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 I haven't had the chance to see the inside of this chapel, but the Family History Center provided me with pictures.


It looks beautiful--the slope of the sealing and the moldings along the sides. A cry room is on the second floor at the back of the chapel, enclosed by glass.


A small, circular stained glass window sits at the front of the chapel.


Since this is a family history center, this building isn't used for worship services anymore, which is really too bad. It's a great example of LDS architecture.
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This chapel was built in 1932 in the Tudor Revival style. At the time, it was nearly on the edge of town; now, this building is just a few blocks away from the famous Las Vegas strip.

(Image Source: Church History Library)

(Image Source: Google Maps)

The building is in very good condition, but its been affected by changing demographics in this area. Latter-day Saints tend to live in the suburbs, and as this neighborhood became more and more urban, wards moved away from the building. Today, the building serves as a family history center. However, the chapel is still intact. We'll take a look at it next week.
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This chapel was built in the 1860s, when West Jordan was a small settlement. In the 1930s, it became a museum for the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers. I believe it is now owned by the city. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places.



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Six pairs of windows line the left side of the chapel. Each one has a different image relating to Christianity and LDS theology.


Wreath & Beehive

Olive Branch and Dove

Anchor and Lily

Star and Scripture

Chalice & Wheat

Grapes and Torch

At the front of the chapel is a beautiful window of Christ knocking at the door.


This window was actually based off of William Holman Hunt's painting, The Light of the World, and you can see the resemblance.




I'm so happy that this building continues to be used regularly.
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The interior of this chapel is stunning.


This building highlights the art deco styles. Artistic patterns are painted on the ceiling and walls. At the front of the chapel is a circular rostrum, with a stained glass window of Christ knocking at the door. Other stained glass windows with Christian and LDS icons line the wall on the left.


At the back of the chapel is a large balcony that is used for stake conferences. A very enthusiastic member took me up there for some of my pictures.




I'll post pictures of the stained glass windows next.
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Note: Preservation Updates are a regularly occurring series of posts where I round up recent information on historic LDS buildings and their futures. Depending on the age of the post, there may be newer information available. Click here to see all Preservation Updates.

On June 1, the historic chapel in Farmington, New Mexico was damaged in a fire that was mostly in the building's main lobby. The building sustained smoke and fire damage.

(Image Source: Farmington Daily Times)
The fire is still being investigated and services have been relocated. This chapel houses a stained glass window of Christ in Gethsemane. I can't find any word on the status of the window. My hope is that the building will be saved, and if not, that the window will be moved to another chapel.
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I originally posted about this chapel a few years ago, but I recently visited this chapel in person and wanted to share my own photos. The Wilshire Ward chapel--also known as the Hollywood Tabernacle and the Los Angeles Stake Center--is a landmark building. Constructed in the 1920s and dedicated in 1929, it was designed by Harold W. Burton, who also designed the temples in Laie and Cardston.

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons) 



The building was originally unpainted, but a few years after it was built, it was painted white. It cost $250,000 to build, making it the most expensive chapel the Church had (and probably has) ever built (only less expensive than temples). It has changed very little, besides some additions. Here's a painting of the building from the 1930s, done by D. Jolley:

(Image Source: Church History Library)

In the 1990s, the Church considered selling the building, but instead, they renovated the building--a project that took several years and cost about $7,000,000. President Hinckley rededicated the building in the early 2000s. I will post interior pictures soon.
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The story of the Porterville Ward (a small town south of Morgan, Utah) is a sad one. It is on a site just outside of the small town on a hill overlooking the valley. It was built in 1898. The main floor was the chapel, while the basement was another large hall for activities. It was a lovely sandstone building.

Source: Utah State Historical Society


In 1942, the building was sold to a private owner and a new chapel was built near the center of town. The owner reported that people kept throwing rocks at the windows, removing pews and benches, while pigeons roosted in the attic. By at least 1975, the chapel was renovated into a home where a new owner lived. In 2001, one of the daughters left a candle burning in her bedroom, which eventually burned the entire meetinghouse down.


The meetinghouse originally had all of its walls still standing, but sometime in the past few years, the front wall came down. It's terribly sad to see, although the scaffolding looks like someone is doing something with it.


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Note: This post is one in a series that focuses on LDS architecture that is not historic, but that departs from standard cookie-cutter plans to become unique and beautiful in a different way. To see all of these posts, click here.

It's always interesting to stumble across a modern building (in this case, the chapel below in Long Beach, CA; just a few blocks from the ocean) and find something very unique. I always wish I could find out the story behind it.


This chapel has a beautiful tile mosaic along its southeast entrance:



It depicts the vision of the tree of life found in the Book of Mormon.



On the right side is presumably the great and spacious building, high up in the air.



On the left is the tree of life, with lines of people in the confusing mists of darkness on the left.


 It's pretty fun to find things like this in these buildings. The primary room also has a large mural of Christ with the children (the same one found in St. George and Blanding), but I wasn't able to get inside. It was still neat to see this mosaic.

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River Heights, tucked into the southeast corner of Logan, has a chapel that was built in 1914. Its main distinction is the beautiful details on the south end.

(Image Source: Church History Library)


While the building still stands, and is in fair condition, it looks like it's being used as a warehouse for the Utah Festival Opera foundation. At least, it looks like a warehouse when I peeked in:


It looks like it was sold at least a couple of decades ago, maybe longer, based on its condition.


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