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Are you thinking of making your very own crochet temperature blanket?

Have you heard of the idea, but are unsure what it is?

Are you looking for temperature blanket color charts, or ideas for temperature blanket patterns?

Then welcome to my complete guide to Crochet Temperature Blankets.

What Is A Temperature Blanket?

You could be entirely forgiven for assuming that a temperature blanket is in some way heated. Like an electric blanket you can crochet.

But it is simply a way of randomly selecting color variations, whilst working on a continuous annual project.

A Temperature Blanket is a crochet or knitted blanket that is made a row at a time.

You make one row every day, for a year.

The temperature part is what makes it truly unique.

Each day have a look at the temperature where you are, and using a chart this will help you to decide which color to crochet with that day.

To keep things consistent, choose how or when you will find the temperature.

Your main choices are to pick the highest temperature that day, lowest that day, or the temperature at a particular time of day.

Temperature Blanket Color Chart

You can choose which colors indicate certain temperatures yourself, but you might also like to work from a temperature blanket color chart.

I have put a couple together here.

One simple temperature blanket chart with eight different colors, and another more complex choice.

Simple Temperature Blanket Color Chart

My simple temperature blanket color chart will help you to crochet your temperature afghan in just a few select colors.

Detailed Temperature Afghan Color Chart

Although you will need more yarn stocked and ready, I think a more detailed and complex color chart will give you the most stunning finish to your crochet temperature blanket.

I have created this chart based on the beautiful spectrum of colors that steel passes through as it is heated.

Before you begin, lay out the yarns you have chosen and make sure that you are happy that you will remember the colors each represent.

Cutting off a swatch and taping it to the relevant line of color on a printout can be a helpful way of staying on track.

Choosing Your Own Temperature Blanket Crochet Colors

Whilst it is nice and easy to use a temperature blanket color chart, you might like to make use of yarns you already own.

You can try and find color combinations that work for you by cutting some short scraps from each color, and arranging them on a piece of paper.

When you have shuffled them around into an order you are happy with, sellotape them down.

You can then write your temperatures down the side, and keep this as a handy key.

Another fun way to choose your colors is to pick up a color chart at your local DIY store, and write the temperatures on yourself.

This can allow you to make a temperature blanket that varies within a range that is desirable to you.

Crochet Temperature Blanket Stitches

Temperature blanket crochet can incorporate a huge variety of styles and crochet techniques.

You can choose the type of temperature blanket that you want to make. Either building a traditional granny stripe or square crochet temperature afghan, or build one using a variety of different crocheted rows.

Your temperature afghan will be a totally unique labour of love. Something that is unlike anyone else’s and reflects a part of your own life.

If you want to check out other people’s temperature blanket patterns for inspiration, I have collected my favourites here for you.

Temperature Blanket Patterns

You can make your own crochet temperature blanket, using a standard blanket pattern and simply color changing with each row, or couple of rows, that you produce daily.

Here are some lovely patterns that I think would convert to a temperature afghan really well.

Diamond Stitch Blanket by Happy In Red

Photo used with kind permission from Happy In Red.

I love this Diamond Stitch Blanket Pattern. It’s nice and simple, but produces a very high quality, great looking blanket.

When using it as a temperature blanket, I recommend that you do two rows per day. Keeping the alternate white rows and reflecting the temperature with the other colored rows.

As it’s an annual project, I recommend extending the row width and working towards a lovely giant double bed sized crochet temperature blanket.

You can find the full pattern for this gorgeous blanket at the Happy In Red blog here. 

As-We-Go Stripey Blanket by Not Your Average Crochet

Photo used with kind permission from Not Your Average Crochet.

I have been looking for an excuse to give the As-We-Go Stripey blanket a try for a while now.

It’s a brilliantly varied design, packed with fun different crochet techniques.

Your crochet temperature blanket using this design can be crocheted a single row per day. The only deviation you need to make from Hannah’s gorgeous pattern is to color change to the relevant temperature color.

You can find the full pattern for the As-We-Go Stripey Blanket by Not Your Average Crochet here. 

Some other gorgeous crochet blankets that you could adapt to form temperature blankets include:

You might also like to have a go with my Easy Crochet Baby Blanket pattern. It is ideal for beginners to crochet, and very quick to put together.

How To Crochet A Temperature Blanket

All you need to crochet a temperature blanket is a pattern, a range of yarns and a color chart.

It’s a project which can be as simple or as complicated as you like, and will produce an amazing unique crochet afghan for you to treasure.

A small amount of work every day for a year, and you will have a wonderful work of art to keep.

The post Temperature Blanket – How To Make A Crochet Temperature Afghan appeared first on Lucy Kate Crochet.

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Does your pup get chilly sometimes? Then why not crochet him a dog sweater! I have put together a great guide to the best free crochet dog sweater patterns around.

I spend a lot of time online checking out various crochet designs and patterns.

Pinterest is a great resource for finding inspiration and ideas, as is Google image search.

But ploughing through the dull to find the magnificent can take a while.

So I thought for this fun topic, I’d save you some time and share my findings with you.

You can check out a huge list of free crochet patterns for dog sweaters below, but first let’s have a quick look at how to crochet a dog sweater.

How To Crochet A Dog Sweater

If you are new to crochet and this will be your first project, then don’t panic.

Crocheting a dog sweater ranges from super simple to fairly advanced. It just depends upon the individual crochet dog sweater pattern.

I’ll note the crochet sweaters for dogs that I think are beginner friendly in my brief descriptions, for you.

In the meantime, you might like to check out my tutorials on learning to crochet and getting started with basic techniques and stitches. This will help you to feel prepared and get off on the right foot.

You might also want to pop open another window with my crochet abbreviations chart to refer back to, where the patterns use crochet abbreviations rather than full terms.

Crochet Dog Sweater Equipment

To make your own crochet dog sweater you will need some basic crochet equipment.

If you don’t have any crochet hooks yet, then I recommend starting by buying a crochet starter kit like this one on Amazon.

The pattern will specify which yarn is best, and often they link to where to buy them.

I buy my yarn from Amazon, or from local craft shops or garden centres.

Free Crochet Dog Sweater Patterns

Welcome to the world of free crochet dog sweater patterns!

I’ve selected my favorites for you, from easy crochet dog sweaters, to crochet dog sweaters with legs.

Even some breed specific free crochet dog sweater patterns, like the crochet dog sweater pattern for dachshunds.

I hope that it helps you to find the free crochet dog sweater patterns you are looking for.

Easy Crochet Dog Sweater by Mini Pin Sweater Paradise

Mini Pin Sweater Paradise is a cute little blogspot site, just devoted to a Miniature Pinscher and her jumpers!

This lovely pattern is given in simple words, and looks nice and simple to follow.

A good choice for a crochet beginner with a small dog.

Check out the easy crochet small dog sweater pattern on Mini Pin Sweater Paradise here. 

Easy Dog Sweater Crochet Pattern by Yarnspirations

If you want a crochet dog sweater pattern free of charge for any size of dog, then this one by Yarnspirations is really fun and easy.

The pattern is designed to be beginner friendly, although it uses abbreviations. If you are totally new to crochet then you’ll want to have a copy of my crochet abbreviations chart up to refer to.

It is still simple though, given in PDF form and the finished coat looks great.

Check out the full pattern on Yarnspirations here. 

Free Crochet Labrador Sweater Pattern by Crocheting Blind

This free crochet Labrador sweater pattern has unique appeal.

It’s quite different to a lot of the other patterns, and is designed to fit the world’s most popular dog breed!

The pattern is fairly easy to follow, and could probably be easily accomplished by someone with minimal crochet experience.

You can find the full pattern on Crocheting Blind here. 

Doggie Snuggle-Up by Red Heart

Red Heart have some great free patterns on their site, and this crochet dog sweater free pattern is one of them.

It says it’s easy, but having read through the pattern i’d be more inclined to say it’s closer to medium difficulty.

Not ideal for beginners, but great for someone with a little bit of crochet experience.

A nice benefit of using this pattern is it creates a crochet dog sweater with legs, which will keep your pup warmer.

Find the full pattern on Red Heart here. 

Dapper Dog Sweater by Joann

The Dapper Dog Sweater by Joann is a lovely traditionally styled dog coat.

Although beautifully modelled on a tiny Chihuahua, it actually comes in sizes extra small to large. So should fit any size of dog well.

Find the full pattern on joann.com here. 

Small Dog Sweater Crochet Pattern – Toy Poodle

This gorgeous small dog sweater crochet pattern is designed specifically for Toy Poodles, but could fit any similarly built dog or puppy.

It’s a very pretty pattern, but probably not ideal for beginners as the instructions are mostly in diagram form and use several different stitches.

Find the full pattern on gosyo.co.jp here.  

Flower Garden Free Crochet Pattern For Small Dog Sweater by Lion Brand

The Flower Garden Free Crochet Pattern For Small Dog Sweater is a lovely statement crochet dog sweater.

The fun oversized flower detail goes really well with a big chunky stitched body.

The pattern is free, although you do have to sign up to Lion Brand’s mailing list in order to access it.

Suitable for fairly inexperienced crocheters, this cute pattern can be made even more basic by leaving out the flower detailing.

Find the full pattern on the Lion Brand site here. 

Crochet Dog Sweater With Legs by Jenna Wingate Designs

This adorable crochet dog sweater with legs is a part of a free ebook by Jenna Wingate.

She has put together a lovely collection of dog sweaters, modelled by her super cute Rat Terriers.

These patterns are pretty detailed, so you will need benefit from a bit of crocheting experience before you tackle them.

You can find out more and download her free ebook on her website here. 

Crochet Dog Sweater Pattern – Dachshund

This crochet dog sweater pattern for a dachshund doesn’t need a lot of explanation.

Known in the US as ‘weiner dogs’ and in the UK as ‘sausage dogs’, this fun dog sweater costume has it’s tongue firmly in it’s cheek.

The pattern is very easy to follow, but you might like to pop my crochet abbreviations chart into an open window again if you are new to the craft.

Check out the full crochet dog sweater pattern Dachshund here. 

French Bulldog Crochet Dog Sweater Pattern by Lion Brand

Another cute pattern by Lion Brand is this cute French Bulldog crochet dog sweater.

Although before we go on, I would be remiss if  I didn’t urge you to take a look at that poor pup’s nostrils (or lack thereof…).  You can find out about the dangers of brachycephaly here. 

Leaving aside my moral issues with Lion Brands choice of model, this pattern is very smart.

A cute little crochet dog coat that would look great and keep your pup snuggly and warm.

The pattern is more advanced, but would suit any intermediate crocheter just fine.

You can find the full pattern on the Lion Brand website here. 

Free Crochet Dog Sweater Patterns

I hope you enjoyed checking out these free crochet dog sweater patterns.

Do let us know how you get along with your new crochet project in the comments section below!

The post Free Crochet Dog Sweater Patterns appeared first on Lucy Kate Crochet.

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It’s crochet pencil holder time! In this article we are going to look at a pattern to crochet a pencil holder, to brighten up your desk.

The crochet pencil holder pattern below is designed to be very beginner friendly.

I love making crochet baskets. They are simple, fun and hugely practical.

The look, the variety. They’re the full crochet packet.

When you think of crochet, you might associate it with soft and flexible items.

Blankets, throws, bags and clothes immediately springing to mind.

But if you get the pattern right you will end up with a basket that doesn’t just look amazing, it’s useful too!

Don’t worry about floppy sides or uneven finishes. Just follow the simple instructions below and await success.

Your First Crochet Pencil Holder

New to crochet?

Then the first basket you make should be a nice straight forward one, and that’s what the patten below reflects.

If you can get it right on a small scale, then you should have no problem moving onto some seriously impressive and creative larger or more patterned baskets soon.

If you follow the instructions below then the finished basket will be the ideal size and shape for a handy pencil holder to go on your desk at work!

Crochet Pencil Holder Equipment

You will need the following crochet pencil holder equipment:

For preference your 4mm crochet hook should be aluminium with a soft grip, as some of these stitches can get fiddly and repetitive.

I used the Women’s Institute yarn, but you don’t have to use the same yarn I have.

Sadly these are only available in the UK, but you can get some great similar yarns in the US.

A nice alternative is a ball of white or cream acrylic yarn, and two alternate acrylic colors that are bright and contrast clearly to the pale foundation shade.

Make sure you also have some scissors and a stitch marker to hand, to make things go as smoothly as possible for you.

Crochet Pencil Holder Pattern Notes

This crochet pencil holder requires the use of two main techniques, magic circles and single crochets.

If you are unfamiliar with these, then check out the tutorials below:

The pattern is written in full form to begin with, with abbreviations underneath in italics. Instructions are then given using abbreviations once they have been established.

If you want to have some help with your crochet abbreviations, you can check out my chart here.

Total stitches in the round are given in brackets at the end of the instruction.

Free Crochet Pencil Holder Pattern

Getting the base of your basket right is key. If you don’t have a flat round bottom, then you won’t have a stable foundation for your sides.

You form this base by making a circular increase as follows:

Round One

Make a magic circle of six stitches, with two strands of yarn. One strand of cream and another of green yarn.

Hold both strands firmly together as you crochet, creating a thick and solid magic circle

Continue onto subsequent rows using both strands. (6)

Round Two

Make two single crochets into each stitch

2sc x 6     (12)

Round Three

One single crochet into the first stitch, two into the next stitch. Repeat six times.

(1sc, 2sc) x 6     (18)

Round Four

One single crochet into the first two stitches, two into the next stitch. Repeat six times.

(1sc x 2, 2sc) x 6     (24)

Round Five

(1sc x 3, 2sc) x 6     (30)

Round Six

Begin the round by swapping the green yarn strand to blue.

Continue the pattern as before with two strands at once.

(1sc x 4, 2sc) x 6     (36)

Round Seven

To finish the base put a single crochet into each stitch, but only pulling the hoop through the back loop.

Make sure it goes through both strands of the back loop, so you will be picking through two strands rather than four.

You now have a complete base to build the sides of your basket onto.

Now you will move on to building up the sides. You’ll be working in both loops again.

Round Eight to Twenty-Eight

Put a single crochet into each stitch for next twenty rows

Approximately every 2.5 to 3.5 rows, color change your colored strand.

Keep the cream strand throughout.

To finish off simply slip stitch into the next row, leaving a long tail that you can work back into the basket.

Crochet Color Changes

You could make your first basket all in one color, but I find that this can ruin the flow when you are new to basket weaving with crochet.

Two distinct threads makes it easier to be sure that you haven’t dropped part of the stitch somewhere, and to pick up and pull the yarn through each hoop.

Using bright and contrasting colours makes this even easier.

To keep a fun and funky look to your finished basket, change crochet colours irregularly

I also think for these baskets having a random effect looks more fun too.

I’d love to hear how you get along, so why not let me know in the comments section below.

Happy Crocheting! Lucy Kate, x

The post Free Crochet Pencil Holder Pattern appeared first on Lucy Kate Crochet.

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I haven’t had much time to crochet lately.

In fact, I’ve barely even picked up a hook.

And things look likely to stay that way for a while, because I have got slightly carried away with a few different projects at home.

I took the picture below this afternoon.

In my house.

That’s right. I’ve destroyed my bedroom.

We moved into our house six years ago. I redecorated most of it, but I never got around to the bedroom.

It had integrated wardrobes full of black mould, rotten windows, paper thin carpet and was generally dank and disgusting.

The rest of the house I sorted in the space of a few months, but when my little girl arrived it predictably took a back seat. I never got around to this room, and the longer I’ve left it the bigger the job got.

In our family, I’m generally the DIY person.

It’s not that my husband isn’t capable, he’s very good too. He just bloody hates doing it.

Fortunately, I love it.

I have never been a fine artist, but decorating hits me right in my crafty core. Especially the finishing part where I get to crochet stuff.

And I must admit, dismantling then smashing out the integrated wardrobes was particularly satisfying.

But, it now seems I have bitten off more than I can chew.

What you can see here is actually a vast improvement on what it looked like last week. When the carpet was half raised, the plaster was falling off the walls and the lamp shade had been sheared off with a knife.

My darling best friend referred to it as akin to a crack den, and she wasn’t wrong.

The problem is that although I have happily scrubbed and bleached the walls of the mould, filled holes and furiously sanded, it turns out the walls were in need of a more serious overhaul than that.

We’re going to need to plasterer.

They look smooth at a glance, but it’s a thin illusion. As soon as I put some color into them, they will look pretty dreadful.

Now, I can do a lot of things when it comes to home improvement, but I’m not touching plastering with a barge pole. That is a trade definitely best left to the professionals.

Here’s the issue with that.

We have furniture, new carpet, new radiator all booked in to be fitted in the next couple of weeks. Ideally, I need the walls to be plastered before then.

Unsurprisingly, no plasterer worth their salt has available with almost no notice just after Easter.

It’s going to be fun sorting this mess out, but we’ll get there.

I’ll let you know how it goes, and show you the results as it starts to come together.

When we get down to final details and I can get my crochet hooks out in earnest, I hope you’ll check back and see what I come up with too.

I’m thinking yellow and grey…

The post Redecorating the bedroom appeared first on Lucy Kate Crochet.

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In this article I am going to share a gorgeous crochet doll pattern.

Crochet dolls are classic and beautiful toys.

They make wonderful gifts, kids toys and even decorative vintage style pieces for an adult bedroom.

This crochet doll and her crochet doll clothes are made entirely using basic crochet techniques.

She is crocheted in sections, and her dress and boots will be removable when you have finished.

So let’s take a look at what you will need to get started.

Crochet Doll Equipment

To make this crochet doll you will need the following:

Stitch markers will make a big difference to how easily you can follow this crochet doll pattern.

If you don’t have any stitch markers, then you can improvise using small cut pieces of thread.

I used Sirdar 100% cotton aran yarn, but you can choose any brand you like. Just make sure it’s the same weight if you are using the same crochet hook sizes.

Crochet Doll Techniques

To make your crochet doll you will need to be confident using a few basic crochet techniques.

The main technique used is working in a spiral of increases and decreases from a central magic circle.

Check out my magic circle tutorial here if you need a bit of a hand.

You will also need to know how to make single crochets and half double crochets.

Here is a quick reminder of how each is done, in the context you will need them in the crochet doll pattern shared here.

Single Crochet

Make a magic circle of six stitches. Work straight into the next stitch. Put your crochet hook through the next stitch in the ring. Yarn over, and pull through the stitch. Yarn over the hook, and pull through two loops.

Half Double Crochet

A half double crochet starts as a double crochet, but skips a step. Make a chain. Yarn over, and hook through the third chain from the hook. Yarn over and pull through the chain loop. Yarn over, and pull through all three loops on the hook at once to finish.

This crochet doll pattern is made using US terms for crochet stitches. If you would like help converting them from UK crochet terms, check out my crochet conversion charts here.

Crochet Doll Pattern

This crochet doll pattern is made up of separate sections for the body parts and the dress.

Several sections are made up using the spiral from a magic circle method, so make sure that you have stitch markers to hand before you begin. This will help you to keep track of the stitches in each row.

Crochet Doll’s Head, Neck & Body

The crochet dolls head, neck and body are all comprised of one piece in this crochet doll pattern.

Follow the instructions carefully, as you will need to pause your crocheting periodically to add in her features, like the hair and eyes.

Crochet Doll Head

Beginning with your 3.5mm crochet hook, using your light orange yarn.

Row 1 – Make a magic circle of 6 stitches (6)

Row 2 – Put two single crochets (2sc) into each stitch (12)

Row 3 – Make 1sc in the first stitch, 2sc in the next stitch. (1sc, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (18)

Row 4 − (1sc x 2, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (24)

Row 5 − (1sc x 3, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (30)

Row 6 − (1sc x 4, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (36)

Row 7 − (1sc x 5, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (42)

Row 8 − (1sc x 6, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (48)

Row 9 to 23 – Put 1sc into each stitch (48)

Row 24 – Make 1sc in the next 6 stitches, then single crochet two stitches together (1sc x 6, sc2tog). Repeat for the length of the round (42)

Row 25 – (1sc x 5, sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (36)

Decide which part of the dolls head is going to be the front and attached two safety eyes.

Row 26 – (1sc x 4, sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (30)

Row 27 – (1sc x 3, sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (24)

You can now attach your crochet doll’s hair.

Take your yarn needle and red yarn, and weave it through the scalp starting at the centre.

Pull the strand so that it’s the equivalent to shoulder length. With each strand you pull through, tie the yarn to the previous one to strengthen it.

You will be left with a series of loops, which you can cut through periodically as you go.

This is a good point to make her a mouth as well.

Separate half of the strands from your red yarn to make a thin line.

Using this thread, sew along three consecutive stitches a couple of rows below the eyes.

Row 28 – (1sc x 2, sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (18)

Fill the head with toy stuffing, leaving just enough space to continue the crochet rounds.

Crochet Doll Body

Row 29 – (1sc, sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (12)

Row 30 to 31 – Make 1sc into each stitch.

The neck is now complete, you will be widening into another spiral pattern for the shoulders and body.

Row 32 – (1sc, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (18)

Row 33 − (1sc x 2, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (24)

Row 34 − (1sc x 3, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (30)

Row 35 − (1sc x 4, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (36)

Row 36 − (1sc x 5, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (42)

Row 37 to 47 – Put 1sc into each stitch for the round (42)

Row 48 – (1sc x 5, sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (36)

Row 49 to 58 – Put 1sc into each stitch for the round (36)

Row 59 – (1sc x 4, sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (30)

Row 60 – (1sc x 3, sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (24)

Row 61 – (1sc x 2, sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (18)

Fill the neck and body with toy stuffing, leaving just enough space to continue the crochet rounds.

Row 62 – (1sc x 1, sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (12)

Row 63 – (sc2tog) Repeat for the length of the round (6)

Repeat sc2tog until the body is closed. Leave a long tail to help with adding legs, and move on to making the limbs.

Crochet Doll Arms

The crochet doll arms begin from the hand. The hand and arm are worked in a continuous spiral, from a central magic circle. You will need to make 2 of these.

Using your light orange yarn, work with the 3.5mm crochet hook.

Row 1 – Make a magic circle of 6 stitches (6)

Row 2 – Put two single crochets (2sc) into each stitch (12)

Row 3 – Make 1sc in the first stitch, 2sc in the next stitch. (1sc, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (18)

Row 4 – Put 1sc in each stitch for the length of the round. (24)

Row 5 – Make 1sc in the first stitch, then single crochet the next two stitches together (sc2tog). Repeat for the length of the round, 1sc, sc2tog. (18)

This has formed your hand up to the wrist.

The hand will not be stuffed, instead with your finger push into the palm of the hand to make a flatten circle.

You will now continue onward with the spiral to form the arm.

Row 6 to 25 – Make 1sc in each stitch. (18)

At the end of row 25, tie off and cut a long tail of yarn for sewing in later. Using the back end of your crochet hook, push the toy stuffing down the length of the arm. Leave the hand without stuffing.

Crochet Doll Shoes

You will need to make two boots. Make your crochet doll boots with the 3.5mm crochet hook, and start in the purple yarn.

They will also be worked from a spiral to begin with from the toe of the boot.

Row 1 – Make a magic circle of 6 stitches (6)

Row 2 – Put 2sc into each stitch in the round (12)

Row 3 – Make 1sc in the first stitch, 2sc in the next stitch. (1sc, 2sc) Repeat for the length of the round. (18)

Row 4 to 7 – Make 1sc into each stitch (18)

Row 8 – Slip stitch into the next 9 stitches, then make 1sc into the following 9 stitches. (18)

Row 9 – *Chain (ch) 2, turn the boot, then make 1sc into each of the remaining 8 single crochets.

Row 10 to 11 – Repeat from *.

Slip stitch one side of the row to the other, to make the back part of the boot. You will now be building up the levels of the boot.

Row 12 – Ch2, then make 1sc four times along the first edge. Follow around the top making 14 stitches in total.

Row 13 – *Ch2, put 1sc into each stitch in the round. At the end of the round slip stitch to join.

Row 14 to 16 – Repeat from *. At the end of row 16, colour change to white.

Row 17 – Slip stitch into each stitch in the round, tie off and sew in the loose ends when complete.

The boots will slip onto the legs, so you don’t need to leave a tail of yarn for sewing in later.

Crochet Doll Legs

You will need to make crochet doll legs. Using your 3.5mm crochet hook and the light orange yarn, work in a spiral.

Row 1 – Make a magic circle of 6 stitches (12)

Row 2 – Put two single crochets (2sc) into each stitch (18)

Row 3 to 28 – Put 1sc in each stitch for the length of the round (18)

At the end of row 28, attach the yarn and cut off leaving a long tail of yarn.

Fill the leg to the top with toy stuffing, and insert into boots.

Joining Your Crochet Doll Together

You will need to join your crochet doll together before you make her clothes, as the size will need to be adjusted slightly depending upon the brand of yarn you decided to use and how tight you make your stitches.

To attach the arms first sew them closed, then sew them to the body at the shoulder level. Leave the indented palms of the hands facing to the front, and angle the arms forward. This gives the impression that the crochet doll is reaching slightly forward, as though to give you a hug.

To attach the legs keep them round and in place. Make sure they are filled right to the top with stuffing, if you want to be able to prop the crochet doll in a standing position.

Crochet Doll’s Dress

Using your 3.5mm crochet hook at white cotton yarn, begin putting together your crochet doll’s dress.

Row 1 – Make a chain of 40 stitches, and slip stitch to join in a ring, colour changing to blue.

Row 2 – Ch2, put 1hdc in each stitch around the ring. Slip stitch to join.

Row 3 – Ch2, put 1hdc in the first 9 stitches, 2hdc in the next 2 stitches, 1hdc in the next 19 stitches, 2hdc in the next two stitches, then 1hdc per stitch to the row’s end.
At the end of the row, slip stitch to join.

Row 4 – Ch2, put 1hdc in the first 10 stitches, 2hdc in the next 2, 1hdc in the next 21 stitches, 2hdc in the next two, then 1hdc per stitch to the row’s end. Slip stitch to join and colour change to white.

Row 5 – Chain 1, sl st into each stitch around the row. Join in a circle by slip stitching into the final stitch.

Tie and cut off the loose end, sewing into the body of the dress.
The collar of the dress is now complete, you will now be making the rest of the dress. Starting in two separate sections for the front and back panels, then joining them together.

Put the collar onto your crochet doll and mark the points at the front and back where the arms join the shoulders.

For my crochet doll this makes 16 stitches along at the front and 13 stitches along at the back.

Check this count on your own crochet doll before you continue.

The tensioning of your stitches and brand of yarns you have chosen may have given you a slightly different sizing.

Continuing in the blue yarn and using your 3.5mm crochet hook, remove the collar and turn it inside out.

Join your yarn onto the existing collar by hooking through the back of the stitches.

Row 6 – Put your crochet hook into the back loop of a stitch next to an armpit marker. Chain 2, and hdc into each back loop to the next marker point.

Row 7 – Chain 2, make 1hdc into each stitch along the row you have just created.

Row 8 – Chain 2, make 1hdc into each stitch along the row.

At the end of the row, tie the yarn off to secure your place. Repeat rows 6, 7 and 8 on the opposite side, so that you have a small front and back panel attached.

From the end of row 8 of the back panel, attach the yarn and chain 5, slip stitching to the edge of the front panel. Join the other sides with a chain 5 too.

Row 9 – Slip stitch into any stitch to join, and chain 2. Put 1hdc into each stitch and chain loop to form a continuous circle around the dress.

Row 10 – Chain 2, put 1hdc into each stitch. Slip stitch to join.

Row 11 – Chain 2, put 1hdc into each stitch. Slip stitch to join, colour changing to white as you finish the row.

Row 12 – Chain 2. *1hdc in the next four stitches, then hdc two together (hdc2tog), repeat for the length of the round. Slip stitch to join.

Row 13 – Chain 2, 1hdc into each stitch, slip stitch to join, colour changing to blue.

Row 14 – Chain 2, *1hdc into the next four stitches, then 2hdc in the next. Repeat from * for the rest of the round, slip stitching to join at the end of the row.

Row 15 – Chain 2, *1hdc into the next five stitches, then 2hdc in the next. Repeat from * for the rest of the round, slip stitching to join at the end of the row.

Row 16 – Chain 2, *1hdc into the next six stitches, then 2hdc in the next. Repeat from * for the rest of the round, slip stitching to join at the end of the row.

Row 17 – Chain 2, *1hdc into the next seven stitches, then 2hdc in the next. Repeat from * for the rest of the round, slip stitching to join at the end of the row.

Row 18 − Make 1hdc into each stitch, colour changing to white at the end of the row.

Row 19 – Slip stitch into each stitch and join at the end of the round.
To finish make sure all of the ends are sew in to a matching coloured row.

Your Crochet Doll

This crochet doll pattern can be followed directly, or adapted to suit the crochet doll you want. The easiest way to adapt it is to change the colours of yarn you use.

Alternatively you can make her different clothing, either through simple changes like crocheting a longer length of dress, or by using fabric and sewing her a set of clothing instead.

Happy Crocheting! x

The post How To Crochet Doll Arms and Body – A Basic Crochet Doll Pattern appeared first on Lucy Kate Crochet.

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Are you looking for some crochet help? Then look no further!

I’m going to give you some handy links to my favorite crochet guides.

Find out how to learn to crochet, get crochet stitching help and crochet pattern help.

We’ll also look at how to pick the right crochet equipment, and resolve those frustrating crochet mistakes.

So here it is! Your quick and simple guide to getting crochet help online.

Learn To Crochet

Do you want to learn how to crochet? Are you completely new the craft?

It can be easy to feel overwhelmed, but actually learning to crochet should be fun. Start simple, take it one step at a time and don’t rush – you’ll soon be flying along the rows!

Crochet Stitching Help

Mastering the wide range of crochet stitches takes time. But there are some great ways to get yourself started, and to get the hang of the basics.

The best place to start is crocheting a chain, and you can find all about how to do that here:

The basis of most crochet toy patterns is making a magic circle. It’s something that can seem daunting at first, but don’t panic! Here are some really easy instructions and a simple video tutorial:

You can find out all about basic crochet stitches in my complete guide:

With step by step illustrations, it takes you right from the start, from holding your hook and casting on, to some simple crochet stitches.

Crochet Pattern Help

Following YouTube tutorials and making simple stitches is a great start, but you will soon want to be following some fun new patterns.

Lots of crochet patterns, probably most of them in fact, rely on abbreviations or even symbols.

This is basically a new language, but don’t worry you won’t need to speak it straight away. Start by keeping a copy of my crochet abbreviations guide to hand:

If you print this out or open it in a new window, and just flick back whenever you see a term you aren’t familiar with.

Crochet symbols are a similar issue, but one which you can also easily work along with by having a handy chart next to you to begin with.

Once the abbreviations or symbols become familiar, you won’t need the charts any more. You will have learned the language.

Of course, once you have learned the language, you will need to also know that some patterns are written with different intentions. So you know dc means double crochet, but did you know that UK and USA mean a different thing by crochet

Whether you are looking to translate uk crochet terms to american terms, or just generally have crochet terms explained, charts can come to the rescue again!

And for the specifics of how to crochet a popular stitch in both terms there is:

Crochet Equipment Help

Crochet success goes hand in hand with the right equipment. When you are looking for crochet help you will therefore often find the solution in a particular item in your crocheting arsenal.

Crochet hooks are the best way to start. Check out this guide to help you know not only the right size, but the best type for the job:

And don’t forget that where you live will change the label on your crochet hooks:

It will also alter the way in which you buy your yarn and choose the right yarn weight:

Crochet Mistakes Help

Do you know that sinking feeling when you look back at your crochet work and realize you have made a mistake along the way? I know that feeling well.

Fortunately, with all the mistakes has come some experience in fixing them!

If you are looking for crochet help with resolving a problem, then check out these articles:

Still Need Crochet Help?

Add your problem into the comments section here, and I will do my best to help! Or alternatively pop over to my Facebook page and post your query there.

Best wishes,

Lucy Kate, x

The post Crochet Help – From getting started to fixing mistakes appeared first on Lucy Kate Crochet.

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Welcome to my free crochet Stick Man pattern!

Teaching you how to crochet your very own Stick Man toy.

Crochet Stick Man Equipment

To follow this Stick Man crochet pattern you will need:

Crochet Stick Man Pattern Instructions

This pattern is made predominantly in rounds, working from a magic circle. The main stitch used is a single crochet (US terms).

If you are new to crochet, you can find guides to how to make these stitches here:

The pattern will begin by being written in full terms, with abbreviations in italics. Thereafter the abbreviations will be used, once they have been established.

The stitch count in each round is given in brackets at the end of the instruction.

If you would like a handy abbreviation chart to check as you go along, you can find one here.

Your Stick Man Crochet Pattern and joining instructions are given below. However, his leaves were made using a pattern from another website. I have linked this in the leaf section below.

Crochet Stick Man’s Head, Body And Leg

You are going to make your crochet Stick Man’s head, body and one of his legs, in one complete piece.

He is a stick, after all!

Start by working with your size 7 /4.5mm crochet hook and brown DK yarn.

Round 1

Make a magic circle of six stitches (6)

Round 2

Make two single crochets in each of the six stitches.

(2sc x 6) (12)

Round 3

Make one single crochet in the first stitch, then two single crochets in the second. Repeat for the round.

(1sc, 2sc) x 6 (18)

Round 4

(1sc x 2, 2sc) x 6 (24)

Round 5

In the front loop only, make 1sc x 24 (24)

Round 6

In the back loop only, make 1sc x 24 (24)

Round 7 – 42

1sc x 24

Fill with toy stuffing

Round 43

1sc x 12 then chain 4 and join the chain across the body and into the first stitch of the round.

We will now be building the first of Crochet Stick Man’s legs.

Round 44

1sc x 12 then 1sc into each of the 4 chains.

Round 45 – 59

1sc x 16

Fill up to row 58

Round 60

(1sc x 3, sc2tog) x 3, then 1sc x 2

Round 61 – 62

1sc x 4, 1sc x 6 in the flo, 1sc x 3

Round 63

(1sc x 3, 2sc) x 3, then 1sc

Round 64 – 78

1sc x 16

Fill very sparingly around the knee, then fill to round 77

Round 79

Single crochet two stitches together (sc2tog) until the leg is closed. Then sew shut and leave a long thread for sewing on the foot later.

Stick Man’s Second Leg

Crochet Stick Mans second leg will be made with a new section of yarn, but attaching it straight into the gap left beside the other leg.

Use your size 7 /4.5mm crochet hook and brown DK yarn.

Round 1

Start the leg by making a slip stitch into the corner stitch at the top of the first leg and chaining one.

Then make 1sc into each stitch around the bottom of the leg and at the other open side of body.

Round 2 – 17

1sc x 16

Round 18 – 19

1sc x 6 in flo, 1sc x 7

Round 20

(1sc x 3, 2sc) x 3, then 1sc

Round 21 – 35

1sc in each stitch.

Round 36

Sc2tog to close.

Crochet Stick Man’s Knees

Using your brown yarn and size 7 / 4.5mm crochet hook, make two of the following:

Round 1

Make a magic circle of six stitches.

Round 2

Then put 2sc into each stitch.

Slip stitch into the next stitch, cut off a long tail and tie off.

Crochet Stick Man side detail

Make a magic circle of six stitches.

Then put 2sc into each stitch.

Slip stitch into the next stitch, cut off a long tail and tie off.

Crochet Stick Man Feet

Using your brown DK yarn and 4.5mm crochet hook, make two of the following

Round 1

Make a magic circle of six stitches

Round 2

2sc x 6 (12)

Round 3 – 8

1sc x 12

Flatten your foot base so that you have 6 stitches on top and 6 underneath.

Round 9

Chain 2, then double crochet (dc) through the top and bottom sc, joining them together.

Slip stitch through the next top and bottom pair of stitches

2dc into the next pair of stitches

Slip stitch through the next pair of stitches

Make 2dc into the next pair of stitches, then slip stitch into the side of the foot to complete.

Crochet Stick Man’s Arms

Using your size 7 /4.5mm crochet hook and brown DK yarn, make two of the following:

Round 1

Make a magic circle of three stitches.

Round 2

2sc x 3 (6)

Round 3 – 13

1sc x 6

Now, repeat Round 1 – Round 13 to make another finger

Round 14

Starting from the finger you just completed, and work a single crochet into the next stitch.

Then make an sc into each stitch around the other finger, joining them together. Move straight back onto the previous finger.

You should now have a ring of 12 stitches.

Carry on working from here.

Round 15 – 19

1sc x 12

Round 20 – 21

1sc x 6 in the flo, 1sc x 6 in blo

Round 22 – 39

1sc x 12

Fill with toy stuffing

Round 40

Sc2tog to close

Crochet Stick Man’s 3rd Finger!

The final little fingers are to be made separately. Use your brown DK yarn and size 7 /4.5mm crochet hook.

Round 1

Magic circle of five stitches

Round 2 – 6

1sc x 5

Fill with toy stuffing

Round 7

Sc2tog to close

Crochet Stick Man’s Nose

To make Stick Man’s crochet nose use your size 7 /4.5mm crochet and brown DK yarn.

Round 1

Make a magic circle of three stitches.

Round 2

2sc x 3 (6)

Round 3 – 11

1sc x 6

Fill with toy stuffing

Round 12

Sc2tog to close

Crochet Stick Man’s Eyes

With white yarn and your size 7 / 4.5mm crochet hook, make two of the following:

Round 1

Make a magic circle six stitches

Round 2

2sc x 6

Finishing Off

Thread your black DK onto a yarn needle, and sew through the centre of the eye. Weave back and forth through the centre and into each of the surrounding round 1 magic circle stitches, until he has a complete pupil.

Crochet Stick Man’s Leafs

I made various attempts at the crochet leaves for Stick Man. And I have to admit, I fell flat. Very flat.

I mean to the extent that I am not even going to share photos of my attempts with you, as they were unidentifiable as leaves. Amorphous green blobs, with strange wavy edges simply weren’t going to cut it here.

So I went back to my very favorite crochet leaf pattern and used that instead.

So to make your crochet Stick Man’s leaves, you will need to pop over to Attic24 here.

The triple layer flower pattern has a leaf tutorial at the bottom of the page.

Follow it using a 2.5mm crochet hook, brown DK yarn for the spine and a green DK yarn for the rest of the leaf.

If you haven’t come across Attic24 before, then I highly recommend a good snoop around the site while you’re there. It’s brilliant.

Joining Crochet Stick Man Together

You are now ready to join your Stick Man crochet toy together.

Lay out the following crochet Stick Man pieces:

  • 1 Body
  • 2 Arms
  • 2 Fingers
  • 2 Feet
  • 4 Leaves
  • 2 Eyes
  • 1 Nose

First few the feet onto the body. Using your brown yarn and needle, weave around the base of the leg and attach the foot, toes pointing forwards.

Next sew the fingers onto the arms. One on the bottom, one on the top.

Then sew your leaves on. A pair on top of his head towards the back, and another pair underneath one of his arms. Use your crochet hook to pull the loose threads helping to secure the leaves of your Stick Man crochet toy in place.

Finally pin the arms, nose and eyes in the position you would like them in.

Sew the eyes on using white yarn, working carefully around the circumference of each one. Remove pins as you secure each side to keep them level and in place.

Then using your brown yarn, very neatly sew the nose onto the center of the face. Sew through each single crochet stitch in the final round to ensure that it is tightly joined.

Last of all, sew the shoulder of the arm only your Stick Man’s crochet body. Check the angle of the arm as it’s a static fix, so you won’t be able to move them after you are done.

I hope you enjoy making your Stick Man crochet toy as much as I did.

When you’ve finished, why not share a photo of him on my Facebook page or via Ravelry!

The post Free Crochet Stick Man Pattern appeared first on Lucy Kate Crochet.

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Have you heard of the Campaign for Creativity?

It’s a movement that is asking the UK government to put more focus on creative talents and crafts in schools.

And it’s one that I am very much behind.

Are Kids Crafts Important?

When I was at school we had a few extra textile classes each year, and I loved them.

Experimenting with hand sewing, dying, machine sewing. It was fun, but it was also useful.

I remember very fondly making a cushion cover with a fish picture on it, which I was ridiculously proud of.

My family has some incredibly talented artists in it, and despite my best efforts I will never be as skilled as them in those areas.

Sketching, painting, charcoals – they are all wonderful mediums covered in standard art classes. But not ones which I felt anything but a bit of a failure when using.

We didn’t have a lot of extra craft based lessons, but those I did work with, showed me that there were ways of being creative without needing to have natural skills with a pencil.

My confidence needed that.

Less Crafts In Schools?

It makes me feel very sad to think that these classes are apparently even less represented these days.

Confidence is important at any age, but especially to kids who are just working out who they are and what strengths they have.

As a teenager I desperately wanted to express myself and be ‘heard’.

My main medium was (really rather questionable) poetry. Crafting was a much more productive way of expressing myself. One that made me feel like I had achieved and learned something important almost every time.

Yes, I think these skills are important to kids for practical reasons. But for me, the emotional reasons to craft are at the top of the chart.

Crafts help you to cope with stress. To learn and expand as a person.

They are also a way for kids who are struggling socially or academically to shine.

A Wall Of Names

At The Knitting and Stitching Show in London, they found a lovely way to publicise the campaign. With a wall of sewn names.

Sitting down at that table and picking up a needle was surprisingly nerve-wracking for me.

I am utterly at ease with a hook, or sewing yarn. But embroidery is something I haven’t done much of since my teens, when I had a brief but enthusiastic affair with cross stitching.

But the message was important, and so was the point that we were making by giving it in that way.

So I gave it a go, and I hope you agree that my results weren’t totally shameful to the craft!

How You Can Help

If you live in the UK, you can get involved with the campaign by signing the petition here.

This is going to the Secretary for State Education. The more signatures it gets, the better!

If you think crafts are important, then why not get behind it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the campaign, so please do share them in the comments box below.

The post Campaign For Creativity appeared first on Lucy Kate Crochet.

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Last weekend was the Knitting and Stitching Show. This four day event is a celebration of crafts, with exhibitors and classes focusing on a range of textile arts.

I have been looking forward to it for months.

Ever since my last attempt to attend the show ended with an unexpected hospital visit instead.

Fortunately, I am delighted to report that it met my expectations and then some. And I even managed to avoid any ridiculous medical problems cropping up beforehand!

I thought you might like to hear what was on offer, and how we made the most of our day at the Knitting and Stitching Show.

If you are ever in London at the same time as the show, then don’t hesitate to check it out.

On Our Way

I had heard that the show can get pretty busy. And having a natural fear of turning up late to anything, we set off bright and early.

Swinging by the station to pick up my super awesome best friend, Sarah.

Sarah is the reason that I crochet. She made my daughter a set of gorgeous tiny rabbits when she was born, and all I could think was “I want to know how to do that!”.

This blog would not exist without Sarah.

And in case she needed any further endorsement as a great companion to take to a craft show – she is also an incredibly talented artist, very crafty and bags of fun.

So, we piled Sarah into the car, drove the 40 minutes into the city, and were dumped with a friendly goodbye down a dodgy back alley next to the venue.

As it turns out, we actually arrived a little early and the doors weren’t yet open. I could exaggerate the queues as having run for miles, but in reality I think there were about a fifty people casually mingling around the area.

Reluctant to stand around anyway, we looked for a cafe.

Coffee was found at what can only be described as ‘an eccentric establishment’. A deli where the two guys behind the till spoke happily and calmly to their customers, swapped immediately to screaming at each other, then returned to calm professionalism again without blinking.

They also really wanted to serve a gentleman who wanted a panini, some pasta. There was some intense back and forth, which may have ended badly if it wasn’t for the aforementioned gentleman’s continually passive insistence that he wasn’t actually in the mood for pasta this morning.

Fortunately, they provided Sarah and I with our coffees without trying to foist unwanted food on us. And we were off to the show.

Knitting And Stitching At The Olympia

The Olympia is a venue I am fairly familiar with. I have been to several shows there, and even worked at one or two in the past. It’s such a massive space however that there are several different zones, and the one the Stitch Show was in wasn’t one I had been in before.

We began by happily pacing the perimeter, to get our bearings and decide what we fancied looking at first.

At least, that was the idea.

Genuinely, I have never been to a show before where there were so many things I wanted to poke, prod and stare at.

From amazing artists’ galleries to a massive range of beautiful stalls.

I wouldn’t have imagined you could have dedicated an entire space to ribbons alone, or indeed Italian buttons! But there you go.

We rapidly got off track, and started the day neck deep in fabrics.

Fabric Stalls at the Knit and Stitch Show

Although there were a couple of large generic fabric stands, most of them had their own individual feel. A style or color palette that attracted you and separated them out from the vast array around you.

Sarah’s got an awesome tablecloth project she’s working on, and was wanting a few different pieces to complement each other.

This was one of my favorite fabric stalls. The unusual patterns and pretty colors were off set by lovely quality fabrics. I will definitely be tracking them down again.

I even picked up this cute raccoon patterned fabric, although I currently have no idea what I’m going to do with it.

Perhaps backing for a crochet fronted throw pillow? I will pop a link here in future when I eventually decide!

New Crafts

One of my aims of the show was to learn something new.

Sarah and I both wanted to go to one of the classes, and we went through the list a few weeks ago and picked our top choices.

I have wanted for a while to do something with my daughter’s baby clothes. I can’t bring myself to throw them out or give them away, but there is a huge sack of the things cluttering up my home.

When we noticed a class teaching rag rug techniques this seemed perfect, so fortunately Sarah was happy with the choice too.

The specific nature of the class was to make a vintage style flower broach, not something I would ever wear or use (or so I thought), but it was the skill of rag rugging I really wanted to learn.

Classes at the Knitting and Stitching Show

Whilst I am usually happy in social environments, I find going to classes (or doing any other activity) for the first time quite nerve-wracking. You would think as someone who runs regular classes that I’d have got over this teenage social hang up, but it’s never worked that way.

So I had to psych myself up, and try hard not to grasp Sarah’s hand like a child, as I false-confidently strolled into the room.

The setting of the classes at the event was much like open classrooms off a purpose built corridor. There were sixteen people in total, a number which the instructor managed very well given the hugely ranging aptitudes that were there.

Learning To Make A Rag Rug

The class was taught by a lady called Jenni Stuart-Anderson. She quite literally wrote the book on Rag Rugs.

Jenni was clearly very knowledgable about her craft, with years of experience. Complemented by a pacient and clear manner when speaking to her students.

She started by teaching us how to work a hook, very similar to a crochet hook, to pull yarn through the hessian backing.

This made up the centre of the flower.

She then introduced us to the bodger. A tool used to pull through tiny individual strips of fabric, making up the petals of the flower.

It was a bit of a race to finish on time, with just an hour and a half to learn something new. But I finished pretty much as the clock stopped.

I was not expecting to like what I had made, purely stylistically. But actually, I love it.

Probably in part due to the sense of accomplishment, but I am definitely going to incorporate it into one of my crochet designs at some point. Or turn it into an enormous hair clip, as my daughter really wants it to be.

So Many Rag Rug Styles!

During the class Jenni showed me one of her books and we chatted about the different techniques and hugely varied styles it produces.

It was really inspiring, and I love the care-free nature of the medium. Basically, anything goes.

I found the process quite relaxing, but was unsurprisingly far more at home with the hooking method than the bodger tool.

I decided not to buy the tools there and then from Jenni, as I wanted to consider my approach a little further.

Rag Rug Stall

Rag rugging isn’t huge in the UK, so there weren’t a vast number of rag rug stalls. But that one that we found was lovely.

Very simply in terms of layout, but brought to life by the wonderful ladies managing it.

We had a quick chat about my aims and they recommended a cheap and cheerful rag rug hook, and piece of hessian to work as the base for my rug.

The kit was incredible value for the money, and the hook worked well with my crochet background, so I went ahead with the purchase.

Walking away very happy with my new project.

So happy in fact, that within about three minutes Sarah had decided to take the plunge too. And we returned to the stall for a repeat order.

Lunch!

The canteen was super busy and rammed. So we grabbed our lunches and found some space crouching on the floor in the corner of the room.

Keeping it classy, with a combination of salad and wine.

Wine at lunch time is a wonderful rare treat. It also probably contributed ever so slightly to how much yarn I then purchased in the afternoon.

Yarn stalls

Let’s face it, I’m all about the yarn.

I am obsessed with the stuff. The texture, the colors. The huge number of ideas the site of it forms in my head for new patterns.

There were a lot of yarn stalls, though perhaps not the range that there were for fabric stalls.

Without a doubt two stand out in my head as being the most exciting.

Toft Yarns

Toft are the brand that brought Edward’s Menagerie. The first crochet book I ever owned. The reason I design my own crochet toys.

They now have numerous books, each just as gorgeous as that first. Though none will ever hold such a special place to me personality.

That’s probably why I look slightly unhinged in this photo Sarah took of me next to the biggest crochet toy I have ever seen.

The stall had some lovely yarns, great examples of their patterns and the softest pom-poms you have ever felt.

Black Sheep Wools Stall

I also fell a bit in love with the Black Sheep Wool stall.

They had literally piles of yarns.

Multi-packs of a specific yarn, which is perfect if you like larger projects. There were also some great deals to be found. Including the gorgeous pack that I chose to take home. One yellow, one grey.

I am currently in the midst of totally redecorating my house, and these are the colors I will be theming our bedroom around. It will be great to share the results with you in a few weeks’ time.

Visiting The Knitting And Stitching Show

The Knitting And Stitching Show will be in London again in September. This time from the gorgeous Alexandra Palace.

I will definitely be stopping by, and I hope that you will too!

If you went to Olympia’s event this month, why not let us know how you got on and what lovely goodies you picked up in the comments section below:

The post The Knitting and Stitching Show Review appeared first on Lucy Kate Crochet.

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Today I’m going to share my quick and easy, cute crochet kids hat pattern.

I put this pattern together this week, as I was making a new hat for my daughter.

This crochet hat will fit kids from around 3 – 6 years old.

Cute Crochet Kids Hat Pattern Notes

This pattern is written initially in full, then once an instruction has been established, it will be written using abbreviations thereafter.

You can find a handy crochet abbreviations chart in this article.

If you are new to crochet you can also find tutorials on all the basic stitches in this guide.

Crochet Equipment

To make this cute crochet kids hat, you will need the following equipment:

Cute Crochet Kids Hat Pattern

Begin using your 6mm crochet hook and ruby yarn.

Round 1

Make a chain of four (ch4) stitches, then slip stitch (sl st) to join as a circle.

From the starting circle, Ch3 then make 11 double crochets (11dc) into centre of the ring.

At the end of the round slip stitch into the top of the first ch3 to join. (12)

Round 2

Ch3 then 1dc into the same stitch. 2dc into each remaining stitch.

At the end of the round slip stitch into the top of the first ch3 to join. (24)

Round 3

Ch3 then 2dc into the next stitch.

(1dc, 2dc) x 11

At the end of the round slip stitch into the top of the first ch3 to join. (36)

Round 4

Ch3, then 1dc into the next stitch and 2dc into the following stitch.

(1dc x 2, 2dc) x 11

At the end of the round slip stitch into the top of the first ch3 to join. (48)

Round 5

Ch3, then 1dc into the next two stitches and 2dc into the following stitch.

(1dc x 3, 2dc) x 11

At the end of the round slip stitch into the top of the first ch3 to join. (60)

Round 6

Ch3, then 1dc into the next three stitches and 2dc into the following stitch.

(1dc x 4, 2dc) x 11

At the end of the round slip stitch into the top of the first ch3 to join. (72)

Round 7

Ch3, then 1dc into each stitch

At the end of the round slip stitch into the top of the first ch3 to join. (72)

Round 8

Ch3, 1dc into the next two stitches. Then ch3 and skip three stitches.

1dc x 3, ch3 and skip 3. Repeat for the length of the round. At the end of the round slip stitch into the top of the first ch3 to join.

Round 9

Ch6. Make 3dc into the chain gap, then ch3 skipping the next three stitches.

3dc into the chain gap, then ch3 skipping the next three stitches.

At the end of the round slip stitch into the 3rd stitch of the starting chain six.

Round 10

Ch3 then 2dc into the next chain gap. Then make a Ch3, skipping the next three stitches, then make 3dc into the next chain gap.

Ch3, skipping the last three stitches, then slip stitch into the top of the starting ch3 to finish.

Round 11

Ch3 then make 1dc into the next 2 stitches. 3dc into the chain gap, then make 1dc into the next 3 stitches. Repeat for the round.

At the end of the round slip stitch into the 3rd stitch of the starting chain six.

Round 12

Ch2 then make 1sc into each stitch.

At the end of the round slip stitch into the 2nd stitch of the starting chain six.

Color change to grey

Round 13

Ch2, then make 1sc into each stitch. At the end of the round slip stitch into the top of the chain two.

Round 14 – 15

Ch2 then make 1sc into each stitch of the round. At the end slip stitch into the top of the chain two.

Crochet Hat Flower Pattern

Start using your grey yarn and 6mm crochet hook.

Round 1

Magic circle of six

Round 2

2sc in each. Slip stitch to join

Color change to ruby yarn

Round 3

Ch3 in first stitch, then make 1dc into the same stitch

Sl st into the next stitch, make 2dc into the following.

Repeat sl st, 2dc to round’s end. Then tie off and cut a length of yarn.

Using your yarn needle weave the loose ends of the yarn into the flower, matching the colors to disguise the thread.

Then use one of the long central strands of yarn to sew the middle of the flower onto the edge of your crochet hat.

When you have finished, using your yarn needle again sew any loose ends from the hat into the body and cut off to finish.

How To Make Your Own Cute Crochet Kids Hat

It’s been very cold lately, and I wanted something that was warm but that she also wouldn’t pull of her head as soon as my back was turned.

The solution was to make something I knew she’d love.

I let her decide the colors and decoration, and I hope you like the results as much as we do.

But if it’s not quite your kid’s cup of tea, then this simple pattern is easy to follow, but also hopefully simple to adapt too.

Choose a yarn color and decorations that your kid prefers, and you will have a new cute crochet kids hat that is unique to them too.

The post Cute Crochet Kids Hat – A Free Crochet Pattern appeared first on Lucy Kate Crochet.

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