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BALI, Indonesia (AP) — Bali’s annual Day of Silence is so sacred that even reaching for a smartphone to send a tweet or upload a selfie to social media could cause offense. This year it will be nearly impossible to do that anyway.

The head of the Bali office of Indonesia’s Ministry of Communications, Nyoman Sujaya, said Tuesday that all phone companies have agreed to shut down the mobile internet for 24 hours during “Nyepi,” a day marking New Year on the predominantly Hindu island.

That means smartphones won’t connect to the internet, shutting off access to social media sites such as Facebook and Instagram and instant messaging apps.

“Let’s rest a day, free from the internet to feel the calm of the mind,” said Gusti Ngurah Sudiana, head of the Indonesian Hinduism Society. “Many Hindu people are addicted to gadgets,” he said. “I hope during Nyepi they can be introspective.”

On the day meant for reflection, Balinese stay home and stop using electricity. The airport and shops close and guests at resorts are asked to keep noise to a minimum. Beaches and streets on the usually bustling island are deserted except for patrols to make sure silence is observed.

Bali’s religious and civilian leaders including police and military chiefs made the request to the central government earlier this month.

It will be the first time the Internet is shut down for Nyepi, which this year begins early Saturday. The same request was made to the government last year but was not implemented.

Sujaya said shushing social media will become the norm for the Day of Silence in the future. Television and radio broadcasts will also be silenced as usual.

“Wi-Fi at hotels, public services and vital objects such as airports, hospitals, security forces and banking still can run normally but with minimal use such as emails,” he said.

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LOCKHART, Texas (KXAN) — A Snapchat post by an employee of the Amazon fulfillment center in San Marcos that read, “Don’t go to Amazon tomorrow” along with a photo of three rifles led to the employee’s arrest.

Joshua Logan Hawkins, 19, was reported to police on March 9. In a Facebook post by the Lockhart Police Department Monday, officials say Hawkins, who has been charged with terroristic threat, lives in Lockhart.

After seeing the Snapchat post, police got a warrant for his arrest and a search warrant for his address.

Officers arrested Hawkins at his home and found three rifles inside.

Bond has been set at $1,500. He has been booked into the Caldwell County Jail.

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AUSTIN (KXAN) — Friends and family members are posting to social media about the young man who was killed in one of Monday’s package explosions. KXAN is choosing not to release his name, as the Austin Police Department is still notifying family members of his death.

However, several friends and neighbors spoke with us, saying the 17-year-old had a big heart and was loved by many. They also say he was a talented bass player, about to graduate high school with a bright future.

“He was very passionate in it,” said De’Montrey McKenzie, a friend who says he attended East Austin College Prep with the victim. “He just loved to play music in the orchestra and in band. I would watch him practice, and he just gave everything his all.”

Friends say the victim played bass for the Austin Soundwaves, his charter school’s orchestra. William Dick, a conductor for the Austin Youth Orchestra, says the young man played for AYO, as well.

Dick told KXAN the teen was one of the kindest, most positive young men he’d ever worked with. Dick said the victim was working hard to secure his future, and had just been accepted into a prestigious summer music program at Interlochen Center for the Arts in Michigan, which he planned to attend before heading to college.

McKenzie added that the victim had been accepted to several universities.

“I hope the person, that they find out who the person is and justice is served, because they took his life away and he didn’t even deserve that,” McKenzie said. “He was going to go to college, he was going to graduate this year, and they just took his life like that.”

Neighbors of 75-year-old victim says she is a “very good person”

Yasmin Navarro has lived on Galindo Street in southeast Austin for around 15 years. She says the 75-year-old victim wounded in Monday’s second package explosion and her family are good people who didn’t deserve this.

“Both her and her mom are very good people,” Navarro said in Spanish. Navarro’s daughter translated her interview for KXAN into English.

“My mom really wants to cry because she knows she’s a very good person, and so, when she found out she doesn’t want to think about it because it’s hard. She doesn’t think that anybody would want to hurt her in particular because she and her family are very good people,” Navarro’s daughter added.

The mother and daughter arrived outside the crime scene after work Monday around 5:30 p.m. Because they were at work at the time of the explosion before noon, at last report, they have not been allowed back inside the tape to enter their home. They live near the victim’s house.

“We haven’t been at all and we came here thinking we could get our dogs,” they said. “We have clothes in there. We have everything in there.”

The real worry, however, is the condition of their beloved neighbor.

“[We want] the authorities to do something more about situations like this because even in a poor neighborhood — maybe ours isn’t that poor, but there’s random people passing by and we never know.”

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AUSTIN (KXAN) — KXAN’s Phil Prazan sat down with interim Chief of Police Brian Manley to answer your questions about the package bombs that have gone off in Austin in the past two weeks.

In a one-on-one interview, Manley said up to 100 federal officials are helping Austin police investigate what led up to the three package explosions that claimed two lives and injured two other people.

Other than perhaps the most infamous mail bombing case of Ted Kaczynski — who, better known as the “Unabomber” for targeting people affiliated with universities and airlines, is currently serving a life sentence for his mail bombs spanning the 1970s to 1990s — has this happened before?

Manley: “I’m not aware of other major cities who have dealt with what we’re dealing with right now.”

Can APD handle the package bomb investigations and South by Southwest?

Manley: “What we’re seeing is exactly what we’d like to see in our city and our great state. And that is all of the law enforcement professionals coming together to work on this.” Since Austin doesn’t have enough K-9 units or bomb techs to work all three scenes and respond to suspicious package calls — of which APD received at least 82 on Monday — other departments have come to APD’s aid.

Do these explosions have anything to do with South by Southwest?

Manley says since the first bomb was before SXSW, he does not believe festival-goers are a target or the cause. The chief warned that they’re working against a person who knows what they’re doing.

“They’ve been successful in three incidents here in Austin that have resulted in two deaths and two severely wounded individuals and we’re not going to stop. We’re going to go all out with our federal partners, and we will not rest until we’ve identified the suspect and taken him into custody,” Manley said.

To watch the full interview with more answers to your questions, click on the video above.

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AUSTIN (KXAN) — East Travis County voters decided to vote out 22-year incumbent State Rep. Dawnna Dukes in favor of someone new. Two people will face off in a May runoff election, immigration attorney “Chito” Vela and former Austin Mayor pro-tem Sheryl Cole.

Both candidates came into KXAN to debate the issues facing House District 46.

Texans vote in their primary runoffs May 22.

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AUSTIN (KXAN) — The bomber who police believe packaged and planted three bombs on home porches is not amateur according to a “parcel bomb” expert.

Package bombs explode on a monthly basis across the world but most of it spurs from political groups in Europe and South America. Less so in the United States. The ATF investigated around 700 explosions in 2016 — the latest information available — but only three were hand placed inside boxes.

“Usually there’s a very specific target and there’s some type of criminal motivation behind it,” said Ben West, who’s spent the last 10 years studying parcel bombs as a security analyst for Stratfor. He says Americans have been mostly spared large-scale parcel bombings since the “Unabomber.”

From the mid-70s to the ’90s, Ted Kaczynski sent more than a dozen bombs, killing 3 and injuring more than 20. West says package bombs usually target individual people and are built to kill or maim, not to bring down a structure. He says whoever is making the Austin bombs aren’t amateurs.

“Because you can make a bomb then place it in a package and then rig it to explode at a specific time. So no, it’s not easy to do,” said West.

The vast majority of package bombs don’t go off as intended, he says, so the fact that each bomb has killed or hurt someone is alarming.

“That shows that the person who’s doing this, they know what they’re doing and they’ve probably practiced a lot,” said West.

West says the bomb 10 days ago was probably a test run for more to come.

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AUSTIN (KXAN) — After two more explosive packages were left on Austin porches Monday, people across the city expressed their worries and talked about how to keep their homes safer.

Monday, Austin police investigators determined a package bomb that killed a teen and injured a woman was likely connected to a bomb that killed a man on March 2. Investigators say it appears the packages were placed on porches instead of being left by a delivery driver. APD believes these explosions are part of a pattern of incidents.

Austin police urged the public: if you receive a package you’re not expecting and don’t recognize the sender, call 911.

As of 6 p.m. on Monday, APD received 82 calls for suspicious packages — not including the calls about the explosions earlier on in the day. The calls started at 8:12 a.m. Monday morning and continued into the evening. APD is being cautious about all of them, but has not been advised that there was an explosive device in any of these. For comparison, APD received only two suspicious package calls on Monday, March 5.

A spokesperson for UPS delivery told KXAN on Tuesday that their company did not deliver any of the explosive packages and that UPS does not deliver packages overnight.

“UPS drivers wear the UPS uniform and announce themselves when making deliveries by knocking on the door or ringing the doorbell,” said Matthew O’Connor with UPS.  He added that UPS offers additional tracking services and updates that allow customers to know if UPS is delivering something to their home.

“We do not believe this package was delivered by any of the official mail services, whether it be the US Postal Services, UPS, FedEx or DHL,” said Interim Austin Police Chief Brian Manley at a press conference Monday. “But that will part of the investigation. But standing here today we do not believe it was delivered by any official delivery service.”

Chief Manley added that the devices used in the recent explosions can detonate by being moved or opened.

“And that’s why I want to reiterate the importance of if you see something that’s out of place do not handle it, do not move it,” he said. “Do not touch it. Call us.”

He added that APD does not know when the packages on Monday were delivered, only that the victims saw the packages on the front porch, handled the packages in some way, and then the explosions happened. Chief Manley couldn’t go into specific sizes of the boxes, but he said they were “an average size, not exceptionally large.”

“What we do know is we have an individual who knows how to construct these [explosives] and cause serious loss of life,” Chief Manley said.

On KXAN News tonight at 9 and 10 p.m., KXAN’s Alyssa Goard explains how delivery companies recommend you handle packages and how neighbors around Austin are responding to these explosions in their city. 

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WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump recognized the Houston Astros on Monday for their first World Series win, an “incredible victory” that Trump said was even more special following the devastation Hurricane Harvey wrought on the Texas city.

Houston defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 7 last year to clinch the title. Trump, who played baseball in high school, declared it “was one of the greatest baseball games anybody has ever seen.” The Astros jumped to a 5-0 lead by the second inning, ultimately winning the game 5-1.

“It’s really a reminder why baseball is our national pastime,” he said at the White House.

Trump thanked the players for spending time with people who were displaced by Harvey’s floodwaters, and for donating money.

“Our administration will continue to stand by the people of Texas and Florida and Puerto Rico, Louisiana, even Alabama and so many other places were affected, and we’re standing by all of them,” said Trump, whose response to last fall’s hurricanes was criticized by some.

Trump singled out some players by name, including American League MVP Jose Altuve. “Who could forget the amazing Jose Altuve? Where’s Jose? He’s much taller than I thought,” Trump said, directly addressing the 5-foot-6 second baseman and turning to shake his hand.

White House visits by championship sports teams are usually highly anticipated, but have become politically fraught in the age of Trump.

More than two dozen New England Patriots stayed away when the Super Bowl-winning team visited in 2017. Several had cited political reasons beforehand.

The NBA champion Golden State Warriors avoided the White House on a trip to Washington last month. Warriors All-Star Stephen Curry had said last year that he did not want to come to the White House. Trump later made it clear that Curry wasn’t welcome, tweeting “invitation is withdrawn!”

At least three Astros — recently retired outfielder Carlos Beltran, pitcher Ken Giles and shortstop Carlos Correa — were absent Monday. Beltran and Giles previously had cited family reasons for why they would skip the event.

Asked afterward about Correa’s absence, team owner Jim Crane told reporters during an availability outside the White House that a “couple of the guys had family issues and spring break, so we didn’t really review that with them.”

Some of the players and managers said they were honored to be at the White House.

“Anytime you can get a chance to come and do something like this, it’s going to be a great time,” right fielder Josh Reddick said after the event. Manager A.J. Hinch said it was a “very special” day because just one Major League Baseball team a year gets to come to the White House.

“We’ll forever remember this,” Hinch said.

Pitcher Justin Verlander tweeted a photo of himself standing behind the president’s lectern in the White House East Room.

The Astros used Monday’s day off from spring training in Florida to fly to Washington for the ceremony. They headed for the airport afterward.

Trump, who received a team jersey, later tweeted that it was his “great honor” to host the team. He included a photo of him and the team in the Oval Office.

___

Associated Press writer Luis Alonso Lugo contributed to this report.

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AUSTIN (KXAN) — How does our 21st-century technological society adapt to be as inclusive as possible for all citizens? A South by Southwest panel tackled this topic.

The panel, labeled “Minority Report: Engaging Kids of Color in Tech,” featured several founders of organizations that promote digital literacy for young people, particularly minorities.

During the discussion, the panelists said they want to ensure as Texas’ minority population continues to grow, tech companies promote diversity.

“We need to change the thinking because there is value in these programs that are specifically focused and engaged in cultural relevance say and how we are training the next generation,” Black Girls Code founder Kimberly Bryant said.

(Left to Right) Dalinda Gonzalez-Alcantar, founder of Border Kids Code, Laura Donnelly, founder of Latinitas, and Google Fiber representative Daniel Lucio, pose for a photo at SXSW in Austin on March 12, 2018. (Nexstar Photo/Wes Rapaport)

The panelists said they noticed kids responded best to robotics, virtual reality and gaming.

“It’s our responsibility to expose them so that they can pick sushi one day if they want or coding, or VR, or drones,” Dalinda Gonzalez-Alcantar, founder of Rio Grande Valley-based non-profit Border Kids Code. She said she and her coworkers tell people that their kids are trilingual, knowing English, Spanish and code.

Laura Donnelly is the founder of Latinitas, an organization with offices in Austin and El Paso. She said every part of society is affected by the tech world.

“Young Latinas are part of the largest population in the state of Texas, they are part of the fastest growing youth population, their point of view really should be driving industry, they really should be those at the lead of innovation,” Donnelly explained. “Media and technology are two of the most powerful platforms right now to influence attitudes, to create social justice, and so we are putting that power in the hands of Latina girls.”

Google Fiber representative Daniel Lucio moderated the discussion. He said the United States ranks 14th in the world for average internet connection speed. Lucio said 61 percent of Americans have internet slower than 10 megabits per second. He said the tech giant is working on more ways to help them access high-speed internet and other technological resources to people who do not have it available right now. Other panelists supported that goal.

“The internet cannot be looked at as an amenity,” Gonzalez-Alcantar said. “When we don’t get them even just access to the internet, let alone quality access to the internet you continue to oppress people.”

Audience members at a SXSW session on minority youth and technology on March 12, 2018. (Nexstar Photo/Wes Rapaport)
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AUSTIN (KXAN) — Three package bombs that have exploded at Austin homes in the past two weeks have led to a massive response from the Austin Police Department and other state and federal law enforcement agencies.

In total, the three explosions have killed two people and injured two others. Photos from the scenes of the bombing locations in east and southeast Austin Monday show the FBI, ATF and numerous Austin police officers and command staff at the scenes investigating.

PHOTOS: Police investigate three package bombs left at Austin homes
Austin Police Interim Chief Brian Manley, left, with members of the FBI during the investigation of package bombs in Austin on March 12, 2018 (Courtesy/Chief Manley)
Chief Brian Manley, right, walks with members of the FBI during the investigation of package bombs in Austin on March 12, 2018 (Courtesy/Chief Manley)
Police and first responders on Galindo Street following a package explosion on March 12, 2018, the third in two weeks. (KXAN Photo)
Police and first responders on Galindo Street following a package explosion on March 12, 2018, the third in two weeks. (KXAN Photo)
Crews respond to a package explosion in southeast Austin on Galindo Street, the second on March 12, 2018 (KXAN Photo/Kate Winkle)
Emergency crews on scene at a fatal explosion in east Austin on Oldfort Hill Drive March 12, 2018 (AFD Photo)
APD's evidence response team at the scene of a deadly explosion in east Austin March 12, 2018 (KXAN Photo/Todd Bailey)
FBI agents knock on doors in the neighborhood of the OldFort Hill Drive explosion (KXAN Photo/Todd Bailey)
Members of APD's bomb squad responded to the scene of Monday's earlier package explosioin. (KXAN Photo)
Emergency crews on scene at a fatal explosion in east Austin on Oldfort Hill Drive March 12, 2018 (AFD Photo)
Emergency crews on scene at a fatal explosion in east Austin on Oldfort Hill Drive March 12, 2018 (AFD Photo)
Man dies after device detonates on his front porch on Haverford Drive on March 2, 2018. (KXAN Photo)
Man dies after device detonates on his front porch on Haverford Drive on March 2, 2018. (KXAN Photo)
Police investigate an explosion at a neighborhood in northeast Austin March 2, 2018 (KXAN Photo/Arezow Doost)
ATF truck at the deadly explosion on Haverford Drive in Austin on March 2, 2018. (KXAN Photo/Todd Bynum)
ATF agents tagging evidence at a home on Haverford Drive in Austin where an explosion occurred. (KXAN Photo/Todd Bynum)
Door and patio of a home on Haverford Drive still cordoned off on Saturday, March 3, 2018 after a device detonated, killing a man on March, 2, 2018. (KXAN Photo/Tim Holcolmbe)
Police investigate an explosion at a neighborhood in northeast Austin March 2, 2018 (KXAN Photo/Arezow Doost)
Police investigate an explosion at a neighborhood in northeast Austin March 2, 2018 (KXAN Photo/Arezow Doost)
Police investigate an explosion at a neighborhood in northeast Austin March 2, 2018 (KXAN Photo/Arezow Doost)
Police investigate an explosion at a neighborhood in northeast Austin March 2, 2018 (KXAN Photo/Arezow Doost)
Home explosion on Haverford Lane in northeast Austin injures one on March 2, 2018. (KXAN Photo/Chris Davis)
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