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Yo, so I had this plant for quite some time now, and only now then I realised that the roots has become so unhealthy. I don’t even know if there’s still roots that are living ahahahaha. Is there hope for this plant? It did grow under my care and I’m fond of it just not sure what went wrong with the roots :( I water about once a week or less, and I have not introduced any changes to the plant recently. Soil mix I don’t remember as I have changed my preference since then but I believe it was a 50-50 soil and perlite? 

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Jack: Hello! The roots look fine though! Established roots usually do look like this (unless they are fresh roots, which are supposed to be pinkish white). If they are growing that would mean it’s been doing okay. What made you uproot it btw? If a succulent’s doing okay I normally wouldn’t uproot it.

Plant it back, water after two weeks and let it regrow its roots :) You can also use more perlite.

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But luckily, some cacti, despite being under pressure from the social expectations of societies, are never thorny at all!
In fact, some can be as fluffy as the dandelions in your gardens, and they are my FAV succulents ever.

Astrophytum Asterias Super Kabuto is one of the fluffballs that deserve more attention for its interesting look.
It is not called “ASTROphytum” without a reason: dotted lines and patterns can fill up its whole body, akin to a night brimming with stars!

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…and this is why a ginormous cactus would be problematic…
Featuring Mammillaria Mammillaris and Jacktus gliding away from his adult responsibilities.

These red packets of alien gooey eggs are (sadly) not extraterrestrial, in fact they are just its seed pouches!
Why can it have so many seeds? Because it’s a good “mammi”, geddit…?

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I love to imagine if succulents were as huge as mountains:
instead of tall leafy trees we would get plants with fat, humongous, meaty leaves as thick as the tree trunks of sequoias or kaoris;
instead of the Everest we would have a Haworthia as the tallest known mountain on Earth, and I would most definitely climb it!

But a gigantic thorny cactus sounds like a trouble…
Anyway, featuring another collection of mine: Haworthia Reinwardtii.

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I drew something! 

Featuring one of my succulent collection: Echeveria Chihuahuaensis.
I have no idea why is it called Chihuahua, but the name’s definitely working.

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Hello Angel, I have the exact same problems! My garden takes full day of direct sunlight, and only a few corners of it get morning/ evening sunlight.

What I do are:
1) Make sure to acclimatize them to our harsh afternoon sunlight by sunbathing them to direct morning sunlight for at least three weeks before you expose them to the hellish 12pm sunlight. Do it gradually! If you put them out on 12pm suddenly they will burn just like us humans do XO

2) Make sure that they are well watered because underwatered succulents tend to get burnt MUCH easier

3) You can try building a rack with roof for them. If that’s too troublesome, you can also cover them (like a tent) with black nets. We have to be creative sometimes ahhaa. For me, I use four satay sticks to support a black net over my more sensitive succulents.

4) Keep check of them regularly, and move them if their colors are turning brown/ yellow/ or if they start having burnt marks. 

Good luck! (Let me know as well if you find out some good tips ehhe)

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Nope sorry! Don’t do seeds, seeds are bad. They never grow in Malaysia.

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