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  1. To change the brush size of Lightroom’s Adjustment Brush; the Left Bracket key on your keyboard makes the brush size smaller; the right bracket makes it larger
  2. To reset any slider to its default setting, double-click on the slider’s nub or its name.
  3. To make your thumbnails in the Library Module larger, press +. To make them smaller press –.
  4. To reset all your Adjustment Brush sliders back to zero, all at once, double-click directly on the word “Effects” near the top of the panel.
  5. To side all the panels, press Shift-Tab. To enter Full-Screen mode, press the letter “f” on your keyboard.
  6. To “Auto” set your White Balance, double-click on the word Temp, then double-click on the word Tint.
  7. To show/hide the Library Search Bar, press the Backslash Key
  8. To get some help finding a missing original photo; click on the exclamation point warning in the top right corner of the thumbnail, and it will tell you where the original image was the last time Lightroom knew where it was.
  9. To see just one panel at a time (instead of constantly scrolling through a list of panels) right-click in the title bar of any panel and choose “Solo Mode.”
  10. To see a side-by-side before/after of your edited image, press the letter “y” on your keyboard.

Hope you found those helpful.

The East Coast ‘Photoshop World Conference’ Kicks Off Next Thursday

There are full Lightroom training tracks all three days, and if you come a day early you can take an in-depth Lightroom Crash Course. If you want to come and join us in Orlando, it’s not too late. photoshopworld.com

Have a kick-butt weekend, everybody!

-Scott

The post 10 Shortcuts Every Lightroom Classic User Should Know appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

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We’ve previously explored the Luminance and Color options for Range Mask, so let’s wrap up this series with a look at the Depth option.

Note at the time of this writing, the Depth option currently only works with photos in HEIC file format captured on supported iPhones (7+, 8+, X, Xs, Xs Max, and Xr) using either the built-in Portrait mode or the Depth capture mode in the Lightroom camera. You can enable the Depth capture mode in the Lightroom camera (on the supported devices) by going to Settings > Technology Previews, and enabling Depth Map Support. Hopefully support will be expanded in the future.

If you don’t have one of the above listed iPhones, and want to follow along you can download the photo I used and import it into the latest version of Lightroom Classic.

Apply Local Adjustment

Just like with Luminance and Color, you need to first apply a Graduated Filter, Radial Filter, or Adjustment Brush before you can enable Range Mask. In my example, I applied a Graduated Filter off to the side of the photo, knowing I can use the embedded depth map to control where the actual adjustment will be applied. Once the Graduated Filter was applied I clicked the Range Mask drop-down menu and choose Depth from the list (when Depth is unavailable it means the selected photo is not the supported file format and/or it doesn’t contain a supported depth map).

I turned on the Mask Overlay by pressing the O key, and then pressed Shift+O to cycle it to white (since red and green didn’t work well in this photo).

The Depth Range Selector tool (eyedropper) is a simple way to click on the area of the photo and select the depth that you want your adjustment to affect. I clicked on the background, which constrained the mask to the area behind the tulips. Note that the Range Selector sliders moved to reflect this selection. You can fine tune the desired range by moving the Range sliders, and then smooth out the falloff with the Smoothness slider. Note, you can also click and drag a region with the Depth Range Selector.

Another way to visualize the mask is by checking the Show Depth Mask box, which displays the depth map as a grayscale image. The white areas are closer to the camera and the black areas are further away. The red overlay shows the region affected by the settings on the Range and Smoothness sliders.

With the range of the Graduated Filter limited to just the background I dialed in the desired settings to darken the area down, warm it up a little, and soften/blur it out. I took it to somewhat of an extreme to show what is possible.

You can add multiple local adjustments if needed, so I added another Graduated Filter, and dialed in the range to just affect the tulips. Note, try holding down the Option (PC: Alt) key while adjusting the Range or Smoothness sliders as another alternative for visualizing the region being isolated using depth map.

I then applied settings to further separate the tulips from the background by increasing Shadows, Texture, Clarity, and Sharpness.

The mask made by the depth map isn’t perfect, but it is cool to see what can be done very quickly based on information captured when the photo was taken and with minimal effort on my part to hone in on. I’d love to see support extended to more capture devices and means for adding depth information.

The post Exploring Range Mask Options: Depth appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

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Great video from Benjamin Warde on how you reorder your panels in Lightroom Classic, and why you might want to in the first place. Great stuff (and all in less than 60-seconds). Check it out:

Lightroom Coffee Break: How to Reorder Edit Controls in Lightroom Classic - YouTube

Thanks, Benjamin.

Hope you have a rockin’ Tuesday!

-Scott

The post How To Reorder Your Panels In Lightroom Classic appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

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Happy Monday, everybody. Today I did a short tutorial for you that includes a bunch of little tips for making better black and white conversions, and you’ll see my workflow for taking a color image through to the black and white final. It’s short and sweet. Well, it’s short anyway.

Lightroom Black & White Editing Tips - YouTube

Hope you found that helpful.

Some photos from my day shooting in the Twin Cities

In-between my Indianapolis and Minneapolis seminars, I had a day off in Minneapolis and I got to spend it shooting some of the classic interior architecture in the area, and I gotta tell ya — I was pretty surprised (delighted, tickled, shocked, etc.) at some of the amazing shooting opportunies up there.

I posted some of my favorite shots from the day at this link (if you’ve got a quick sec).

Only 10 days ’till Photoshop World Orlando (and just three months until Vegas Photoshop World).

It’s not too late to come and join us in Orlando. But, if you can’t make Orlando at the end of this month (May 30-June 2), we’re doing a West Coast Photoshop World Conference in Las Vegas at the Mirage Resort & Casino on August 21-23, 2019 and it’s going to be epic. Tickets and info on both conferences at photoshopworld.com

Make it a good one today!

-Scott

P.S. We announced two new cities/dates for my “Ultimate Photography Crash Course” full-day seminar. Chicago on July 17, and Detroit Area (Livonia) on July 18th. Come on out and spend the day with me. Tickets and details here.

The post Lightroom Black & White Editing Tips appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

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I saw a post this week in my feed and it noted that the Texture Slider was the first new slider added to Lightroom in four years (I guess the last slider added was the Dehaze slider). Of course, there’s been a ton of new features added since then, but as far as sliders go, I think they might be right. Well, thankfully, this new slider has been worth the wait.

I also ran across this excellent post from Adobe’s own Julieanne Kost, and I wanted to share it here because (a) Julianne’s awesome (b) it’s one of the best descriptions I’ve seen of it anywhere (c) her animations (there are embedded GIFs) really give you a great idea of why this slider is so significant.

Here’s a link to her post.

Thanks, Julieanne for sharing this insight into this important new feature.

Well, I went and did it. I went mirrorless

It’s true. The full story (and a Q&A) is over on my daily blog today.

Have a great weekend, everybody!

-Scott

P.S. If you’re wishing you had signed up to go to the Photoshop World Conference in Orlando (it’s in two weeks), it’s not too late: photoshopworld.com

The post How to Use Lightroom’s New Texture Slider (and why it’s ​so awesome) appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

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Write caption…

We just announced two new cities for my new full-day seminar, The Ultimate Photography Crash Course. They are:

Chicago on Wednesday, July 17th

Detroit Area (Livonia) on Thursday, July 18th

I am so, so excited about this new day of training — it kicked off in Indianapolis and Minneapolis last week and I was thrilled with the incredible feedback from the 450+ photographers who came out for the day. Some of the best comments from any seminar I’ve done ever.

Photo by Mike McCaskey Here’s what’s this new tour is based on:

if I could spend just one day with a friend, and I only had that one day to give them a giant leap forward in their photography, what would I teach them that would have a real, immediate impact on their photography. What could I show them, that would change their photography from that day forward. That’s exactly what I put in this seminar.

Check out this video and you’ll totally get it.

The Ultimate Photography Crash Course with Scott Kelby - KelbyOne Live Seminar - YouTube
Check out this short video — then you’ll know if this seminar is right for you. Who should attend this new seminar?

It’s not aimed at pros (though there will be some pros there for sure); but it’s for landscape photographers, portrait photographers, travel photographers, flash shooters, natural light portrait folks, wedding photographers, and street shooters, fine art photographers, food photographers, and anyone who is just tired of struggling along, and knows there’s got to be an easier, faster, better way to make great images.

I teach lots of post-processing there, too!

Some really cool Photoshop and Lightroom stuff – you’ll totally dig it.

Come out and spend the day with me.

You have nothing to lose — it’s risk-free because it’s 100% money-back guarantee if it’s not the best photography seminar, you’ve ever attended, at any price ever. Period! Don’t spend the next five years “paying your dues” and learning everything the hard way, or not learning it at all. If you’re ready to make a big jump in your skills and start taking great images now, this is the one day that can change everything.

It’s just $99 for the full day of training and includes a detailed printed workbook (the biggest one I’ve ever written by the way) bonus videos and more goodies. It’s a kick-butt day and you’re going to learn a lot no matter where you are on your photographic journey.

Tickets and more details here. I hope I get to meet you in person for a day that’s going to change everything!

-Scott

P.S. More cities and dates to be announced soon. We’re going pretty much everywhere in the US, so hopefully we’ll be in your hometown soon.

The post Chicago and Detroit — I’m Headed Your Way Soon! appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

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Today, Adobe has released an update for the Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw family of applications. Before getting into the new features that have been added, it is important to note that Adobe has dropped the “CC” from the names of Lightroom Classic CC and Lightroom CC. This is because all versions of Lightroom are now only available via a Creative Cloud subscription, so there is no need to differentiate the CC version from the perpetual license version. One could make the case that having the “CC” on the end did help differentiate between Lightroom Classic and the cloud-based version of Lightroom, but we’ll have to press on and be specific about which version of Lightroom we are using when discussing with others.

From now on, be prepared to see what was called “Lightroom CC” now called just “Lightroom” in general or if referring to one of the applications within the Lightroom ecosystem, you might see “Lightroom Desktop” (Mac and Windows), “Lightroom Mobile” (iOS and Android), “Lightroom Web” (lightroom.adobe.com), or “Lightroom TV” (Apple TV). All of these are part of what is called the Lightroom ecosystem, as they all reference the same pool of photos and edits stored in the cloud. I’m sure this will take some time for all of us to digest and adjust how we refer to these apps.

Adjusting Texture

In what is sure to be one of the most popular aspects of this update, the new Texture control has been added to Lightroom Classic, the cloud-based Lightroom (Windows, Mac, iOS, Android, and ChromeOS), and the Camera Raw plug-in for Photoshop. You’ll find the Texture control in two places. As a global adjustment, Texture can be found in the Basic panel of Lightroom Classic and Adobe Camera Raw, or in the Effects panel in the cloud-based versions of Lightroom.

It has also been added as a local/selective adjustment to the Graduated Filter, Radial Filter, and Adjustment Brush tools. In Lightroom Classic there is even a new local adjustment preset called, “Soften Skin (Lite)” that sets Texture to -35 and Clarity to -15.

As you might surmise by the name, this control is all about enhancing texture (with a positive Texture value) or reducing the appearance of texture detail (with a negative Texture value).

Texture hones in on medium-sized detail (like the rough surface of the rocks, the jeans, or the leather boots in the first photo) and by doing this can enhance (+) or reduce (-) the appearance of those details with less of an affect on the finer details (like the pores in skin of the second photo) . Experiment with increasing Texture for photos with lots of detail, such as landscape photos, or decreasing texture on portraits. I think you’ll find the greatest level of control using Texture as a local adjustment in conjunction with a Range Mask to further restrict the adjustment to just the area of the photo you want to target.

Lightroom Classic Only Updates

There are a few updates specific to Lightroom Classic that are worth noting. In regards to tethering, the Canon EOS R is now supported. Adobe also maintains the complete list of tether supported cameras.

There were a series of under-the-hood updates to various aspects of Lightroom Classic to improve overall performance. The text engine in the Book, Print, and Slideshow modules, as well as the Watermark editor has been updated. As has the PDF exporter in Book and Slideshow. Additionally, the video metadata library and SDK for Canon tethering were also updated.

During import from a memory card you should be aware of a change in behavior in the Sources panel. Previously, if a memory card was mounted and the Import window launched, you would see the memory card selected in the Devices section of the Source panel. However, it was determined that performance was improved if the contents of the memory card was selected in the Files section of the Source panel (as if it was just an attached drive instead of a device). Note that the Eject after import checkbox should still be checked by default even when the folder is selected in Files. Give it a try and see if that works better on your system too.

Way back in Lightroom 4 days there was a little-known plug-in on Adobe Labs called the “Adobe DNG Flat Field plug-in” that was intended to assist in the correction of an optical phenomenon called “lens shading” or “lens cast” that more commonly occurs on mirrorless cameras with third-party lenses or even medium format backs on technical cameras. In those cases where the sensor is very close to the back of the lens a situation can occur where asymmetrical vignetting can appear on the photo (and that vignette can also come with a magenta color cast on the right side and green cast on the left). Well, that plug-in has been updated and is now built right into the Library module of Lightroom Classic.

If you have a camera and lens combination that suffers from this problem you can use the new Flat-Field Correction tool to remove the vignetting and color cast. The Flat-Field Correction requires what is called a calibration frame, which is a second photo with the same lighting and lens settings (lens, aperture, focal length, and focusing distance)  as the actual photo, but shot through a plastic diffusion card (such as an ExpoDisc® or similar). Then select the calibration frame and the actual photo in the Library module and go to Library > Flat-Field Correction. The tool takes over from there and uses the calibration frame to remove the cast and produce a corrected DNG version of the original photo. Head over to Adobe’s help document on Flat-Field Correction to learn more.

One final note is that the Auto settings function in all of the Lightroom family applications was also updated to improve overall performance.

Cloud-based Lightroom Updates

Some additional features were also added to some members of the Lightroom ecosystem of apps.

Lightroom Mobile (iOS and Android) now have a new Home view that contains some of your most recent photos along with interactive tutorials and inspirational photos. This Home view will eventually get added to Lightroom Desktop too (Windows and Mac). The interactive tutorials provide you direct access to the tutorial photo and then walks you, step-by-step, through each adjustment. I’ve never experienced a tutorial that was more hands-on and interactive than these. While they may benefit beginners the most, I think it can still be a useful exercise to see how other people approach an editing session.

The inspiration section is similar in that we can see what edits have been applied to the photo in question, but it is more from the standpoint of an observer than an interactive edit. Give them a try and you’ll see what I mean. You’ll also notice some familiar instructors like Kristina Sherk, Matt Kloskowski, Terry White, Nicole S. Young, and more, have provided educational and inspirational content in these sections.

While Lightroom Desktop (Windows and Mac) doesn’t yet have the new Home view, Adobe did expand the Help menu (question mark icon in upper-right) to include a search function and access to built-in tutorials.

All of the cloud-based Lightroom apps have access to the new Group Album function, where you can send an invitation to other people that allows them to add photos to that album (and by extension your catalog). To access this new feature, you first need to share the album. In Lightroom Desktop, you can right-click an album and choose Share & Invite where you’ll first need to enable sharing, which creates a link to that album. From there you can configure your settings on the Share & Invite screen. In Lightroom Mobile, tap the three-dot menu next to the album you want to share and tap Share & Invite to access the same controls on the Share & Invite screen.

From the Share & Invite screen you can use the Link Access to control access by invite only or set the album to be viewed by anyone. Use the Invite People screen to enter the email addresses of the people you want to invite to the album, or you can enable Allow Access Request from the Link Settings screen and simply share the generated link with people instead of having to enter everyone’s email address individually.

As with each update, there is also additional support for the raw files from new cameras and new lenses. Adobe also keeps a running list of all updates, known issues, and bug fixes that is worth checking out.

Remember, the updates tend to roll out gradually to all customers, so if you don’t see the update right way, check back later on.

The post May 2019 Update for Lightroom Classic, Lightroom, and Adobe Camera Raw appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

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I learned this tip from UK-blogger/photographer/awesome guy Brian Worley and darn it’s a good one — it’s how to use a feature in Lightroom Classic to find out which lens (or lenses) you use the most. It’s a deceptively easy way to find out which lens is your favorite (it must be because you use it the most).

STEP ONE:In Lightroom’s Library module; in the Catalog panel on the left, click on ‘All Photos.’

STEP TWO:Press the backslash key [ \ ] to bring up the Library Filter across the top of your thumbnail preview area. Click on the Metadata tab up top (shown circled below in red).

STEP THREE: If it’s not already selected, in one of the columns choose “Lens” as the column header (also shown circled in red above), and it will instantly display the number of images you took with each lens you own (as shown above, where not surprisingly my 70-200mm f/2.8 is my most-used lens). My 14mm ultra wide angle isn’t far behind. Click on any listing, it will display just those photos taken with just that lens. The stuff that Lightroom does behind the scenes for us is really impressive.

Thanks, Brian! Also, please check out Brian’s Guest Blog post from April of this last year. Great stuff (as always).

Here’s to all the opportunities and possibilities of another great week!

-Scott

P.S. Thanks to all the awesome folks in Indianapolis and Minneapolis where I kicked off my new full-day seminar “The Ultimate Photography Crash Course” to more than 450 photographers. I had such a great time, and I was thrilled at how well the new seminar was received. I met so many nice folks who are really passionate about photography and Photoshop and Lightroom — totally my kinda folks. Thank you all for the warm welcome and gracious hospitality. 

The post Lightroom Can Tell You Which Lens Is Your Favorite appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

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Following up from last week’s post on the Luminance Range Mask, this week we’ll dive into the Color option. For this next photo I used a Graduated Filter with Range Mask set to Color to adjust only the orange sparks from the burning steel wool.

To start, I dragged out the Graduated Filter at the top of the photo. I don’t need to concern myself with the actual graduated part of the filter (the area between the two outer lines) or even that the filter is placed off the photo, as I’ll use the Range Mask to affect the only the sparks. I also switched to the green Mask Overlay to see it better (press Shift+O to cycle the mask colors).

With the Graduated Filter in place, set the Range Mask drop-down menu to Color to access its controls. The Color Range Selector (eyedropper) is used to click on the color you want to limit the mask to affect. Like with the White Balance Selector, you first click on the eyedropper to activate the tool, then you click on the desired color within the area you’ve defined with the local adjustment.

To increase accuracy (especially in color gradients like the sky), you can click-drag over an area of color to increase the range of hues included in the mask. Alternatively, you can hold the Shift key and click up to 5 different points to increase accuracy of the mask. I Shift+clicked 5 times to ensure I included all of the sparks. I turned off the mask overlay while clicking to better see the sparks.

Note, the H key hides local adjustment pins, so if you are not seeing anything as you click, press the H key again to show the pins (or set the Show Edit Pins drop-down in the Toolbar to Always). You can further refine your mask using the Amount slider. Decreasing the amount contracts the mask, and increasing the amount extends the mask. I decreased the Amount slider a small amount for this photo.

If you hold the Option key (PC: Alt), while you drag the Amount slider you will see a grayscale mask appear on the photo (this also works with the Range slider when using a luminance mask). Areas in black are being excluded from the adjustment, and areas in white get the full adjustment. Sometimes this is an easier way to see what is happening.

My goal was to increase the contrast and intensity of the sparks against the background, so I used a combination of positive Temp, Highlights, and Clarity. When I use a combination of adjustments on a local adjustment tool, I usually click the (hard-to-see) disclosure triangle next to the Effect drop-down, which collapses all of my adjustments into a single Amount slider. Then I dial that amount up and down to get the effect I am looking for.

I personally prefer to apply a local adjustment with no settings applied first, adjust the mask, then dial in settings, but you can certainly start with settings (or a preset) dialed into your local adjustment tool of choice. The final result is all that matters.

Next week we’ll wrap up this series with a look at the Depth option in the Range Mask.

The post Exploring Range Mask Options: Color appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

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Last Thursday, we did a post here noting that the latest issue of Lightroom Magazine is now available (and I’ll tell you now to download this issue for free in just a sec), but I wanted to pause a moment to first celebrate the fact that we hit 50 issues (which is no small feat, and one we’re really proud and thankful for), but also to honor and acknowledge the magazine’s Managing Editor, my friend and colleague Chris Main.

Chris (seen here above) was one of our company’s first employees, and he has really grown and flourished in his position over the years (where he does double-duty, as he is also Managing Editor of Photoshop User magazine as well), and today I believe Chris is doing his best work yet.

Chris leads the charge of publishing 20 issues a year of the two magazines combined means there’s not much time for anything else, but he really makes it look easy. Chris was also the guy behind getting the awesome KelbyOne Mags app up and running and getting a load of all back issues of both magazines up online (including all 50 issues of Lightroom magazine) as well.

Chris is totally dedicated to our readers and making the magazines the very best they can be, and one look at either magazine and you can see Chris’ fingerprint on every page (metaphorically, but you knew that right?). Anyway, Chris is very modest and therefore he kind of flies “under the radar” but in reality, he’s a driving force behind these magazines, and I wanted to take a moment at this 50th issue to recognize his talents, hard work, and dedication to our readers around the world. Thank you, Chris. You rock!

Chris and I are both blessed to have graphic design superstars Jessica Maldonado, Margie Rosenstein, and Angela Maymick working on both magazines, and they are not only awesome designers, but all three are just the coolest people, and an absolute pleasure to work with. Chris and I both know how truly lucky we are to have these superstars providing the look and feel of the magazines, and we never take that for granted.

We’ve been also very fortunate to have such great writers for the magazine, including the best-known names in the Lightroom universe, and we’re indebted to them for helping so many people along on their Lightroom journey. Thanks so our columnists and contributing writers: Rob Sylvan, Sean Duggan, Martin Evening, Sean McCormack, Serge Ramelli, and Rick Sammon, along with our frequent guest feature writers.

Take a look at the covers of all 50 issues below

If you’re a KelbyOne Pro member, you already have access to all 50 back issues — a mountain of learning — all from within the KelbyMags App). If you’re not a Pro member, check below for how to get our 50th-anniversary issue free right now.

How To Download Our Latest Issue Free

We’re making this latest issue available for free download to folks to sign up for our FREE level of KelbyOne membership (no credit card required). Our Free level of membership is actually pretty sweet, because not only do you get to download this issue of Lightroom Magazine, you can also download the latest issue of Photoshop User magazine as well, plus you get to watch some of our best full-length courses free as well, including “Learn Lightroom CC In One Hour.”

So, head over to KelbyOne.com; scroll down to the bottom of the page, and choose the FREE level of members and you’re “in.” Again, no credit card required, so jump on over there right now.

This has nothing to do with Lightroom…

… this past Saturday afternoon our son Jordan graduated with two degrees from The University of Alabama, and the whole family (and friends) went up to be there as he walked across the stage to pick up his diplomas and let me tell you, it was such a proud moment for us all. We were cheering and screaming and whoopin’ it up!!! (#rolltide!). We are so proud of him, and the fine young man he has become. A prouder parent I could not be.

I am here in Indianapolis Today For My Seminar Tomorrow

It’s not too late to come and join me, and about 200 other Indianapolis area photographers, for my full-day seminar; “The Ultimate Photography Crash Course.” Sign up over at KelbyOneLive.com

I’m in Minneapolis on Thursday

If you want to join me there for the seminar, it’s not too late either. KelbyOneLive.com

And then there’s the Photoshop World Conference at the end of this month

The world’s biggest and most complete Lightroom training track starts on May 31st in Orlando and runs for three days — you gotta come (and yes, there’s still time to sign up and be a part of it all): PhotoshopWorld.com

Have a great day everybody! Can’t wait to meet everybody tomorrow here in Indy!

-Scott

The post Celebrating 50 Issues of Lightroom Magazine (and how to get your free copy right now!) appeared first on Lightroom Killer Tips.

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