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Cloud Musings by Kevin L. Jackson - 2d ago
by
Kevin L. Jackson & Dez Blanchfield

Today’s real business innovation is happening at the seams of industries. Moreover, after listening to this podcast between Sanjay Rishi, GM Global Cloud Consulting Services at IBM Global Business Services, and Dez Blanchfield, you will understand why Mr. Rishi describes his primary role as delivering cloud enable innovation and transformation

In this fascinating discussion, Sanjay and Dez talk about how organizations embark on cloud journeys through different entry points, namely by:

  • Developing support and engagement systems for customers, employees, and suppliers;
  • Migrating legacy applications into a cloud computing environment;
  • Leveraging exploding technologies like IoT and blockchain to innovate and transform business; and
  • Delivering business ROI with both speed and innovation.

In pursuing this goal of helping his clients strategize on cloud adoption, he has learned many valuable lessons. One of the most important centers around how enterprise leaders miss the role of organizational communications when transformation begins. The issue is that communications is quickly relegated to an afterthought and doesn’t get the correct amount of attention. In his experience, communications and change management are both essential and serve as the difference between success and failure. Sanjay’s guidance is for leaders not to forget that people’s hearts and minds must change if innovation is to deliver business results.

Another insightful nugget from this podcast is Mr. Rishi’s observation on how the CIO role is shifting from IT to business. This position is less about the back office and technology enablement and more about influencing change within organizations and becoming a catalyst for transformation and innovation. The most significant takeaway here is the need for empathy from the standpoint of understanding what challenges a CIO is going through concerning change and the speed with which change can happen. Transformation creates “haves” and “have-nots” in organizations.  Those pulled into the transformation become the “haves,” and then the masses see themselves as the “have-nots.”

Pioneers Of Possible ep. 006 with Sanjay Rishi - GM Global Cloud Consulting Services, IBM GBS - SoundCloud
(1734 secs long, 56841 plays)Play in SoundCloud

People are hungry for inclusion and to be informed even if they do not participate in influencing an organization’s transformation. In sharing these insights, Sanjay Rishi reinforced his observation that the essence of digital transformation lies in relationship innovation (12:12). He even provided two vivid examples, a European TELCO and a Latin American Bank, to drive home the point. In short, by innovating the organization’s relationship with customers, suppliers, stakeholders, and employees, people can be influenced and effectively led through the investment journey needed to harvest cloud-enabled innovation opportunities.

Organizations must come to grips with the reality of two-speed transformation. The first gear of change is incremental and evolutionary while the second revolutionary and built around disruption.  First gear delivers needed enhancements and improvements to the existing business while the second wards off the threat of disruption from smaller players and start-ups. Business success is not about slowing down the rate of change. It is about balancing these two rates of change. The dependencies between the two are very significant, and embracing both is essential for success

Breaking out his crystal ball, Sanjay ended the exchange by telling everyone that the next big thing is an organization’s ability to sense and understand individual behavior in a way that enables the presentation of consumption choices. This vision seems to represent a doubling down on his earlier statements on relationship innovation. According to Mr. Rishi, this capability expands organizations and accelerates life changes for our benefit. Although individual sensing and anticipation of demand certainly has security challenges, he sees the change as positive in that it makes life much more efficient and allows us to harvest the many associated opportunities.


This post was brought to you by IBM Global Technology Services. For more content like this, visit ITBizAdvisor.



( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2016)
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By Kevin Jackson & Dez Blanchfield

Digital Transformation often needs Intelligent Automation. This type of change is the focus of a recent “Pioneers of Possible” podcast.  In discussion with Elli Hurst - Vice President, Global Automation - IBM Global Business Services (GBS), Dez Blanchfield finds out how her life’s journey inspires her in helping IBM clients use Intelligent Automation to enable globally integrated capabilities.

With six years at Price Waterhouse and 24 years at IBM, Elli seems to have moved a long way from her family’s restaurant business. The service industry passion that she learned from her father, however, is still deep in her heart. That care and passion areevident in how she focuses on understanding her client’s desired business outcomes. By using these targeted outcomes as a beacon for every engagement, her team helps clients align and execute on priorities in a manner that delivers a returnon investment in months.

Her being a technology company executive, it is surprising to hear her describe technology as only “table stakes." While recognizing the critical and fundamental role that technology plays, Ms. Hurst prioritizes the need for process and people elements to work together with the technology.  While automation typically starts with a focus on reducing cost, it moves quickly to the delivery of value. Cost efficiencies exist, but value gained by the speed at which an enterprise can perform a business process with high quality is more important than to cost savings. According to her, attaining these types of business outcomes and values stem from a strategy that addresses:
  • Impact onthe business and to the people that are performing work;
  • How people interact with the technology and automation;
  • How people can help enable automation; and
  • What new skill setsare needed.
The answers to these points are the basis for a successful Digital Workforce Strategy.
Organizations often err by trying to automate what people do.  Ms. Hurst’s insight is in knowing that automation should be designed to assist people in what they do which represents the real secret to bringing automation forward into the enterprise. Automation always impacts a workforce and jobs always change. Business value is released, however, when this change frees up innovation and unveils more exciting projects and tasks for that workforce.



The impact of automation on the workforce is not a bad thing; it is a good thing. Elli recommends “Taking it to the Positive” by getting buy-in and engaging the workforce teams impacted by automation. Experience has taught her that while point solutions may deliver 40% increases in efficiency, used in tandem with a Digital Workforce Strategy, they can simultaneously deliver a 95% increase in employee satisfaction. Establishing and executing that strategy is the key to any transformation that uses automation.

Another one of her telling observations is that automation drives the most significant disruptions to back-office repetitive tasks. By looking at the end-to-end business model through an industry lens, her teams have helped clients to impact the external world beyond the back office and through to the client’s customers. Described as enabling digital experience “concentric circles,” this process enables enrichment of a client’s entire business ecosystem.

The automation conversations usually start in a specific area, like robotic process automation, which has been spurred by a back-office disruption. Addressing any disruption like this requires a strategy because global automation is a journey that aligns business process with rapidly changing technology. The organizational strategy must be able to flex and continuously adapt its strategy. The typical 3-5 year strategy is no longer viable. Intelligent automation demands a “fail fast” strategic approach.

Ms. Hurst ended this fascinating conversation by describing the future of automation as the convergence of all technologies at the enterprise level. In her view, the enablement of self-healing, lights-out, information technology platforms will give business executives the ability to couple an integrated view of all business processes with an ability to take immediate and effective action through mobile devices.


Pioneers Of Possible ep. 005 with Elli Hurst - Vice President, Global Automation - IBM GBS - SoundCloud
(1647 secs long, 57180 plays)Play in SoundCloud


This post was brought to you by IBM Global Technology Services. For more content like this, visit IT Biz Advisor.



( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2016)
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Cloud Musings by Kevin L. Jackson - 1M ago


Over the past few years, the data storage market has changed radically. The traditional hierarchy of directories, sub-directories, and files referred to as file storage has given way to object storage, individual storage objects. While file storage was designed to help humans interact with data, object storage is all about automated efficiency.

User expectation of data usage drives file storage repository design.  In this structured data model, all folders and names are organized to support a pre-defined business process or model. The file system also associates a limited amount of metadata (i.e., file name, creation date, creator, file type) with the saved file. Finding individual files is done either manually or programmatically by working through the hierarchy. The file storage approach works well with data collections but can become very cumbersome as data volume grows.

Object storage, on the other hand, is optimized for an unstructured data model. While this approach is not “human-friendly” it also doesn’t require prior knowledge or expectations of data use. Files are stored as objects in various locations with a unique identifier and a significant amount of metadata. The size of the accompanying metadata can range from kilobytes to gigabytes and often includes a content summary, keywords, key points, comments, locations of associated objects, data protection policies, security, access, geographic locations and more. Enhanced metadata enables a lower level of granularity when protecting, manipulate, and managing stored objects.

Specific business, technology, and economic drivers caused this significant market change. Business drivers include:
  • Rapid growth in amount and importance of unstructured data
  • Need to implement faster data retrieval based on identifying details incorporated in metadata that the operating system reads.
  • The requirementto apply organization to unstructured data resource through the use of text analytics, auto-categorization, and auto-tagging.
  • Increased legal and regulatory requirements for scalable data archiving and e-discovery
  • Enhanced business process and model flexibility enabled by the use of a flat storage structure.
From a technical point of view, object storage is far superior to file systems. This advantage is primarily due to its unlimited scalability and ability to be managed programmatically. It also:
  • Has fewer limitations when compared to the traditional file or block-based systems because of the flat data environment
  • Ability to customize metadata through arbitrary use of any number of data attributes
  • Global accessibility using HTTP(S) and REST APIs


From an economic point of view, object storage is also more cost-effective than file storage solutions, especially when storing large amounts of data. Since object storage solutions efficiently leverage unlimited scalability, organizations find that it is less costly to store all of their data. This advantage also exists in private cloud implementations where costs can be even lower than that provided by public cloud providers. Object storage is also much more durable than file-based alternatives.

The marketplace offers plenty of alternatives when object storage is the right answer. Access protocols, technology, and cost, however, varies widely. As shown in Table 1, storage cost for 1 terabyte of data for one year ranges from a high of $4,300.80 with data striping from QualityTech/QTS to a low of $47.88 from Wasabi that uses a more advanced erasure codingapproach. While location differences cause some cost variation, most of the variation can be attributed to design architecture and underlying storage technology.

Although this market survey is not exhaustive by any means, it highlights the importance of being an educated consumer when considering object storage solutions.  Other solutions aspects worth investigating include:
  • Complexity and performance across provider storage service tiers
  • Data immutability and durability
  • Speed of internal consistency across multiple copies of your data
  • Elapsed time to the delivery of the first byte of requested data
  • Use of active integrity checking
By all objective accounts, object storage is the right storage for large segments of an organization’s data holdings. This reality should lead to more effective due diligence and care when considering your enterprise’s next storage upgrade.




( This content is being syndicated through multiple channels. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of GovCloud Network, GovCloud Network Partners or any other corporation or organization.)
( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2018)
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by Kevin Jackson & Dez Blanchfield

In episode four of the “Pioneers Of Possible” podcast series, Dez Blanchfield caught up with  Max Michaels, General Manager, IBM Network Services in the studio.  Their engaging and insightful discussion included a philosophic story about cooperative deer hunting from Mr. Michaels’ childhood, through to his professional life experiences with a famous former CEO of Pepsico and Westinghouse, both which contributed to the depth and strength Mr. Michaels’ brings to his role and the management of the IBM Network Services business.


Early in the discussion, Max shared an anecdote about how his Grandmother’s personalized retelling of a Jean-Jacques Rousseau's tale circa mid-1700’s, about a group of hunters who elected to collaborate while tracking a large stag, rather than operate independently, influenced him throughout his career. He also recounted how he enjoyed a similarly defining experience working with Michael H. Jordon when the venerable leader was Chairman and CEO of EDS.

Throughout the conversation three endearing characteristics stood out about Max Michaels as a thought leader and innovator - they were:
  • The extent to which he values good business judgment
  • Successes he has earned through unorthodox thinking
  • The critical converging of the IT and networking world
His unorthodox way of thinking was very effectively put into practice while at McKinsey, when in 1996 he led a three-person team, one among some 300 teams worldwide, to win a company-wide competition to generate new client-ready knowledge ideas called the McKinsey Worldwide Practice Olympics. Ranked #1 among 300+ McKinsey teams by showing how to apply the Black-Scholes option trading model to any strategic situation. The critical financial insight behind the Black-Scholes model is that it “eliminates risk” by showing how to buy and sell an underlying asset in just the right way. At McKinsey, Mr. Michaels showed how the identification of the right issues leads to correct strategic actions.

The insight displayed by this win is that the business world is not directly comparable to the financial world. When you invest by buying stock in the financial world, you may have little direct input into what happens to make the stock goes up or down. The business world is entirely different in that when you invest in a new product, strategy or marketing plan, the investor has a continuing opportunity to change the outcome, based on customer perception and preferences change. Throughout the conversation in this episode of the Pioneers of Possible podcast series, this approach to driving successful outcomes turns out to be key to Max Michaels’ leadership style at IBM Network Services, and the genius behind the “Always-on Initiative,” designed to help enterprises support the always-on nature of day-to-day business. The network is the enabling capability for “Always-on” and serves as a foundational element to the convergence between information technology (IT) world and telecommunications (telecom). 


Before this trend took hold, companies ran IT and telecom networks separately and with separate leadership teams. With the intuition gained earlier, Mr. Michaels is now helping IBM customers move away from focusing on IT outcomes and move towards a converged business outcome. This approach, in turn, changes business models in ways which makes it possible for organizations to better leverage the convergence of IT and telecom, both within and external to their organizations.

According to Max, the average person in the US is interacting with the network for 16 hours a day. Businesses, therefore, need to deliver their products and services to these individuals through the network.  Modern business models rely on the network to facilitate seamless connectivity and the convergence of cloud, the new model for delivering IT, and telecom. Networks enable the cloud, and in the next phase of the evolution of digital business and digital transformation, where the cloud, in turn, becomes the network. IBM as a cloud company is leading the way.

This very paradigm is in effect the same core driver behind the transformative effect the cognitive capabilities of IBM Watson has when incorporated into the network and the cloud, an effect as positively disruptive as a driver of change on how we all experience the world around us, both in business and in life. Through the lens of network service, this overarching principal also heightens the importance of network and cloud convergence. The explosion of data the world has experienced over the recent decade has increased the demand for everything to be software-defined, so that compute, storage and networks can all combine into a single entity which provides value to the end user. Network virtualization and software-defined infrastructure are dramatically and fundamentally changing the entire enterprise managed services world and that, in essence, is the definition of the IBM Service Platform with Watson delivers.

Please enjoy this episode of the podcast series. We look forward to your feedback and comments through social media as we continue our journey to introduce you to leading IBM innovators and thought leaders.

Pioneers Of Possible ep. 004 with Max Michaels - General Manager, IBM Network Services - SoundCloud
(2113 secs long, 32604 plays)Play in SoundCloud


This post was brought to you by IBM Global Technology Services. For more content like this, visit ITBizAdvisor.



( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2018)
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Hardware matters. From productivity to security to innovation, make sure your machines can keep up. Intel’s Sarah Wieskus joins The End Point Imperative: A Podcast series from Intel to discuss the importance of stable, optimized hardware in today’s digital world.

Kevin L. Jackson: Hello everyone and welcome to this episode of The Endpoint Imperative, a podcast series from Intel. My name is Kevin L. Jackson, and I will be your host for this series. The topic for this episode is "In A Software World Hardware Does Matter." From security to productivity. With me again is Sarah Wieskus with Intel, Sarah, welcome back.

Sarah: Thank you, Kevin.

Kevin: You know since our last talk, I've been dying to ask you about this migration to Windows 10. Everyone is doing it. And this move to as-a-service models where releases of new features occur two or three times a year is putting everyone in a tizzy. What does this mean for the hardware?

Sarah: Sure, great question. We spend a lot of time with customers helping them with this exact question. Intel is constantly innovating on the hardware side with our business brand of vPro. Again, vPro is our optimized for the business brand of hardware for the environment and enterprise. We are innovating on this platform every year, future proofing it for these new features and new releases, as an example with Windows 10 and Microsoft. Microsoft and Intel have a very collaborative strong relationship. We make sure that everything they would like to enable is supported on the hardware side as well. So that a customer can trust that from end to end, the hardware to the software, that everything is validated, verified and works out of a shoot.

Kevin: With this accelerated pace of updates and feature releases, enterprises need to think about the hardware, about how to support this new steady cadence of continued innovation. Is that about the size of it?

Sarah: Absolutely. We work hand in hand, again, to make sure the features that they are enabling every six months, so when these releases come out, run best in the enterprise, on top of our hardware. It is an end-to-end story. For example, from a security perspective, because security is one of the many reasons customers are migrating to Windows 10. We have enabled specific hardware attributes that Windows 10 can take advantage of, as an example. And security is so important for the enterprise, and again, is one of those reasons people are refreshing to Windows 10. We're making sure that if a customer is going down that path, that if they chose to run that technology on top of the Intel vPro business brand, that those hardware security elements are complementary with the software.



Kevin: This evolution, though, is accelerating. How is the Intel vPro platform keeping up? What's next?

Sarah: Great question, and as I said earlier, we are innovating on top of this technology every year. And this vPro brand really means four things to the customer. It means that it's going to have the best performance to enable productivity. That it's going to be the most stable solution we have for business. Meaning a unified driver stack. Meaning a more stable firmware. Also, as I mentioned before, that hardware security piece. There are specific hardware security features enabled on the vPro BIOS, as an example. And then finally manageability. With vPro brand we enabled something called "lights out management", or out of band management, so that regardless of the state of the system, you're able to manage that hardware and ensure the platform runs as optimally as possible.

Kevin: You know, unfortunately we're at the end of our time for this episode. But it's really good to know that Intel is making it easy for business, with vPro platform, now and for the future. Thank you, Sarah, for your insights and expertise.

Sarah: Thank you, Kevin.


The Endpoint Imperative Ep.6: In a Software World, Hardware Does Matter - SoundCloud
(336 secs long, 7693 plays)Play in SoundCloud

( This content is being syndicated through multiple channels. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of GovCloud Network, GovCloud Network Partners or any other corporation or organization.)





( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2018)
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Cloud Musings by Kevin L. Jackson - 1M ago

Credit: Shutterstock

by Kevin Jackson & Dez Blanchfield

IBM recently launched an exciting new project in the form of a podcast series produced and hosted Dez Blanchfield, appropriately titled the “Pioneers Of Possible. This new podcast series sets out to connect listeners from around the world with innovators and thought leaders within IBM’s Global Technology Services (GTS) and Global Business Services (GBS) business units worldwide.

Each episode offers a “fireside chat” between Dez Blanchfield the host, one of an exciting lineup of IBM GTS & GBS subject matter experts, all of whom are currently very actively engaged in the challenges associated with leading and delivering the future today. Though its initial three episodes, the show focused on connecting listeners with IBM’s subject matter experts. Getting to know these leaders personally and professionally is an important goal because, in their roles, they drive the trends, disruptions, and transformations we see across many industries today.


In episode one of the series Mickey Iqbal, IBM Fellow -Global Lead for GTS Enterprise IT Transformation Advisorsstates “In today’s world, businesses are faced with the challenge of keeping up with the accelerating rate of change.” Dez Blanchfield likened this to leaders needing to sprint just to keep up. Running in multiple lanes, in multiple races simultaneously. A key message throughout this episode in the series is that in today’s increasingly competitive environment, success lies in an organization’s ability to create new ideas and solve problems and selecting the right partner to help them through the business and technology transformation required to achieve the desired outcomes.

In episode two of the series, Nick Fuller, Senior Manager, Cognitive Service Foundations, IBM Research, talks about how “Technology immersion and actively collecting ideas both help.” His impressive professional pedigree coupled with an incredible array of 63 patents certainly give weight to his comments on such matters. In this episode, the discussion included the broad topic of problem-solving in today’s race to leverage cognitive computing and artificial intelligence. He posits that a multi-step process is required, including:

  • Stepping back to look at critical conditions and parameters;
  • Avoiding analysis paralysis at all cost;
  • Not being afraid to put a stake in the ground in defining a new paradigm or solution; and
  • Remaining open to repeatedly trying new ideas;
  • Do not fear “failing fast.”

In episode three we hear from Bridget Karlin, CTO, and VP of GTS, Innovation & Automation, Global Technology Services, that “If businesses are looking to innovate during transformation, that the typical path is through the application of advanced technology in the delivery of new business values and opportunities.” Bridget and Dez discuss how this observation explains why IBM GTS is so focused on technology vision and thought leadership.  In particular, Bridget outlines IBM, in this pursuit, are developing an end-to-end framework for infusing artificial intelligence into all of their new technology capabilities.

Thus far in the series, our SME’s have offered listeners tuning in an amazing look into their personal lives, professional career paths, and their roles with IBM. A key theme throughout thus far has been that IBM’s Cognitive Technology Service Platform, known as Watson, brings significant business and technical competitive value to organizations in the exciting array of new business and service capabilities it can enable.


As a transformative company itself, IBM has moved from a systems integrator model to a service integration model that is led by technology. IBM’s focus on using their digital transformation to improve the way IBM delivers services is what led to the Watson service delivery platform. This offering infuses artificial intelligence derived insights from Watson into the IBM service delivery process. In doing this, IBM leverages open source and best of breed technologies to deliver rapid outcomes. This approach also focuses on building and maintaining a service delivery ecosystem.


This post was brought to you by IBM Global Technology Services. For more content like this, visit IT Biz Advisor.



( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2016)
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Workplace expectations are changing, and along with them, the devices we use to do our jobs. In this episode of "The End Point Imperative", Intel’s Sarah Wieskus tells us about how Intel is driving better user interface and performance while continuing to driving enhanced security and manageability.

Kevin L. Jackson: Hi everyone and welcome to this episode of The Endpoint Imperative, a podcast series from Intel. My name is Kevin L. Jackson and I'm your host for the series. The topic for this episode is "A Form Factor Renaissance". With me, is Sarah Wieskus the Enterprise Sales Director with Intel. Sarah, welcome.

Sarah Wieskus:Thank you, Kevin.

Kevin: Let's talk today about the changing expectations around technology in the workplace. How is Intel driving the user experience and performance while continuing to drive and enhance security manageability? In the US, in fact, mobile workers are projected to account for more than 70% of their workforce. They're really a digital native, younger and more demanding workforce. Can you tell us about the consumerization of IT?

Sarah: Sure, Kevin. An example of that was several years ago when many consumers received amazing, thin and light, instantly connected, instantly available devices at home. They wanted to bring those into work and use them because their work devices were thicker, not as fast, not as easily connected, et cetera. IT then had to figure out how they take a consumer device and manage it in the enterprise, secure it, connect it, make sure peripherals would work with it and also, make sure the enterprise applications would even run on these consumer-type devices. Now fast forward to today we see what's almost called a consumerization of IT 2.0 where it's not about the device because there's many, many thin, light and instantly on and instantly available devices that are enterprise grade in the workplace. It’s really about the experiences that are happening at home that we want to leverage in the enterprise.

I have three examples. Example number one. Many of us use our thumb to log in to our phones at home or use our face to log in to our computers at home but then we go to work and we have to put in many passwords into many different systems and applications and websites. These passwords can get lost and stolen and forgotten. It’s much much more efficient to use your finger or your face as an example to connect to those devices at work. 

The Endpoint Imperative, Ep. 5: A Form Factor Renaissance - SoundCloud
(464 secs long, 7768 plays)Play in SoundCloud


Another example is when we talk about having web meetings at home. Instantly with a push of a button on my phone, on my devices at home, I can connect to my friends and family very easily, see them, talk to them, with pretty good quality, but when I go to work to have a web meeting it's very complex, it's not easy to connect and you sacrifice on quality. Why is that? 

Then finally, many of us, at home are using assistive technology. That’s what we call it. Where it's technology in the room, your kitchen, your living room that you talk to, and you ask the device to help you with turning the lights on and off, advancing the music on your phone and advancing the music on your stereo. This assistive technology, I'll call her a she, will help you at work as well. Why is it when you come to work you don't have that type of experience in the space you're working in? Wouldn't it be great to walk into a conference room for example, and tell her, "Turn the lights on", "Connect to a projector", "Take notes for me"? From a high level, it's all about how do we enable some of those amazing technologies that make us more efficient, more collaborative at home and bring that into work?

Kevin: Yes, I really see myself in each of those examples. Tell me, how has Intel really amp'ed up their innovation to develop these end user devices for work?

Sarah: Well, Kevin, it takes a village. It's not something we can do by ourselves. Intel spends a lot of time working with ecosystem partners to make something like that happen at work. We have to work with the numerous software providers, numerous other technologies to make those kinds of things happen and to make them easy, that is a major key as well.

People don't care about how it works in the back-end, they just want to push a button and it works. They want to work all the time reliably and that's not an easy thing to accomplish when you are talking about a complex environment with different types of software technologies, different types of hardware technologies, different types of infrastructure that you have at work.

Kevin: You've referenced the back-end but for IT team that's their job so what does it really mean for the IT team? They used to be able to dictate the hardware and software that was used.

Sarah: Yes that is true. What we've really focused on is how can we enable those technologies and make it easy for IT. Intel has a platform brand called the vPro For Business. This brand means that all the necessary performance technologies, manageability technologies, security technologies, stability technologies are there. We're working really hard to enable these consumer-like experiences at work on top of that vPro platform brand. That way IT knows that, "Hey, vPro is here so I know this is the most secure, manageable, efficient platform for these experiences to essentially write on top of." We want to make it that easy for them, that they can look at a brand and just know that they can bank on that for business.

Kevin: We can really look to Intel to help them. Unfortunately, we're at the end of our time for this episode but thanks to Sarah with Intel for her insights and expertise.

Sarah: Thank you.





( This content is being syndicated through multiple channels. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of GovCloud Network, GovCloud Network Partners or any other corporation or organization.)





( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2016)
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The enterprise data storage marketplace is poised to become a battlefield. No longer the quiet backwater of cloud computing services, the focus of this global transition is now going from compute to storage. An overview of recent storage market history is needed to understand why this transition is important.


Before 2007 and the birth of the cloud computing market we are witnessing today, the on-premise model hosted in large local data centers dominated enterprise storage.  Key marketplace players were EMC (before the Dell acquisition), NetApp, IBM, HP (before they became HPE) and Hitachi. Company employees managed information technology resources (compute, storage, network) and companies tightly controlled their data in facilities they managed. Data security, legal and regulatory concerns, for the most part, were very localized. The data itself was highly structured (i.e., Relational Databases and SQL) in support of serially executed mostly static business processes. This structured approach worked because consumer segments in most industries were homogeneous, segregated and relatively static.  Companies also felt relatively safe in their industry vertical due to the high financial and operational barriers prospective new competitive entrants would face.


On March 13, 2006, Amazon Web Services launched Simple Storage Service (S3). Although not widely appreciated at the time, that announcement was the launch of Cloud Storage 1.0 and heralded a gradual but steady global adoption of cloud-basedstorage services. Surveys show that by 2016 approximately 30% of all businesses had transitioned to cloud-based storage.  Although cloud compute service and application management were the primary reason for migrating to the cloud, the rapid growth of unstructured data (Social media, Hadoop, Big Data Analytics) significantlyheightened the importance of cloud-based storage. Rapidly changing business processes that increased the need to target smaller consumer segments (localization, online retail) also contributed to rapid data growth and breadth.  Over time Google, Microsoft, Rackspace, and other cloud storage vendors entered the market. Coincident with the transition to cloud storage, international data security, legal and regulatory concerns also grew. Even though the daily news greeted everyone with multiple high profile data breaches and data loss incidents, fines were minimal and very few mandatory notification laws existed. Cloud storage technology was characterized by:
  • Implemented through a 2005-2008 technology base;
  • Primarily being hosted on Linux or Windows operating systems;
  • The use of proprietary, incompatible and competing APIs;
  • The vendor selection also threatened vendor lock-in;
  • Additional charges for data manipulation activity (puts, gets, deletes);
  • A continuing requirement to manage multiple storage options and pricing tiers.

As if this was not challenging enough, vertical industry barriers were shattered by digital transformation and the elimination of significant startup capital investment requirements.

As we all prepare the champagne and noisemakers for the birth of 2018, Cloud Storage 2.0 is already with us. Massive transition to cloud computing has commoditized storage.  Industry observers’ expectations storage to become an IT utility.  Increased data volumes and the sourcing of unstructured data (Crowdsourcing, Social Media Analytics) have elevated the importance of previously benign enterprise storage technology decisions. Many business processes are now expected to be dynamically executed in a parallel fashion (Agile business, Social Media Customer Service). Blended consumer segments and need to target and satisfy individual consumers is common. There are also significant changes on the data security front. These changes include:
  • Significant fines for data loss or breach;
  • Mandatory data breach reporting laws; and
  •  Heightened international data security, privacy, legal and regulatory concerns (i.e., National data sovereignty Laws, BREXIT and EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR))

Webinar: Cloud Storage 2.0 – Storage for the Big Data and Digital Transformation Era - YouTube

Corporate risk introduced by these dramatic changes means that cloud storage vendors need to drastically up their game as well. Customers no longer want to deal with continually balancing between the cost to store data and the risk associated with intentional deletion. In fact, expanding legal and regulatory requirements are now the driving force behind operational needs to execute real-time retrieval of complex data assets (i.e., biometrics, social media analytics, dynamic data streams). These needs mean that Cloud storage 2.0 minimum requirements now include:
  • Using new and improved purpose-built operating systems;
  • Native control of storage disk for higher density and faster access speed;
  • Solutions optimized for the storage and analysis of unstructured data;
  • Significant reduction of multiple storage tiers and options;
  • Elimination of separate charges for data manipulation activity (puts, gets deletes);
  • Storage immutability (data or objects cannot be unintentionally modified after creation);
  • Significantly reduced pricing; and
  • Use of standards-basedinterface APIs.

 

These are the many reasons why enterprises must think before accepting storage services from the current cloud industry leaders. Don’t settle for a Cloud Storage 1.0 band-aid when you should buy a Cloud Storage 2.0 solution. When your team is evaluating options:
  • Compare access speeds and select the vendor that can offer the fastest possible access;
  • Use storage with a pricing structure that allows you to retain all of your data for as long as needed;
  • Make sure your company is ready to meet the new data security regulations;
  • Choose cloud storage that is inter-operable across the most extensive ecosystem (partners, storage applications, formats); and
  • Always evaluate the solution’s scalability, durability, immutability, and legal compliance capabilities.


Change is happening now so don’t get fooled!

( This content is being syndicated through multiple channels. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of GovCloud Network, GovCloud Network Partners or any other corporation or organization.)





( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2017)
Follow me at http://Twitter.com/Kevin_Jackson
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( This content is being syndicated through multiple channels. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of GovCloud Network, GovCloud Network Partners or any other corporation or organization.)





( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2017)
Follow me at http://Twitter.com/Kevin_Jackson
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Digital Transformation is the No 1 priority for organizations large and small. It’s imperative that IT remove any obstacles to digital transformation success – including outdated PCs and mobile devices. Intel’s Kaitlin Murphy has some pointers to assure that your PC fleet and mobile devices are not your Digital Transformation Stumbling Blocks.

Kevin: Hello everyone and welcome to this episode of "The Endpoint Imperative" podcast series from Intel. My name is Kevin L. Jackson and I'm your host for this series. This episode's topic is identifying and overcoming digital transformation stumbling blocks. With me is Kaitlin Murphy, director of marketing for business clients at Intel. Kaitlin it's great to have you back.

Kaitlin: Thanks, I'm glad to be back.

Kevin: In my last episode I was talking with Yasser Rasheed, and he told us about how the IT security model is changing. Earlier you had talked about even more than that is changing, and that the PC is at the center of what's being called digital transformation. Can you tell us more about that?

Kaitlin: Sure. One of the core tenets of digital transformation is building in digital environment, where employees can work wherever they want, whenever they want, and however they want. To some degree that means using the technology they want, which includes the PC. The PC is a very personal device and it's heavily relied upon on a daily basis. In fact, there was a recent global survey that said 95% of respondents chose the PC if they could only have one device to use during the workday. So, for lots of employees the PC is the thing that they need to be productive. It's literally the gateway to access everything. The tools, the apps, and data and then to be able to do things with it, not to mention communicate with others.

It isn't just a consumption device, it's a creation device too. And with each generation of new platform, new features, new enhancements are introduced, and they help employees to be able to perform the way they want. Delivering performance improvements and security improvements too. It also benefits IT and they've realized the importance of prioritizing the new devices in the transformation, so that they can take advantage of those capabilities.

The Endpoint Imperative, Ep. 4: ID’ing and Overcoming the Stumbling Blocks to Digital Transformation - SoundCloud
(340 secs long, 7674 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Kevin: Can we zoom in on this migration to Windows 10. What does that mean to the organizations in their digital transformation?

Caitlin: The moving to Windows 10 a new hardware is one of the quickest and easiest ways to take advantage of the best of both worlds. New hardware in conjunction with the new software delivers the best performance, the best security, and ultimately the best experience, both for end users and for IT organizations. And Intel powered devices are a great way to unlock that premium performance, for things like mobility, touch and workloads. Think about battery life, you can literally have a battery that lasts you all day. You're not tethered to your desk or to a power cord. Then there's multitasking. We all multitask, and the performance today allows people to be running multiple things at the same time and not be slowed down.

Not to mention there's huge enhancements with the introduction of Windows 10. Just think of the optimization in 365 and all the touch capabilities. Especially with the tight development relationship between Intel, Microsoft and OEMs you just can't find a bunch of well integrated devices to meet their needs and how they want to work. Like the two in one options, they have dials and touch and they can use a bunch of different modality based upon what the person is trying to do and how they feel most comfortable doing it.

Kevin: It sounds like a lot of new capabilities for the end users, but what is the biggest challenge you see facing organizations as they ramp up for this transformation?

Kaitlin: For any large-scale transformation is difficult, right? It's complex and it takes time. Not just time to execute but time for the people to adjust as well, and the culture. One big issue we hear about is the proliferation of more devices. How do you secure and manage all of them? So, think about it. Digital transformation is anchored in PC's but it's actually a lot larger than that. It's about building that digital environment. In doing so also involve deploying ambient compute, things like sensors from lighting temperature control, or intelligence in the conference room so that meetings it can start faster and deliver improved collaboration capabilities. Each of these pieces of compute has to be maintained right, both security managed, and that presents a challenge.

Kevin: Wow, sounds like the digital transformation can be really hard for the organization. But now we're out of time for this episode. I'd like to really thank Kaitlin Murphy with Intel, for providing us her insights and expertise. Thanks.

Kaitlin: Thank you.


( This content is being syndicated through multiple channels. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of GovCloud Network, GovCloud Network Partners or any other corporation or organization.)


( Thank you. If you enjoyed this article, get free updates by email or RSS - © Copyright Kevin L. Jackson 2017)
Follow me at http://Twitter.com/Kevin_Jackson
Read Full Article
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