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OFFICIAL HONDA Announcement has sent the internet on fire! The CR500 was arguably the most reliable and most powerful 2 stroke motocross bike of its time and a leaked Honda announcement shows that they are making a comeback with fuel injected versions!

The OG Beast!

At 13KG lighter than its predecessor it’s on the 500c model this range will be the lightest 2-Strokes currently available and at 76BHP and 73MPH top speed… thats a BEAST!

Sure the current market leader in 2-Stroke motocross bikes, KTM, does not make a 500cc but maybe there will be one coming after this bike hits the street!

Honda info from social media sites says:

“Building Dreams for a living, we welcome the a new family member to our line up”

The models are made up as follows:

-2020 CR125

-2020 CR250

-2020 CR325

-2020 CR500

Sources state that the issue with the 500cc making a comeback was down to the exhaust fumes being unable to pass modern rules. With this new fuel injected engine, Honda have put forward for patent it looks like they have cracked it!

Honda have been told that due to the crazy stats of the new CR500 it will not be allowed to race any of the current 450 Classes due to the power restrictions.

There is no release date yet for these bikes but testing has started so hopefully track info will start to emerge soon.

Engine Blueprint.

This blueprint shows the new 2-Stroke engine with fuel injector places at the top of the cylinder aimed at the back wall. When the piston hits TDC (top dead center) the injector sprays the fuel oil mix. This way unburned fuel does not get swept out with the exhaust gases and should being down emissions and also that classic ‘smoker’ reputation of the older generation 2-Strokes.

KTM also have injected 2-strokes coming to market so things are set for a big shake up soon!

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This an archived test of the 2000 Kawasaki KX125 that was in the December 1999 issue of Motocross Action Magazine.

QUESTION ONE: IS THE 2000 KX125 FAST?

Heavens no. Unfortunately, no. No.

QUESTION TWO: IS THE 2000 KX125 FASTER THAN THE ‘99?

What isn’t? Waring blenders, Black and Decker drills and Vegamatics put out more power than the ‘99 KX125. The sad thing is that Kawasaki has made major strides with the KX’s horsepower output. The ‘99 pumped out two more ponies than the ‘98 and the 2000 adds another horse to the mix–yet the bike is still anemic when compared to its competition

Is the 2000 faster than the ‘99 KX125? Yes, but most of Kawasaki’s powerband efforts were spent trying to give the KX125 a distinct powerband. For 2000, the KX engineers added more inertia to the drivetrain to help the KX125 churn out a broader powerband (hopefully adding some bottom and a little over-rev to what was a midrange-only engine). Unfortunately, it didn’t work as well as they hoped.

QUESTION THREE: IS THE 2000 KX125 ENGINE COMPETITIVE?

Let’s put it this way. If Team SplitFire’s Ricky Carmichael was forced to race a stock KX125 engine, he wouldn’t be a three-time 125 National Champion. True, a good rider could win races on this bike at the amateur level, but he’d have to work harder than the guy who finished second. In the pro ranks–forget about it (unless you ride for SplitFire).

QUESTION FOUR: WHAT ABOUT THE JETTING?

We had problems with the jetting of our KX125. Problems that would have forced us to bad mouth the stock set-up. But, in the midst of our testing, Kawasaki jump started their already completed test program and told us that they would make a “running change” to fix the jetting on all the bikes in the warehouse–and send out the proper jets to any buyer who already had a 2000 KX125.

It should be noted that Kawasaki’s last-minute jetting change is a “quick fix” and, over the long run, there will probably be a better jetting solution (most likely focusing on the slide cutaway). The KX engineers leaned out the Power Jet. Why? Because it was cost effective.

The major jetting changes will be in the pilot and Power jets (it is left to the rider to judge the size of the pilot jet for his local conditions).

QUESTION FIVE: WHAT JETTING DID WE RUN?

Here is what we ran in our bike for SoCal’s sea-level tracks:
Mainjet: 160
Pilot jet: 45
Power Jet: 42 (55 stock)
Needle: N7NW
Slide: 6.0
Air screw: 2 turns
Clip: 2nd (3rd stock)

QUESTION SIX: HOW GOOD IS THE GEARING?

This year the KX125 comes with a 49-tooth rear sprocket (last year it had a 48).

QUESTION SEVEN: WHAT ABOUT THE REAR SUSPENSION?

Kawasaki has decent rear suspension. They have a good shock, excellent valving and dual compression adjusters. The only thing they need to make the KX125 better is a straight-rate shock spring!

Kawasaki’s insistence on using a progressive-rate shock spring ruins the rear suspension. It allows the back end to wallow under acceleration, ride on the harsh part of the stroke under a load and bottom over the big stuff. Swap the stock shock spring for a straight-rate 4.9 kg/mm and you will love the rear of the KX125.

What was our best setting?
Spring rate: 4.9 (4.6-6.1 stock)
Race sag: 97mm
Hi compression: 1 1/2 turns out
Lo compression: 11 clicks out
Rebound: 13 clicks out

QUESTION EIGHT: HOW GOOD ARE THE NEW FORKS?

Let’s take this opportunity to explain how Kayaba’s new fork technology works. It should be noted that Kayaba calls the it SASS (Speed Activated Spring System), but everybody else just calls it the bladder fork.

(1) There are two air chambers; the traditional one above the oil level and a second one below the oil level (contained within a bladder).
(2) The two air chambers are divided by a special separator plate that sits on top of the cartridge cylinder.
(3) The separator plate is designed to leak oil. At slow fork shaft speeds, oil can leak around the separator plate’s Teflon seal quite easily. As fork speed increases, the Teflon band provides resistance to oil flow.
(4) At slow fork speeds, the two air chambers work in unison. The main air chamber and the air in the bladder compress at the same rate (controlled by displaced oil inside the cartridge and leaked oil from above being compressed).
(5) At higher fork speeds, the Teflon band restricts oil flow around the bladder, which allows the air in the bladder to be compressed at a slower rate than the air in the main chamber. The air in the main chamber compresses at a higher rate than the air in the bladder, thus leaving some additional air spring (which is what the compressed air acts as) to absorb higher loads.
(6) In essence, the two air chambers work as one unified air spring at slow fork speeds, but as two distinctly separate air springs (one with a high spring rate) at high fork speeds. The main air chamber is position-sensitive (to the height of the air in the chamber), while the air in the bladder is speed-sensitive (to the rate of resistance that the separator plate imposes on oil flow). This, in theory, allows a bladder fork to save air volume for emergency use.

QUESTION NINE: WHAT ARE THE BEST FORK SETTINGS?

What was our best setting? For hardcore racing we recommend this set-up:
Spring rate: 0.41kg/mm
Oil height: 110mm
Compression: 11 clicks out
Rebound: 13 clicks out
Fork leg height: 3mm above top of stanchion
Notes: Surprisingly, even though the new forks are bladder forks, which typically run a smaller primary air chamber, the 2000 KX125 has the same air volume as the ‘99 forks (in comparison, the 2000 KX250 forks have a much higher, 88mm oil height). Kawasaki did drop last year’s progressive-rate fork springs in favor of a stiffer straight-rate spring. Very good move.

QUESTION TEN: HOW DOES IT HANDLE?

The KX125 is the least 125-ish of all the tiddlers. The frame is big, wide and girthy. Its turning radius is not as razor sharp as most of its competition. It takes its time getting around a corner.

When sitting astride the KX125, you could swear you are aboard a KX250. It has the same ergos, but the numbers are not identical. The KX125 steering head is moved back 15mm, while the swingarm is shortened 10mm. This makes the little KX125 more agile than its big brother—although the sensation of roominess is hard to erase.

Do we think it is a great handling 125? No. But even though its not the quickest turning, most stable, lightest feeling or most petite–it still rates highly with the MXA wrecking crew because it feels more like a motocross bike than the other tiddlers. It doesn’t feel like a toy. It goes where you aim it and seems to absorb feedback better than your typical tiddler chassis. The KX125 has a much shorter wheelbase than the KX250, which eliminates the big KX’s reluctance to turn tight berms. Not every rider will fall in love with the big-bike feel of the KX125, but every MXA test rider did.

QUESTION 11: WHAT DID WE HATE?

The hate list:
(1) Decals: The new decals, which are only new if you carry a color chip chart around with you, chip away on day one.
(2) Gas tank: Mr. KX, please mold the gas tank in green plastic. It’s not as though you’re saving millions of dollars by making them all black The black gas tank makes it hard to see the fuel level.
(3) Bar clamps: We mounted a KX250 top triple clamp to our KX125. The KX125 comes with solid bar mounts, while the KX250 bar clamps are rubber mounted and reversible. We felt the need to move the bars forward in the clamps.
(4) Handlebars: The stock handlebars are prone to bending—and it doesn’t necessarily take a crash before they start flaking paint at the crossbar juncture.
(5) Shifting: It’s a little notchy.
(6) Clutch: The clutch is borderline, although it can take more abuse than the KX250 pack.
(7) The U-rims are nice looking, but we’ve seen enough cracked ones to wish for standard-issue hoops.

QUESTION 12: WHAT DID WE LIKE?

The like list:
(1) Pipe: The gray pipe coating is durable, non-rusting and trick looking.
(2) Air filter: The air filter locating system uses two prongs. We like this, but always reach in the airbox and make sure the bottom prong is in the hole.
(3) Seat brackets: Last year the seat brackets would break off. For 2000, Kawasaki replaced the pop rivets with threaded studs.
(4) Front brake lever: Kawasaki hasn’t totally solved their brake problems, but they do have a very ergonomic brake lever.
(5) Frame guards: Only Kawasaki and KTM offer plastic frame guards to keep the frame spars from scratching.

QUESTION 13: WHAT DO WE REALLY THINK?

It’s slow. Really slow. Slower than we thought possible (but we say the same thing about the KX125 every year). We think that the KX125 has the potential to be a great bike—but not with a boat anchor in place of an engine.

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Ryan Villopoto holeshoted a moto at the 2007 MXDN in Budds Creek on a 250 four-stroke in a sea of 450s. 

Not since 1987 had the United States hosted the Motocross des Nations, until the Youthstream brain trust chose Budds Creek as the site for the 2007 MXDN. It was natural for the prestigious world-class event be held just outside of the nation’s capital. It was the 60th edition of the MXDN, and America brought its very best to the party as it had so many times before. Only the 2007 edition was different from all others. Why? It served as Ricky Carmichael’s last professional motocross race. Win or lose, he would hang up his leathers. There was also a hint of controversy, although that’s not uncommon. Tim Ferry, new to the des Nations effort, was hand-picked by team manager Roger DeCoster. Some believed that Andrew Short was a better fit, given that he placed higher in the 450 National standings that year; however, there was no disputing DeCoster’s 250 pick—Ryan Villopoto.

Villopoto, along with James Stewart and Ivan Tedesco, had won the Chamberlain Trophy one year prior in Matterley Basin, England. The lightning-fast redhead from Poulsbo, Washington, had become a sensation since turning Pro at the end of 2005. Ryan was the de facto 250 racer on American shores, and the 2007 Motocross des Nations was his coming-out party. On that warm and sunny Maryland day in late September, Villopoto did what so many greats before him could not. Ryan became the first-ever 250 rider to win both motos in the history of the event. He somehow managed to dispose of Europe’s best 250 and 450 riders, including the great Antonio Cairoli, and 10-time National Champion Ricky Carmichael.

Ryan and Tim Ferry.

Historians point to Team USA’s victory at Maggiora, Italy, in 1986 as the most dominant performance from the boys in red, white and blue. That was the year Johnny O’Mara wowed the Europeans with his exquisite riding aboard a factory Honda CR125. The “O’ Show” went 2-2 in the combined classes, a feat previously thought impossible. However, even O’Mara’s achievement takes a backseat to what Ryan Villopoto accomplished in 2007. Here are some sobering facts about RV’s race weekend. He won the 250/450 combined moto by 15 seconds over Chad Reed and lapped through 16th place. This was after he tangled with a lapped rider and squandered 15 seconds. More impressive was the combined 250/Open moto when Ryan gapped the field by over a minute and lapped through 11th place.

HISTORIANS POINT TO TEAM USA’S VICTORY AT MAGGIORA, ITALY, IN 1986 AS THE MOST DOMINANT PERFORMANCE FROM THE BOYS IN RED, WHITE AND BLUE. 

There were several factors that contributed to Villopoto’s dominance at the 2007 Motocross des Nations. (1)Carmichael and Ferry gifted their number-one gate picks to Villopoto. As a result, Ryan had the best starting position heading into a bottleneck first turn. (2) Ricky Carmichael fell in the second turn of their combined moto while trying to avoid downed riders. He came from last place to third. Regardless of extenuating circumstances, though, Villopoto took full advantage of every opportunity. He nailed both holeshots and won by a big margin.

At the 2007 MXDN at Budds Creek, Ryan Villopoto was unstoppable. 

As the sun set on the horizon, Team USA and its legion of patriotic fans were raucous in victory. The pressure to perform on home soil washed away as champagne corks pierced the sky. The USA was within one point of having the lowest combined score possible. France, in second, was 26 points behind, while Belgium finished third. Villopoto, Ferry and Carmichael won their respective overalls, but no one made a bigger statement than Ryan Villopoto. He became instrumental in carrying the American torch in two more MXDN races, both of them victories. And, had it not been for a series of injuries, Ryan likely would have captured the Chamberlain Trophy a mind-boggling six straight times.

In the press conference following the 2007 MXDN, Ricky Carmichael paid Villopoto the biggest compliment, saying, “Everyone is going to be scared to death of Ryan, and they should be, because he has that something special.” Indeed, Carmichael was right. Villopoto went on to capture four straight 450 Supercross titles and two 450 National crowns.

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Dean Wilson just upped the vlog game.

If you’ve ever seen the Uncle Drew commercials, you can see where Wilson got the idea for his latest video.

In the Pepsi commercials, now Boston Celtics point guard Kyrie Irving dresses up as a grandpa and schools some young bucks on the playground. The commercials became so popular, they even made a movie this year.

The Boston Globe has an article on how it all came to be.

Anyway, Wilson dresses up as a grandpa and takes his grandson to Fox Raceway for some motos. He eventually gears up himself, races Colt Nichols, hits ramps with Axell Hodges, and more. It’s amazing.

Wilson just won the internet this week.

80 YEAR OLD GRANDPA EARL SHREDS DIRT BIKE - YouTube

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Honda have officially announced the come back of the century, The CR500 is back in production, just ten years ago nearly all motocrossers were two-strokes, and the mean big brother of them all was the CR500. Stock, it made 58bhp and weight just 230lbs. It didn’t fit in any racing categories so Honda barely bothered updating its noodley frame, but that didn’t stop Robbie Knievel using one to jump 5 billion dollars at an ING Bank event.

HONDA Released a private statement that has been leaked within a HONDA Forum, that talks of a new  CR5OO is in the making for the 2018/19 model line ups, the bike will have 92bhp and weighs 197lbs, frame waying 14kg lighter than the original, and a top speed of 87mph

The internet rumor machine is in full swing over the whisper Honda may be returning to the smoker stable for its future off-road weapons.

Log onto just about any forum and there it is. It started as an April Fools joke by Spy Guy but has turned to reality with Honda reportedly filing a number of trademarks on the names of CR, CRM and CRE.

The CR name is synonymous with Honda’s legendary 2-stroke Moto-X range, with the CRM and CRE names a kittle less recognisable and most likely mean something to only the most ardent Honda enthusiast. They relate to the 2-stroke enduro’s and trailies from the 70s and 80s.

This could just simply mean Honda are renewing the patents to these names to prevent them from lapsing, however, it could also be the move to bring back a blue haze from red machines to race strips around the world.

So could we once again see the likes of a CR500 strapped with 17s lording over every other puny supermoto only to dominate race tracks around the globe? Lets hope so…..but…. KTM still make smokers and they have a little more recent practice of the engineering art. Still will be interesting to hear that sweet sound of a Honda smoker on full revs…Stay tuned!

The post HONDA OFFICIALLY ANNOUNCES CR500 RETURN appeared first on LatestMXVideos.

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Ryan Villopoto is back! Well, kind of. RV decided to line up at the Monster Energy Cup on Saturday and did well. Although he retired from professional racing in 2015, RV finished 12-11-13 in the three main events and took 13th overall. Not bad for a retired guy!

Steve Matthes spoke to RV about his comeback after the race.

Racer X: Ryan Villopoto, the story of the weekend. Came back. How was it?
Ryan Villopoto: It was all right. It was good. Practice was okay. I don’t really know what my expectations were. I think speed was… Everything was pretty good, just really struggled off the [starting] grate. That’s the first three gate drops I’ve ever had off the grate. I was just struggling with the bike to leave the gate. My reaction seemed okay, but the RPM’s would fall down. It’s a stock bike with a PC piston in it. So the RPM’s would fall and then it would automatically end up wheelying because I couldn’t keep the R’s up and maybe spin it off the deal. But nonetheless, it was a good time. I think I did my job on the side of everybody was pumped to see me back out there regardless of the finish.

Harder than you thought?
It was hard, but I couldn’t say I would have done any better if the track would have been a little more technical. There was one rhythm section.

You get a bad start. What do you do to make up time?
Nothing. I don’t really know. Ultimately, I didn’t come here to say I’m going to get top five. I would have loved to do that, but it is what it is. I had a great time. I think everybody’s expectations, I achieved that with just the media and the fans and everybody just loving seeing me behind the gate again.

Were you nervous? You raced last year, or the year before?
Two years ago in August.

Were you nervous though?
Not necessarily nervous. I mean, nervous, but I didn’t have anything riding on it. I was here out of my van. It was cool.

It was cool to see you back. It was definitely a highlight I think for a lot of people to see how you would do and how you would ride. Eighth fastest in practice and ninth overall on the night.
Yeah. I think I missed the Joker Lane.

What?
Maybe the last one. I don’t know if they’re going to catch that.

What about bump starting your bike?
I don’t really know. We had a little thing going on, but we made it. 

I don’t think anybody will care about that Joker Lane.
They shouldn’t care about [it]. From what I heard at the last lap [Savatgy and Tomac], they should care about that more than me.

[Note: Vilolpoto did actually get penalized for skipping the Joke Lane. That pushed him from ninth overall to 13th.]

I agree. Thanks again for coming to the live show [the Pulp MX/Racer X live podcast on Friday night]. It was a lot of fun. Did you like it? Fans seemed to really dig it.
I think it was awesome. That was a pretty cool deal.

The fans were into it, man. They really liked you being there.
I just think it was cool. It was almost like a talk show, comedy show type thing. Everybody was up there. You can get drinks and hang out and have a good time. It was good. Next time I’ll have a beer.

Nice to see you back. We’ll see you at Anaheim 1.
Yeah, maybe. You’ll see me for sure, actually.

The post BREAKING : RYAN VILLOPOTO RETURNS TO RACING! appeared first on LatestMXVideos.

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Press Release: KTM Motorsports is pleased to officially welcome Cooper Webb to the Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Team for the 2019 race season. The North Carolina native will pilot the KTM 450SXF FACTORY EDITION alongside teammate Marvin Musquin in the AMA 450 Supercross Championship and AMA 450 Pro Motocross Championship.

Webb joins the KTM family with a long list of accomplishments since his professional debut in 2013. Following a decorated amateur racing career, Webb achieved great success in the 250cc division, claiming back-to-back AMA 250SX West Championships in 2015 and ‘16, before putting a cap on his 250cc career in 2016 with an AMA 250MX National Championship.

Since moving into the premier 450cc division in 2017, Webb has earned two career podium finishes in AMA Supercross and multiple top-five finishes in Supercross and AMA Pro Motocross. Heading into the 2019 season, Webb is confident in his abilities and he’s READY TO RACE for top finishes with the support of Red Bull KTM.

Cooper Webb: “It was an honor when Roger and Ian reached out for me to be the next guy on the Red Bull KTM team. It’s really encouraging to know what this team has achieved – they really have been there and done it, so I don’t see any reason why they can’t do it with me. I will be putting in the work and doing everything possible to come into the year as strong as I can be. With everything around me, I know I have put myself in the best possible position for winning on the track again. I had a very comfortable feeling with the guys from the very first moments and that just gives you confidence. Working with Aldon at the Baker’s Factory is another strong part of the whole KTM set-up. I have an opportunity that really involves the whole package, so the plan is to ‘stick to the plan’ and focus on getting ready with the bike for Anaheim I. I don’t want anything to take me away from that!”

Team Manager, Ian Harrison: “We are excited for Cooper to join the Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Team for the upcoming 2019 season. Cooper has had an exciting and successful career winning in 250cc competition and our goal is to give him the tools to continue that success on a KTM going forward. We feel the combination of both Marvin and Cooper racing the KTM 450 SX-F FACTORY EDITION in both Supercross and Motocross is strong, and our hopes are that the pair can motivate and push each other to race to their fullest potential. The Red Bull KTM Team commits to investing a lot of time and resources long-term into our riders, providing them with access to top facilities, technology and factory-backed support in order for them to have successful careers with the team. We look forward to Cooper taking full advantage of these opportunities so we all can enjoy even more success as a team and a lasting future together.”

Webb is set to debut his ride aboard the KTM 450SXF FACTORY EDITION at the upcoming Monster Energy Cup in Las Vegas on Saturday, Oct. 17.

The post BREAKING NEWS | COOPER WEBB SIGNS WITH KTM appeared first on LatestMXVideos.

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Honda have officially announced the come back of the century, The CR500 is back in production, just ten years ago nearly all motocrossers were two-strokes, and the mean big brother of them all was the CR500. Stock, it made 58bhp and weight just 230lbs. It didn’t fit in any racing categories so Honda barely bothered updating its noodley frame, but that didn’t stop Robbie Knievel using one to jump 5 billion dollars at an ING Bank event.

HONDA Released a private statement that has been leaked within a HONDA Forum, that talks of a new  CR5OO is in the making for the 2018/19 model line ups, the bike will have 92bhp and weighs 197lbs, frame waying 14kg lighter than the original, and a top speed of 87mph

The internet rumor machine is in full swing over the whisper Honda may be returning to the smoker stable for its future off-road weapons.

Log onto just about any forum and there it is. It started as an April Fools joke by Spy Guy but has turned to reality with Honda reportedly filing a number of trademarks on the names of CR, CRM and CRE.

The CR name is synonymous with Honda’s legendary 2-stroke Moto-X range, with the CRM and CRE names a kittle less recognisable and most likely mean something to only the most ardent Honda enthusiast. They relate to the 2-stroke enduro’s and trailies from the 70s and 80s.

This could just simply mean Honda are renewing the patents to these names to prevent them from lapsing, however, it could also be the move to bring back a blue haze from red machines to race strips around the world.

So could we once again see the likes of a CR500 strapped with 17s lording over every other puny supermoto only to dominate race tracks around the globe? Lets hope so…..but…. KTM still make smokers and they have a little more recent practice of the engineering art. Still will be interesting to hear that sweet sound of a Honda smoker on full revs…Stay tuned!

The post Honda Announces CR500 appeared first on LatestMXVideos.

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Cole Seely will return to Honda HRC. Seely, who has spent his entire premier-class career with the team, has agreed to a on a one-year deal that will keep him on the team through the 2019 season.

“I’m really excited to be re-signing with American Honda,” Seely said in a statement. “I have an awesome crew around me and we get along great, so I’m eager to get back to work with them. This past year was really rough, so to have a company like Honda continue to back me is amazing. It’s one thing to have brand loyalty as a rider, but to have rider loyalty as a brand is saying something huge. This will be my tenth season on a Honda! I’m excited for 2019 but am trying to take things slow and easy right now so I can build myself up and not rush the process. We have started to do some testing, though, so it’s been fun getting back into the mix.”

Seely missed most of the 2018 season due to a broken pelvis and sacrum sustained in a crash at the Tampa Supercross. He was in a wheelchair for two months due to the injury and just recently returned to riding.

“It’s been good,” he told us recently of getting back on the bike. “It was a little weird at first. This is the longest I’ve ever been off the bike, so getting back out there, I thought I was going to feel like I forgot how to ride. But it actually came back pretty quickly. I’ve just been trying to take it easy and slow, which is hard. Being a professional racer, you just want to go out there and start crushing it right away. So I’ve just been trying to flow and let the blisters build back up on my hands, all that kind of stuff. I don’t feel any pain or tightness or anything, it’s just the normal muscles in my back and shoulders that are getting sore. Obviously you don’t really get those muscles firing unless you’re riding.”

Team manager Erik Kehoe said of the signing: “I’m looking forward to having Cole back with us for 2019. He had a tough year with his injuries, but as his recovery progressed, he became more eager and excited to get back to racing, which was great to see. We’re confident in his ability to make his comeback and return to the podium. He’s very talented and a huge asset to our team, so we’re happy to continue our relationship.”

Seely will join Ken Roczen on the team. The team said they will not be participating in the Monster Energy Cup this year.

The post COLE SEELY INKS EXTENSION WITH HONDA HRC appeared first on LatestMXVideos.

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Motocross of Nations rosters are starting to round into form, with only a few top teams left to announce. Today, Great Britain announced their team for RedBud. Representing the team in MXGP will be Tommy Searle, with Ben Watson in the MX2 spot and Max Anstie racing Open.

Searle has represented the country for a decade now, including last year when a team of Searle, Anstie, and Dean Wilson snapped a podium-less streak that dated back to 1997.

“I’m happy to have been chosen to race for my country again as this will be my tenth time doing so,” Searle said in a press release. “I know what to expect and what it takes, and we will work together as a team and give everything possible!”

Watson, 21, will be making his MXoN debut for the team at RedBud. “I am so motivated to give this opportunity absolutely everything for myself, the whole of GB and everyone who has put their trust in me,” he said in a statement. “I am feeling very privileged to be selected and cannot wait to do all I can along with Max and Tommy to get Team GB on the podium again. Let’s go”

You can learn more about Watson and his breakthrough season in our interview with him here.

Anstie, who went 1-1 at home last year at Matterley Basin in MXGP, will ride the Open Class this year.

There were several other riders hoping to make the team, including Jake Nichols, who even came to the U.S. to race the RedBud National to prove his worth for the squad. Team manager Mark Chamberlain admitted it was not easy to narrow the team down to just three riders.

“This is year has been really tough to pick the team,” said Chamberlain. “Lots of different hurdles had to be overcome to get to this decision. I’m pleased with the riders selected and feel it’s a really strong team. I would like to thank the riders selected and the ones who haven’t made it for their professionalism. It’s great to have so many good riders and all of them wanting to be on Team GB! The focus now is on the build up to the race and making the best possible surroundings for the riders to get the job done. It’s great to have Ben Watson on the Team as being his first year he is buzzing. That with Max and Tommy with the experience they bring together a really good team

The post GREAT BRITAIN ANNOUNCES 2018 MOTOCROSS OF NATIONS TEAM appeared first on LatestMXVideos.

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