruel, she is also kind! It may surprise you to know that changing what you eat can have a big impact on the severity of your symptoms.

You might start noticing symptoms in March when the tree pollen season starts. Then there’s the grass pollen season, followed by the weed pollen season, which can go on into September.

If this is you, I sympathise: itchy, red or watery eyes; runny or blocked nose; sneezing and coughing; itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears; loss of smell; earache; headache; and feeling exhausted.

Some foods will make the symptoms of hay fever worse, so try to cut these out or reduce them during hay fever season. Other foods are naturally anti-inflammatory, so you’ll want to ensure you’re getting plenty of these in your diet.

Foods containing high levels of histamine can intensify symptoms. These include chocolate (sorry about that), tomatoes, aubergines and many fermented foods like vinegar, sauerkraut, yoghurt, miso, soy sauce, and canned fish.

There are also foods that, while they are not high in histamine themselves, can trigger your cells to release histamine. These include strawberries, pineapple, bananas, citrus fruits and egg whites.

Foods containing wheat – like bread and pasta, cakes and pastries – can also be problematic for people with grass pollen allergies.

Dairy products like milk and cheese stimulate the body to produce more mucus, making blocked noses or ears much worse. Matured cheeses also tend to contain high levels of histamine. And sugar, which causes your body to produce more histamine, can further exacerbate your symptoms.

Foods to add in or increase when you have hayfever

Anti-histamine foods, which will help reduce allergy symptoms include foods that contain the natural compounds quercetin and beta carotene, and those high in vitamin C (see below).

Local honey also may be helpful because, although it contains trace elements of pollen, over time it may help your body become more familiar with the pollen entering your system and reduce the inflammatory response it makes.

Vitamin C containing foods

Blackcurrants, blueberries, peppers, kale, collard leaves, broccoli, kiwis, mango, courgettes, and cauliflower.

Quercetin containing foods

Onions, garlic, goji berries, asparagus, all berry fruits, apples, kale, okra, peppers, plums and red grapes.

Beta carotene containing foods

Sweet potato, carrots, butternut squash, red and yellow peppers, apricots, peas, broccoli, dark leafy greens like kale, and romaine lettuce.

What to drink

Drink plenty of water. Keeping well hydrated is helpful for all aspects of health. In the case of hayfever, it thins the mucous membranes and reduces that ‘blocked up’ feeling.

Green tea is packed full of antioxidants, which are helpful for the immune system generally. It has also been proven to block one of the receptors involved in immune responses.

Ginger tea has been shown to help reduce allergic reactions by lowering your body’s IgE levels (the antibody involved in the specific immune reaction associated with hayfever).

Peppermint tea is worth trying because peppermint contains menthol, a natural decongestant that may help improve sinus symptoms.

Add nettle tea to your shopping list for its ability to relieve inflammation of the upper respiratory tract and ease nasal congestion, sneezing and itching.

An anti-inflammatory approach

Hay fever is an inflammatory condition and may be further helped by including other types of food that calm the inflammatory response. Top of the list are foods containing anti-inflammatory omega 3 fatty acids, which I often recommend to clients struggling with any inflammatory condition. These include all types of oily fish (like salmon, trout, sardines, halibut and cod) as well as flaxseed and walnuts.

Coconut oil is another anti-inflammatory oil and can be used in cooking and baking or added to smoothies.

As well as adding flavour to your food, herbs like parsley, sage, thyme, oregano and basil have anti-inflammatory properties as do many spices, including turmeric, ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, fennel and nutmeg.

While the main problem for hay fever sufferers is the pollen itself, you may also find that hidden food intolerances are making matters worse.  I offer a range of testing options at my clinic if this is something you would like to explore.

Please do arrange a complementary call with me to discuss your concerns on 07961 166582 or email email@marcellerosenutrition.co.uk, I would love to help.

Please join my Facebook community Fuss Free healthy Eating, dedicated to making healthy eating easier!

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Most people don’t give a second’s thought to their skin – unless they’re scowling at the wrinkles or wobbly bits in the mirror. It’s already doing a fabulous job keeping your insides in, protecting you from infection and radiation, and keeping you warm. There’s also a huge amount you can do to keep your skin looking healthy and fresh and – I’m happy to tell you – stave off the wrinkles without buying expensive anti-ageing products. Read on to find out how.

Ditch the bad guys

Alcohol, caffeine, food additives, salt, sugar, and tobacco are full of cell-damaging free radicals, which play havoc with your skin. Ideally, cut them out altogether but certainly reduce them as much as you can. 

Be fat-friendly

Essential fats found in fish, avocados, nuts and seeds keep cell membranes soft and smooth – they’re nature’s perfect skin plumpers. Just in case the word ‘fat’ sends a red flag up for you, I want to reassure you that scientists have finally admitted all that ‘fat is bad for you and makes you fat’ propaganda was flawed. Eating the right fat is not only not bad, it is really, truly GOOD for your health.

Eat back the clock

Stock up on antioxidant-rich fruit and veg. These are crucial for your entire body – not just your skin. They reduce the speed of skin aging and degeneration. Eat them raw or lightly steamed as cooking for long periods destroys enzymes, minerals and vitamins and can create skin-damaging free radicals. Make a concerted effort to add at least one extra portion of veg every night this week to your evening meal. You should also aim to ‘eat a rainbow’ over the course of the week – that means picking as many different colours of veg and fruit as you can.

As a very general rule, each different colour group contains a different set of plant chemicals. Scientists now know that bringing a variety of different antioxidants into your diet has a synergistic effect, which means the combined result is more powerful than the individual parts.

Drink up!

Keep skin cells plump and full or your skin will look shrivelled and dehydrated – a long cry from that radiant glow you’re going for. Cells also need water to rebuild and to remove the build up of waste products (toxins). It’s a very simple (and free) step that most people don’t prioritise and yet the results and be striking. Aim for 2-3 litres a day depending on weather conditions and your level of exercise. You’ll soon see the benefit with your skin.

 

Helpful nutrients for skin health

Vitamin C for collagen production. Foods to include: blackcurrants, red peppers, kale, collard leaves, broccoli, kiwis, oranges, courgettes, cauliflower and spinach, citrus fruit.

Vitamins A, C, E and selenium are antioxidants that limit the damage done to collagen and elastin fibres by free radicals. Foods to include (aside from the vitamin C foods, above, and the vitamin A foods, below): sunflower seeds, almonds, spinach, swiss chard, papaya, mustard greens, asparagus, peppers, Brazil nuts, fresh tuna, some meats including pork, beef, turkey and chicken, cottage cheese, eggs, brown rice, sunflower seeds, spinach, oats, mushrooms.

Vitamin A helps control the rate of keratin production. A lack of vitamin A can result in dry, rough skin. Foods to include: sweet potato, carrots, butternut squash, spinach, kale, collard greens, turnip greens, romaine lettuce.

Vitamin D. Skin cells produce a chemical that is converted into vitamin D in sunlight. It’s important for many functions in the body, including immunity, blood sugar balance and bone health. It’s hard to get enough vitamin D from food alone, but try to include more oily fish and eggs – and don’t forget a daily dose of getting out into the sun in the spring and summer months!

Zinc is important for the production of skin cells. A lack of zinc can result in poor skin healing, eczema and rashes. Foods to include: fish, ginger root, lamb, lean beef, turkey, green vegetables, oats, nuts, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, yoghurt and scallops.

Essential fats for making cell membranes. A lack of essential fats causes cells to dry out too quickly, resulting in dry skin. Foods to include: oily fish (salmon, sardines), halibut, scallops, flaxseed, walnuts, soya beans, tofu.

Watch what you put on your body, too

The skin is the largest organ in the body with a surface area about the size of a double bed. It soaks everything up you put on it, and what soaks in, ends up in your blood stream. So if your shampoo and conditioner or shower gel (all of which wash over you as you shower), or your body lotions or creams contain nasty chemicals like parabens or sodium lauryl/ laureth sulplate, you are feeding yourself synthetic oestrogens that can wreak havoc with your hormones. Check labels for ingredients – often they may be marked as paraben-free.

Learn how to deal with problem skin

A targeted nutrition plan can work wonders for skin problems like acne, eczema, psoriasis and so on. This kind of personalised nutrition is often poorly understood and isn’t really talked about in the media. It doesn’t work to just add a single ‘superfood’ to your diet. However, a bespoke plan that takes into all of your skin – and health – concerns can make a huge difference. Ask me how. I’d love to help.

Arrange a complementary call with me to discuss your concerns on 07961 166582 or email email@marcellerosenutrition.co.uk

Please join my Facebook community Fuss Free healthy Eating -dedicated to making healthy eating easier!

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There is an argument that all foods are OK in moderation, and this is largely true if we have an overall healthy diet and want to maintain a healthy relationship with food that doesn’t become obsessive. We don’t want ‘being healthy’ to become something that feels like a chore or that has you missing out on some of the things you really enjoy. But as a nutrition professional, there are a number of foods that I don’t ever eat.

1 Low fat/ reduced fat foods/ diet foods

These foods are, by definition, very highly processed. Where fat is taken out of a food, what nearly always goes in instead is either sugar or artificial sweeteners. The idea that fat is bad or leads to weight gain has now been acknowledged as being entirely wrong. We now know that sugars (and excess starchy carbs) are what mostly leads to weight gain and keep you craving sweet things. Many artificial sweeteners aren’t great for gut health either. I’d far rather stick to the natural, full fat version.

2 Margarine and butter substitutes

Margarine and vegetable spreads are the nutritionally poorer relations of real butter, coconut oil and other healthy fats like olive oil. Again, they are heavily processed. Often what draws people to them is the thought that they are somehow healthier because of their lower levels of saturated fats. Given that saturated fat is not the enemy to your health – while artificially hardened vegetable oils (think trans-fats) are - it’s far better to stick to unadulterated fats, using ghee (clarified butter) and coconut oil, or olive oil for cooking at lower temperatures.

3 Sugar free fizzy drinks, diet drinks and energy drinks

Sometimes I see clients ‘filling up’ on diet drinks, which (although they contain no actual calories) are doing your body no favours. They’re still conditioning your body to expect more sweet stuff, and the jury is still out on whether artificial sweeteners are not great or seriously detrimental to health. Energy drinks often provide a dual hit of very large amounts of caffeine accompanied by either a lot of sugar or artificial sweeteners. When I’m working with clients who are propping themselves up with these drinks, I like to get to the cause of their fatigue, because what’s in the tin of Red Bull (or similar) will not be helping.

4 Hotdogs and processed meat

It is quite shocking how little actual meat goes into hotdogs, and processed deli-style meats are often pumped with water, sugar (even if it’s not actually called sugar, look out for anything ending in ‘-ose’ – like dextrose) and preservatives. Some of the additives in processed meats have been linked to increased risk of colon cancer. Cooking some extra roast chicken, turkey or meat so you can have some cold leftovers over the next few days is a useful alternative.

5 Shop-bought cereals

Most supermarket cereals are filled with sugar and very high in starchy carbs, which will have your energy levels crashing come mid-morning. Better options include home-made granola (go for a recipe without excess sugars including the natural ones!), which are easy weekend jobs and last a good while, porridge or overnight oats, omelettes or poached eggs (in fact, any kind of eggs) on wholemeal toast.

6 Agave nectar/ syrup

Agave syrup comes from a cactus, and the syrup is made from the pulp of the leaf. It’s very highly processed and is mainly fructose, which needs to be processed by the liver, causing more stress for an already over-worked organ. Fructose is actually worse for you than glucose (which is effectively what we are talking about when discussing ‘blood sugar’). Agave syrup (or nectar) is very similar to the (deservedly) much-demonised high fructose corn syrup, that has contributed greatly to the obesity epidemic in the US. My advice? Don’t use it!

7 Mycoprotein like Quorn

Quorn is a very processed food that comes from a fungus Fusarium venenatum and is fermented.  It has a lot of other ingredients added – like flavourings, yeast, starches and colourings, gluten to give it the texture and flavour of meat. Lentils and pulses are a much healthier alternative if you’re after vegetarian choices.

8 Fruit Juice

The easiest way to get lots of sugar into your system in a short space of time is by drinking it. And since it comes in as liquid, the body doesn’t register it as “eaten”, so it cunningly slips past any detectors that might otherwise signal satiety or ‘satisfaction’. Fruit juice – particularly when freshly squeezed – certainly contains lots of lovely vitamins and minerals, but it contains just as much sugar as that can of Coke. So, don’t kid yourself: fruit juice is not healthy. If you want fruit, eat fruit. Don’t drink it!

If you are confused about what you should be eating, think you may be lacking nutrients in your diet or struggle with low in energy and want to get back to your healthy energized self, arrange a complementary call with me to discuss your concerns on 07961 166582 or email email@marcellerosenutrition.co.uk, I would love to help.

Please join my Facebook community Fuss Free healthy Eating, dedicated to making healthy eating easier!

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63% of women in middle age are overweight or obese which is an alarming statistic. Once women hit their 40s, they typically gain an average of 1lb a year so we could easily be a stone heavier by the time we reach 55!More alarming though, is the harm that obesity can cause; being overweight dramatically increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoarthritis and some cancers. We now know that carrying too much weight around the middle can stimulate long term inflammation throughout the body as well as leading to the build up of fat in the liver. It really makes for bleak reading.  So what can we do about it?

The ‘midlife’ years can be a challenge for all sorts of different reasons and, yes, weight loss IS harder. How I wish I could tell you there was a magic pill and, just by taking it, you’d automatically revert back to the woman you were 20 years ago … Sadly, it’s not quite that straightforward.

The rules are different when it comes to weight loss when you’re over 40. It’s a path you need to navigate carefully to find your own magic formula. But losing weight, regaining your energy and getting back to your best is possible with the right advice, and some support along the way.

The wheel of weight loss

There’s more to losing weight than just eating the right things. What you eat is just one part. An important part, nonetheless.

Think of winning at weight loss in your 40s as being like a pie slice. There are other pieces of pie that that are important and can help or hinder weight loss.

Aside from diet, the seven remaining pieces of pie are thyroid hormones, the stress hormone cortisol, the fat storage hormone insulin, oestrogen, sleep, digestion and exercise.

 Where are you out of balance?

You may not have given your hormones a second’s thought before but, given the rollercoaster you are on right now, it’s worth having some understanding of what’s going on chemically inside you and the impact it’s having.

OESTROGEN - progesterone levels fall rapidly as you stop ovulating as regularly and, although oestrogen is decreasing, too, it’s falling at a slower rate, meaning you can end up being oestrogen dominant (that’s too much oestrogen in proportion to progesterone).

THYROID  – the thyroid is your internal motor and it comes under increased pressure in your 40s. Imagine a record playing at a reduced speed … That’s what happens when your thyroid is struggling to keep up. Low levels of thyroid hormones can bring mood changes, weight increases, constipation and a sluggish feeling.

Your hormones work together synergistically. When one or more is out of kilter, there is an effect on the others, too. This is especially true where the thyroid and adrenals are concerned.

CORTISOL – the stress hormone made by the adrenal glands, can also increase (particularly if you’re used to spinning too many plates), making sleep more difficult and leading to weight gain. Rather comically, we have not evolved a great deal since caveman times when the big stressor was the sabre-toothed tiger and we had to keep the energy round the middle so it could be easily accessed when you needed to run away from that tiger.

INSULIN is the hormone linked to diabetes, but it is also the fat storage hormone. As a doubly whammy, it additionally blocks fat burning. It’s made by the body in response to the carbohydrates you eat. The more refined the carbs, the more insulin produced and the more fat is stored. But, as we age, the cells in our bodies can become less sensitive to insulin, so the pancreas needs to pump out more and more to get the same job done.

DIGESTION. If your digestive system is not working quite as it should, this can leave you feeling – and looking – bloated. There’s a lot of research into the microbiome (your gut environment) right now, and there are proven links between the balance of bacteria in the gut and being overweight.

Anyone with an imbalance of good to bad bacteria in their large intestine will also find themselves absorbing up to 15% more calories from their food. So if you’re the kind of person who has suffered off and on with tummy troubles, it’s worth talking to a nutrition professional to get things checked out. Symptoms worth investigating include gas, bloating, acid reflux, constipation or diarrhoea (or alternating), feelings of nausea.

 Extra bonus symptoms!

All this, and you might even be managing the symptoms of perimenopause (the run-up to the big event), menopause and beyond. These include delights such as night sweats, erratic menstrual cycle, insomnia, bloating, cravings, headaches/migraines, overwhelm, irritability, mood swings, anxiety/depression, brain fog, poor memory, loss of sex drive, vaginal dryness, aging skin (and hair), joint pain and fatigue. Yay!

Get some answers

If ever there was a time to get your hands on facts to shed light on the situation, this is it. Your GP might be able to run a few tests that will tell you whether or not you are going through the menopause. But what next? In clinic, I am used to working with the best private laboratories to provide my clients with tests that show us which hormones are out of whack – so that we can come up with a bespoke nutrition and supplement programme to tackle it. Email me or book a free call to discuss whether testing (and specifically which tests) might be right for you.

Watch what you eat.

One of the tragedies of this time in your life is the realisation that you really cannot get away with eating the same foods you used to. Your body has changed, and you need to learn to eat for this new way of being.

This means it’s more important than ever to switch from whatever kind of diet you’re on now to a low GL (glycaemic load) diet that balances your blood sugar levels. This means you will be eating foods that do not trigger as much insulin secretion in response to what you eat.

Eating this kind of diet really is enjoyable and filled with foods you’d probably heard you couldn’t eat, like good fats, avocados and eggs! A blood sugar balancing diet like this focuses on REAL food: meat, fish, eggs, tofu, lentils, beans and chickpeas, lots of veg, some fruit, nuts, seeds, and wholegrains. If this is a long way from where you are now, I’d love to help you move to this way of eating. Work with me and it will feel easy rather than an uphill struggle or – worse still – devoid of all those little props you have used to get yourself through these trying times.

Eat functional foods

These are foods that actually do stuff in the body. On one level, the food you eat can help balance your blood sugar and energy levels. On another it keeps you feeling satiated and it also nourishes you. The cherry on top is to use the very subtle, yet magical powers of food to help support your body in times of need.

At this time of your life, that means phytoestrogens. Phytoestrogens are plant-based chemicals (the good kind), which are structurally similar to oestrogen and exert a weak oestrogenic effect. They include soy beans, lentils, beans, chickpeas, tofu, barley, rye, oats, alfalfa, apples, pears, carrots, fennel, onion, garlic, sunflower seeds, flaxseeds, and liquorice root.

 Rest + Relax

Stress can make you gain weight and feel both tired and miserable as well as using up stores of important vitamins. This is why a stress action plan is a must. Self care in your 40s and 50s is no longer a ‘nice thing to do’, it is essential for managing symptoms of the transition to menopause.

This will also help with anxiety, which I see a lot in clinic with women of your age. It’s really common to feel anxious or worried now about things that never used to bother you, from minor things to the big stuff like ‘who the hell am I now?’

If you have not been good (and most women aren’t) at putting your needs first and doing nice things for yourself, start now. Write down 5 activities you really enjoy doing – even if it’s been a while since you did any of them!

Sleep tight

Sleep and weight are intimately related. If you are not getting enough sleep on a regular basis, you are setting yourself up to be hungrier, eat more, weigh more, and have a harder time losing weight. 

Scientists now know that, if you are consistently surviving on too little sleep (that’s less than seven and a half hours of good sleep a night), you’re not going to be functioning at your best, focusing properly or thinking creatively. You are also sabotaging any attempts to take control of healthy eating and your weight.

Sleep deprivation causes hormone imbalance, and I’m not talking PMT, but the hormones that directly affect your feelings of hunger. Ghrelin (the hunger hormone – makes you feel more hungry) and leptin (the satiety hormone that tells you when you’ve had enough) are majorly disrupted when you are not sleeping enough.

Lack of sleep also messes with your levels of stress hormones and your body’s sensitivity to insulin, both of which contribute to weight gain.

So, after a night of bad sleep, if you feel ravenous, it’s not all in your head, but rather, in your hormones. And, it’s the refined, carb-heavy, starchy foods that are going to be calling your name, not the lovely healthy ones.

Do the right exercise

As the weight creeps on, it’s very common for women to start getting into the types of exercise that are very punishing on the body, like running and high intensity interval training. These very intense forms of exercise stress the body and, if your body is already stressed, it’s just too much.

Yoga, Pilates, Zumba and other dance-based classes are good, and don’t knock a decent walking workout. Resistance/ strength exercise (weights) is also good to help with the loss of muscle. Strength training also helps you shore up bone, maintain balance, and avoid injury – important for protecting your skeleton, both now and when you’re older.

Ditch toxins

Chemicals in your body care products – anything from shampoo and conditioner to body wash, body lotion and other moisturisers – contains chemicals, like parabens, sodium lauryl/laureth sulphate and ureas. These are synthetic forms of oestrogen that are known endocrine disrupting chemicals. Scientifically, these chemicals are molecularly similar to oestrogen and your body finds it very tricky to distinguish between the fake oestrogen and the real oestrogen. Unlike the friendly phytoestrogens mentioned above, these nasty ‘xenoestrogens’ have a much stronger effect than our own body’s oestrogen.

At this time in your life, you really don’t want to be overloading your body. These toxins place an additional stress on the body, can damage the cells in your body that produce insulin, disrupting its action (and not in a good way), can impair thyroid hormones and place extra burden on the detoxification system.

Get expert help

I know how hard it can be to see the weight pile on and feel powerless to do anything about it. Apart from your friends (except the skinny ones – what do they know?) no one understands what it’s like to feel overweight and unattractive, or to see the reflection of some frumpy old lady when you still feel young and vibrant on the inside.

Most of the weight loss solutions you have likely tried are based, possibly, on flawed science but also likely not designed for women of your age. If you need support with this my signature programme will tackle all aspects of what I’ve been talking about. The programme combines both diet and lifestyle elements, so we can work on your confidence as well as that expanding waistline. This is perfect for you if you experience any of the issues I set out at the beginning, and now is exactly the right time for a brand new you: new diet, new attitude and new healthy lifestyle habits. 

To arrange a complementary call to discuss your concerns or book an appointment call me on 07961 166582 or email email@marcellerosenutrition.co.uk, I would love to help you.

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DO YOU NEED TO KICK START YOUR NEW YEAR? Give yourself the best start by restoring your energy levels, kicking the sugar cravings and resetting your metabolism.

This is a recipe from my 4 week Reboot programme kicking off on 21st January . I’m offering an early bird price of £39 if booked by 14th January. (Thereafter the price is £49)

If you would like help with simple, tasty and quick meal ideas, need to know what’s really healthy and what’s, or simply need some motivation accountability and support, why not take advantage of my offer!

The programme will show you how to EAT HEALTHILY for the LONG TERM to maintain optimum health and well being, whilst still enjoying your food

- NO FADDY DIETS, RESTRICTIONS OR CALORIE COUNTING!

What you’ll get:

✅• A January reboot resource pack, including seasonal family friendly recipes that are easy to make or prepare; simple, tasty breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack recipes. This includes vegetarian/vegan options. There are no specialist health foods – just the stuff you'd find in any old supermarket. ( it’s yours to keep and use forever too!)

✅• This is a virtual programme run via a private Facebook group. Check in whenever suits your schedule. You'll have access to your programme anytime, anywhere. I'll be in the group every day giving tips, motivating you, holding your hand and answering your questions

✅• Expert advice: Nutritional advice + support from a Registered Nutritional Therapist & Health Coach.

✅• Weekly Live Facebook Q&A to deal with challenges and questions.

✅• Not another 'diet': Make it actually happen with motivational support and accountability from your coach. Experience the transformation.

Email me at : email@marcellerosenutrition.co.uk to book your place!What past participants have said:

"A big thank you Marcelle. I’ve felt mentally and physically better, had more energy and lost weight. I’m happy to feel that I know what I need to do to get over cravings - I’d been really struggling in the evenings and have felt so much better on the programme. Your meal plans had just the right amount of variety without overwhelming me with too much choice. I can look at healthier eating as not just normal eating less the tasty things but as replacing food that doesn’t make me feel good with food that does. I finally made some fit fudge as an occasional treat to celebrate! I’m sure the test will come now but remembering the 80/20 rule. Thank you!" C.M

"I just wanted to say a big thank you Marcelle Rose. I’d been struggling to lose the last of my baby weight and as a tired and busy Mum I had lost the motivation to make good food choices. You’ve given me inspiration, some new knowledge and great recipes which all the family can enjoy. I’ve lost 3.5 kg and enjoyed experimenting with some new foods. I will always be someone who enjoys their food and eat out more than I probably should but the plan has really helped, especially as it isn’t overly restrictive. Next step is to sort food plans and keep digging deep. I haven’t nailed my post dinner sugar cravings but am making steps in the right direction. Thank you so much, most of all, it’s been really enjoyable" A.J

“I was aware of how to improve my eating habits but I was lazy and busy so would grab rubbish on the go, finish kids' food, succumb to 'treats' with little hesitation. Since doing the challenge, I have definitely become more mindful of how I eat in general and I loved being part of a 'support' group. I have made some lasting, simple changes. Marcelle is great. Organized, professional, approachable, she offers loads of guidance, motivation and is always close by for support. “ I.B

“The reboot challenge expertly lead by Marcelle has taught me to experiment more with my foods and be more creative in the kitchen. Never felt like a diet but has given me exactly what is says, a reboot for my palate and some news tastes for me and my family to try and like!! Even for someone like me how doesn’t enjoy cooking, the reboot recipes were practical and surprisingly good!Feel less need for sugary fast foods and enjoying more nutritious and healthy options!! “ D.G

"I've really enjoyed the challenge and learning more about how my body has reacted to the change. I feel so good, more energy and a little boost in confidence, having lost some weight and inches. Have loved the recreating the recipes and I know that I will continue following the plan when I'm at home but allow myself to relax if I'm out." L.B

"Thanks so much Marcelle. Have discovered some new family favourites (we all loved the healthy fish and chips last night) and reset my eating pattern for sure. Good days and bad but the overall trajectory is upwards! “ C.H

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Eating food you have cooked or prepared at home is not only healthier for you but also considerably cheaper. The key to this is planning. You’ve probably heard the saying ‘failing to plan is planning to fail’. Without a weekly food plan, it will be pure luck if you end up with the right foods in the fridge or cupboard. And, without planning your time, you won’t always make the time to enjoy breakfast or make that lunch. You could be saving a LOT of money each and every week by following these tips.

EXERCISE 1: HOW MUCH ARE YOU REALLY (OVER) SPENDING?

Be honest with yourself about your spending and shopping habits. That starts with looking into how much you spend each week on take-out coffee, croissants and other breakfasts; lunchtime salads, soups and sandwiches; snacks and other food treats; and ready meals, takeaways or last-minute meals out. Make a note every time you buy something (not the main food shop) to eat out of the house. Do this for a week, then multiply by 4 to give you an approximate monthly total.

Log into your banking app (or go online) and make a note of how much you spent over the last month on food.

Add the two figures together. This gives you your total for how much you are spending on food each month. I suspect you will be shocked. Most people are.

Commit to saving a certain amount each week or month. Decide what that is. Commit to it and write it down. What will you do with that extra money? Where can you economise?

EXERCISE 2: PLAN YOUR PLANNING

Become a planning ninja. The thing about planning is that you need to actually plan to plan. It’s easy to get derailed by events, situations, relationships and tasks that insert themselves into our already busy lives. Choose a time when you know you will be free every week to plan your meals – breakfasts, lunches and dinners. Ideally plan midweek for the following week. Put a reminder alarm on your phone. If this planning job doesn’t get done, you will have no choice but to shop on a day-to-day basis, which is much more expensive.

EXERCISE 3: AUDIT WHAT YOU HAVE

Turn these meal plans into a shopping list. Also create a master list of what you already have in your freezer, fridge and cupboards. Cross anything you already have off your shopping list. 

EXERCISE 4: SHOP YOUR PLAN

As an experiment, spend at least one week only allowing yourself to buy what is on your shopping list. No extras! The planning and shopping discipline may take a little time to get used to, but it is worth persevering. Off-list shopping and impulse buys are the biggest enemy for anyone wanting to keep to a budget. Do not go to the supermarket hungry. You are more likely to shop off-list when you do.

EXERCISE 5: GET CREATIVE

A huge amount of food is thrown away, because we’re not sure what to do with leftovers. Make a commitment to using yours and prepare to save money. There is a bank of resources online to help you find easy recipe suggestions for pretty much anything you may have lurking in the fridge. This will feel uncomfortable at first. You will be making some meals you have definitely not tried before!

Try the following:

Tesco Meal Planner Left Over Tool (https://realfood.tesco.com/meal-planner/leftover-tool.html)

All Recipes Lefts Overs Tool (https://realfood.tesco.com/meal-planner/leftover-tool.html)

Love Food Hate Waste (https://www.lovefoodhatewaste.com/recipes/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIoqb6tqnl3QIVA7ftCh2Cjg_eEAAYASAAEgK12_D_BwE)

 

GOLDEN RULES OF HEALTHY EATING ON A BUDGET

1 INCLUDE PROTEIN AT EVERY MEAL AND SNACK

Protein keeps energy levels stable and is essential for the body’s growth and repair, and healthy skin and nails. Protein is found in meat and poultry, fish, seafood, eggs, lentils, beans, pulses (like chickpeas), quinoa, nuts and seeds. Protein should make up a quarter of your meal (about the size of a clenched fist). Many people do not have protein-based breakfasts. How can you change yours?

MONEY-SAVING TIP: the cheapest sources of protein are vegetarian sources, like beans and lentils. Consider going meat-free one or two days a week. Eggs sold as ‘mixed sizes’ are cheaper than buying all M or L.

2 EAT PLENTY OF FIBRE

That means lots of vegetables  – likely more than you are currently eating. The recommendation is 5 portions of vegetables and 2 portions of fruit (ideally low sugar fruit like berries, apples, pears, plums – anything grown in the UK) a day. Fibre keeps energy levels constant, balances your hormones, fills you up, keeps you regular and those fruit and veg contain many immune-boosting plant chemicals. Aim to eat a rainbow of colours over the course of the week.

MONEY-SAVING TIP: Greengrocers are often the cheapest places to buy your veg. Also consider basing meals around special supermarket deals (example Aldi’s Super 6), and don’t rule out the basics and essentials ranges of veg (usually just means they are not regular shapes and sizes). Don’t rule out frozen veg either. It’s cheap, often frozen soon after picking so it’s very fresh, and offers the ultimate convenience. And you are likely to waste less.

 3 CHOOSE HEALTHY FATS

Eating fat doesn’t make you gain fat or otherwise put on weight, but some fats are healthier than others. The body loves omega 3 fats, which boost mood and support the stress response, and reduce inflammation. They are found in oily fish (salmon, trout, halibut, cod, fresh tuna, mackerel, sardines), flaxseeds, chia seeds, hemp seeds and walnuts. Other healthy sources of fat are avocados, olive oil, coconut oil, nuts and seeds.

MONEY-SAVING TIP: Frozen fish is a far cheaper option than refrigerated. Don’t be fooled into thinking it’s inferior. Often supermarket ‘fishmonger’ counter fish has been frozen.

 4 THINK CAREFULLY ABOUT STARCHY ‘CARBS’

Many diets rely heavily on white, pasta, bread, rice and potatoes, but these (especially when eaten without protein) can unbalance your blood sugar levels and cause you to store fat. Swap to healthier wholegrain alternatives; brown rice, wholemeal pasta and bread, and sweet potatoes, and ensure this element takes up no more than a quarter of your meal.

MONEY-SAVING TIP: Many people bulk up meals with starch, especially on a budget. Your body will love you for bulking meals up with veg instead. Eating large portions of starchy foods will have you craving more food than if you had more modest portions.

 5 CUT SUGAR

Most people have an understanding that sugar is not good for them. Eating sugary food is like a treadmill, with one biscuit creating the need for the next. Sugar creates a blood sugar or energy imbalance, fuels inflammation in the body, and makes you put on weight.

MONEY-SAVING TIP: Consider that the more sugar you eat, the more you need to eat. Sugary ‘treats’ soon become a three times a day habit. Depending what you’re snacking on, cutting it out (or cutting down) could save several ££ each day.

HAVE YOU GIVEN YOURSELF NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS but know you need some support to achieve them? Why not take the first step by booking a FREE call with me to see what the options are. I offer a range of health and weight loss programmes that can help you reach your personal health goals. To book your call email me at email@marcellerosenutrition.co.uk , I would love to help. USEFUL RESOURCES

Economy Gastronomy by Allegra McEvedy & Paul Merrett

https://amzn.to/2T03pPj

 Save with Jamie by Jamie Oliver

https://amzn.to/2STcNUK

Eat, Shop, Save by Dale Pinnock

https://amzn.to/2PPFwIj

 Eat Well for Less (various different books) by Greg Wallace & Chris Bavin

https://amzn.to/2Scqq1A

https://amzn.to/2SfvylC

https://amzn.to/2ScwuXK

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It’s normal to want to indulge over the festive season, but the number of people joining diet clubs and gyms in January speaks volumes about how many regret their festive binges.

I wonder whether that’s a well-trodden path for you? Maybe you’ve grown up associating food with pleasure and fun, so subconsciously you fear that if you don’t eat tonnes, you won’t have a ‘happy Christmas’. It’s easy to slip into a ‘one more won’t hurt’ mind-set – just one of the many reasons you might have piled on the pounds during the festive period in the past.

When working with clients on weight loss programmes, I always like to get clear on what has held them back in the past. These are a few of the things that often come up:

Portion control – have you ever felt you’ve waited all year for Christmas, so you’re not about the hold back?  The extra roasties or chocolates don’t seem to matter.

Social life – family commitments, work lunches and endless parties mean that you are literally overloaded with temptation, sometimes on a daily basis. And hangovers add to the urge to eat junk food and veg out on the sofa.

Sedentary lifestyle – a busy social life means exercise routines get put on the back burner as we swap dumbbells for the remote control. The average family spends 3.5 hours watching TV on Christmas Day. Swap that for some gym time and you’ll have done the hard work of actually making a start come the New Year!

Mental ‘hall pass’ – willpower goes out the window at this time of year. It’s almost as if you tell yourself that it’s fine to binge on everything in sight as you’ll lose it all when you go on a January diet / detox.

But the fact is, you can still enjoy the festive season and not gain weight. For most people ‘Christmas’ is actually just a handful of days – Christmas Eve, the Day itself, Boxing Day, New Year’s Eve and maybe a party or two along the way. The trick is to not feel left out by integrating treat foods into the context of an overall healthy diet. So one mince pie, not four, in one afternoon. And as long as you have some strategies in place before the festive season, there’s no reason why you can’t start the New Year looking and feeling fantastic.

As a qualified Nutritional Therapist and Health Coach, I work with clients to take control of their relationship with food and plan how to get through times when over-indulgence might feel hard to resist.

Here are my top 9 tips:

 1 SET A FESTIVE FOOD GOAL

It’s unrealistic to try and avoid all temptation over Christmas, but by setting a specific goal – say, limiting yourself to one treat a day, or scheduling in a quick workout once or twice a week to offset your increased calorie intake – will help you stay on track. You could even make it into a fun game and get the whole family involved!

2 EAT SMART

If you don’t have a plan (for parties, going out, visiting friends, having family over and so on) you are setting yourself up to fail. Be clear in your mind what your healthy options are, and if you know you’re going somewhere you won’t be able to eat the right foods, take some nutritious snacks or meals with you. Fill up on some protein-rich leftover turkey, or keep sugar cravings at bay with a homemade energy ball before you hit the party circuit.

3 PORTION CONTROL

Eating from a smaller dish causes you to eat less, because the food itself looks more substantial. If you transfer food from a 12-inch plate to a 9-inch plate, it looks like more food and you, therefore, feel more satisfied.

4 AVOID EXCESS

Christmas excess can lead to hangovers, and hangovers often lead to poor food choices, especially a tendency to seek out sugar and starchy carbs. Research reveals that fat from certain foods, including ice cream and roast potatoes, goes straight to the brain and tells you to eat more! It triggers messages that are sent to the body’s cells, warning them to ignore appetite-suppressing hormones that regulate our weight.

The effect can last for a few days, sabotaging efforts to get back to a healthy diet afterwards. Dr Deborah Clegg, who conducted the research, explains: “Normally our body is primed to say when we’ve had enough, but that doesn’t always happen. When you eat something high in fat, your brain gets ‘hit’ with the fatty acids and you become resistant to insulin (which regulates blood sugar levels) and leptin (the hormone that suppresses hunger). Since you are not being told by the brain to stop eating, you overeat.”

5 OUT OF SIGHT

If you want a Quality Street chocolate and all you have to do is reach to the tin and help yourself, chances are you’ll end up eating 3 or 4. But if you have to get your shoes on, walk to the shop in the cold to buy some chocolate, you probably wouldn’t bother.

Ever heard yourself say “take this away from me, so I stop eating it?” With food directly in front of you, it’s easy to overindulge. Once it’s removed, you realise you aren’t even hungry – you were just eating because it was there. So keep unhealthy foods out of sight in cupboards or better still, don’t buy them. If you know they’re in the house, you might not be able to resist.

6 REMEMBER VEGETABLES

Veggies don’t need to be doused in oil and roasted to within an inch of their lives to taste good. One of my favourite festive side dishes are thinly sliced Brussels sprouts, which I flash-fry with garlic, pine nuts and a dash of white wine. It’s so tasty, I make it all year round. Slow-cooked red cabbage and apple is another fantastic way to get some much-needed nutrients.

7 SLOW DOWN

It takes around 20 minutes for your body to tell your brain that you’re full. If you eat quickly, you’re more likely to eat more. Slowing down gives you time to recognise and assess how hungry you really are. One trick I use is counting chews (it’s tedious but, believe me, it works). If you chew a bite 10 times, you’ll eat slower. I also found myself enjoying food more, as there’s more time to actually taste what I’m eating. Eventually it becomes second nature to chew more. If you’re in a group, try to be the first person to start eating and the last to stop. Pacing your eating like this will get you to eat more slowly without getting in your head about the specific amount that you eat.

8 CIRCLE OF SUPPORT

Emotional support is crucial when it comes to making big changes to your diet. Research shows that people who felt supported by their friends and family were 50% more likely to stick to a healthy eating plan. So ask your loved ones to help you avoid temptation by not to offering you sugary treats. Buddy up with a family member who is also trying to lose or maintain their weight. Having that moral support will boost your chances of success (and you won’t be riddled with that horrible feeling of regret the next day).

9 BE KIND TO YOURSELF

It is the season of goodwill, after all. If you slip up, don’t beat yourself up or see it as an excuse to write off the rest of the day and eat everything in sight. Just chalk it up as one bad decision and move on. You can get back on track tomorrow.

If you’re resigned to Christmas weight gain and are promising yourself you’ll do something about it in the New Year, why not make a commitment to your future self by booking a FREE call with me to see what the options are. I offer a range of health and weight loss programmes that can help you reach your personal health goals.

To book your call email me at email@marcellerosenutrition.co.uk , I would love to help.

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It’s normal to want to indulge over the festive season, but the number of people joining diet clubs and gyms in January speaks volumes about how many regret their festive binges.

I wonder whether that’s a well-trodden path for you? Maybe you’ve grown up associating food with pleasure and fun, so subconsciously you fear that if you don’t eat tonnes, you won’t have a ‘happy Christmas’. It’s easy to slip into a ‘one more won’t hurt’ mind-set – just one of the many reasons you might have piled on the pounds during the festive period in the past.

When working with clients on weight loss programmes, I always like to get clear on what has held them back in the past. These are a few of the things that often come up:

Portion control – have you ever felt you’ve waited all year for Christmas, so you’re not about the hold back?  The extra roasties or chocolates don’t seem to matter.

Social life – family commitments, work lunches and endless parties mean that you are literally overloaded with temptation, sometimes on a daily basis. And hangovers add to the urge to eat junk food and veg out on the sofa.

Sedentary lifestyle – a busy social life means exercise routines get put on the back burner as we swap dumbbells for the remote control. The average family spends 3.5 hours watching TV on Christmas Day. Swap that for some gym time and you’ll have done the hard work of actually making a start come the New Year!

Mental ‘hall pass’ – willpower goes out the window at this time of year. It’s almost as if you tell yourself that it’s fine to binge on everything in sight as you’ll lose it all when you go on a January diet / detox.

But the fact is, you can still enjoy the festive season and not gain weight. For most people ‘Christmas’ is actually just a handful of days – Christmas Eve, the Day itself, Boxing Day, New Year’s Eve and maybe a party or two along the way. The trick is to not feel left out by integrating treat foods into the context of an overall healthy diet. So one mince pie, not four, in one afternoon. And as long as you have some strategies in place before the festive season, there’s no reason why you can’t start the New Year looking and feeling fantastic.

As a qualified Nutritional Therapist and Health Coach, I work with clients to take control of their relationship with food and plan how to get through times when over-indulgence might feel hard to resist.

Here are my top 9 tips:

 1 SET A FESTIVE FOOD GOAL

It’s unrealistic to try and avoid all temptation over Christmas, but by setting a specific goal – say, limiting yourself to one treat a day, or scheduling in a quick workout once or twice a week to offset your increased calorie intake – will help you stay on track. You could even make it into a fun game and get the whole family involved!

2 EAT SMART

If you don’t have a plan (for parties, going out, visiting friends, having family over and so on) you are setting yourself up to fail. Be clear in your mind what your healthy options are, and if you know you’re going somewhere you won’t be able to eat the right foods, take some nutritious snacks or meals with you. Fill up on some protein-rich leftover turkey, or keep sugar cravings at bay with a homemade energy ball before you hit the party circuit.

3 PORTION CONTROL

Eating from a smaller dish causes you to eat less, because the food itself looks more substantial. If you transfer food from a 12-inch plate to a 9-inch plate, it looks like more food and you, therefore, feel more satisfied.

4 AVOID EXCESS

Christmas excess can lead to hangovers, and hangovers often lead to poor food choices, especially a tendency to seek out sugar and starchy carbs. Research reveals that fat from certain foods, including ice cream and roast potatoes, goes straight to the brain and tells you to eat more! It triggers messages that are sent to the body’s cells, warning them to ignore appetite-suppressing hormones that regulate our weight.

The effect can last for a few days, sabotaging efforts to get back to a healthy diet afterwards. Dr Deborah Clegg, who conducted the research, explains: “Normally our body is primed to say when we’ve had enough, but that doesn’t always happen. When you eat something high in fat, your brain gets ‘hit’ with the fatty acids and you become resistant to insulin (which regulates blood sugar levels) and leptin (the hormone that suppresses hunger). Since you are not being told by the brain to stop eating, you overeat.”

5 OUT OF SIGHT

If you want a Quality Street chocolate and all you have to do is reach to the tin and help yourself, chances are you’ll end up eating 3 or 4. But if you have to get your shoes on, walk to the shop in the cold to buy some chocolate, you probably wouldn’t bother.

Ever heard yourself say “take this away from me, so I stop eating it?” With food directly in front of you, it’s easy to overindulge. Once it’s removed, you realise you aren’t even hungry – you were just eating because it was there. So keep unhealthy foods out of sight in cupboards or better still, don’t buy them. If you know they’re in the house, you might not be able to resist.

6 REMEMBER VEGETABLES

Veggies don’t need to be doused in oil and roasted to within an inch of their lives to taste good. One of my favourite festive side dishes are thinly sliced Brussels sprouts, which I flash-fry with garlic, pine nuts and a dash of white wine. It’s so tasty, I make it all year round. Slow-cooked red cabbage and apple is another fantastic way to get some much-needed nutrients.

7 SLOW DOWN

It takes around 20 minutes for your body to tell your brain that you’re full. If you eat quickly, you’re more likely to eat more. Slowing down gives you time to recognise and assess how hungry you really are. One trick I use is counting chews (it’s tedious but, believe me, it works). If you chew a bite 10 times, you’ll eat slower. I also found myself enjoying food more, as there’s more time to actually taste what I’m eating. Eventually it becomes second nature to chew more. If you’re in a group, try to be the first person to start eating and the last to stop. Pacing your eating like this will get you to eat more slowly without getting in your head about the specific amount that you eat.

8 CIRCLE OF SUPPORT

Emotional support is crucial when it comes to making big changes to your diet. Research shows that people who felt supported by their friends and family were 50% more likely to stick to a healthy eating plan. So ask your loved ones to help you avoid temptation by not to offering you sugary treats. Buddy up with a family member who is also trying to lose or maintain their weight. Having that moral support will boost your chances of success (and you won’t be riddled with that horrible feeling of regret the next day).

9 BE KIND TO YOURSELF

It is the season of goodwill, after all. If you slip up, don’t beat yourself up or see it as an excuse to write off the rest of the day and eat everything in sight. Just chalk it up as one bad decision and move on. You can get back on track tomorrow.

If you’re resigned to Christmas weight gain and are promising yourself you’ll do something about it in the New Year, why not make a commitment to your future self by booking a FREE call with me to see what the options are. I offer a range of health and weight loss programmes that can help you reach your personal health goals.

To book your call email me at email@marcellerosenutrition.co.uk , I would love to help.

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Being vegan is on trend right now, and those in favour of this way of eating will tell you that it’s the absolutely healthiest diet you can have from a nutritional perspective, plus you get to save, not only the lives of animals but the planet, too.For most people, it is a bit of a stretch to go from where you are now to a 100% vegan diet and it’s something I’m asked about all the time. So I’m going to put it all out there for you: what it means to be vegan, what’s great about it, what’s not so good, where you might struggle – and I’ll also be giving you tips for getting started, whether your intention is to immerse yourself fully or if you just fancy dabbling.

WHAT IS A VEGAN DIET?
A vegan diet is a stricter version of a vegetarian diet. On top of not eating any meat,  fish or seafood,  a vegan diet also cuts out any food stuffs made from animal sources (some of which are the most nutrient-dense foods you can eat) – so, this will include egg,. milk, yoghurt, butter and cream as these also come from animal sources. And that means honey, too, as well as certain wines* and desserts (gelatin).

There is no set macro or micro nutrient ratios for a vegan diet; just vegetables, grains, fruit, nuts, seeds and any other foods made from plants. However, since the main vegan protein sources are pulses and grains, and only a combination of the two provides complete proteins (containing all the amino acids - apart from quinoa) this can be a high carbohydrate diet by definition.

* If you’re wondering why most wine is not vegan Here’s the answer…
All young wines are a little bit cloudy thanks to tiny molecules like proteins, tartrates, tannins and phenolics. These are completely harmless, but we wine-drinkers like our wines to be clear and bright. To make the wines clear, wine makers have traditionally used some added ingredients called ‘fining agents’ to help the process along. They include casein (milk protein) or albumin (egg whites), gelatin (animal protein) or isinglass (fish bladder protein). They act like a magnet, resulting in far fewer – but larger – particles that are more easily removed. You can now purchase vegan wines but would need to find bottles specifically labelled ‘vegan’. 

Advantages V's disadvantages

ADVANTAGES OF GOING VEGAN
Cruelty-free
• Promotes natural foods
• Rich in vitamin C and fibre, plus other plant chemicals
• Helpful for some health conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, other auto-immune conditions).

If done properly it can be a healthful diet ( see more about this further down!)

DISADVANTAGES OF GOING VEGAN
Natural food is not a requirement to comply with the diet
• Does not explicitly encourage healthy eating patterns
• May be nutrient deficient (B12, haem iron, omega-3 fats, complete protein) 
• Often high in carbohydrates
• Can be too low in protein, especially if you’re stressed or recovering from adrenal fatigue
• Does not limit or exclude sugar
• Not necessarily suitable for elderly, pregnant women, type 2 diabetics, or those with high triglycerides or carbohydrate intolerance
• Not always practical, especially when travelling abroad
• May or may not be effective for weight loss
• May be unhelpful if prone to disordered eating, rigidity and control. (It is common for those with anorexia or orthorexia to be on a vegan diet)

IS BEING VEGAN HEALTHY?
Good question! A vegan diet necessarily doesn’t mean a healthy diet. 
There have been various well-publicised assertions over the years (most notably the book The China Study and, more recently, the film 'What The Health') that claimed eating a vegan diet was the healthiest thing you can do.

Although vegans commonly take an interest in how diet relates to health and tend to educate themselves about nutrition, the vegan diet does not explicitly prescribe healthy foods. There is a vegan alternative for every junk food out there. And you can live on white toast with margarine and jam (and see your blood sugar levels sky rocket) while still being vegan – and that is certainly not healthy.

One thing that everyone agrees on is that the following is healthy:
• Enjoy an abundance of freshly prepared vegetables
• Minimise processed foods and instead cook meals from scratch
• Eat mindfully and slowly
• Choose local, organic foods


Given that the vast majority of health complaints are linked to chronic inflammation, a plant-heavy, antioxidant-rich vegan diet will go some way to mediating inflammation and it will certainly not hinder your attempts to be healthy. Given we don’t eat nearly as much fibre as we should for optimum health, committing to eating more veg is only going to be a good thing.

THINGS TO BE MINDFUL OF ON A VEGAN DIET

• Vegan diets don’t provide the fat soluble vitamins A or and D. You can’t get vitamin A from carrots. What you get is beta carotene, which is the precursor to vitamin A.

• You may have heard that carotene can be converted into vitamin A, but this conversion is usually insignificant. First, it takes a huge amount of carotene to convert enough of actual vitamin A. And, if you have low thyroid function, impaired digestion or a lack of healthy fats in the diet, this conversion won’t happen at all.

Vegan diets (unless you’re eating a lot of natto – a kind of fermented soy) don’t give you the vitamin K2. This is needed for shuttling calcium into your bones.

• Many people try to be vegan by relying on fake food – they replace milk, cheese and meat with foods manufactured to look and taste as though they are milk, cheese and meat. Since food manufacturing is not magic, non-foodstuffs are used including stabilisers, gums, thickeners and highly processed protein extracts. Moreover, you may be counting your vegan cheese in as a source of protein, when many are actually made from carbs.

• Vegan diets are low in vitamin B12 and iron. The readily-absorbed forms of these nutrients are found in animal products. Several studies (see notes in comments) suggest that up to 68% of vegans were deficient in vitamin B12.

• Several studies have shown that both vegetarians and vegans are also prone to deficiencies in calcium, zinc, and essential fats (see notes at the end).

HOW TO GET STARTED ON A VEGAN DIET
Some people like to make changes all in one go. If this is you, choosing a vegan recipe book from the resources I’ve listed below will be helpful.

Or you might try changing one meal at a time – possible having a vegan breakfast during your first week, adding a vegan lunch during week two and so on.

You might try changing one product at a time, for example, swapping traditional cow’s milk for almond milk, or butter for coconut oil. There’s a plant-based alternative for most things you can think of.

One thing that you can look forward to is some exciting new recipes. Bringing the principles of being vegan into your life even a few days a week (assuming we are talking veg-based meals rather than fake or junk foods), will deliver a whole new taste experience. There will be things that you love – and things the family rejects. It’s all part of the fun of discovering new things.

Please get in touch if ‘going vegan’ is something you are considering but don’t know where to start or if you’re already on a vegan diet but feel you need some help with it. Please email email@marcellerosenutrition.co.uk to arrange a complementary call to discuss your concerns.

RESOURCES – BEST VEGAN BLOGS
The Colourful Kitchen www.thecolorfulkitchen.com
Deliciously Ella www.deliciouslyella.com
Minimalist Baker www.minimalistbaker.com
Oh She Glows www.ohsheglows.com
The Vegan Woman www.theveganwoman.com

RESOURCES – VEGAN RECIPE BOOKS
Christine Bailey, Go Lean Vegan: The Revolutionary 30-day Diet Plan to Lose Weight and Feel Great 
https://amzn.to/2OiVKJh

Hugh, Fearnley-Whittingstall, River Cottage Much More Veg: 175 easy and delicious vegan recipes for every meal 
https://amzn.to/2OhAXWk

Angela Liddon, Oh She Glows 
https://amzn.to/2P6Enk7

Angela Liddon, Oh She Glows Everyday 
https://amzn.to/2PChzIe

Ella Mills (Woodward), Deliciously Ella 
https://amzn.to/2JxcdIS

Ella Mills (Woodward), Deliciously Ella The Plant-Based Cookbook: 100 simple vegan recipes to make every day delicious 
https://amzn.to/2SwzBdL

NOTES

Vegans are deficient in B12 and folate

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2933506/?tool=pubmed

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/78/1/131/4689908

Vegans are deficient in calcium

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21139125

Vegans are lower in iron

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24871479 https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/78/3/633S/4690005

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14988640

 Vegans are lower in zinc

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/78/3/633S/4690005

Vegans are low on essential fats

https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/82/2/327/4862944

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Starting: October 29thEnds: November 25thPrice:£49 -early bird offer £39 if booked by 21st OctoberSign up by emailing me on My brand new 4 week, Autumn Reset Programme will show you how to eat healthily for the LONG TERM to maintain optimum health and well being, whilst still enjoying your food- no faddy diets, restrictions or calorie counting.This is also totally for you if you want to kick the sugar cravings, reset your metabolism for fat burning, restore energy levels and boost your mood.It’s great value and I’ve had fantastic feedback from my previous programme

This is what some of the participants said:

“I was aware of how to improve my eating habits but I was lazy and busy so would grab rubbish on the go, finish kids' food, succumb to 'treats' with little hesitation.Since doing the challenge, I have definitely become more mindful of how I eat in general and I loved being part of a 'support' group. I have made some lasting, simple changes.

Marcelle is great. Organized, professional, approachable, she offers loads of guidance, motivation and is always close by for support. “ I.B

“The reboot challenge expertly lead by Marcelle has taught me to experiment more with my foods and be more creative in the kitchen.Never felt like a diet but has given me exactly what is says, a reboot for my palate and some news tastes for me and my family to try and like!!Even for someone like me how doesn’t enjoy cooking, the reboot recipes were practical and surprisingly goodFeel less need for sugary fast foods and enjoying more nutritious and healthy options!!D.G

"I've really enjoyed the challenge and learning more about how my body has reacted to the change. I feel so good, more energy and a little boost in confidence, having lost some weight and inches. Have loved the recreating the recipes and I know that I will continue following the plan when I'm at home but allow myself to relax if I'm out. " LB

“It's definitely worth it!!! I lost over half a stone and inches on my waist!!!” AJ

“Before starting the programme , my eating pattern was generally ok though it was carb heavy which often left me feeling sluggish & bloated. Now I have more energy and I am less sluggish. I am most happy about my weight loss. My advice to others thinking about doing the plan is just do it, it’s money well spent as you will see the results pretty quickly!” KO

WHAT'S INCLUDED:• A brand new Autumn Reset resource pack, including seasonal family friendly recipes that are easy to make or prepare; simple, tasty breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack recipes. This includes vegetarian/vegan options. There are no specialist health foods – just the stuff you'd find in any old supermarket. ( it’s yours to keep to use forever too!)• This is a virtual programme run via a private Facebook group. Check in whenever suits your schedule. You'll have access to your programme anytime, anywhere. I'll be in the group every day giving tips, motivating you, holding your hand and answering your questions• Expert advice: Nutritional advice + support from a Registered Nutritional Therapist & Health Coach. Facebook Q&A to deal with challenges and questions.• Not another 'diet': Make it actually happen with motivational support and accountability from your coach. Experience the transformation.All for just £49!BUT I’m doing a special early bird offer for £39 if you sign up before 21st October.Email me to book your place
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