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I’m not planning on moving to Germany, no. Purely because my family is in the UK, and because I’ll be a qualified veterinarian, imagine teaching myself all of my degree again but in a foreign language? That would be extremely difficult and I’d probably have so much trouble learning all the drugs and procedures in another language. Also there’d be different laws I’d have to follow and language barriers, gosh I don’t even want to think about it XD

I’m learning because I like it :) I have since the age of 14.

I think the reason why I’m not willing to teach myself vet med in German (beside the obvious hurdles) is because my passions/priorities are:

  1. Animals and veterinary medicine - dream career
  2. German - hobby, at best. Sometimes I don’t look at it for weeks because #busylife

If you love German that much, you’ll manage it! There’s always a way :D Regarding the work load, maybe dedicate a small amount of German time each week, each few days, each day, whatever you can. When I really want to squeeze it in, I manage it fine! It all helps, even if it’s only 30 minutes, it’s something :)

Thank you for the ask, have a lovely day!

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languagesandshootingstars:

Red - You’re (one of) my favourite langblr(s)    
Pink - You’re my langblr crush  
Blue - You inspire/motivate me
Yellow - You’re my polyglot role model
Orange -  I like you
Purple - I want to get to know you
Green - We don’t talk but I really like your blog  
Brown - We don’t have any languages in common but I really like your blog
Gold - I’m learning your native language
Silver - I’m a native speaker of your target language
Bronze - I’m learning one (or more) of the languages you’re learning
White - You have made me want to learn some language
Grey - I’m not a big fan of you or your blog but I’m following you anyway
Black - I dislike you and your blog

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Sorry for the late reply, exams and placements have been pretty time consuming! Since grammar can’t be skipped, i’d just say learn small chunks at a time. That way it won’t seem daunting. Also, children learn a lot of language by listening to people use it, and trying themselves.

Even if your grammar is terrible at first, try to use it from the get go. Watch lots of youtube videos, movies, tv shows, the news, the radio etc to get used to how things are used. I used to learn a lot of German this way when I first started out because i’ve always been self-taught and could only look into it around my normal school/college times.

Good luck!!

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languageundliebe:

So I recently read Frankenstein in German and i thought I’d make a vocab list of some of the words i came across whilst reading. 

Nouns

der Adel - nobility
der Blitz (Blitze) - lightning
der Dämon (Dämonen) - demon
der Donner - thunder
das Elend - misery
die Entdeckung (Entdeckungen) - discovery
die Finsternis - darkness
die Genesung (Genesungen) - convalescence
das Geschöpf (Geschöpfe) - creature
der Gräuel - abomination
der Hügel (Hügeln) - hill
die Kajüte ( Kajüten) - cabin (in a boat)
die Kreatur (Kreaturen) - creature
die Lawine (Lawinen) - avalanche
der Matrose - sailor
der Müßiggang - idleness
der Peiniger - tormentor
die Reise (Reisen) - trip
der Schar­lach - scarlet fever
das Scheusal - beast, monster, zombie
die Schmach - disgrace
die Schurkerei (Schurkereien) - villainy
das Tal (Täler) - valley
das Unwetter - storm
die Verzagtheit (Verzagtheiten) - despondency
das Wrack - wreck
die Zier - ornament

Verbs

entrinnen - to escape
sich über etw. grämen - to grieve over sth
etw. hegen - to cherish sth
krönen - to crown
etw. verrichten - to perform/execute sth

Adjectives 

entsetzlich - terrible
mannigfaltig - varied
merkwürdig - peculiar
(un)gezähmt - (un)tamed
verödet - deserted

Please let me know if you spot any mistakes.

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germanyinusa:

There has been a point in most readers’ lives, when we all got dead set on finishing the classics—those books that are referenced throughout time and which often land themselves on high school or college student’s required literature lists. For an American, classics may mean books like Frankenstein, To Kill A Mockingbird, anything from Shakespeare or Moby Dick. Reading these books gives you a glimpse of the societal lens of an era and how language around certain topics has developed over the decades.

It is difficult to whittle the list down, but for you we have collected “classics” of Germany. These books are significant for their time period, their subject matter, and for their influence on future authors. Just like some of the classics in the United States, a few are from foreign authors but were translated and gained popularity in Germany—some of these may even be familiar with!

Die Welle / The Wave

“The Wave” by American writer Todd Strasser is about a history teacher who conducts an experiment in his classroom where he seeks to demonstrate what it’d be like to live in Germany under the Third Reich. He slowly integrates principles and practices of the Nazi regime into class—slogans, rules of conduct, and an organizational structure, and a feeling of identity and community. His experiment was meant to demonstrate how, though it seems easy to assume only evil people would join in the Nazi movement, through slow exposure and manipulation, even normal people can be swept up in destructive political movements.

Im Westen Nichts Neues / All Quiet on the Western Front

Erich Maria Remarque, a German veteran of World War I, published Im Westen Nichts Neues in 1929. His book made a splash for its unromantic portrayal of soldiers’ hardship both during and after their time at war. In 1933, when the Nazis rose to power, Remarque’s book became one of the first books to be publically burnt. It has since sold 2.5 million copies and has been translated into 22 languages.

Tauben im Gras / Pigeons on the Grass

Unique in that the events of the entire book take place in the span of one single day, Tauben im Gras portrays the intensity of living in an occupied Germany. All day, allied planes fly overhead. It’s focus on characters experiences rather than events occurring helps highlight the personal cost to Germans of living in the 1950’s.

Die Leiden des jungen Werther von Goethe / The Sorrows of Young Werther

If you thought you could escape a classics list without Goethe you were wrong. Goethe, like Shakespeare in the States, is a grind you just have to endure as a student. Die Leiden des jungen Werther von Goethe, published in 1774, was one of the most important novels in the Sturm und Drang (storm and stress) period of German literature and was rumored to have been written in full in five weeks. The plot revolves around a love triangle between the young Werther, Charlotte and Albert and the tragic mental and physical downfall of Werther. 

Die Verwandlung / Metamorphosis

Look familiar? Multi-national novelist and reigning king of magical realism Franz Kafka in 1915 in Leipzig. In the novel, a traveling salesman wakes to find himself transformed into a bug. His works have influenced other great writers and magical realists like the famed Gabriela Marcia Marquez.

Die Räuber / The Robbers

Johann Christoph Friedrich Schiller was a jack of all trades—philosopher, poet, playwright, and historian. He was also buddy buddy with an already famous Wolfgang von Goethe. He, too, contributed to the Sturm und Drang literary movement and his drama The Robbers included it’s quintessential emotional language, individualism and symbolism, centering around two brothers pitted against each other.

Die Blechtrommel / The Tin Drum

Part of the Danzig Trilogy, Günter Grass’s book, published in 1959 has been praised as having portrayed the forgotten face of history. They focus on the rise of Nazism and the lasting effects of World War II on areas separated after the war ended.

Der Vorleser / The Reader

A book written by a lawyer and judge doesn’t seem like it’d make the classics list but this 1990’s novel captured the attention of generations of Germans coming to terms with their past. Much of the book deals with the divide between those who were born before and after the atrocities of the second world war. It has been translated into 25 languages and was adapted into a film starring Kate Winslet.

Das Parfüm /Perfume

Those who saw the movie adaptation of this book probably didn’t suspect that it was originally based on a German historical fantasy novel by author Patrick Süskind. This book combines murder and sensuality by following the character Jean-Baptiste Grenouille, born with an exceptional sense of smell.  He only explores the possibility of taking another life after discovering the wonderful scent of a young girl. Though the plot sounds creepy, this book has been the inspiration for everything from a Russian musical to a music video of Marilyn Manson.

Winnetou and Old Chatterhand

The most stunning part of German writer Karl Friedrich May’s adventure novels of the American Old West are that he, despite writing in first person, had never actually been there, or to the United States in general. He is one of the best-selling German authors of all time, selling 200 million copies of his books worldwide.

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Here you go! :)

German Vocab: Doggos

der Hund - dog
die Hündin - female dog
der Welpe - puppy

die Schnauze - muzzle
das Fell - fur
die Ohren - ears
der Schwanz - tail
die Pfote - paw

das Halsband
- collar
die Leine - leash
das Hundefutter - dog food
das Hundespielzeug - dog toy

bellen - to bark
jaulen - to howl
winseln - to whine
knurren - to growl
schnuppern - to sniff
streicheln - to pet
den Hund ausführen/mit dem Hund Gassi gehen - to walk the dog

die Hunderassen - dog breeds
der Labrador - labrador
der Schäferhund - shepherd dog
der Mops - pug
der Dackel - dachshund
die Bulldogge - bulldog

die Kommandos - Commands
Sitz! - Sit!
Bei Fuß! - Heel!
Aus! - Drop!
Nein!/Pfui! - No!
Hierher/Komm! - Here!
Platz! - Down!
Such! - Search!
Bleib! - Stay!

das Lob - praise
Gut gemacht!/Fein gemacht! - Well done!
Guter Hund! - Good dog!
Guter Junge! - Good boy!
Gutes Mädchen! - Good girl!

*

Hast du ein Haustier? - Do you have a pet?
Ja, ich habe einen Hund. - Yes, I have a dog.
Ich habe einen Welpen. - I have a puppy.
Mein Hund ist ein Labrador. - My dog is a labrador.

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prepolyglot:

natural disaster | Naturkatastophe (f)

hurricane | Orkan (m)

tornado | Tornado (m)

blizzard | Schneesturm (m)

typhoon | Taifun (m)

cyclone | Wirbelsturm (m)

tropical storm | Tropensturm (m)

drought | Dürre (f)

thunderstorm | Gewitter (n)

hailstorm | Hagelschauer (m)

heat wave | Hitzewelle (f)

wildfire | Lauffeuer (n)

earthquake | Erdbeben (n)

volcanic eruption | Vulkanausbruch (m)

avalanche | Lawine (f)

landslide | Erdrutsch (m)

sinkhole | Erdfall (m)

flood | Hochwasser (n)

tsunami | Tsunami (n)

relief | Hilfe (f)


Please let me know if there are any mistakes or better translations!

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