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Hey there, Stranger! Hope you’re  having a great week. It’s been a wonderful two weeks so far because I teamed up with my friend and fellow badass builder, Sarah from The Created Home to bring you the plans and tutorial on our Geometric Furniture Collection. Did you see the Geometric Bookshelf, Concrete and Wood Dining Table, or Concrete and Wood Coffee Table? We’re back to share the matching DIY Concrete and Wood Side Table today!


I just love the concrete and wood combo! Grab the plans below and stop by The Created Home to read all about Sarah’s build process. She shares a ton more photos and helpful tips. She’s also working on a dedicated post on how she made that beautiful concrete top, so stay tuned for that. In the meantime, you can check out this video on how to make a concrete table top by DIY Pete.

Don’t you just love those mitered joints? When you have mitered joints like the ones in this table base, it’s best to “size the end grain” for the strongest joint. To do so, simply dilute wood glue with a 50:50 ratio with water and brush this mixture onto the end grains. Once the end grain is dry, you can apply the glue at full strength and join the mitered edges. This will help create a stronger mitered joint.

Thanks for dropping by! Be sure you check out the other pieces in this Geometric Collection! If you build any of the pieces in this series, we’d love to see them. Please tag us on social media so we can see your creations!

The post DIY Concrete and Wood Side Table appeared first on The House of Wood.

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Hi friends! We’re back to share another new piece in the Geometric Collection! I collaborated with incredible and talented Sarah from The Created Home on this furniture collection and have been loving every piece so far! The concrete and wood combo is such a dream, isn’t it? Take a look at the matching Geometric Bookshelf or Geometric Concrete and Wood Dining Table.


This DIY Concrete and Wood Coffee Table is such a chunky beauty, isn’t it? We’ve got you covered on the plans below, but be sure to check out The Created Home for a full step-by-step rundown of the process. Sarah is also working on a dedicated post on how she made that gorgeous concrete top. In the meantime, you can check out this helpful video tutorial by DIY Pete.

One important thing to mention when working with mitered joints, like the ones in this coffee table… to create a strong mitered joint, you’ll want to “size the end grains.” To do so, simply dilute wood glue with water at a 50:50 ratio and brush this mixture onto the end grains. Once the end grain is dry to the touch, you can apply the glue at full strength and join the mitered edges.

Thanks for visiting! We’ll be sharing the matching side table later this week, so stay tuned for that! Happy building!

The post DIY Concrete and Wood Coffee Table appeared first on The House of Wood.

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Hello again! I’m excited to share the second piece in this Geometric Furniture Collection! If you missed the first one in this series, the Geometric Bookshelf, you can go back and see it here. Sarah from The Created Home never ceases to amaze me with her mad maker skills! Grab the plans below and visit The Created Home to see Sarah’s process for making this DIY concrete and wood dining table.


When you have mitered joints like the ones in this table base, it’s best to “size the end grain” for the strongest joint. To do so, simply dilute wood glue with a 50:50 ratio with water and brush this mixture onto the end grains. Once the end grain is dry, you can apply the glue at full strength and join the mitered edges. This will help create a stronger mitered joint.

Sarah is working on a dedicated post on how she made the concrete table top, but in the meantime, my friend DIY Pete has a thorough and informative video tutorial on how to make a concrete table top here.

This concrete table top will be super heavy (over 400 pounds!), so be sure to recruit some help with lifting the table top onto the base. Stay tuned for the last two pieces in this Geometric Collection – we’ll be sharing the matching coffee and side tables next week!

The post DIY Concrete and Wood Dining Table appeared first on The House of Wood.

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Hooo boy, am I excited to share these next few projects with you!!! Once again, I teamed up with the incredible Sarah from The Created Home on these next few builds. Remember her? I mean, how could you forget? She built this gorgeous round dining table out of reclaimed wood and tackled this intricate fretwork console table… oh, yes. It’s always a special treat when I get to work with Sarah because she turns out something absolutely amazing every time. This DIY geometric bookshelf is no exception. This is the first of several pieces in this geometric collection. We’ll be sharing the coordinating dining, coffee, and side table soon, so stay tuned for that! But for now, feast your peepers on this striking statement piece:


So, so good, right?! I’m literally dyyying over here! I’m not even exaggerating. I mean… CAN. YOU. EVEN?!?!

I’m dead.
In fact, I’m writing this post from the grave.


I know you want NEED this beautiful thing in your own home. And you can have it! Grab the plans below and head over to The Created Home to see how Sarah built this DIY geometric bookshelf. She’s got a ton more photos and step-by-step tips and tricks to help you make your own. And be sure to follow Sarah and me on Instagram to see sneak peeks of our other collaborations. We’ll be sharing the coordinating pieces this week and next, so you don’t want to miss it!

The post DIY Geometric Bookshelf appeared first on The House of Wood.

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Hi friends! I am THRILLED to share the plans for this DIY Wood and Steel Coffee Table with you today! I teamed up with my good friends, Ashley and Whitney from Shanty 2 Chic, as well as the awesome folks at Lincoln Electric and Purebond Plywood to bring you this beautiful project! Feast your eyes on this rustic industrial gorgeousness:


I am IN LOVE! And can you believe we welded that steel base?!?! We are no longer just woodworkers, folks! We have added welding to our proverbial toolbox! Welding is something I’ve been meaning to learn, but have previously been a bit intimidated by the whole thing because… oh, you know… FIRE and ELECTRICITY. I’m happy to report that welding is not as scary and as inaccessible as I expected!

I first dipped my toe into welding when I met the folks at Lincoln Electric at a conference. They had a welding booth set up and they allowed us to demo their welding machines. After an afternoon of MIG and TIG welding, I was hooked! Welding has opened up a whole new medium for me. Did you see the DIY entertainment center I just built? That steel base was my very first welding project!


This DIY wood and steel coffee table was SUCH a fun collaboration! I drove up to Fort Worth to visit Ashley and Whitney, gave them a crash course in TIG welding, and this coffee table is what we made together! The top is made from Purebond Plywood and the base is mild steel square tubing. If you’ve spent any amount of time around here, you already know that Purebond is our favorite plywood for many reasons. It’s environmentally responsible, formaldehyde-free, and made in the US. Purebond is my go-to plywood whenever I’m building furniture. And I designed this coffee table so you’re only using a single sheet of plywood!


Let’s talk about this Lincoln Electric Power MIG 140MP welding machine for a minute. If there’s one welding machine you should get, it’s this one. The Power MIG 140MP is incredibly affordable compared to other welding machines and it’s also quite versatile. It’s a 3-in-1 machine that has the capability to do MIG, Stick, and TIG welding and it runs off of standard household 120V power! There’s a chart right on the machine that literally tells you what settings to use with which material – it takes the guesswork right out of the equation.

Keep in mind – Ashley and Whitney learned how to TIG weld and we welded this steel base in the same afternoon! So, if you’ve ever been hesitant about learning how to weld, we’re here to encourage you! You can do it!


WHERE TO BUY METAL
  • Local Metal Supply Shops
    • Pros: least expensive, they will cut everything to lengths for a small fee, lots of scraps you can get for cheap.
    • Cons: they cater to a professional crowd, so you may need to find someone with a little patience to help you find the best type of material for your project.
  • Online Metal Supermarkets
    • Pros: they’ll cut and deliver anything you want, and because they typically use machines, the cuts are precise.
    • Cons: can be expensive and most of their websites are a little clunky. You need to know exactly what you’re looking for.
  • Home Improvement Stores
    • Pros: easily accessible and readily available
    • Cons: most expensive and they usually only offer shorter lengths (nothing over 5 feet)

Here’s a helpful article I wrote on how I clean and prep steel for TIG welding.


Be sure to watch the fun videos we made! And don’t forget to stop by Shanty 2 Chic to see more of this build! Are you ready to build this DIY Wood and Steel Coffee Table for yourselves? Grab the plans below!

How to Weld! - YouTube

DIY Wood & Metal Coffee Table - YouTube


*Special thanks to Lincoln Electric and Purebond Plywood for sponsoring this project! And big hugs to Shanty 2 Chic for their wonderful hospitality and collaboration! All efforts, opinions, and victory dances are our own.

The post DIY Wood and Steel Coffee Table appeared first on The House of Wood.

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It must be baby season, because a lot of my friends and family are having babies these days! What better way to celebrate their sweet blessings than to make them handmade keepsake gifts? These DIY personalized wooden name puzzles make adorable baby shower gifts! I’m excited to be teaming up with Inventables on this project – I couldn’t have made this darling puzzle without my X-carve 3D carving machine.


These wooden puzzles are not only cute, but tactile too! A great alternative to the basic plastic alphabet puzzles you see, right? As a homeschooling mama, I love that these DIY wood puzzles can be an effective learning tool for young minds – this baby will be spelling her name in no time!


This baby name puzzle project is easy to do with the X-carve. I opened up my laptop and fired up Easel, the web-based software that Inventables created. It’s simple to use and fairly intuitive. Easel has several different apps built into the program, including the Inlay Generator app, which is what I used for this project. The Inlay Generator creates both the cutout and the pocket parts, taking the guesswork out so the puzzle fits nicely into the pocket. After pulling my design into Easel, I selected it and clicked on App > Inlay Generator > Select Bit Size (1/8″) > Tolerance (I used the default 0.003). It created the design for me, so I just selected my material, specified the dimensions, selected the bit I was using (1/8″ straight bit), and hit “carve.”


I experimented with different bits in the simulation mode to see which one would give me the best result, in the least amount of time. Since I was using 1/2-inch birch plywood, I found that the 1/8″ straight bit was the best choice. The puzzle took about an hour and a half to carve completely. Then, after a quick sanding with a 220-grit sanding block and a coat of Danish oil, this baby name puzzle was good to go!


If you’re interested in taking your woodworking to the next level, check out the Inventables X-carve 3D carving machine. The X-carve comes in 3 different sizes: 500mm, 750mm, and 1000mm (I have the 1000mm machine). You’ll find a lot of different carving materials, bits, and accessories on the site as well. And if you’d like to try your hand at designing using Easel, it’s completely free to use! You can browse through other users’ projects and even create your own to share within the Inventables community.

I can’t wait to make more of these DIY baby name puzzles for my friends. In fact, I’d better get back to it. If you need me, I’ll be stationed at my X-carve, completely mesmerized as I watch it do its magic!

The post Personalized Baby Name Puzzle appeared first on The House of Wood.

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If you follow me on Instagram, you know I just recently learned how to weld! And it’s not as intimidating as I thought! It does take a bit of prep work, though. The best welds come from clean metal to metal contact; any foreign materials in the welding area can cause welding imperfections. The steel is usually greasy, grimy, and covered in rust and mill scale when you get it from the metal supply shop, so you’ve got to clean the steel before you can begin welding. Whenever you’re TIG welding, everything needs to be clean – from the metal to the torch and everything in between. Here’s my typical prep work routine.


Supplies: Where To Buy Metal
  • Local Metal Supply Shops
    • Pros: least expensive, they will cut everything to lengths for a small fee, lots of scraps you can get for cheap.
    • Cons: they cater to a professional crowd, so you may need to find someone with a little patience to help you find the best type of material for your project.
  • Online Metal Supermarkets
    • Pros: they’ll cut and deliver anything you want, and because they typically use machines, the cuts are precise.
    • Cons: can be expensive and most of their websites are a little clunky. You need to know exactly what you’re looking for.
  • Home Improvement Stores
    • Pros: easily accessible and readily available
    • Cons: most expensive and they usually only offer shorter lengths (nothing over 5 feet)

How To Clean Steel For TIG Welding

Use an angle grinder with a 60- or 80-grit flap disc and grind off the mill scale until you get down to bright, shiny metal. You don’t need to clean off the entire bar, though – just clean the joints where you’re going to weld. Then use a rag and wipe the metal down with acetone to remove any remaining grease or oils.


How To Sharpen the Tungsten Electrode

In order to get the best weld and set yourself up for success, you’ll need to prepare the tungsten electrode by sharpening it to a pencil point. You can use a bench grinder for this, but be sure that the grinding wheel is clean so you don’t risk contaminating the tungsten with whatever is on the wheel. If possible, designate a dedicated wheel just for sharpening your tungsten.


Turn the grinding wheel on and let it get up to speed, hold the tip of the the tungsten to the wheel lengthwise, and slowly rotate it to sharpen it to a point. Try not to hold the tungsten crosswise against the grinding wheel or you’ll grind microscopic ridges into the electrode, which can restrict the welding current and cause the arc to wander as you’re welding. Once the electrode is sharpened, wipe it down with some acetone. It’s also a good practice to sharpen several electrodes so you have some ready on-hand in case one gets contaminated. It makes switching out the tungsten electrode much faster and more efficient.


Prep the Filler Rod

You’ll also want to remove any oils or contaminants from the filler rod, so lightly sand it with a fine grit sandpaper, then wipe it down with acetone as well.


Now that the tungsten electrode, steel, and filler rod is clean and prepped, you’re ready to start TIG welding! Check out the fun video I did with the sisters from Shanty 2 Chic. I haven’t been welding long, but I wanted to show you how easy it is to start welding projects, even as a beginner! I drove up to their workshop in Fort Worth, gave them a crash course in TIG welding, and we welded this coffee table base! Plans for the coffee table are coming soon, so stay tuned for that!

How to Weld! - YouTube

The post TIG Welding Prep Work appeared first on The House of Wood.

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*This post is sponsored by The Home Depot.

Hey House of Wood readers, this is Adam writing to tell you about a few new products we received from The Home Depot recently. From time to time when Jen receives products that I really like, I “borrow” them from her. Here are a few really handy tools that have quickly become my favorites.

First up is the MILWAUKEE 500-LUMEN LED PIVOTING RECHARGEABLE FLASHLIGHT. Now I know Jen has told you how I like to be prepared at all times. I’ve made survival kits for each of our cars and I always have a pocket knife (or three) and a flashlight on my person. In my car, I keep a second flashlight and this little Milwaukee just became my favorite one for the car. It’s got three power settings, spot (500 lumens for 2.5 hours), High flood (400 lumens for 3 hours), and Low flood (100 lumens for 10 hours).

I find it really handy that I can use the lower power setting and go longer between charges. Oh, and did I mention that it’s rechargeable? The REDLITHIUM USB battery is charged internally with micro-USB cable from USB power source or AC outlet. It comes with a 2 ft. job-site tough, braided micro-USB cable with metal ends, but I use a multi-USB cable in my car that charges my phone and my flashlight simultaneously. You can also switch the battery with a fresh one allowing even less down time for extended use.

So all that stuff is convenient, smart, and useful, but let me tell you what I LOVE most about this little light. It has a magnetic base that lets me set it down and work with both hands and still have my workspace illuminated. The head swivels so I can direct the light where I want it.

I have a lot of flashlights – I have no less than a dozen name brand high end flashlights that I’ve acquired over the years in the Army, but the Milwaukee 500 lumen LED pivoting rechargeable flashlight is the one I keep in my car now.

The Milwaukee 100 ft. chalk reel seems ginormous to me, but this isn’t your standard chalk reel. I’m used to using a small chalk reel that fits in a tool belt and this one is definitely a touch too big for that. Jen and I will be putting this monster to use on our first big project after we move next month – we’re going to build Jen a detached workshop and I’m pretty sure we’ll be using this ginormous chalk reel as we are laying in the bottom plate. This chalk reel will come in handy with its 100-foot line and 18 oz. chalk capacity. We would have loved to have this thing when we were building our neighbors a floating deck and pergola. But stay tuned for a lot more new projects coming up the pipeline with the new house!

I’m a fan of all things Dremel. I don’t use them for nearly as many applications as they are capable, but I love them. We’ve been wanting a DREMEL SAW-MAX 6 AMP VARIABLE SPEED CORDED TOOL KIT for a while so we were really excited to get this one. While I don’t have a project to use this on just yet, I can assure you that Jen has already informed me that we are re-doing the flooring on the ground level of our new house… all of it.  I think this thing will be my go-to tool for trimming the flooring as we are laying it down.

Personally, I plan on doing some work in the basement because rumor has it, I’m finally getting a space that doesn’t become a “photography studio” or “storage for styling props”. A space that I can call my… wait for it… MAN CAVE.

I don’t know if I’ll be putting in a wet-bar (are those still a thing?) or maybe making a bookshelf/secret hidden door that leads to a fireman’s pole a la the Batman television show circa 1966-1968 (Adam West is the best). Regardless, the Dremel Saw-Max is great to use in spaces where a circular saw may be just a bit too bulky to fit. By the way, it can be used for wood, plastic, metal, tile, and masonry and it does plunge cuts! I’m near certain Jen is going to want to replace perfectly good tile somewhere so that’ll be convenient for me.

We just started welding last year and rather than do anything that makes sense, Jen decided to start learning how to TIG weld. (That Frankenstein square tube stock in the photo above shows our practice welds). Now that Jen is working with metal and welding, I get to do LOTS of prep work which means cutting, grinding, and cleaning the steel.

Traditionally, when you’re cutting metal, there is a tremendous buildup of heat. The metal can easily get to 800 degrees F! The first time I ever saw this blade demoed, the folks at Diablo tossed the freshly cut piece of steel to me and I caught it with my bare hand – it didn’t feel the slightest bit warm!

This DIABLO 7-1/4 IN. X 48-TEETH CERMET STEEL DEMON FERROUS METAL CUTTING SAW BLADE cuts 1/16 in. to 1/4 in. wall thickness in steel studs, angle iron, flat bar, channel, EMT conduit, plate, and bar stock. It also cuts 1/4 in. to 1 in. diameter threaded rod and can handle both mild and stainless steel. I’m really excited about what all this blade can handle because I know of one project Jen has coming up that I can put this to use on and lets just say it’s going to make me sleep a lot easier. Stay tuned for that (pretty sure Jen will be sharing sneak peeks on Instagram, so follow her to get the inside scoop). It’s going to be good.

*I acknowledge that The Home Depot is partnering with me to participate in the ProSpective 2018 Campaign. As a part of the Program, I am receiving compensation in the form of products and services, for the purpose of promoting The Home Depot. All expressed opinions and experiences are my own words. My post complies with the Word Of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) Ethics Code and applicable Federal Trade Commission guidelines. This post contains affiliate links. To read my full disclosure policy, please click here.

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Hi friends! I’m so excited to share a brand new project with free plans with you today! I teamed up with my new friend, Toni from Girl, Just DIY on this DIY Chevron Storage Cabinet. Isn’t it beautiful?! I’ll take two, please.


I’m so happy Toni reached out to me earlier this year – I’m always thrilled to collaborate with such talented builders! Toni was on the hunt for a cabinet with storage to put her in hallway and this is what we came up with. We just love how it turned out!


Be sure to head over to Toni’s post, where she shares her step-by-step process, along with a lot more photos. I can’t wait to see y’all build this DIY storage cabinet for yourselves – that chevron pattern really is a showstopper!

Grab the plans below and please tag us @jenwoodhouse and @girl_justdiy on social media so we can see your projects!

Love this project? PIN IT for later!

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*This post is in partnership with Rockler Woodworking and Hardware.

“Hello, Beautiful.” That’s literally what I say every time I walk by our new DIY Modern Sliding Door Entertainment Center. I’ve been saying it so much recently, it’s starting to get weird.

But can you blame me?
Behold my Magnum Opus:


From the walnut drawers and sleek sliding doors to the welded steel base, I still can’t believe I made this! And all for a little less than $900 in materials. And before you balk at that price tag, keep in mind I opted for the more expensive walnut hardwood plywood. If you use birch or maple, I’d estimate your costs to be about half that. Oh, and expect to drop anywhere from five to eight thousand dollars on the store-bought variety.

No, thanks. I’d much rather build than buy any day of the week.

I really wanted the sliding doors on this entertainment center to be sleek and modern – I didn’t want to use exposed barn door hardware, so I was thrilled to find this low-profile European Style Sliding Door Hardware at Rockler. Because our entertainment center is a massive 126 inches long, I had to order 3 sets and piece together the tracks, since they come 58 inches long. I was a bit nervous about it actually working as intended, but it did! The doors slide quietly and easily and installation was clear and straightforward per the included instructions.

Victory dance!


I worked long and hard on this DIY entertainment center, but the build itself wasn’t very complicated at all. I’d say this is a solid intermediate-level project, but only because there are so many different components. Because we move so often (Army life!), I have to keep things like ‘ease of portability’ in mind and so I drew the plans so that the pieces are modular.


There are the two small end cabinets with drawers, the bookshelf towers that will sit on top of that, the center console with drawers and the TV console, and of course the pièce de résistance: the sliding doors. And we can’t forget about the welded steel base. Of course, you can substitute wood for the base, if you’d prefer, but I recently learned how to weld, so I was pretty excited about incorporating metal into this build!


This was also my first time working with walnut hardwood plywood. One full 4×8-foot 3/4-inch thick sheet ran me about $119 and we picked up 6 sheets from a local lumberyard. The Rockler Material Mate Panel Cart and Shop Stand made it easy to transport full sheets of plywood. We slid the panels directly onto the cart from the back of the truck, tilted the top vertically, and rolled it into my workshop. Once inside my workshop, it took little effort to transfer the plywood from the cart to my workbench. The Material Mate is quickly becoming an essential part of my workshop.


Useful Tools and Shop Helpers: Welding Supplies: Hardware:


The plans include plywood cut layouts as well. When laying out the cuts in the diagrams, I was mindful of the direction of wood grain and tried to maximize material so there’s as little waste as possible.


Per the plans, we cut all of our plywood down to size on the table saw. Be sure to wear a respirator whenever cutting or sanding walnut – dust from walnut is pretty nasty stuff! It’s a common respiratory irritant, so protect those lungs! My favorite dust mask is made by RZ Masks because it’s easy to put on and doesn’t fog up my safety glasses.


Speaking of safety gear – these Microjig push blocks make working on a table saw so much safer! I’m able to maintain more control over my workpiece while still keeping my hands far away from the blade. I almost always use them whenever I work on the table saw.


If you watch my Instagram stories, you’ll know how much I love this miter saw blade. It’s the Diablo 12-inch 100-tooth miter saw blade. The cuts are so clean and precise that sanding is minimal to none! It works particularly well for plywood too – there is virtually no tear-out!


Another tool I have been loving lately is this pocket hole jig made by Porter Cable. It auto-adjusts so you don’t have to change the settings when working with different material thicknesses. It also has a self-adjusting clamp so clamping your material is quick and easy.


Once the plywood is cut and the pocket holes are drilled, it’s time for assembly.


I used this digital level to make sure the shelves were straight and level.


A right angle drill is very useful when you need to drive a screw in tight places.


The center console carcass is constructed and it’s time to move onto the bookshelf towers.


Here are the sides for the bookshelves.


The photo below shows the top and bottom pieces of the entertainment center. Notice the grooves that are cut towards the front edge of the boards. This will be for the sliding door track. We used the table saw with a stacked dado blade for this, but you can also use a router fitted with a channel bit.


It’s starting to take shape! The bookshelf towers, TV tower, end cabinets and center console are all built! Next we’ll build the drawers to go into those cabinets. I ended up using birch plywood for the drawers, just as a matter of preference – I liked the look of the lighter wood inside the drawers.

When building drawers, you always want to measure the space where the drawer box will go and build the boxes accordingly. Generally speaking, drawers need to be 1 inch narrower than the space it’s going into, to allow for a 1/2-inch clearance on both sides for standard drawer slides. Whichever type of drawer slides you choose, you’ll want to defer to the manufacturer’s instructions.


If you find installing drawers frustrating, I highly recommend this Rockler Universal Drawer Slide Jig. It made installing the drawer slides easier and more efficient – by setting the jig once, you can easily repeat the process with the same precision for all of the drawers. I also used four 100-lb. Accuride Zinc 14-inch Full Extension Drawer Slides and four 19.5-inch Amerock Oil-Rubbed Bronze Bar Pulls. For the sliding doors, I chose this longer pull: 30-inch Oil-Rubbed Bronze Cabinet Bar Pull.


In hindsight, I wish I’d set the jig a little lower, so that the drawer slide was positioned more towards the middle of the drawer box. Not a huge deal because these drawer slides are made to support 100 pounds of weight wherever they’re installed, but my perfectionist tendencies dictate that the slides should have been centered.

Want to know the easy way to install drawers? Check out my Instagram stories. In fact, there are quite a lot of videos showing the entire process of this build, so if video is more your speed, you’ll want to check those out. You’ll get a closer look at my process, the mistakes I made, how I corrected them, as well as helpful tips and tricks. Be sure you’re following me on Instagram, where I show a lot more “behind-the-scenes” stuff.


Awesome. The drawers are installed and now it’s time to move onto welding the steel base.

Did I mention that I recently learned how to weld?! I attended Workbench Conference 2018 and..

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