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The 50 winning and 200 shortlisted Portrait of Humanity images have been announced!


1854 Media, publisher of British Journal of Photography, in partnership with Magnum Photos, have created Portrait of Humanity – an award aiming to unite the global community through the power of photography. The winning and shortlisted portraits have now been revealed to the world. They show that there is more that unites us than sets us apart.

Portrait of Humanity / © Fabian Muir The Hands that Rock the Cradle, North Korea These children live in an orphanage. They make me think not only of their own future but also of their country’s future. I hope they will grow up in a North Korea that opens up and emerges from the time capsule within which it has been locked for well over half a century.

The 200 shortlisted portraits will be included in the Portrait of Humanity book, published by Hoxton Mini Press and distributed worldwide. The Portrait of Humanity book is available for pre-order here. Our judging panel, comprised of international industry leaders, have selected the 50 winning portraits. Each will be exhibited at celebrated galleries, museums and photography festivals across the world.

Portrait of Humanity / © Pieter de Vos No Man’s Land, South Africa Christopher has spent most of his life on the economic margins of South Africa despite his dogged pursuit of employment and stable housing. ‘I was a street kid,’ he said. ‘The kid that grows up on the street is in no man’s land.’

The 50 winning portraits will embark on a global tour from September 2019 – January 2020.

  • September 2019, Organ Vida International Photography Festival, Zagreb, Croatia
  • October – November 2019, LagosPhoto Festival, Lagos, Nigeria
  • November 2019, National Centre For Photography, Ballarat, Victoria, Australia
  • November 2019 – January 2020, Louisiana State Museum as part of PhotoNOLA Festival, New Orleans, United States

The 200 shortlisted portraits will be included in the Portrait of Humanity book, published by Hoxton Mini Press and distributed worldwide. The Portrait of Humanity book is available for pre-order here.

View the 50 winning images here: bjp.photo/pohwinner

View the 200 shortlisted images here: bjp.photo/pohshortlist

Portrait of Humanity / © Roland ‘Kilimanjaro’ Błazejewski Family, Germany I met this couple in Berlin. They were sitting together on the side of a street when I started a conversation with them. We talked for a long time and the man repeated, ‘We are a family, we are together, we are strong’ over and over. When I got up to leave I glanced back at them and took this photograph.

The 100 commended images, chosen by Clear Channel, will be announced in the coming weeks. These will be displayed on Clear Channel out-of-home digital screens worldwide, and seen by millions.

The 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners will share $10,000 in grant awards, to create projects that explore their interpretations of humanity. They will also be announced in the coming weeks.

20 images have also been chosen by Photography on a Postcard. These will be on display at Photo London, and contribute to the The Hepatitis C Trust’s campaign to eliminate the hepatitis C virus by 2025.

Portrait of Humanity / © Michal Solarski Zlata, Ukraine I met Zlata on the waterfront in Odessa. She had come to the city with her mother to take part in a beauty contest. I thought her Ukrainian dress looked beautiful against the setting sun over the Black Sea. Traditionally, the floral headdresses are worn by young, unmarried women as a sign of their purity; they were once even thought to protect them from evil spirits.
Key Dates:

Shortlist & Winners Announcement: 7 May 2019
Portrait of Humanity book launch party – 23 May 2019
Touring Global Exhibition: September 2019 – February 2020
Portrait of Humanity Book Launch Party
We are inviting you to join us in celebrating the launch party of the first ever Portrait of Humanity book, published by Hoxton Mini Press. On Thursday 23 May 2019 we will be joined by a selection of the winning and shortlisted artists that have been featured in the book, to celebrate Portrait of Humanity’s global impact and achievements. There will be a DJ, drinks and the chance to meet everyone who has contributed to this years award. This event is RSVP only, register for the event here by 17 May 2019 to confirm your attendance. The Portrait of Humanity book is available for pre-order here.

About Portrait of Humanity:

Portrait of Humanity is a new global initiative by 1854 Media, publisher of British Journal of Photography, in partnership with Magnum Photos.

As an evolution of Portrait of Britain, an award focused on capturing the many faces of modern Britain, Portrait of Humanity shows how our differences unite us on a global scale. It serves as a timely reminder, that despite our many differences, we are able to unite as a global community to create one of the greatest collaborative photography exhibitions in history.

About 1854 Media & British Journal of Photography:

1854 Media is an award-winning digital media organisation with a global audience of photographers, arts lovers and industry experts.

At 1854’s core is British Journal of Photography, the world’s longest running photography title, which has been showcasing pioneers of the art form since 1854. It manifests in a monthly publication that takes an international perspective on contemporary photography, focusing on fine art and documentary, and the cutting edge of editorial and commercial practices. It has also created internationally renowned photography awards – including OpenWallsPortrait of Britain, BJP International Photography Award, Female in Focus and Portrait of Humanity all of which aim to discover and promote new talent.

Studio 1854 is the visual content agency of British Journal of Photography, the longest running photography title in the world. Drawing on our global community of creatives, we create stories for brands through photography, film and journalism. In tandem, Studio 1854 also offers paid opportunities for photographers to produce new and creatively challenging work.

About Magnum Photos:

Magnum Photos is an artist’s cooperative of great diversity and distinction, owned by its photographer members. We represent some of the world’s most renowned photographers, maintaining its founding ideals and idiosyncratic mix of journalist, artist and storyteller. Our photographers share a vision to chronicle world events, people, places and culture with a powerful narrative that defies convention, shatters the status quo, redefines history and transforms lives.

For over 70 years Magnum Photos has been providing the highest quality photographic content to an international client base of media, charities, publishers, brands and cultural institutions.  Since its establishment, it has remained loyal to its original values of uncompromising excellence, truth, respect and independence.

About Clear Channel Outdoor Holdings:

Clear Channel Outdoor Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: CCO) is one of the world’s largest outdoor advertising companies with a diverse portfolio of 450,000 print and digital displays in 31 countries across Asia, Europe, Latin America and North America, reaching millions of people monthly. A growing digital platform includes over 13,500 digital displays in its international markets and more than 1,200 digital billboards across 28 markets in the U.S.

Comprised of two business divisions – Clear Channel International (CCI), covering markets in Asia, Europe and Latin America, and Clear Channel Outdoor Americas (CCOA), the U.S and Caribbean business division – CCO employs 5,600 people globally.

For more information, visit: 

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New York, USA, 2011
Copyrights to Jakob Wagner© All rights reserved

“The most important aspect of my work is to match the right spot at the right time. Light and weather are the main actors in my sceneries”

– Jakob Wagner

Jakob Wagner was born 1985 in Herdecke, Germany. In summer 2008, he successfully completed his three-year apprenticeship as a photographer. After five more years as a photo assistant for a few renowned photographers he started his own business in Düsseldorf specializing in landscape, aerial, cityscape, industrial and fine art photography. When Jakob Wagner is not at work on commissioned assignments, he devotes much of his time and passion to his personal photography projects, which have been featured already in many art magazines, books, blogs and exhibitions worldwide. His photographs are available in signed limited editions.
During the past years, You can find important clients including: Emirates, Adobe, Audi, Siemens, Telekom, Lufthansa, Clariant, Time Magazine, Stern, Gerolsteiner, Victorinox, Jung von Matt, Scholz & Friends, Mutabor Design, Loved, Jim Beam, Occhio, The Royal Opera House, Wired magazine, Jetgala, Audi Magazin, Open Skies, Aether Apparel and many more.

Shanghai, China, 2013
Copyrights to Jakob Wagner© All rights reserved

JAKOB WAGNER

“My photograph “Urban Zoom #1″ is part of a personal long time photography project, which I worked on since 2005 till now. In the first photo of my „Urban Zoom” series I’ve shot in London 2005, I tried by long exposure times, camera movement and zooming while exposure, to capture the slow-flowing and constant change of the city, in an abstract way.

The result pleased me so much that I decided to create a series of abstract images with as many abstract photographs from big cities around the world as possible. Meanwhile, I have captured more than 20 “Urban Zoom” photographs. Through my work as a photo assistant, I had the fortune to visit all these thrilling places like San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, Shanghai, Manila, Quito, Dubai, Abu Dhabi and many more.

When I started my Urban Zoom series, I still worked on film, so I could see the result just some days later. So the change to a digital camera system (2008), simplified the workflow on this series immensely, because I got the full control to the result through the quick check of the photo on my camera display.”

Doha, Qatar, 2011
Copyrights to Jakob Wagner© All rights reserved

About the challenges associated with aerial-landscape photography

“The most of my aerial photographs are taken from normal passenger planes, because had the fortune to work as a photo assistant for a few renowned photographers while they were working all around the globe. This job included a lot of time in airplanes. A very few are taken from a helicopter which is unfortunately very expensive. The best way to take aerial photographs under perfect requirements is a gas balloon flight. From a gas-balloon you are able to shoot in all cardinal directions and you fly very slowly, which gives me the opportunity to select my subjects deliberately, furthermore you have the possibility to fly several days at a stretch. They could fly higher (up to 9.000 meters) and further than hot-air balloons, but were more dangerous as they were usually filled with hydrogen gas.

To fly with a gas-balloon is always a challenge, because only the weather and the wind decide when and where to the journey goes, additionally gas-balloons need a hydrogen pipeline to start, so there are just a few spots around the world, where you can start your trip and you will never know where exactly it ends. So every gas-balloon flight is a real adventure and challenge for me.”

London, UK, 2005
Copyrights to Jakob Wagner© All rights reserved

What has been your favourite place/subject to photograph?

One of my favorite places is Cape Town in South Africa, because of his many various landscapes in the same area. There are wild cliff coasts, beautiful beaches, high mountains, green shadowy woods, dry steppe and white and yellow sand deserts. Everything lies in the same area, within a seven-hour drive. These landscape diversity is unique in the world and fascinates me always again. No other place impressed me that sustainable.

Through my work as a photo assistant, sometimes I got the chance to visit places that refuse outsiders. In May 2010 I had the fortune to see one of the ocean giants up close. We traveled from Rotterdam to Felixstowe as guests of one of the biggest container ships in the world, the Emma Mearsk. Also really impressive journey!

JAKOB WAGNER

NIGHTSCAPES

New York, USA, 2011
Copyrights to Jakob Wagner© All rights reserved

“The most important aspect of my work is to match the spot at the right time. Light and weather are the main actors in my sceneries. Sometimes I return many times to one spot, to get the shot with the right balance between weather and light.”

Dubai, UAE, 2011
Copyrights to Jakob Wagner© All rights reserved

“My interest in creative expression started early. At 12 I started to draw and two years later I discovered graffiti, I started with nightly (illegal) lettering in public urban areas and improved my graffiti skills right up to large scale commissions. I borrowed a camera, to take photos of the art works of my friends and mine, to be documented as a graffiti artist. I quickly realized what great potential the photography had and I started to use it as a new artistic form of expression. After some years of experimenting with analog photography technics and video art, I was then beginning (at the age of 17) to realize that I wanted to be a photographer. During experiments I found that with long exposure at night, things you cannot see with the naked eye, could be visualized. That fascinated me and I started my “Nightscapes” series.

Through my work as a photo assistant, I had the fortune to visit all these thrilling places like San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, Shanghai, Manila, Quito, Dubai, Abu Dhabi and many more. I used every minute of my rare free time to take photographs for my personal projects like the “Nightscapes” series.

Shanghai, China, 2013
Copyrights to Jakob Wagner© All rights reserved

Tell us about the process of taking these photos? Does weather play a part in your photography? If so, how?

“For example, when I plan to travel to a city I have never been before, then I prepare myself with an extensive web research about the place, weather conditions, possible shooting locations, position of the sun, local tips and everything what could be important. Weather Apps, rain radar, Google and Street View are a really big help for me by researching in advance. Furthermore, I have to decide in advance of every photographic project individually, which sort of Equipment I need. I never carry everything possible with me, I always try to carry only the bare necessities to stay mobile and flexible.

The most important aspect of my work is to match the right spot at the right time. Light and weather are the main actors in my sceneries. Sometimes I return several times to the same spot, to get the shot with the right balance between weather and light.
If I plan to do the aerial photo shooting I try to do it on the first clear day after some bad weather days with hailstorms and/or thunderstorms, because this day have the most clear atmosphere with an extremely wide and clear view.

For Architecture and Cityscapes I preferably photograph at the end of the dusk, or at the beginning of the dawn. During this time of the day the combination of the existing, natural light and the artificial illumination works best for me. Furthermore, at this time you are able to use long exposure times between 2 and 30 seconds, which creates stunning flow motions of water surfaces, clouds or traffic light streams.

Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 2010
Copyrights to Jakob Wagner© All rights reserved

For Landscape or Cityscape motifs it can also be very interesting to photograph during the darkness of night. The trick is, you have to over-expose the shot with exposure times between 30 seconds and 15 minutes, depending on the available light from the city itself or the moon. Unfortunately the contrast range of the most cameras is usually too small to be able to manage extreme lighting situations like this in one shot. Therefore, it is highly recommended to do this kind of motifs with a minimum of three different exposed shots to compose the final image with all the highlight and shadow details afterwards with the digital post processing. There are a lot of so-called HDR programs on the market, which will help you to fit into each other the exposure latitude to one image with a higher contrast range. I don’t use this kind of programs because the most of them create a final image which is too artificial and unrealistic for my taste. I do the stitching with a lot of layers and a rubber tool by hand in Adobe Photoshop, to keep the full control about the feel of the final image.

I was fascinated by the weather ever since I can remember, especially by thunderstorms and lightning. So it is obvious why I decide to focus, among other things, on weather.

Read the full Article on Lens Magazine Issue #53

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Copyrights to NORI Inoguchi © All rights reserved

NORI’s images of inanimate objects have an unmistakable life-force.
His clean, modern lighting and confident execution of imaginative concepts transforms even the most mundane items into art forms. Nothing is still in his work. Everything moves, jumps, flies, like in a memorable one-frame movie.


Copyrights to NORI Inoguchi © All rights reserved

After studying in NY, He started shooting for clients as diverse as Nikon, Bobbi Brown, L’Oreal, Galaxy, Lancóme, Pierre Cardin.
NORI, The extraordinary photographer who started his career in 2009, divides his time between New York, Paris, London and even Japan, his native home, also make time to shoot many personal projects and editorials for International Magazines. His imagery is the outcome of his interest in the unpredictability and surprise of the ingredients he chooses to work with, but through meticulously controlling the studio environment, he finds ways to give life to otherwise inanimate objects, immortalizing a singular moment in time.

His imagery is the outcome of his interest in the unpredictability and surprise of the ingredients he chooses to work with, but through meticulously controlling the studio environment, he finds ways to give life to otherwise inanimate objects, immortalizing a singular moment in time.

Copyrights to NORI Inoguchi © All rights reserved

Anastasia Tsypkina: Thank you NORI, We are very honored to feature an interview with you and to exhibit your work to our readers. Your projects are most fascinating and I assume most of our readers already got familiar with your work and the big companies you were shooting for, but now we would like them to discover the person behind this unique, and powerfully dynamic quality work!

This month’s issue Focusing in MOTION, and your work is most impressive in that field.

I would like to start from the beginning, tell us about what lead you to the photography field, and to move from clean and clear, sharp style shooting to experiment with Powder bombs, liquid, movement in still life photography and extreme high speed motion?

NORI Inoguchi: From an early age, I was always interested in photography. I used to like to experiment with taking pictures in different ways. I grew up with a very typical Japanese family till I was 18. And then I moved to NY and studied Fine arts and photography. I was also into graphic design and worked as a graphic designer for a few years after graduation. This combination of my educational and Japanese backgrounds led to my minimalist approach in high speed. My subjects are “unexpected.” You can’t take the same moment ever again in any way. That encouraged me to experiment with my subjects on set all day.

Copyrights to NORI Inoguchi © All rights reserved

A.T: How did you get your first big commercial campaign project?

N.I: When I started assisting a still life photographer in NY, I was lucky enough to use his professional equipment and shoot for my portfolio after work and on weekends. I spent extra time in his studio, at night and over almost every weekend for a year. Within a year, I completed my first portfolio book and found my first agent in NY. After a few months, I got a big world wide campaign for Samsung with Digitas.


Copyrights to NORI Inoguchi © All rights reserved

A.T: Which campaign you liked the most? Please describe the sophisticated aspects behind the project, The Idea behind the shooting and the special technique.

N.I: I love all my work, but the Pierre Cardin Powder project is definitely one of my most favorite campaigns. The creative director was inspired by the Indian holy powder festival. She is a very passionate woman from Brazil. My responsibility was making the products look beautiful in exploded powder. I had a little experience with powder, but not a lot. I spent days and nights with powder before the shoot and now subsequently became a powder explosion expert. My studio was covered in powder all over after the project and the studio looked far from sophisticated, but I was really satisfied how the images came out. I was so excited when I saw the “unexpected” moment. No special technique for my photography; just spend time with the subject and have fun with them is the most important thing.

Copyrights to NORI Inoguchi © All rights reserved

A.T: You were born in Japan, and was educated in NY, How were those days of studying and what was your point of view on the photography field before the start of your success in 2009?

N.I: I am proud to be Japanese. The culture is very minimal and sophisticated. It’s totally different from Western culture. I was lucky enough to come to NY at age 18 and learned “New York culture.” Everything I saw and experienced in NY was so “fresh” for me. NY turned a little nerdy camera kid into a professional photographer. Coming to NY was my life changing moment. If I wasn’t brave enough to leave Japan at that time, I would not be standing here now. Coming from Japan, a culture that reveres and promotes the art of photography, it was easy to indulge in my passion.
But, NYC, arguably the center of the photography world, was where I honed my love. I’ve actually spent more time in NYC than Japan.

Copyrights to NORI Inoguchi © All rights reserved

A.T: How would you describe the way of your development during the past 10 years? Would you call it easy and natural or with hard work and calculated?

N.I: After my first big jobs, I thought it would be easy and natural, but it hasn’t been. It is work! I work every day and have to always experiment with new things. I see what competitors are doing. I look at trends. I have to stay fresh, otherwise my work would not be attractive to audiences. Therefore, it’s definitely hard work. You have to have eyes that tell you what is beautiful and what is not.


A.T: What advice can you give the emerging starting photographers in this commercial field?

N.I: Never stop what you are doing, what you are passionate about. It’s important to have your own style, but as a commercial still life photographer unlike fashion or beauty photographers, you have to keep creating something new. In a way, it’s a very “nerdy” job, because you have to spend time with one subject for days to create something no one else can create. Keep your eyes on trends. What’s on the market and how companies want to advertise their products. It’s totally different from 10 years ago and it will be totally different in the next 10 years. Spend time with your subjects without looking through the camera. Look at your subject and talk to them. You will see the best way to show them on camera.


A.T: Let’s discuss your special technique for catching the singular moment in time. You find the way to give life to inanimate objects, Tell us about those techniques and what lead you in the search for them?

N.I: Using the right equipment and a minimal knowledge about lighting and post production are required, but I don’t think I have any special technique that no one else has, but I think I have natural eyes that bring inanimate objects to life. That is my passion and I don’t know how I developed that talent. I just trust myself and be confident about how I am shooting.

A.T: I personally admire the sense of life and energy in your work, we can see that also with the “the High Speed Motion”. What would you choose as the most difficult to shoot?

N.I: I never thought it’s most difficult to shoot, but perhaps the most fun to shoot. Technology is phenomenal in this age. I am glad that I was born in this era. For instance, there is a motion camera that can capture movement that your eyes cannot catch and that didn’t even exist 15 years ago! You can shoot with the camera now in a normal studio and with minimal equipment. Isn’t that just great? Why don’t we take advantage of that?
Nothing gives me greater pleasure than to see the moment I couldn’t see with my own eyes.

Copyrights to NORI Inoguchi © All rights reserved

A.T: From your website, I found out that the field of your work is greatly abroad. What direction you would like to try yet? Can we wait for more, new, experiments with dynamic color?

N.I: Yes, I just keep trying until I find something I’ve never seen before.

Copyrights to NORI Inoguchi © All rights reserved

A.T: Would you tell us what things inspire NORI?

N.I: To look at something I have never seen. Sometimes just a landscape in a country that I have never been before, a beautiful flower I have never seen before or an art piece from a small gallery in NYC.

A.T: Thank you for the time you could find for me and let’s wish our favorite Lens Magazine, its team and readers more and more colors that shine from the Lens Magazine’s pages.

See the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #53

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Sand and Water

© Igal Harari All Rights Reserved

“Living in the bustling, cosmopolitan center of Tel Aviv, I regularly seek peace and solitude within the beauty of nature, both for my own inner self and for my art as a photographer. I love to explore new corners and angles of Israel’s beautiful landscapes to capture nature’s hidden treasures.
In this series, I am inspired by the vast desert, the curves of the rolling hills and the glistening water as the sun kisses the lakes and the sea.
I am excited by photographing these idyllic scenes, waiting for the perfect light to fall just before pressing the shutter. The quality of the light is always vital for landscape photography in order to truly demonstrate the majesty and glory of Nature.”

© Igal Harari All Rights Reserved

ISRAELI LANDSCAPES
BY IGAL HARARI

© Igal Harari All Rights Reserved

“I use photography as a mean of self-expression and my choice of subject comes from a place of intuition.
My artwork focuses mainly on nature, still life, and portraits.

As one who is inspired to compose by the contrast of light and dark I am looking for the light within the shadows.

When I photograph people my intention is to unveil the beauty that lies behind their eyes, and to let them unfold a part of themselves in a free and easy way.

Many times this feeling of uncertainty appears while taking photos, but it is amazing to realize, how strangely and mysteriously images appeared in my work, slowly, and without intention .”
– Igal Harari

© Igal Harari All Rights Reserved © Igal Harari All Rights Reserved © Igal Harari All Rights Reserved

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #52

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Stay by me, 2016
© Temel Nal All Rights Reserved

Explosive sensual color. Thick dynamic brushstrokes.
Delicate shards of reflected light.

Temel Nal’s unique Photoworks unite the opposite forces of abstract and figurative in a powerful interaction of imagination and reality.

“I feel color, I sense light……” are the fundamentals that drive him to create his emotional and strong images. Nal has been transforming the everyday with his camera since 1996. Skylines, cars, fields of flora, architecture, Oriental Bazaars, people – all chosen subjects that he elevates from the literal, with his specific – never divulged – photographic technique. His easy relationship with intense color and powerful emotion make his work highly accessible to the viewer.

He kicks open your senses with his swathes of abstract camera “strokes”, inviting us to reconsider the values that we ascribe to the every day.
Fundamental to all his works is the astounding fact that they are not computer-manipulated. Starting with an analogue camera in the early years, he changed to digital with the advent of that new technology. All of Nal’s images have been and are the result of the technique he uses whilst taking the photo.

There is no post-production manipulation, only a minimal enhancement in the definition and color intensity of the image. Not unlike film development in the analogue era.
In a world where it is taken for granted that photographic images are incessantly enhanced, his direct-creation in situ is like a breath of fresh air. Janus-faced technology does not come into the equation. He calls this “Pure Photo Impression”. Emphasizing that his final image is pure, untampered and the exact rendition of what he was feeling at the time and place of the work’s genesis. He uses his camera – to re-quote Fox Talbot – as “the pencil of art”. This disregard of technology gives his work a highly personal, self-reflexive slant, bold and vibrant colors contained within the artificial boundaries of the canvas, tempered with the unexpected of strong, liberated emotion.

Temel Nal’s works are varied in format and come in multiples. Images are printed on canvas, satin paper, handmade paper, acrylic glass. Temel Nal is available for and has extensive experience in commissioned works.
– Paula Domzalski

Searching for Chrysler I, 2016
© Temel Nal All Rights Reserved

New York. The city that never sleeps! Bright lights, energy, bustling nights, fevers of colour, colour, colour. It grabs you and won’t let you go. It transforms you and your lens. It holds you tight.
Everyone is touched by New York, one way or another….it touched and held me too. This series is a series of my impressions and feelings whilst walking New York in 2016. It is for all lovers of energy, light and colour.

–Temel Nal

TEMEL NAL – Delicate Shards Of REFLECTED LIGHT

“I am a photographic artist specializing in impressionistic images of landscapes, people, nature, objects and cityscapes.
An important fact is that none of my images are computer-manipulated. I very occasionally minimally enhance an image by making it either slightly lighter or sharper. My specific style is the result of a unique, photographic technique, which I developed, which allows me to “paint” with my camera on site.

My images are a direct result of the impressions I had at the time. I try to capture the infinite variations of our everyday reality, releasing color from its form and
creating a color-dominated, impressionistic world.
All my work is available signed, dated and numbered in Limited Editions of 7. I print on handmade bamboo paper, satin finish photo paper and with sublimation dye printing on very thin aluminium.
– Temel Nal

Garden III, 2013
© Temel Nal All Rights Reserved

Central to Temel Nal’s work is the relationship between form, color and light. He draws on the influence of the original impressionists and works only outdoors, capturing everyday images of cityscapes, floral and light with his: CANON EOS5 Mark II camera.
This line of aesthetic inquiry: form, color, light is of course nothing new.
A major theme throughout the abstract art of the 20th century, it has led many a major artist on a multitude of diverse routes of aesthetic exploration.
Nal’s work, however, is singular. He uses the camera as a tool. As a brush.
He “pints” with his camera using a technique that makes his works unmistakenly recognizable. He chooses not to divulge this technique, only saying that NONE of his work is computer-manipulated. This is central to understanding his specific form of aesthetic. His work represents the relationship between himself, his ens and his object. That is the fundamental tenet and the basis of all of his work.

Garden IV, 2013
© Temel Nal All Rights Reserved ColPan 1, 2016
© Temel Nal All Rights Reserved

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #52

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© Marcela Ruty Romero All Rights Reserved

“The protagonist is the light, which escapes and is reflected in seemingly uninhabited spaces, but which have been constructed by man.”

Marcela Ruty Romero was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina and has been living in Israel since 2001.
She started to photograph at the age of 7, Later on studying history and anthropology.
She opened her photography studio “RutySoft” in 1994. Her studio offers professional services of product photography and architectural photography.

From the artistic level of view, her vision of the world is usually monochromatic, she explores the night looking for sensations, patterns in architecture, textures in nature, people in action, as well as spaces without people.
In this series, the protagonist is the light, which escapes and is reflected in seemingly uninhabited spaces, but which have been constructed by man.
‘Night scene’ is one of Romero’s latest series, which she is working on and still in progress. Her idea is to highlight the meeting between tranquility and tension caused by darkness and light.

The snapshots were made in the early hours of the night, with tripod, long exposure. In post production the lights were enhanced, generating high contrast that maximizes the tension between light and dark, with the purpose of generating emotions in the viewer.
The photos presented were conducted at the Monument to the Negev Brigade, Beer Sheva’s High-Tech Park Bridge, and diverse buildings in Tel Aviv.

© Marcela Ruty Romero All Rights Reserved © Marcela Ruty Romero All Rights Reserved © Marcela Ruty Romero All Rights Reserved © Marcela Ruty Romero All Rights Reserved

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #52

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© Chaim Martello All Rights Reserved

On the roof of the famed holy sepulcher church in the old city of Jerusalem, lives a group of monks from Ethiopia.
Heirs to a rich and ancient monastic tradition in their country and claiming king Salomon as forefather, they are ancient dwellers of Jerusalem.
Christian interdenominational battles for control on the holy sites relegated them out of the church, but they made of necessity a virtue and built their abide with pride on top of it, on what, they say, is the site of the sacrifice of Itzhak.

They speak Tigrinya, but some of them also English, Arabic, or Hebrew. They pray, talk, interact with pilgrims, safeguard their spot on the roof as a treasure. And they give us all, the gift of ‘a slice of Africa’ in Jerusalem.

© Chaim Martello All Rights Reserved

CHAIM MARTELLO

“My artistic practice is well anchored in the classical tradition of street and documentary photography. I step quietly into a space,
I observe it, and at times I photograph.

Humanity is my persistent subject and my language.

For this project, I’m doing portraits of people as well as “portraits” of a place.
I am not “sitting” my “sitters”. We talk, and they go along with their life, that I only ask them to stop for a fraction of a second.
I portray them, as well as my relationship with them, my fascination with their gazes and the space they inhabit.”

© Chaim Martello All Rights Reserved © Chaim Martello All Rights Reserved © Chaim Martello All Rights Reserved © Chaim Martello All Rights Reserved

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #52

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© Allan Kliger. All Rights Reserved

“Emotion – We all know what emotion is, don’t we? Or rather, we know what it looks like when we see it in someone else, and we know what it is when feeling it ourselves. There it is. That word.

FEELING.

It’s inextricably tied to emotion, to the emotive state.

© Allan Kliger. All Rights Reserved

Are they the same? Most dictionaries define emotion as a psychological state that arises spontaneously rather than through conscious effort, often accompanied by physiological changes. An instinctive state derived from one’s circumstance or relationship with others. In photography, it’s often what separates a great image from one that’s not. One that makes us stop, to study, to connect, to identify, to smile or feel pain, but in the end to feel something. To feel connected to the world around us.
We Are Social Creatures.

© Allan Kliger. All Rights Reserved

Seeing an emotional expression in another makes us feel. It brings us into that vignette, into that experience. Sometimes unwillingly, often by choice. It’s what I look for when I shoot. I want to feel alive, to feel alerted and aware of the world and it’s people around me and so when I see an expression of emotion I am driven to capture it. To freeze it forever. Perhaps to later relive being there, perhaps to kick start, like a jolt of current or caffeine, just for that moment, what it feels like to be alive. Sort of like when we’re healthy we can take it for granted because we don’t really feel anything, but when we’re feeling sick, only then do we know how good it feels to not be sick. To feel, to be in the space of another’s emotion, makes me feel, makes me appreciate, that I’m not simply a bag of bones but a sentient, spiritual being.

And so I look for emotive moments, for people in the throes of something emotional to them. Laughing, crying, fighting, playing, dancing, loving. Just not merely existing. But living. And when I see that, when I’m near to that, I throw myself into the moment to capture it. No boundary, no space. Right there, part of that moment. Feeling that moment and shooting by touch, by feeling and instinct, the joy or pain, while at the same time being dispassionate as I’m composing, lighting, dancing for the best angle. Being drawn in by the moment but separate from it, too. And, at the end, feeling that I was witness to something ineffable, that I, too, was alive.

© Allan Kliger. All Rights Reserved

Most who know me would say that I’m a people person. That probably explains why I love to shoot people. Portraits. More often than not in some far away place where I don’t speak the language. I don’t need to speak the language. We all connect at some level, we know what fight or flight means. It’s primeval. And so is knowing when it’s ok. When it’s safe. We see it someone’s eyes, in their gesture. I hope people see it in my eyes as I approach them.

That’s about the order of things for me. I’m drawn to people, to emotions and to experience, to connection and to the capturing of the world and of its people.
I think it’s the people thing that draws me the most. Every photographer, every artist, finds their soul feeling most alive, most alert, when it connects, intersects, with that which somehow speaks to it. For some it’s their way of looking back at their life, for others their way of looking forward. I think my inspiration comes from both. The looking back part clearly comes from my Father. For as long as I can remember my father took pictures. For him, it was a way to connect with friends and family. Cameras with bellows, fancy sounding Zeiss lenses, bulb flashes that had the coolest sound when they popped, light meters and film, my first Brownie Hawkeye camera. My father was the one at family events who was always taking the pictures. He was always handing out copies of prints that he’d made for his friends and colleagues.

© Allan Kliger. All Rights Reserved

I saw first-hand the love he had for capturing moments, of how his camera enabled him to connect with friends and strangers, and to share those moments with those he cared about. So I guess that love of connecting with people, of sharing moments with others has come naturally to me and… And inspired me to do more. To continue the tradition and to chart my own path forward.


Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #52

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©Vicky Martin. All Rights Reserved

“Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore”.

This line is taken from the film the Wizard of Oz inspired the title for my series Not In Kansas. I take inspiration from strong female figures, whether from film, literature or everyday life. Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz has always been particularly influential as she was one of the first tenacious female heroines I was introduced to. Her story resonates with me on many different levels, she exuded strength, independence, bravery, wonder, enchantment and vulnerability. Hopefully the viewer will perceive these traits in the character created in my series.
Not In Kansas is a series of constructed narratives which blur the boundaries between fantasy and truth, offering scenarios within which the protagonist wrestles with feelings of confidence, determination and boldness but is conflicted with ideas of isolation, loneliness, detachment and fear.

©Vicky Martin. All Rights Reserved

There is an emotional uncertainty from which the viewer is drawn to interpret the scenario depending upon their own personal perceptions. The images are composed to simulate
a sense of a simultaneous collision of elements of a before or after moment, with a deliberate ambiguity which only the viewer can resolve and further contextualize.
I wanted the series to have a cinematic feel with the locations being an integral part of this. The setting of each image is crucial to the narrative with the mood being accentuated by the outfit and props used to create the final photograph. Locations used in this series include Germany, The Netherlands, Italy and the UK. These are carefully researched and scouted to optimize the visual impact.
Not In Kansas is a consciously color saturated series as a direct reference to the vibrant display of color used to such great effect in the film to create a dreamlike wonderland distinct from the bleakness of reality and to differentiate fantasy from the truth.

©Vicky Martin. All Rights Reserved

As a photographer, I am continually fascinated with the concept of identity and enjoy exploring this through narrative portraiture, seeking to encourage the viewer to ask questions about the work to which ultimately the answers depend on the viewer’s own personal identity and perceptions.
My work is also consciously feminine as I like to draw on inspiration from strong yet vulnerable figures.
I love the creative process from initial concept through to making it all come together in the finished photograph and I’m always excited and challenged to be planning the next image and figuring out how to make it work.

I am very much hands on and resourceful, making props and some of the more elaborate outfits in my photographs, in fact, I made the shoes for Not In Kansas, I feel that this brings an added uniqueness to each image.

Vicky Martin

©Vicky Martin. All Rights Reserved

Vicky Martin (UK) is an award winning fine art photographer. Studying art and photography in the 1990s it was not until 2008 after being awarded a prestigious bursary that she was able to pursue photography professionally. Since then Vicky has had her work published and exhibited nationally and internationally, from Europe to the USA in solo and group shows. Her work continues to garner many awards and nominations including Winner of the Professional Beauty and Fashion Category at the Chromatic Awards 2018, Winner of the All About Photo Magazine Colors issue 2018, Winner of the Single Image in the Professional Fine Art Category at the 12th Julia Margaret Cameron Awards 2018 and Winner of the Professional Fine Art Series at 2016 Fine Art Photography Awards.

©Vicky Martin. All Rights Reserved

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #52

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©Aga Szydlik. All Rights Reserved

The San Blas islands are part of the Archipelago de San Blas, located in the Northwest of Panama on the Caribbean side.
The islands are inhabited and governed by the indigenous people of Guna Yala, who rebelled against the Panamanian government in 1925 and were granted full sovereignty over the land. Guna Yala is a sovereign nation and operate under their own constitution and government. Guna Yala is very protective of their culture and the islands they inhabit, strictly regulating tourism and flow of visitors.
Guna ferry passengers and supplies from the port and in between the islands using speedboats, expertly navigating treacherous waters are filled with palm stubs and previously sunken islands and boats.

Currently, the San Blas Archipelago is nearly at the water level and as the global shifts in temperature and rising sea levels accelerate, Guna people will have become climate refugees losing their well-preserved culture and homes to the sea.

In addition to climate change, Guna people face another issue, an ecological disaster, as there is no waste removal program and islands inhabited by locals are filled with rubbish. Being very conscious about the environment and its protection, Guna area contains plastic waste as much as they can, however, with every big wave rubbish washes it out into the open sea.

In contrast, islands designated for visitors are free of rubbish, it’s pristine white sand raked to perfection complementing the sparkly Azul Caribbean waves leisurely washing over… Blissful, tropical paradise sought by tourists.

©Aga Szydlik. All Rights Reserved

In addition to climate change, Guna people face another issue, an ecological disaster, as there is no waste removal program and islands inhabited by locals are filled with rubbish. Being very conscious about the environment and its protection, Guna area contains plastic waste as much as they can, however, with every big wave rubbish washes it out into the open sea.

In contrast, islands designated for visitors are free of rubbish, it’s pristine white sand raked to perfection complementing the sparkly Azul Caribbean waves leisurely washing over… Blissful, tropical paradise sought by tourists.

©Aga Szydlik. All Rights Reserved

Aga Szydlik

©Aga Szydlik. All Rights Reserved

Aga Szydlik is a photographer whose primary focus is on cultural, documentary, and experimental photography.
She is passionate about exploring the world and through her travels in complete immersion in the culture she documents. Through her photography, she aims to tell the narrative of people she meets during her travels and the stories they tell her.
She is passionate about capturing emotions, rituals and everyday situations in different social contexts such focused on cultural, humanitarian and ecological issues impacting the environment and human life.

©Aga Szydlik. All Rights Reserved ©Aga Szydlik. All Rights Reserved ©Aga Szydlik. All Rights Reserved ©Aga Szydlik. All Rights Reserved

Read the full article on Lens Magazine Issue #52

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