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In the lead-up to Jazz Camp starting January 7, here are some frequently asked questions before and during the camp.

  1. Do I need to bring my own instrument?
  2. When do I choose my electives?
  3. Will my child be sleeping in a room with others of the same age-group?
  4. What if my child gets sick? Is there someone to care for them?
  5. Are students supervised at night? Who looks after the students?
  6. This is my child’s first time away from home. I’m worried!
  7. Can I contact my child during the camp?
  8. My child is homesick. What should I do?
  9. My child likes to smoke, drink, and bully others. Is that ok at camp?
  10. Who is responsible for my child’s instrument at Jazz Camp?
  11. When are you emailing the final details?
  12. My child needs to get to the airport after the end-of-camp festival. Can you help with that?

  1. Do I need to bring my own instrument?

Yes, you do. This includes drummers, keyboard players, guitarists, bassists, percussionists – everyone. The only exception is rhythm section players (drums etc) who are flying to Sydney from interstate or far away.

  1. When do I choose my electives?

Everyone chose their electives when they booked into the camp, they were part of the registration form.

  1. Will my child be sleeping in a room with others of the same age-group?

Yes, accommodation is by age-group. The rare exception is if someone has requested that brothers or sisters stay together or if a large group are coming to camp together from the same school, for instance, and have arranged this.

  1. What if my child gets sick? Is there someone to care for them?

Yes, there is a professional nurse on staff staying onsite for the duration of the camp. There are also trained first-aiders among the JWA and Naamaroo Conference Centre staff. If a student aged under 18 needs to go to a doctor or hospital we will contact you or your alternative emergency contact.

  1. Are students supervised at night? Who looks after the students?

Yes. There is a staff of counsellors separate from the musical tutors who are dedicated to supervising and caring for the campers. There is a ‘lights-out’ time that the counsellors enforce. Of course, every camper is expected to cooperate and follow the directions of the counsellors and is responsible for doing the right thing.

  1. This is my child’s first time away from home. I’m worried!

Jazz Camp is a great first-time-away. It is a friendly, motivating, supportive, and structured environment. There is no need to worry. Most likely you are more worried than your child. Also, be careful not to focus on worry, concerns, or negativity too much as children pick up on those emotions and that often triggers them to become worried or homesick.

  1. Can I contact my child during the camp?

Yes, you can but we kindly ask that you don’t unless absolutely necessary. Calls during class time are disruptive and not appropriate. It is better that you leave it up to your child to contact you if they have to. In our experience, the more contact a child has with home during camp, the more likely it is that they will feel homesick.

  1. My child is homesick. What should I do?

If they contact you, reassure them that it is normal to feel that way: they are in a new environment, sharing the space with lots of other people, being bombarded with new experiences and information, and surrounded by amazingly accomplished musicians. They (or you) should speak to the counsellors and they can help. The more upset you get, the more upset your child is likely to become. Your child might say they want to come home: of course they can, but they shouldn’t. One of the great lessons from Jazz Camp is how to deal with those feelings and overcome them.

It is quite common for children to feel homesick, especially if they are not used to being away from their parents. This is natural. At camp, students are with lots of people, most of whom will be strangers at the start of the week. It will seem like everybody already knows everybody else (they don’t), and everyone knows exactly what is going on all the time (they probably don’t). It is not the same as home: there are lots of other people sharing the same space, all with their own needs, and compromises are always made unlike, perhaps, at home. It is also common for young musicians to feel intimidated at first.

There will be other musicians at the camp who are extraordinarily good, have been playing jazz for years, and are completely comfortable and familiar with jazz and the kinds of musical activity at Jazz Camp. Some of these students might even be younger than your child or teen. This can be confronting. Everyone coming to camp is likely to be well above average as a musician, probably one of the best players at their school or in their area. At Jazz Camp, all these high-achievers are concentrated together. Don’t worry. They were all new to it once and have worked over time to get better. They aren’t better people or better musicians, they are just more experienced and more practiced. We don’t compare Year 6 students with Year 12’s at school, so we shouldn’t do it at Jazz Camp either.

  1. My child likes to smoke, drink, and bully others. Is that ok at camp?

No, it isn’t. There is no smoking or drinking permitted at the venue and, of course, it is against the law for under-18s to drink or smoke. Under-18’s found breaking the law will be sent home at the discretion of the camp directors, without refund. Bullying or doing anything deliberately to make others uncomfortable is not tolerated: the perpetrator would be sent home at the camp director’s discretion, without refund.

  1. Who is responsible for my child’s instrument at Jazz Camp?

Each camper is responsible for their own instrument and for taking care not to even risk damaging anybody else’s instrument. During breaks and when moving about the site instruments should be in their cases and never left unattended in precarious position. Instrument insurance is recommended for every musician, not just for Jazz Camp but always.

Drum kits, keyboards, and amps are likely to be shared between two musicians. They are generally set up in one rehearsal venue where they remain for the whole camp and are used by each ensemble that uses that space (usually up to two groups). This saves anybody having to continually carry heavy gear around. Only players of those instruments are allowed to use the instruments. So, for example, only drummers are allowed to play drum kits at camp.

  1. When are you emailing the final details?

This has already been done. If you didn’t see the email please check your junk mail folder first, and then contact camp@jazzworkshopaustralia.com.au for it to be re-sent. There won’t be any other emails before the camp unless there is a significant update. There is also information on the jazz camp page on our website www.jazz.camp.

  1. My child needs to get to the airport after the end-of-camp festival. Can you help with that?

We can book a taxi for you child. There are usually several people heading to the airport after camp so they can share a taxi. Of course, older campers can do that for themselves too.

The post Jazz Camp FAQ appeared first on Jazz Workshop Australia.

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We’ve got an awesome line-up of evening concerts for students coming to this January’s Summer Jazz Camp. Each night a professional group plays exclusively for our campers along with some Q&A.

For Jazz Camp 2019 we have

  • Sandy Evans Trio
  • Emma Pask band
  • Funk Engine
  • Jazz Camp faculty concert

    Sandy Evans. ©K. Steains

This camp is sold out, but if you like the sound of that, keep an eye out for Jazz Camp 2020. Bookings for that will open in July.

The post Jazz Camp evening concerts appeared first on Jazz Workshop Australia.

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Here are three things you can do to improve your jazz playing if you are a student. We won’t say they are “easy” because they all involve effort, but they aren’t hard to do and are simple enough to understand. Remember that improvisation in various forms is at the heart of jazz, not just playing written notes. Also know that being good at jazz isn’t magical or mysterious, and isn’t just for a lucky few who were born with it.

1. Do it with other people
One of the most important aspects of jazz is that it is best done with other people. Jazz involves improvised interaction in real-time between musicians. It is a wonderful and powerful skill to have. You can’t practice this kind of responsive interaction by yourself. That makes playing in an ensemble a must. As well as good music lessons, you need experience playing in a jazz band; not a big band or “stage band”, but a small, improvising group. Big bands are important too, and great fun, but they are focused on different things and teach different skills.

2. Listen to jazz and play by ear
If you are going to play jazz, which is largely based around improvisation, you need to listen to it being played so as to attune your ears to the nuance and style of the musical language. Listen to recordings of it and go to live performances too. This will also teach you what your instrument should sound like, in the hands of a professional. You should also practice playing by ear. Most of what  you do in jazz relies on your ears and your ability to imagine sound, not upon your eyes and reading music. Of course you should be able to read too, but that won’t turn you into a good jazz player. Listening and training your ears will.

If you’d like to get good at playing jazz, you will also need to practice both technique (how to make your instrument work, and how to control is so as to express yourself) AND improvisation (“soloing” and the skills and techniques that jazz improvisers use). Jazz playing is not just “from the heart”, and is not just something that “you just have” or “don’t have”. Good jazz players work at it. It isn’t magic, it is the culmination of practice and experience over time.

3. Practice!

People you hear who are good at playing jazz have practiced doing it. That means practicing the techniques that go into playing such as scales, arpeggios, tone production, sequences, register, endurance, touch, time, and so on. It also means applying those techniques in a structured way to practice improvising, interpreting melodies in different styles, ensemble interaction, etc. Forget the myths about it all just being “from the heart” or entirely spontaneous: that’s just publicity. Like just about everything else you can do, success requires a lot of hard work over time. Even if, in the end, it turns out that your “heart” or “feeling” isn’t as “great” as Miles Davis’s was, you’ll never find out if you can’t play your instrument and don’t know your stuff. And anyway, who cares? There was only one Miles, just as there will only be one you. So get busy and enjoy the journey because there’s nothing else like it!

The post 3 ways to get better at playing jazz appeared first on Jazz Workshop Australia.

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by Saul Richardson, 2018.

There is a popular misconception that playing jazz is exclusively about uniquely talented individuals expressing an unusual inner creativity that only a select few a born with. Popular “wisdom” also says that jazz is mysterious and cannot be taught. As Paul Berliner pointed out in his landmark study of improvisation Thinking In Jazz (Berliner, 1994), most people’s experience of jazz is based on hearing fully-fledged professionals, most often great and famous ones, at the height of their prowess. What people don’t see is the long learning processes. How the greats achieved success is publicly invisible, a mystery.

For those outside the jazz community who discover improvisers as mature artists through their recordings, these issues remain mysterious. For prospective musicians who wish to follow in the footsteps of their idols, however, unravelling the mystery is essential (Berliner, 1994, p. 2)

Adding to the mystique is a tendency even for jazz musicians, who really know better, to buy into the mythologizing of their art. Claims about jazz like “You can learn it, but you can’t teach it” (Betty Carter interview, in McLeod, 2001, p. 76), and the saying “if you have to ask, you’ll never know” attributed variously to Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong or others, serve to obscure the education and training that precedes public success.

All that makes for good publicity and is great fun. But for students, students’ parents, and music teachers, and other stakeholders, it is a real problem. Why?

It hides what is really involved

It hides the years of training in techniques, skills, theory, procedures, and practices that actually go into developing a high-level jazz player. Paul Berliner (1994) and Ingrid Monson (1996) are good starting points for getting a sense of what really is involved. Because it is hidden, it can be very hard for students or music teachers with limited experience or training in jazz to know what to learn or teach, and how. The rhetoric excludes people from learning jazz by hiding how it is done.

It lowers the status of jazz and jazz education

It lowers the status of jazz education and jazz as a field of study. It can also lower the status of jazz musicians. The reason is that it is likely to be seen not as a structured, rigorous thing, but a self-indulgent frippery attractive mostly to indolent narcissists that is of little consequence to anybody but its players. Because of this, jazz  may be widely perceived as lightweight, just for fun, unstructured, hedonistic. This has certainly been my experience interacting with parents and people outside jazz who may admire the skill, but the Bohemian image is not for them or their kids. Consequences of this include: parents don’t see jazz as a viable alternative study to exams and classical music; students avoid it (if you’re not a genius, then why bother trying?); universities cut it; governments don’t fund it; and, it is belittled as “just for fun” or sidelined by schools as merely an optional “extension activity”.

It leads to bad teaching

It leads to lots of really, really bad teaching. Jazz musicians who buy into the mythology see the music as the natural expression of innate qualities of people: they see it as already inside, something for students to discover independently within themselves and may even characterize intervention by a teacher as redundant or even authoritarian. They valorize self-teaching and make the (mistaken) claim that “the greats were largely self-taught” (they were not, but that is for another post, based on research in my PhD in progress).

Where this too often seems to lead is “lessons” that are a series of, at best, loosely-related experiences lacking connection or educational logic. The conviction is that a jazz student will learn jazz regardless of what a teacher does and failure just indicates that the student didn’t have jazz in them to start with or was just the wrong kind of person. It is lazy and unhelpful pedagogy, not conducive to knowledge-building. It enables teachers to absolve themselves of responsibility and blame students for failure. The rhetoric gets in the way of effective teaching and learning.

It drives people away from jazz

It doesn’t help that few jazz musicians who teach have any training or expertise in education. Because of this, many students likely have negative experiences with jazz education. Certainly, jazz education has a very high attrition rate, in the sense that lots of people do it but then have nothing more to do with jazz: participation in and consumption of jazz is small and declining among adults (ARIA, 2016; BuzzAngle Music, 2017; Rabkin & Hedberg, 2011), despite relatively high numbers involved as younger students indicated by participation in student festivals (GIJ, 2018). School jazz bands also seem to be relatively common, although much less so than classical or concert ensembles (Engadine Music, 2013; NSW School Band Festival, 2018). Can jazz afford to be turning people away?

The reality is that of course jazz involves creativity, all the arts do, as do many things. However, becoming a fluent jazz improviser involves a large body of teachable, trainable skills, techniques, procedures, and concepts. They can be taught and learnt effectively in a logical, useful sequence that should be treated with the same rigor as classical music typically is. Ignore the rhetoric, the claims that “no one ever taught me” and that “jazz musicians just learn to play on the bandstand”: these things come from a mythology so potent that people involved in jazz have come to believe them as fact.

I certainly reject that unhelpful approach as exclusive, pernicious, and damaging. Jazz can, and always has been, taught and learnt. If you have to ask, then I will try to teach you what you don’t know.

References

ARIA. (2016). Distribution of music sales in Australia from 2010 to 2015, by genre. Retrieved from http://www.aria.com.au/pages/documents/genre-origin.pdf

Berliner, P. (1994). Thinking in jazz: the infinite art of improvisation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

BuzzAngle Music. (2017). BuzzAngle music 2017 U.S. report: a report on 2017 U.S. music industry consumption. Retrieved from http://www.buzzanglemusic.com/wp-content/uploads/BuzzAngle-Music-2017-US-Report.pdf

Engadine Music. (2013). Bandfest 2013. Retrieved from http://www.engadinemusic.com/bandfest

GIJ. (2018). About GIJ: what is Generations In Jazz? Retrieved from https://www.generationsinjazz.com.au/about-gij/

McLeod, J. (2001). Jim McLeod’s jazztrack. Sydney: ABC Books.

Monson, I. (1996). Saying something: jazz improvisation and interaction. Chicago: Chicago University Press.

NSW School Band Festival. (2018). 57th NSW School Band Festival. Kensington, NSW: NSW School band festival ltd. Retrived from https://schoolbandfestival.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2018-SBF-Program-FINAL.pdf

Rabkin, N., & Hedberg, E. (2011). Arts education in America: What the declines mean for arts participation. Retrieved from Washington:

The post Jazz education rhetoric and reality appeared first on Jazz Workshop Australia.

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Kali Gillen, popular sax and clarinet teacher, is leaving teaching to pursue other opportunities. Although she is still studying at the Sydney Conservatrium, she is kept busy as a performer involved in projects like the Sydney Women’s Jazz Collective and various musicals and other shows. Her students at JWA and Jazz Camp always enjoyed her rigorous and effective teaching and are all sorry to see her go. We and her students wish her the very best for the future.

The post Farewell Kali Gillen appeared first on Jazz Workshop Australia.

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Award-winning drummer & composer Craig Naughton is now giving drum lessons at the JWA studio in St Leonards. Initially he will be available on Thursday afternoon and evening, possibly adding Saturdays later on.

Craig is one of Australia’s most accomplished drummers, valued for his solid groove as well as his effortless mastery of complex forms and odd-meters! Better still, he is a highly-experienced teacher having previously taught at the University of New South Wales, the Australian Institute of Music, and privately in his own studio. He loves teaching students of all levels and ages with the patience and skill to teach beginners and the formidable chops to comfortably take the most advanced students to new, previously-unimagined levels of excellence. Craig Naughton has experience in preparing students for HSC music performance, Conservatorium and university auditions, and AMEB exams.

As a performer, Craig leads his own group, plays in a range of other bands as a freelance ‘side man’ in jazz, fusion, rock/pop, and contemporary styles. He has also performed with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. He is a two-time winner of the prestigious Billy Hydes National Drummer Playoff, and also played on the Aria Award-winning album All Out with the James Muller Trio (Best Jazz Album – 2000).

To find out more or to book drum lessons with Craig Naughton contact us and we can get you started right away. All ages, all levels of experience.

The post Craig Naughton drums @ JWA appeared first on Jazz Workshop Australia.

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Saul Richardson. 2018.

Here are some thoughts on some factors that seem likely to drive girls and women away from jazz education, performance, and consumption. Some of these probably effect many boys and men in the same way. These are not the only factors at work, but these one are easily fixed. I also explain some reasons why excluding girls from jazz is bad, in case any such explanation is necessary.

1. Educators may encourage fear of improvisation in students

Many kids, boys and girls, are reluctant to improvise or even afraid of it. One thing I’ve noticed over the years is that this happens when it is made a “thing”, when it is a separate and special activity apart from normal band or playing music. It also happens when it is badly taught and/or taught by people who are themselves nervous about it or can’t really do it. It can be made worse by a constant focus on it being “all about feelings” and “expressing your individuality”. Sure, those things are important to professional improvisers, but they are frightening to adolescents because they involve exposing your innermost self to scrutiny and, maybe, ridicule. Solution? Focus on skills and techniques. “If you do x, then y will happen”, “to achieve that effect, do this”. Like a recipe.

Of those who survive the “feelings” stage, many more are later alienated when the focus shifts to the reality of playing jazz: you actually have to be good at doing stuff, and have to know things. It isn’t just about expressing your feelings or having fun. But too often the being-able-to-do-stuff part either isn’t taught (teachers lack the skills/knowledge) or is kept a secret (‘jazz greats are all just natural geniuses’; ‘it is all magic’, ‘if you have to ask, you’ll never know’)

2. Instrument choice, focus of lessons, and gender.

Research tells us that girls are more likely to play instruments that are not widely accepted by school band teachers as part of the regular big band (Harrison, 2007; McKeage, 2004). In the beginner band flutes may be allowed, but to progress only woodwind doubles. In addition, even if you do play a big band instrument, if you are not a serious student of jazz learning skills of improvisation at a high level, you are not going to be able to get into a uni jazz degree or get professional gigs. I know from my own music school that the majority of students who are sent by their parents to focus on jazz in their music lessons are boys. If a student only ever does AMEB-style work, it doesn’t matter what grade they achieve, they can’t play jazz at a serious level until they start to actually work at it.

So, if girls tend to spend their primary and high school years focusing on AMEB, orchestra, and concert band, then they have little chance of progressing into professional jazz. To even get into the Con, for example, you already have to be a very good jazz player. Even if you do a classical degree, you still can’t do more than be a reader in a big band. And someone who isn’t a jazz player or a soloist is often a bit of a liability in a big band. If you can’t play jazz, then you don’t get jazz gigs. If you’ve been directed into reading-only forms of music, then you won’t be able to play jazz. You are, on the other hand, very likely to conduct school concert bands and give private lessons, all perpetuating the same cycle.

3. Why is this a problem?

Of course it could be that girls and women simply are not very interested in jazz. If that is the case, then that is fine. However, there do seem to be pedagogical and structural factors that might be excluding female musicians from jazz. Conventional histories of jazz certainly present the ideal jazz great as a man; women are virtually invisible, potentially giving the impression that women are not part of that world and perhaps are unwelcome. Anecdotal reports abound of women being treated badly and harassed by male colleagues in jazz and popular music. If men see jazz as properly for men, then perhaps those with such an attitude might perceive women as out of place in the field. The anthropologist Mary Douglas found that a widespread cross-cultural definition of ‘dirt’ was ‘matter out of place’ (Douglas, 2002/1966, p. 35). Could it be that men in jazz see women as ‘out of place’, as somehow polluting, and thus in need of being cleared away?

If, as it seems, girls and women are being excluded from jazz and mistreated once they are involved in it, then that in itself is problem enough. It is also a problem for a field of only marginal popular interest with a miniscule market-share of around 2% of USA digital album sales and 1% of USA streaming in 2017 (BuzzAngle Music, 2017) if 50% of the population are potentially alienated from it. A 1995 study found that jazz was unique among other ‘highbrow’ arts activities such as classical music, museum and art gallery visits in that its audience consisted of significantly more men than women (DeVeaux, 1995). Other studies have found that 74% of modern jazz CD purchases were made by men (Oakes, 2010) and that jazz festival audiences were predominantly male (Oakes, 2003). A report for the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in the USA found that ‘those who had more arts education were more likely to attend arts performances – a relationship which was about four times stronger than that of any other factor considered’ (Bergonzi & Smith, 1996, p. 4). While Bergonzi and Smith were not focusing only on jazz, we might extrapolate from their findings that participation in jazz education might lead to more attendance at jazz concerts and higher consumption of recorded jazz. Interestingly, they found that participation in arts education did not make it any more likely that someone would participate in arts as a performer. However, the problem remains that potentially 50% of all people are excluded from jazz education and less likely to become jazz audiences or consumers. So, quite apart from the fundamental problem of exclusion and mistreatment, jazz seems to be shooting itself in the foot by alienating a huge part of the population, something it can ill-afford.

4. Solutions

Luckily, the problems I have summarized are all easily fixed. Firstly, teach improvisation as skills, not feelings, and incorporate it as an everyday activity in teaching. You won’t stop people from having emotions, but you can stop them developing the facility to express them. Secondly, accept non-standard instruments into jazz ensembles and jazz education programs. Thirdly, men should stop seeing women as polluting or threatening, should cease harassing female colleagues and students and give up seeing women musicians in terms of non-musical things like their appearance. Fourthly, stop focusing on students’ gender as important: instead focus on the skills, techniques and procedures involved in playing jazz, manage classroom environments to eliminate harassment, and avoid making being a girl or woman playing jazz a “thing”: it is not and should not even be noteworthy.

5. References
  • Bergonzi, L., & Smith, J. (1996). Effects of arts education on participation in the arts (Vol. Research Division Report #36). Santa Ana CA: National Endowment for the Arts/Seven Locks Press.
  • BuzzAngle Music. (2017). BuzzAngle music 2017 U.S. report: a report on 2017 U.S. music industry consumption. Retrieved from http://www.buzzanglemusic.com/wp-content/uploads/BuzzAngle-Music-2017-US-Report.pdf
  • DeVeaux, S. (1995). Jazz in America: who’s listening? Carson, Ca: National Endowment for the Arts/ Seven Locks Press.
  • Douglas, M. (2002/1966). Purity and danger: an analysis of concept of pollution and taboo with a new preface by the author. London: Routledge & Keegan Paul.
  • Harrison, S. (2007). A perennial problem in gendered participation in music: what’s happening to the boys? British Journal of Music Education, 24(03), 267-280. doi:10.1017/S0265051707007577,
  • McKeage, K. (2004). Gender and participation in high school and college instrumental jazz ensembles. Journal of Research in Music Education, 52(4), 343-356.
  • Oakes, S. (2003). Demographic and sponsorship considerations for jazz and classical music festivals. The Service Industries Journal, 23, 165-178. doi:10.1080/714005121
  • Oakes, S. (2010). Profiling the jazz festival audience. International Journal of Event and Festival Management, 1(2), 110-119. doi:10.1108/17852951011056892

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Jazz Camp 2019 Registration
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    You can register up to three campers on the same form. There is a discount for siblings. A 2.6% surcharge applies to Paypal or credit card payments.
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  • Part 1: Student's Details
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    The grades are an estimation only and it absolutely does not matter if they haven't done exams. If unsure, just guess.

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    Please chooseNone, beginnerHas improvised a little.Intermediate. Has had some training and does it regularlyAdvanced. Has had training and does it oftenVery advanced. Lots of training, very experienced, improvises at a high level, already doing some professional gigs, etc.

    Give us your best estimate. "Very advanced" players will be experienced soloists who improvise fluently through complex chord changes and sound more or less like professionals. Please note that this has NOTHING to do with "grades" or exams, or on music reading: there are plenty of professional classical musicians who don't know how to play jazz at all (they'd need to go into a beginner group to start learning how). Focus only on jazz improvising when you answer this question.

    If you answer "advanced" or "very advanced" you will be asked to send us a short recorded sample of you/your child improvising.

  • You have said you are an "advanced" or "very advanced" jazz improviser. Are you sure? To help us place you in the best groups for you at Jazz camp we'd like a short sample of your playing. You can send us a video or audio recording later. If you already have one online (e.g. on Youtube), then you can give us the link right now.
  • Would you like to submit a video link now?*
    You don't have to do this right away, so if you don't have anything you can give us right now, don't worry.
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  • Link to video or audio of the student improvising.*
    Please paste the link here plus any very brief comments if needed.
  • Rooming Requests
    If there is anyone the camper would like to room with, list them here (maximum of two names). We'll try to accommodate your request as best we can. Rooms are generally by age group and, of course, boys and girls are separate. Click the + button to add a second person.

  • Does this camper have special dietary requirements?*
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    • Yes
    Naamaroo Conference Centre charges $10/day extra for all special meals except vegetarian. Vegetarian meals are no extra cost. Any other special meals cost an additional $50 for the camp.
  • Special diet details*
    Vegetarian (no extra cost)Other, ($50) Give details.
  • Special meal requirements*
    Give details here of special needs such as gluten-free, etc.
    The venue will ask you to provide them with details of the diet and what your child CAN eat safely.

  • Does the camper have a medical condition or allergy Jazz camp staff should know about?*
    • No
    • Yes
  • Details of medical conditions or allergies
    Include details of any relevant medication

  • Do you give permission for the camper to swim whilst at Jazz Camp?*
    • Yes
    • No
  • I advise that this camper is (please select one):
    • a strong swimmer
    • an average swimmer
    • a poor swimmer
  • Thanks. Now enter details about the second student:
  • Name, student #2*
    First Last
  • Age, student #2*
  • Sex, student #2*
    • Male
    • Female
  • Date of birth, student #2*
  • Main instrument, student #2*
    Please chooseSaxophone, altoSaxophone, tenorSaxophone, baritoneSaxophone, sopranoClarinetFluteTrumpetTromboneFrench hornEuphoniumPiano/keyboardGuitarBass (electric or acoustic)DrumsVibraphoneVoiceViolinOther (please specify)
    Select the camper's instrument.
  • "Other" instrument, student #2

    Name the instrument.

  • Technical skill or grade, student #2*
    Please chooseBeginner (up to grade 2)Intermediate (grades 3-4Intermediate-advanced (grades 5-6)Advanced (grade 7+)
    How well can the student play their instrument? Give an estimate. It doesn't matter if they haven't done exams, but some grades are suggested as a rough guide.

  • Second instrument (optional), student #2
    Does the student play a second instrument that they plan to play in combo or big band at the camp?
    • No
    • Yes
  • 2nd Instrument details, student #2
    Please chooseSaxophone, altoSaxophone, tenorSaxophone, baritoneSaxophone, sopranoClarinetFluteTrumpetTromboneFrench hornEuphoniumPiano/keyboardGuitarBassDrumsVibraphoneVoiceViolinOther (please specify)
    Please only add this if the student will be definitely be playing this instrument in combo or big band at the camp.
  • "Other" instrument
    Name the instrument.
  • Technical skill on 2nd instrument, student #2
    Please chooseBeginner (up to grade 2)Intermediate (grades 3-4)Intermediate-advanced (grades 5-6)Advanced (grade 7+)
    The grades are an estimation only and it absolutely does not matter if they haven't done exams. If unsure, just guess.

  • Experience/level as a JAZZ improviser, student #2*
    Please chooseNone, beginnerHas improvised a little.Intermediate. Has had some training and does it regularlyAdvanced. Has had training and does it oftenVery advanced. Lots of training, very experienced, improvises at a high level, already doing some professional gigs, etc.

    Give us your best estimate. "Very advanced" players will be experienced soloists who improvise fluently through complex chord changes and sound more or less like professionals. Please note that this has NOTHING to do with "grades" or exams, or on music reading: there are plenty of professional classical musicians who don't know how to play jazz at all (they'd need to go into a beginner group to start learning how). Focus only on jazz improvising when you answer this question.

    If you answer "advanced" or "very advanced" you will be asked to send us a short recorded sample of you/your child improvising.

  • You have said you are an "advanced" or "very advanced" jazz improviser. To help us place you in the best groups for you at Jazz camp we'd like a short sample of your playing. You can send us a video or audio recording later. If you already have one online (e.g. on Youtube), then you can give us the link right now.
  • Would you like to submit a video link now?*
    You don't have to do this right away, so if you don't have anything you can give us right now, don't worry.
    • Yes
    • No, I'll email one later
  • Link to video or audio of the student improvising, student #2*
    Please paste the link here plus any very brief comments if needed.
  • Rooming Requests, student#2
    If there is anyone the camper would like to room with, list them here (maximum of two names). We'll try to accommodate your request as best we can. Rooms are generally by age group and, of course, boys and girls are separate. Click the + button to add a second person.

  • Does student #2 have special dietary requirements?*
    • No
    • Yes
    Naamaroo Conference Centre charges $10/day extra for all special meals except vegetarian. Vegetarian meals are no extra cost. Any other special meals cost an additional $50 for the camp.
  • Special diet details, student #2*
    Vegetarian (no extra cost)Other, ($50) Give details.
  • Special meal requirements, student #2*
    Give details here of special needs such as gluten-free, etc.
    The venue will ask you to provide them with details of the diet and what your child CAN eat safely.

  • Does student #2 have a medical condition or allergy Jazz camp staff should know about?*
    • No
    • Yes
  • Details of medical conditions or allergies, student #2
    Include details of any relevant medication

  • Do you give permission for student #2 to swim whilst at Jazz Camp?*
    • Yes
    • No
  • I advise that student #2 is (please select one):
    • a strong swimmer
    • an average swimmer
    • a poor swimmer
  • Thanks. Now enter details about the third student:
  • Name, student #3*
    First Last
  • Age, student #3*
  • Sex, student #3*
    • Male
    • Female
  • Date of birth, student #3*
  • Main instrument, student #3*
    Please chooseSaxophone, altoSaxophone, tenorSaxophone, baritoneSaxophone, sopranoClarinetFluteTrumpetTromboneFrench hornEuphoniumPiano/keyboardGuitarBass (electric or acoustic)DrumsVibraphoneVoiceViolinOther (please specify)
    Select the camper's instrument.
  • "Other" instrument, student #3

    Name the instrument.

  • Technical skill or grade, student #3*
    Please chooseBeginner (up to grade 2)Intermediate (grades 3-4Intermediate-advanced (grades 5-6)Advanced (grade 7+)
    How well can the student play their instrument? Give an estimate. It doesn't matter if they haven't done exams, but some grades are suggested as a rough guide.

  • Second instrument (optional), student #3
    Does the student play a second instrument that they plan to play in combo or big band at the camp?
    • No
    • Yes
  • 2nd Instrument details, student #3
    Please chooseSaxophone, altoSaxophone, tenorSaxophone, baritoneSaxophone, sopranoClarinetFluteTrumpetTromboneFrench hornEuphoniumPiano/keyboardGuitarBassDrumsVibraphoneVoiceViolinOther (please specify)
    Please only add this if the student will be definitely be playing this instrument in combo or big band at the camp.
  • "Other" instrument
    Name the instrument.
  • Technical skill on 2nd instrument, student #3
    Please chooseBeginner (up to grade 2)Intermediate (grades 3-4)Intermediate-advanced (grades 5-6)Advanced (grade 7+)
    The grades are an estimation only and it absolutely does not matter if they haven't done exams. If unsure, just guess.

  • Experience/level as a JAZZ improviser, student #3*
    Please chooseNone, beginnerHas improvised a little.Intermediate. Has had some training and does it regularlyAdvanced. Has had training and does it oftenVery advanced. Lots of training, very experienced, improvises at a high level, already doing some professional gigs, etc.

    Give us your best estimate. "Very advanced" players will be experienced soloists who improvise fluently through complex chord changes and sound more or less like professionals. Please note that this has NOTHING to do with "grades" or exams, or on music reading: there are plenty of professional classical musicians who don't know how to play jazz at all (they'd need to go into a beginner group to start learning how). Focus only on jazz improvising when you answer this question.

    If you answer "advanced" or "very advanced" you will be asked to send us a short recorded sample of you/your child improvising.

  • You have said you are an "advanced" or "very advanced" jazz improviser. To help us place you in the best groups for you at Jazz camp we'd like a short sample of your playing. You can send us a video or audio recording later. If you already have one online (e.g. on Youtube), then you can give us the link right now.
  • Would you like to submit a video link now?*
    You don't have to do this right away, so if you don't have anything you can give us right now, don't worry.
    • Yes
    • No, I'll email one later
  • Link to video or audio of the student improvising, student #3*
    Please paste the link here plus any very brief comments if needed.
  • Rooming Requests, student#3
    If there is anyone the camper would like to room with, list them here (maximum of two names). We'll try to accommodate your request as best we can. Rooms are generally by age group and, of course, boys and girls are separate. Click the + button to add a second person.

  • Does student #3 have special dietary requirements?*
    • No
    • Yes
    Naamaroo Conference Centre charges $10/day extra for all special meals except vegetarian. Vegetarian meals are no extra cost. Any other special meals cost an additional $50 for the camp.
  • Special diet details, student #3*
    Vegetarian (no extra cost)Other, ($50) Give details.
  • Special meal requirements, student #3*
    Give details here of special needs such as gluten-free, etc.
    The venue will ask you to provide them with details of the diet and what your child CAN eat safely.

  • Does student #3 have a medical condition or allergy Jazz camp staff should know about?*
    • No
    • Yes
  • Details of medical conditions or allergies, student #3
    Include details of any relevant medication

  • Do you give permission for student #3 to swim whilst at Jazz Camp?*
    • Yes
    • No
  • I advise that student #3 is (please select one):
    • a strong swimmer
    • an average swimmer
    • a poor swimmer
  • Part 2: Choose your elective activity
  • Each camper has a choice of activities as part of days 2 and 3 of camp. Please see here for details of each elective.. Elective options do fill up, so you may not get your first choice.
  • Name, camper #1*
    Camper #1 if you are registering multiple students today.
    First Last
  • What is your 1st choice for your elective activity?*
    For camper #1 if you are registering multiple students.
    A break from music: games etc.CompositionDrumming for non-drummersIntroduction to jazz theoryJazz fusion/jazz-funkJazz vocal ensembleLatin jazz/salsaSoul JazzSynthesizers in creative music: an introduction
  • What is your 2nd choice for your elective activity?*
    For camper #1 if you are registering multiple students.
    A break from music: games etc.CompositionDrumming for non-drummersIntroduction to jazz theoryJazz fusion/jazz-funkJazz vocal ensembleLatin jazz/salsaSoul JazzSynthesizers in creative music: an introduction

  • Choose electives for camper #2
  • Elective choices for camper #2*
    Camper #2 if you are registering multiple students today. Name:
    First Last
  • What is your 1st choice for your elective activity?*
    For camper #2 if you are registering multiple students.
    A break from music: games etc.CompositionDrumming for non-drummersIntroduction to jazz theoryJazz fusion/jazz-funkJazz vocal ensembleLatin jazz/salsaSoul JazzSynthesizers in creative music: an introduction
  • What is your 2nd choice for your elective activity?*
    For camper #2 if you are registering multiple students.
    A break from music: games etc.CompositionDrumming for non-drummersIntroduction to jazz theoryJazz fusion/jazz-funkJazz vocal ensembleLatin jazz/salsaSoul JazzSynthesizers in creative music: an introduction

  • Choose electives for camper #3
  • Elective choices for camper #3*
    Camper #2 if you are registering multiple students today. Name:
    First Last
  • What is your 1st choice for your elective..
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The elective activities for our upcoming 2019 Summer Jazz Camp will be:

  • A break from music/games
  • Composition
  • Drumming for non-drummers
  • Introduction to jazz theory
  • Jazz Fusion
  • Jazz singing group
  • Latin jazz/salsa
  • Soul jazz
  • Synthesizers in creative music: an introduction

Campers choose one of these activities as part of days two and three of the camp. Here is a short summary of each elective:

A break from music/games: this is what it says ‘on the tin’; sometimes too much music is too much and even the most obsessive musician can use a break sometimes. Read quietly, relax in the sunshine, enjoy a board game, or get some exercise. This is organised by our fun-loving counselling staff.

Composition: Learn techniques for writing music, develop your own tune or song, or bring along something you’re already working on and workshop it with a jazz camp faculty member.

Drumming for non-drummers: Learn about the role of drums in jazz, useful drumming and rhythm techniques, and have fun drumming on practice pads or a real kit. Rhythm, groove, and co-ordination essentials, and lots of fun too.

Introduction to jazz theory: Begin to unravel the mysteries of what all those chord symbols mean, what on earth modes are, and the relationship between chords and scales.

Jazz Fusion: Jazz fusion is a mixture of jazz and elements of other types of music, most often rock. Since the 1960s, fusion has been played by artists and bands such as Return To Forever, Chick Corea, John McLaughlin, Uzeb, Carla Bley, the Brecker Brothers, Miles Davis, and Cindy Blackman. In this practical class you will learn about fusion while you play and listen to classic tunes.

Jazz singing group: This practical option is open to singer and non-singers alike. The voice is the natural instrument that we all have, and developing skills with your voice does wonders for every other aspect of your playing. Better still, it is great fun too! This is a chance to sing jazz and gospel music in a group and perform at student concerts during the camp.

Latin Jazz: In this practical elective you will learn about various styles of music from Cuba and Brazil by  listening to classic recordings and playing these often vibrant, often lyrical styles. All under the careful guidance of an expert tutor.

Soul Jazz: This style of jazz originated in the USA in the 1950s, in part as a response to a perceived dilution of African American musical heritage from increasingly commercial jazz and efforts to make jazz more ‘classical’. Soul jazz brought back the sounds and harmonies of gospel, blues and funk to jazz. In this practical elective you will learn about the style, hear classic recordings, and of course play the music.

Synthesizers in creative music – an introduction: Synths are making a resurgence in popular music, in jazz, and other creative musics. Many cutting-edge artists are incorporating synths and electronic music into their live performances. This elective is an introduction to programming sounds and using synths and other electronica. Advances in midi and computer technology mean that these versatile creative tools are no longer exclusively for keyboard players: this class is for everyone with an interest.

The post Summer Jazz Camp 2019 electives appeared first on Jazz Workshop Australia.

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New members are welcome in our new jazz combo for adults

We’ve started a new jazz combo for adults,  intermediate+ level, rehearsing on Monday nights and tutored by pianist Gavin Ahearn. It is for musicians who can already play their instruments well and have experience playing jazz. Anyone who has previously done our introductory 12-week combo course and found it easy or at least comfortable would fit into this group.

There is plenty of space for new members, including a bassist. The band has a very strong drummer. Horn players, a pianist, and guitarists are welcome.

This is an ongoing group, not a fixed-length course, so membership is for at least an 18-week semester.

As always, the rehearsals involve coaching in jazz improvisation and style as well as learning, rehearsing, and playing music. Expect plenty of playing, but it is more than just a weekly jam. Rehearsals are 7pm at our studio in St Leonards/Crows Nest.

Want to join a jazz band and learn how to play jazz? You’ll be welcome. Let’s talk!

The post New jazz combo for adults appeared first on Jazz Workshop Australia.

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