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What are your values? Before we can talk about specific values as they apply to your work or career, we first have to touch on what values are in general. They are the beliefs and ideas that are important to you and which you use to guide your everyday actions. Examples of what may constitute your Individual core values may be honesty, self-respect, work hard, and achievement.

These overarching principles are an important part of who you are and what paths you choose to follow. It’s important to understand what internal and external forces can be at play when it comes to the decisions we make, and why.

Intrinsic and Extrinsic Values – What is the Difference?

We all have both intrinsic and extrinsic values that affect the choices we make. Intrinsic values have to do more with our internal motivations. Do you like helping others? Do you enjoy the work you do because it is challenging?

Extrinsic values are more concerned with the by-products a decision or action may have. They refer to what you get out of making a choice or decision – in other words, the external rewards. Will you earn more money? Will you be recognised by your peers? Will you be known as a valuable leader?

Identifying your Work Values

Ignoring your values, particularly when it comes to your work, will greatly diminish your chances of being satisfied with your career or job. As such, it is imperative that you identify them early on within your career to make sure that you get the most out of your working life.

One of the easiest ways to determine what your important work values are is to compile an inventory of work values and rank them in order of importance to you. By having this list ready and close to you, it allows you make informed decisions when it comes to your work choices and where they may lead you.

Some examples of value items that could appear on your inventory may be:

  • Independence: freedom to work and make decisions on your own
  • Relationships: positive working connections with co-workers
  • Support: having supportive management
  • Helping Others: assisting individuals or groups
  • Job Security: a high probability that one will remain employed
  • Collaboration: working creatively with others
  • Helping Society: contributing to the betterment of the world
  • Compensation: your pay rate
  • Leadership:  managing others
  • Influence: affecting people’s opinions and ideas

Do any of these resonate with you? Write down your values and keep a note of when they change, when new values are added, and how the order of importance may shift.

The post Are your Values Valuable? appeared first on LMA.

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How can you achieve success in 2018?

One of the best ways to achieve success is to develop your own self-confidence!  Start every activity in 2018 without giving mental recognition to the possibility of defeat.  Concentrate on your strengths rather than your weaknesses; on your powers rather than your problems and on your opportunities rather than your obstacles.

To develop supreme confidence in yourself and your ability to succeed, identify your goals for the year in all areas of life and then outline clear plans of action for each of them.  Nothing gives you more confidence than having clear-cut knowledge of the actions you plan to take and the order in which to take them.  The mere existence of a written plan of action contributes immeasurably to your self-assurance and self-confidence.  The most important source of self-confidence is knowing that you can take the actions and make the necessary internal changes that are needed for your goals to become reality.

Confidence in yourself enables you to deal honestly with your shortcomings and compels you to consistently make corrections.  Confidence comes from experience. Experience comes from know-how.  Know-how comes from having the courage to submit yourself to obstacles, situations and circumstances from which the average person shies away.

Self-confidence stimulates your creative imagination.  No matter what you undertake, you will never do it until you think you can.  You will never master it until you have the confidence in yourself to act first in your own mind.  Anything you undertake must be mentally accomplished before it can be materially accomplished.

The primary element at the beginning of any goal, the one factor which will guarantee its success, is confidence in the beginning that it can be done.  The major difference between high achievement and failure is confidence – confidence builds your self-image.  You either succeed at failure or you succeed at success.  Both of these results are outward expressions of the attitude you hold toward them.  You can either think lack or abundance, poverty or plenty, obstacles or opportunities.  The choice is yours!

The degree of success you achieve in 2018 will be governed by your level of self-confidence and the degree of determination you apply to achieving your goals.  Every time you say to yourself, “I can do it, and I will do it,” you are strengthening your determination and reinforcing your positive self- image.  You are forming a habit of thinking which will manifest itself in behaviour that generates success.  You begin to look for ways that things can be done instead of looking for reasons why they can’t be done.

Determine to be successful in all areas of your life in 2018 by developing your confidence and taking control over your future! An LMA course could be a great first step – Click Here.

The post The best way to achieve success in 2018 appeared first on LMA.

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The Australian culture of nothing really happening in the New Year until after Australia Day seems to still ring true. We then go into the February panic period when we realise that the first quarter is half over and we don’t have a solid plan in place.

If developing your people is one of your necessities or goals for 2018 – start early. LMA has several courses starting in February/March, including High Performance Management which specifically addresses strategic planning and change management and The Performance Edge, a personal development course that develops the ‘total person’ through our unique development process, achieving permanent behavioural change which dramatically improves all facets of participants’ lives, professionally as well as personally.

Click here to view our 2018 Course Schedule.

The post Act Now appeared first on LMA.

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Dwight D. Eisenhower once said “Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because they want to do it.” LMA Graduate Michael Carnell is a walking testament to this, thanks in part to his professional development during LMA’s High Performance Management course.

Michael is both a Director at South Haven Group and its Director of Investment. In his role, he is responsible for South Haven’s investment strategy, acquisitions, management, disposals, investor relations and major negotiations. He has significant experience in all aspects of real estate investment, development, asset management, construction and business administration. He undertook LMA’s High Performance Management (HPM) course which commenced at Glen Iris in November 2016.

“I was the first person from South Haven to undertake a LMA course. Both the company and I were attracted to the HPM course as an opportunity to invest in a greater understanding of what it takes to be an outstanding leader in today’s corporate environment,” says Michael.

Throughout the course, his colleagues at South Haven were very interested in hearing what Michael was learning and understanding how they could apply these lessons to the betterment of the group and themselves.

South Haven Group is a privately-owned creator, investor and owner of quality properties. It focuses on delivering excellent outcomes for our tenants, investors and partners in all phases of the property investment, development and ownership cycle.

“The course reaffirmed that effective communication is the lifeblood that courses through an organisation’s veins and keeps it alive and functioning. It provided so many useful learnings and tools which I continue to implement and practice with particular focus on the importance of teamwork, communication, delegation and empowerment of others.”

“The combined benefit has been less stress coupled with increased productivity, time to listen, lead and strategise,” according to Michael.

The post Spotlight on LMA Graduate appeared first on LMA.

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As 2017 draws to a close we would like to celebrate the thousands of people who have participated and graduated from an LMA course this year. The combined Return on Investment for our Participants was over XXXX – what an amazing result!

Here is some of the feedback from LMA graduates in 2017.

As high achievers, we hope that you continue to practice LMA’s teachings, utilise the tools within the workplace and set goals in both your personal and professional lives.

Remember that high achievers:

  • Think positively (Above the Line)
  • Are willing to pay the price for success
  • Are willing to accept personal responsibility
  • Expect to succeed
  • Set goals in all areas of life
  • Are on a journey of self-discovery and self-improvement

Congratulations to the 2017 Graduates of Leadership Management Australia!

The post Three Cheers for the High Achievers appeared first on LMA.

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As talk of the festive season and 2018 starts to become more common in your work and personal life, it’s a good idea to take stock of the progress you’ve made toward your various goals this year.

For many people, this can be a time for celebration and happy reflection. For others, this review period can be less pleasant. If you didn’t achieve all the goals that you set at the beginning of the year, you may feel like you have failed. No matter how many goals you have achieved, or what progress you may have made, now is the perfect time to recalibrate your thinking and address the year that was.

We generally think about goals in terms of completion. If something is left unfinished or unfulfilled, our self-esteem can take a hit, we can become disheartened and our motivation drops. If this thinking sounds familiar to you, it may be time to reframe how you view your own version of success.

If you’re stuck in the traditional end of year thinking pattern, try readjusting with the following:

  • Think About your Big ‘Wins’ of the Year

The best thing about adjusting your thinking from goals alone to include ‘wins’ is that the scope of achievement can be expanded to take in so many more moments of personal advancement that may have happened throughout your year. For example:

  • Did you develop your abilities as a leader?
  • Did you develop new abilities and skills?
  • Did you create or deepen new and exciting relationships?
  • Did you make progress in your own self-development?
  • Question Whether your Desires and Focus has Shifted

Life is dynamic and ever-changing. It is natural that within the time from January to now your primary focus and driving motivators may have changed. Acknowledge these potential changes and make time to determine your new focus and where the motivation behind it may lie.

  • Start thinking positively about 2018

After you have evaluated where your focus may be heading into the new year, sit down and review your long-term goals. Write down again the goals you are currently working on and add new ones for 2018.

Remember, to be the most effective goals need to be SMART – specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and tangible.

Look Ahead, Congratulate Yourself

Periodic review is essential to the process of growth and goal achievement. However, the key is to acknowledge, appreciate, and celebrate what you did accomplish, and then to refocus on the goals that you still want to achieve. While this normally happens at the end of the year, it is always helpful to remember that time periods of achievement are different for everybody. Think positively about what you have achieved and look ahead to all you can possibly undertake in the New Year.

The post Time to Look Ahead appeared first on LMA.

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Transition times can be trying for any business. However, the more you wish to innovate and progress with the times, the greater the need to be able to skilfully guide your people through the difficulties that can come with change.

Ensuring that any developments align with your overall and individual goals, both short term and long term, is also essential to consider when implementing any changes across your organisation.

Here are our tips and guidance to help you as a leader positively transition through change, and lead your team to bigger and better things:

  1. Everyone reacts to change differently. Make allowances for differences and questions

Depending on the type of personalities in your office, some of your team may take the intended changes very differently to others. While it is not your goal to change your employees, you need to be aware of how different team members will project their reservations upon others.

Remember, your team are not mind readers! Introduce the change to the group and give them the opportunity to ask questions in a comfortable and secure environment. Give them every opportunity to become comfortable with the intended changes in their own way.

  1. Invite feedback

Don’t jump into making changes immediately after announcing the new direction. Launching immediately into action without gathering feedback will make your team feel more isolated from the changes happening around them. Instead, once you have announced the intention for a change of direction, invite your management team and informal leaders to work with smaller focus groups to determine where improvements can be best made, and how. Allow others to assist you to determine the next steps forward across a range of departments. You will be guaranteed to learn something, and you will be a better leader through the change for it.

  1. Identify your change masters

After the change has been introduced and workshopped, you will be able to better identify who on your team will be your advocates or ‘change masters’. These are people on your team who will back your vision 100% and will do everything to try and implement it. They are normally followed and respected by their peers, and will assist in warming others to your lead. By letting these change masters to share the big visions you have for the future, you are creating more informed advocates who will continue to push developments along in a steady way.

  1. Determine who is on board, then drive

At some point after the feedback and rallying stages, there is a moment when it will be time to kick the changes into gear. Disruption, if needed, for the good of the project and the company will be seen and embraced for the step forward it is, if handled in a way that involves group dynamics, feedback and recognition of personal impact. Know that others will come on board with the changes that are needed, and there will be no dramatic showdown or mass uproar.

The post Leading a Team Through Change appeared first on LMA.

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Motivation can be a fragile thing. More often than not, it is easier to demotivate your team than it is to motivate them. Motivation is almost always intrinsic, and it originates from within an individual.

As opposed to always focusing on motivation, more effective leadership and management techniques may be those which serve to not demotivate those around you. Not being a demotivator is reliant on your own communication choices with your team.

A few key demotivators to avoid with your team would be:

Being Excessively Critical

Guidance and direction are one thing, criticism is another. Guidance points to success and development, while criticism highlights and publicises failure. While managers and leaders cannot simply ignore poor practices and procedures that may compromise performance, or productivity, there are ways to approach your team that will inspire internal motivation, rather than encourage demotivation.

The core objective as leaders and managers is to reach organisation’s goals in the most efficient and effective way possible. To do this, it requires an understanding that all available assets must be activated to perform at their best. If a team member is not performing at an appropriate level, it is your responsibility to do what has to be done to resolve the problem. If there is a demonstrated need for more training, provide it.

Excessive criticism may lead to team members who will actively work against the goals of the organisation and no amount of motivational techniques will creative internal drive.

Failing to Appreciate and Reward

Some of the most demanding challenges as a leader or manager arise when there is a need to balance what needs to get done, against what needs to be reflected upon and improved. In today’s numbers oriented world, it is easy for managers and leaders to focus on the numbers to the detriment of their people skills. When a person or department reaches or almost reaches targets, set time aside amongst the team to celebrate the achievement.

Appreciation doesn’t function merely in celebrating achievement, it has a much broader definition. Celebrating milestones demonstrates a regard for others and a respect for their energy and effort directed towards the goals of the organisation.

Ignoring Progress

Checkpoints are very important for goal setting. However, to be effective you must be faithful and diligent in your inspection and regulation of them. By ignoring progress within projects your team is involved with, you undermine their confidence and risk that key objectives will not be met when or how you wish them to be. Checkpoints provide the facts that you have to work with to improve. They tell you what, if anything needs to be corrected or modified.

Just as it is important to reward progress, it’s also equally important to note the direction and speed of work amongst your team to maintain peak productivity.

Is your communication style demotivating your team?

The post Is Your Communication Style Demotivating your Team? appeared first on LMA.

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If you walk into many organisations in most industries, you will likely encounter the staffing phenomenon of those in positional leadership roles, and those in personal or real authentic leader roles. What will often separate the more forward-thinking, aspirational and focused organisations from others is the ratio of real authentic leaders compared to the number of positional leaders.

What differentiates a positional leader and a personal leader?

Positional leaders operate from a traditional or formal understanding of power. Someone who holds a position of power, say a CEO, CFO or COO, can reasonably assume that a large amount of power is granted to them based on their title alone. Leaders who operate from a positional standpoint alone are often unable to look beyond the roles and responsibilities of the title to see how their performance, attitude and general behaviour affects others.

Authoritarian by nature, positional leaders often rely solely on their formally defined responsibilities to influence or coerce others to obey them. Unfortunately, those who operate using this type of leadership style have fundamentally misunderstood how great leaders work to secure and maintain the loyalty of those around them.

On the other hand, personal power comes from being someone worth following and looking to for direction. Authentic leaders or personal leaders operate far beyond the formal responsibilities of their position. Those who operate with a personal leadership mindset are more focused on organisational and business growth, motivation of those around them, and the overall engagement of the entire team.

While personal leadership also can involve positional leadership in times of trial, stress or necessity, it is not used as the defining factor for influencing others. Rather, a strong personal leader will be highly respected because of their ability to juggle responsibility, while also being able to be relied on by those around them.

Developing personal leadership qualities amongst those outstanding performers in your team is essential for your business to grow around the qualities of self-leadership, self-respect and self-management. Similarly, those who aspire to be leaders would be advised to invest in their own self-leadership, and develop their personal power, trusting that opportunities to influence others will surely come.

Remember, leadership is not necessarily about the title someone holds or the designation of duties. It is more about the impact, influence and inspiration that someone has over a group of people. More often than not, the real power of a position comes from more than just where they may sit within an organisational chart; it comes from how authentically they can hold a team together, generate enthusiasm in others, and make a genuine difference in an organisation.

Are you a good manager?

LMA’s complimentary and confidential DIY Leadership Management Competency Analysis can provide you detailed information on your leadership style.
Click here to start the Leadership Management Competency Analysis

The post Positional Leadership v Personal Leadership appeared first on LMA.

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Even if you have a reputation of being the best at what you do, it will amount to little if you are unable to work well with others. According to recent research from the Deloitte Access Economics report, while the Australian workforce has a strong soft-skill base for now, the current rate of training around soft skills will not be enough to keep up with the demand for soft skills in the future.

What are soft skills? Unlike hard skills, which can be proven and measured, soft skills are intangible and can often be difficult to quantify. The report from Deloitte revealed the specific types of soft skills many employers will be looking for now and for years to come. These mainly included analytical thinking, verbal and written communication, and leadership.

With the demand for soft skills on the rise, it is important for everyone to consider how the focus on these often difficult to quantify skills will affect their career progression in the future.

One of the reasons that soft skills are now so revered is that they are the best tools to help facilitate better human connections, and therefore encourage closer and more productive working relationships between teams and colleagues. Critical soft skills for this development of positive interpersonal behaviour such as communication, presentation skills and conflict management abilities should be the focus of any training in the soft skills area. While these skills have been identified as essential for the future, often employees are seldom given the opportunity to develop these soft skills for their own benefit.

However, if you are given the opportunity to develop your soft skills through training and development, you will be taking advantage of improving a suite of skills that will steer you closer towards your larger career goals. Some of these key soft skills may be:

  • Honing of a more positive attitude – generation of strong, positive energy throughout a workplace encourages others to be optimistic and upbeat in the face of difficulties. The Performance Edge is a key course to cultivate an ‘Above the Line’ attitude in work and personal life.
  • Ability to work under pressure – the ability to still do your best work under pressure is an invaluable asset to yourself and others.
  • Better problem-solving skills – stronger problem-solving skills will allow you to become more resourceful in times of trial, thereby making you a better resource for others around you. Advanced problem solving skills are fundamental to being an effective manager, the Challenge of Leadership course delves into this in more detail.
  • Better flexibility/adaptability – the ability to adapt to changes and new situations is an invaluable skill now

Although soft skills can’t be ingrained in the same manner as hard or technical skills, the good news is that they can still be developed. To benefit from soft skills and develop a successful career, the foremost step for any professional is to develop their self-awareness regarding their own behaviour and gaps in their soft skills knowledge and practice. The ability to direct and fill in opportunity areas highly depends on career ownership and effective management of your own skill gaps, and understanding how these can be filled for your future benefit.

To start your people on the journey to better soft skills, both Thrive Alliance and LMA have a range of short to longer term courses that can help you to achieve your goals. For a course designed to develop the ‘total person’ through permanent behavioural change and a deeper development of soft skills, learn more about LMA’s The Performance Edge course. To learn more about how a better understanding of emotional intelligence in the workplace can assist your leaders and team members, visit Thrivealliance.com.au and view the available short courses here.

The post Soft Skills and Career Advancement appeared first on LMA.

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