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The Sunshine Crop Sweater pattern from Knitting with Chopsticks is an easy, beginner friendly, oversize sweater knitting pattern. Made with worsted weight cotton yarn, it is a perfect sweater for those cold summer evenings. A neutral main color, with a touch of bright contrasting color is the perfect combination to go with high-waisted shorts or a pair of jeans.

The loose knit sweater is worked in 4 pieces (front, back, and each sleeve) and then sewed together. Only the knit and purl stitches are used as well as simple decreases and increases. You don’t need to be an expert to make this sweater!

Head to her blog for all the details!

[Photo: Knitting with Chopsticks.]

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If you were on the Internet over the weekend you might have seen a video or news story about the Heavy Metal World Knitting Championships, which took place last week in Finland.

From the look of things, the event may have been even stranger than you would think from the name. People dressed as sumo wrestlers, in dresses that looked like wedding gowns and other wild attire banged their heads to the music while knitting.

According the AP story linked above, Finland has the highest number of heavy metal bands per capita (at more than 50 bands per 100,000 people) and there are tons of knitters, too.

The competition’s website says

Knitting to the rhythm of heavy metal music can be compared to playing air guitar – which is a Finnish way to goof around as well. In heavy metal knitting, the knitter becomes a part of the band, showing their best needlework tricks as the heavy riffs echo on the background. The knitter takes part in the jam while their balls of yarn and knitting needles swish through the air…

Competitors from nine countries took to the stage to stitch and thrash, with the Japanese team Giga Body Metal coming out the winner. I don’t know how the winner was determined or what the prize is, other than that cool trophy, and getting to say you’re a world champion of heavy metal knitting, which I guess is prize enough.

[Photo via Heavy Metal Knitting.]

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Knitting has been used as a way to visualize data in lots of different ways, from temperature and mood scarves to how long the train takes or how much men talk in meetings.

But this is next-level tracking right here. Seung Lee tracked his newborn son’s sleep patterns in six-minute increments for his first year of life, then made a double-knit blanket to visualize the data.

Yes, white is when he was awake.

The whole process is laid out in a thread on Twitter, and it’s amazing. I kind of wish I’d thought of it but I was so sleep deprived I couldn’t even imagine something creative to do with it.

This is an amazing keepsake that literally represents the entire first year of life. He says the actual knitting took about 300 hours, which does not count time spent planning, tracking or developing the pattern.

But as you’ll see if you click over, his son loves it, which is the most important thing.

[Photo: Seung Lee via Twitter.]

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The knitter known as Nixknittingsticks shared this with us:

I recently had a few requests to design a Mr Ray the Stingray from the Finding Nemo and Finding Dory movies.
Having already designed knitting patterns for Dory, Baby Dory, Hank the Octopus, Squirt the Turtle and Nemo, I couldn’t resist!
He is the jolly school teacher that jokes around with the children and carries them on his back, all the while singing to them a catchy song to teach them all about the ocean.
The pattern is worked flat, seamed and stuffed, the ‘spots’ on the upper body were added on after using duplicate stitch!

You can grab the pattern from LoveCrafts for $3.76.

[Photo: Nixknittingsticks.]

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I know I just said the other day that I am nowhere near done talking about — or knitting — summer projects, but that doesn’t mean we can’t start looking ahead to cooler days just a little bit. Or giving a nod to our friends in the southern part of the world who are cold right now.

The Black Max Shawl pattern by Olga Baklanova caught my eye because it’s a pretty simple looking textured triangle worked in a solid color yarn (though of course you could certainly work it in a tonal or multicolored yarn if you wanted).

It has some yarn overs but nothing you’d call lace, making it a great choice for those who don’t like frills. But it’s still really pretty and looks fun to knit. Best of all, you can grab the free pattern on Ravelry.

[Photo: Olga Baklanova.]

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I love knit bunting, and it’s a pretty quick and easy way to add some color to a space, to decorate for a party with a handmade touch, or just to add a bit of crafty fun wherever you go.

It’s a great summer project, too, because the pieces are small and portable.

This mini triangle bunting pattern from Yarnspirations is extra cute because the triangles are tiny.

Stitch it up in a rainbow of colors, or just your favorites, or whatever little bits you happen to have on hand. It’s so adorable you’re sure to want to keep knitting triangles all season long.

[Photo: Yarnspirations.]

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If you’re new to knitting — or even not that new — and you’re looking for an easy way to improve your knitting skills, you should take some time to learn how to read your knitting if you haven’t already.

Understanding how different stitches look and why they look the way they do makes it easier to catch mistakes and to know how to fix them.

Little Nutmeg Productions has a great post on how to read your knitting complete with lots of photos you can compare to your own knitting. This will not only help you tell your knits from your purls but will also help you see where you increased or decreased stitches (helpful when you need to work a certain number of rows between shaping rows and you don’t know how many you’ve worked).

[Photo: Little Nutmeg Productions.]

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I know, now that the Fourth of July has passed, I’m probably supposed to be writing about fall knitting projects and gearing up for gift knitting and all of that, but no.

We’ve barely even had summer where I live — I think it has rained almost every day of July so far which is just not normal — so I’m going to be knitting and sharing summer knitting projects for a while longer.

The Erie Marsh lace top from Annie Lupton popped up on my Instagram feed not too long ago, and it’s a great top for this time of year. Most of the body is an allover lace pattern with a little solid Stockinette at the top. It’s worked flat from the bottom up and has tank and sleeved options.

Grab the pattern from Ravelry for $6.

[Photo: Annie Lupton/Boho Chic Fiber Co.]

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There are lots of bootie knitting patterns out there, but a lot of them are knit like socks, with small yarn and needles, worked in the round, and rather intimidating to newer knitters.

Gina Michele has a great pattern for slightly heavier weight (they’re still worked with size 4 US needles, so nothing crazy) baby booties worked flat and seamed into a bootie shape after the knitting is done.

They’re really cute, easy and quick to knit for a last-minute shower gift or to make in multiples for your own little one.

[Photo: Gina Michele.]

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I really love the look of the Lesley Tee from Bigger than Life Knits. It looks so fun to wear, and the fit and flare design means it will look great on a lot of different body types.

It’s worked in fingering weight yarn, so it’s not exactly a quick project, but it is a pretty easy one as it’s worked mostly in Stockinette Stitch. The raglan seams are accented with yarn overs and the panels of Stockinette in the skirt are accented with twisted rib.

The pattern can be downloaded from Ravelry for $8.

[Photo: Bigger than Life Knits.]

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