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Your Myers-Briggs personality can give you insight into how you perceive the world around you and make decisions around your life, career, and relationships. This includes your relationship with money.

While everyone has their own unique view and story around their finance history, personality tests can reveal a lot about your spending, saving, and investing habits. This is called your “money personality” and it can reveal if you are the type of person to set limits on a shopping spree, pick up the bill when dining out with friends, and more.

For example, INFP’s are known for being compassionate, idealistic and inquisitive. In order to be content and comfortable with their spending, INFPs are encouraged to link their financial goals to their personal values. They’re also advised to make sure to take care of themselves before helping others and to take setbacks in stride rather than dwelling on the past.

While all of the decisions around your finance ultimately affect your financial goal and savings plans, these actions are actually a bigger revealer around who you are as a person. Use the graphic below to discover what your personality type reveals about your finances, whether you need help budgeting or could use some investing advice. Discover more below.

Please include attribution to Mint.com with this graphic.

Mint.com is a free, web-based personal financial management service for the US and Canada operated by Intuit.

The post How Your Personality Is Impacting Your Finances appeared first on Introvert Retreat.

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Just because my transition from extrovert to introvert has benefited me, does not mean it is the same for everyone. You might not realize that introverts have personality traits that could lead to addiction (while extroverts have their own specific set of traits that might make them addiction-prone, as well). Because introverts tend to prefer spending time alone, determining if he or she is struggling with an addiction based on isolation could be difficult.

If you are determined to always be alone, and are trying to deal with your addiction, it’s important to step outside your comfort zone, however you can. Addicts in recovery need to be around people and need to talk about their experiences, thoughts and feelings in order to grow. Because of fear of group settings, you may avoid going to rehab or support group meetings, which are tools that can otherwise greatly assist your recovery journey.

Since alcohol releases dopamine, it can help you to feel more confident in social situations, where you might talk more, or feel confident enough to approach others. This allows you to step outside of your comfort zone as an introvert. Alcohol can cause some introverts to self-medicate in order to get through social events. Whether it is work, or a family function, drugs or alcohol can be used to help introverts manage to make it through. When you become used to self-medicating for social events, you may run the risk of becoming addicted.

Positives of Being an Introvert in Recovery

They say introverts are deep, critical thinkers, meaning we see and understand the big picture. When you know the consequences of your actions you will be more likely to make the correct decisions. Other qualities that could help keep introverts sober are:

  • Introverts are good listeners – Beneficial in rehab during support group meetings. Extroverts may go to support group meetings for more socialization, while introverts might be more focused on hear the message.
  • Introverts are more receptive to meditation – Being able to clear your mind and be one with yourself can go a long way. Meditation is a popular recovery option for many holistic therapies.
  • Introverts take time to reflect – Whether it is reflecting on your recovery or looking into a future decision, introverts with this ability are setting themselves up for a successful recovery.
  • Introverts are okay with being alone – If you enjoy and draw energy from being alone you are less likely to put yourself in risky social situations.
  • Introverts don’t need to party – Introverts do not need to go to big parties to have fun, which can help an addict in recovery. Extroverts in recovery may still feel they are missing out if they do not go to parties, this thinking could cause someone to relapse.
Knowing The Signs of Addiction

If you have a loved one who is an introvert, there’s a chance it could be more difficult to figure out whether they are using drugs or not, because they might naturally spend time alone. . Introverts also tend to be more reserved. Being high strung, talkative and antsy could be a personality trait, or conversely, there are similar crack addiction signs, which could even be confused with an extroverted personality. On the opposite end of the spectrum, introverted personality traits could be confused or blurred by with the reaction associated with drugs like marijuana or opiates (downers). Because of the distinction between personalities and the variety in drug highs, if an introverted person has a crack addiction, the signs might appear to be more obvious.

Basic Signs of Drug Addiction
  • Spending more amounts of money, or needing money
  • Health problems
  • Change in sleeping and eating patterns
  • Neglected appearance
  • Performance or attendance problems at school or work
  • Obsessive behavior
Treatment Options for Introverts

You may not find a public treatment facility for addiction to be suitable. As an introvert, it may be beneficial to receive your initial addiction treatment in a private one-on-one setting. This could allow you to connect deeper and share more personal issues that need to be addressed. Private addiction treatment and one-on-one counseling with a professional addiction counselor could be a great start. However, eventually, you will have to meet others during your recovery to share your story of strength and hope. This may seem like a difficult task, but you could have something to say that could change someone’s life, and in recovery helping others can be rewarding to you as well.

Dale is a writer and researcher in the fields of mental health and drug addiction. After a battle with addiction, Dale became the first in his family to earn his Bachelor’s degree and was able to find a job doing what he loves. Dale believes in writing about mental health and addiction to help get rid of the stigma associated with both. When not working you can look for Dale at your local basketball court.

The post Introverts and Addiction: Struggles to Overcome appeared first on Introvert Retreat.

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As introverts, we have a unique set of needs to thrive in the workplace. Also, just because we are introverts doesn’t mean that we can’t be a part of a dynamic team. We just need some balance, and employers who realize that will have better success at creating a diverse environment of employees that includes plenty of introverts.

Unlike extroverts, who thrive in large groups, introverts need a little alone time to recharge and refocus their energy. Socializing and interacting with others can be especially taxing for us. That doesn’t mean that we aren’t interested, or capable. It just means we need a different work environment to be the best that we can be in any professional role. One challenge for today’s employers is creating a workplace that supports varied personalities and working styles. Fortunately, the introverts are here to help! Keep reading to find out how you can make your office a more comfortable environment for everyone.

Create Structure in Day-to-Day Operations

Introverts struggle without structure. There is no need for military-level rigidity, but an office that has a structured workday and plans ahead is going to set everyone up for success. Not only is it unprofessional to take a more “fly by the seat of your pants” approach to running a business, but it can be especially taxing on employees. Offer structure in the work environment with things like:

  • Scheduling done well in advance: this includes work schedules, meetings, deadlines and due dates, and any other time-sensitive tasks or events. Last-minute meetings or schedule changes are extra stressful for introverts, who appreciate a good plan.
  • Structured meetings and activities: rather than an open-format meeting or round table setup, create an agenda for office meetings and other group activities. This gives introverts an idea of what to expect. It also helps you keep meetings and activities on-task and on-schedule, which is good for everyone.
To thrive professionally, introverts need a different work environment than extraverts.Click To Tweet Offer Multiple Communication Tools

Believe it or not, some introverts love office life. They enjoy the group projects, the camaraderie, and other aspects of working with people. They just can’t always do it as much as extroverts. They also might need to do things in a different way to avoid over-stimulation, which is the primary reason introverts spend less time in group settings or “busy” situations.

When it comes to communication, versatility is a must. Some days, we might be fine to pick up the phone and make a call or speak up in a meeting. Other days, we might need the option of email or messaging, or a one-on-one meeting with our supervisor to discuss our ideas or express our needs. Make sure that your organization offers a variety of approved communication methods for employees, including options like:

  • Email
  • Phone
  • Chat or messenger services like Slack
  • Virtual and physical collaboration sessions
  • Group meetings
  • One-on-one meetings or brainstorming sessions

The goal is to ensure that all employees still feel supported, regardless of their chosen method of communication. As long as the means are appropriate for the topic or task, introverts shouldn’t be made to feel bad for choosing email or chat over stopping by a coworker’s desk to discuss a work project.

About Those Team-Building and Social Events

Tons of studies have shown the power of team-building activities for an organization. It’s no secret that getting coworkers together outside of the work setting creates a stronger bond that benefits the company. However, for the sake of the introverts, you have to again think about offering options. The best way to find out what works best for your staff? Ask them.

Today’s companies are often fast-paced, fun environments that focus on team bonding and social events outside of work. Some employees don’t have the energy at the end of a long work day to hit the bar or head to the baseball game with the team, and that’s okay. Firstly, make sure none of your employees ever feel bad or are “forced” into work-related social events. Secondly, find ways to create team-building activities and events that are more in line with their interests or offer a more relaxed environment.

Important Reminders:
  • Never make an employee feel guilty or judged for not participating outside of work
  • Never assume that because an employee leaves promptly at the end of their shift that they don’t care about their job. They may just be out of energy for the day.
  • If you don’t know what your employees want from team building and social activities outside of work, ask them.
Respect Introverts’ Need for Space and Privacy

This is really what it all boils down to when dealing with introverts. They just need a little more privacy and space than extroverts, and employers who realize that will capitalize on the potential of these capable employees. An introvert might need a dedicated office space with a door, or might not be as willing to mingle with coworkers throughout the day. Make sure they know that these things are acceptable.

Thanks to technology, catering to introverts by creating a versatile work environment is easier than ever. Studies have shown that the most productive employees are those who feel like they have some control over their work. Discuss options with your employees in an one-on-one setting, including flexible scheduling, occasional remote work, and other workplace privacy options that can provide a distraction-free environment.

The Bottom Line

With as much as 50% of the population considered to be introverts, employers would fare well to create a work environment that caters to these unique individuals. Our contemplative nature, combined with our love of solving puzzles and strategizing, can make us valuable assets to a number of industries and organizations. By optimizing your organization, you can capitalize on these and other strengths with the introverts on your payroll.

Jen McKenzie is an independent business consultant from New York. She writes extensively on business, education, and human resource topics. When Jennifer is not at her desk working, you can usually find her hiking or taking a road trip with her two dogs. You can reach Jennifer @jenmcknzie

The post How to Create an Introvert-Friendly Company Culture appeared first on Introvert Retreat.

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Mental health challenges can affect anyone regardless of their personality type. Introverts and extroverts alike can succeed in therapy, but their communication and recharging methods differ in critical ways. Introverts must understand how to navigate treatment that requires them to recharge in a new environment or open up more than they want to. If you are an introvert new to mental health treatment or therapy, consider these tips to help you tailor your social interactions and make the most of your recovery.

Opening Up in Treatment

If you are nervous about therapy or attending a treatment center as an introvert, you have healthy options for respecting your own needs. Therapists are well versed in introvert preferences and are happy to support you if you communicate what helps you open up best. The same goes for inpatient treatment centers, which offer both group support and plenty of privacy for those wishing to receive treatment in peace. Regardless of your reason for receiving help, use these methods of opening up if you are an introvert:

  • Journal and share with your therapist
  • Ask to be connected with a support partner
  • Communicate if you feel overwhelmed or need a break
  • Ask for guided meditations
Introverts and extroverts alike can succeed in therapy, but their communication and recharging methods differ in critical ways. Click To Tweet Recharging Alone

Some introverts are social, but all introverts need to recharge themselves at the end of it. Having privacy to reflect is especially important during a mental health treatment program so you can fully absorb what you learn without the social energy distracting you. Regardless of whether you live at home or temporarily at a center, make the effort to organize your home environment to make you feel relaxed. Work on developing these habits to improve your mental health and allow yourself to retreat into your space after a day of treatment comfortably:

  • Listen to calming music before bed
  • Disconnect from devices to reflect on your interactions
  • Journal your emotions
  • Stretch and focus on deep breathing
  • Cook or ask for foods that make you feel recharged
Making Connections

Introverts have no problem connecting with others, it is the quality and method of these connections that differs from extroverts. This matters in mental health treatment since you may be asked to connect with a therapist, support groups, staff at treatment centers, or to rethink relationships in your personal life. If this is the case, be sure to facilitate your connections in your own way (and at your own pace). Here are some introvert-friendly ways to focus on the quality of your connections in treatment:

  • Begin by sharing exactly what you’d like from an interaction
  • Don’t force it, you are free to take a step back and recharge
  • Take your time getting to heavy topics with small talk
  • Connect with others alongside activities

Try these ideas if you are an introvert new to mental health treatment. If you communicate your needs and recover in a way that supports your strengths, succeeding in treatment as an introvert is completely possible.

Adam Durnham is an introvert and freelance blogger who specializes in mental health and addiction recovery. You can find a lot of his work at Willow Springs Recovery.

Photo © photographee.eu / depositphotos

The post How to Succeed in Mental Health Treatment as an Introvert appeared first on Introvert Retreat.

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Let’s start with an uncomfortable truth: small talk is good for you.

It helps you to work. At least some small element of every job is social, and the more you know about your clients, colleagues, or audience – the more you intuit from the minutiae of banal interaction – the better you adjust to the project needs.

It makes you happier. Or at least, small talk may seem like torture at the time, but passing the time of day with a stranger gives a sense of fulfilment.

And it improves your well-being. We’re pack animals. Sure, we need to manage the booms and busts of our social energy – but in perpetual isolation, we wither.

Here’s another truth: you can’t avoid small talk forever! But small talk is not all born equal. The most torturous small talk is when neither party fully commits. On the other hand, take a deep breath and step right in – and you might just come out of it alive.

Small talk is not all born equal. Click To Tweet

For introverts, that’s easier said than done. Our brains aren’t excitedly wired for quick-fire chit-chat. But we have a secret weapon: preparation. Sure, you never know quite what subject or point of view is going to emerge in your next elevator encounter. But you can build a framework to deal with whatever comes at you.

The good people at OnStride have created a complete guide to doing just that: figuring out in advance how to survive and even benefit from small talk. Spend ten minutes going over it now, and that next 30-second elevator ride won’t feel like a lifetime!

Article by G. John Cole

John writes on behalf of NeoMam Studios. A digital nomad specializing in leadership, digital media, and pets, his passions include world cinema and biscuits. A native Englishman, he is always on the move, but can most commonly be spotted in the UK, Norway, and the Balkans.

Website: gjohncole.com

The post 8 Small Talk Survival Techniques appeared first on Introvert Retreat.

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Everyone has some introverted tendencies. Everyone likes to spend time alone and away from the constant interactions with others sometimes. For introverts, however, that need is a lot more frequent. If you’re friends with an introvert, it’s important to understand their needs. It’s about respecting the space they need to recharge and understanding that needing that space is not a reflection on you or how much they love you.

One of those boundaries has to do with having a controlled environment that they can escape to if they need to. Another is understanding that for an introvert, parties are not always going to be their thing. They may require more information about your social event in order to prepare. Being friends with an introvert has a lot to do with making some time that works for them — not just for you.

The Importance of a Controlled Environment

There are a lot of misunderstandings about introversion. Introverts aren’t always shy; they aren’t always anxious; they don’t always detest social situations. However, one thing that is true for introverts is that they feel the most comfortable and content in their own space to recharge from the rest of the world. This is why it’s important for them to have some control over their environment. This might mean a door they can close, a car available to leave, or a phone in their pocket when they need an unbothered minute in a social situation.

As a friend of someone who is introverted, it’s important to respect that need for a controlled environment. All that means is allowing them to get away, not bothering them when they need space, and understanding that the pop-in isn’t a great option when you want to see them. All it takes is a little communication and understanding on your part.

Parties Aren’t for Everyone

For an introvert, a party is like an emotional marathon. Even in a room full of their closest friends, an introvert may look at a big social gathering as something that will deplete them for days. There’s a lot of people, a lot of talking, and a lot of emotions tied into a social event of this magnitude. Though many introverts enjoy these social settings, that doesn’t mean it won’t still be draining on them. If they also battle social anxiety, they may worry about the proper etiquette in certain social situations. They may feel anxious about the people they don’t know, the games that they will be expected to play, or the draining small-talk discussions.

In order to respect the space your introverted friend needs, you’ll have to be understanding about the fact that parties aren’t for everyone. Your introverted friend may not want to come, may leave early, or may need you to stick close to them if you bring them into an unknown social circle.

Understand the Need for Information

Your introverted friend flourishes in their own environment. For this reason, a new environment can be stressful. This is why your introverted friend may have a lot of questions for you if they agree to join you in an activity, a social event, or even just a trip to your house. The reason for this is that more information helps them feel comfortable in a new setting. A controlled environment is comforting, so be sure to understand your introverted friend’s need for information. They need times, names of people, a heads-up if you’re going to be late or if any changes are happening, whose name the reservation is under, etc.

Even something as simple as eating at another home can be a source of discomfort for an introvert — especially an introvert who may also have anxiety. They may overthink sitting in the wrong spot or worry about not liking the food. There’s a whole psychology to food that everyone has, but for someone who is introverted, it can be really overwhelming to worry about offending someone or working through the social cues of a dinner party. Give your friend all the information they request, and don’t feel offended if they decide a social interaction will be too much for them.

Making the Right Kind of Time

Being friends with an introvert really means understanding the right kind of space your friend needs. It means understanding that they may not be at your parties or stay long at social functions, but they feel right at home having a movie night or coffee date with just the two of you. It means making the right kind of time for them. Introverts love deep conversations and relationships, not shallow ones. They love using their social time to make meaningful connections as opposed to top-level conversations they’d have at a party or large social event.

Introverts can be social people, but they also need solitude to recharge. This means finding the balance as their friend to give them the space they need while also spending time with them on mutually agreeable terms. Friendship is all about compromise and understanding, and being friends with an introvert is no different in that respect.

Introverts create energy on their own and in their solitude. Being social expends that energy, and being alone allows it to recharge. Extroverts, on the other hand, tend to get energy from the outside world. They expend that energy in their solitude. Being with others and interacting with the world allows them to recharge. Ambiverts do a little of both. If you’re friends with an introvert, it’s important to understand just how depleting the outside world can be for them. Introverts need you to respect the space they need while understanding that the space they need doesn’t mean they don’t adore time with you — it just means they need that time to recharge.

Chelsy is a writer/blogger from Montana who graduated with her journalism degree in 2012. She is now a freelance writer in the beautiful city of Boise, Idaho. She is an animal lover, an advocate for mental health, and her hair is always a mess. Follow her on Twitter @chelsy5.

The post Respecting the Space Your Introverted Friend Needs appeared first on Introvert Retreat.

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As I’ve been gradually transitioning my hands-on, in-person organizing business to provide more virtual services, I’ve also been thinking about the business tools I use. Extraverts can, and do, of course, use these tools too, but if you are an introvert trying to make your way in an extraverted world, these might help:

TimeTrade, Acuity (or similar appointment scheduler)

Is there anything worse than the back-and-forth discussion involved in scheduling a mutually-agreeable time to meet with a client? Or with anyone, for anything? Phone tag is the worst! Most introverts hate talking on the phone…unless you’re like me and you don’t mind if it’s a scheduled call. Technology to the rescue! (For more ideas, see 7 Phone Tips for Introverts.)

Skype, FaceTime (or similar video chat app)

I love meaningful, one-on-one, face-to-face interaction. But there are obvious benefits to not having to go anywhere to do it. Eliminating the driving and parking part saves time and money, for starters. It opens up a virtual world full of potential new clients. And, if you are mindful during the call, your conversations will be naturally limited to the pre-arranged block of time. Not all businesses can benefit from this, but many coaching and consulting services can.

Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn (and other forms of social media)

It’s social, but not in person, and can be done on your own time. Clothing optional. Yay! (For those who completely avoid networking in person, though, you might be encouraged to give it another try if you read my post Networking for Introverts.)

Freedom, Stay Focused (or other internet blocker)

Wait, didn’t I just say social media was a good thing? In fact, a godsend to introverts? Yes, but it can also be overwhelming. I might be more productive if I spent less time on social media, but I enjoy it and I have other ways of managing my time (scheduling, time blocking, timers, adjusting notification settings, etc.), but you might appreciate such a tool.

Constant Contact, MailChimp (or similar email tool)

Tell them what you have to say all at once, on a regular basis, especially if they aren’t all on social media. They won’t all read your newsletter every time, but it reminds them that you’re still there, and it sure beats telling them one at a time…or making phone calls…

WordPress (or similar blogging tool)

Some business people despair of getting “enough” subscribers for their blog. I don’t think of it that way. I use my blog posts in many ways. I link to them on social media and in my newsletter. I send them to clients to reinforce whatever we have been talking about in their sessions. I send them to new people I meet — who have expressed interest in an issue that it so happens I’ve written about — as a way of establishing that I can help them, without “selling”. Why keep recreating the wheel? If people keep asking about the same thing, and I haven’t yet, I write a blog post about it.

Adobe Spark (or other video creation tool)

We’ve all heard that videos are the future of social media. Videos? For introverts? Ack! I’ll admit to not having thought of this myself as an introvert-specific tool. But think about it. They can be a way of personalizing your business and reaching people without the pressure of being live. You don’t even have to show your face if you’re not quite ready for that; you can start with voice-overs. Unless, of course, you are ready for apps such as Facebook Live.

(Virtual) Introvert Communities

It always helps to have the support of like-minded people. For me that includes Janet Barclay, creator of this Introvert Retreat blog, and Thea Orozco from Introvertology (coaching, blog, Facebook group, podcast).

Which tools might you try?

What other business tools do you think make life easier, particularly for an introvert?

Please share with us in the comments!

Hazel Thornton is a professional organizer and genealogist based in Albuquerque, New Mexico; creator of The Clutter Flow Chart Collection; and author of Go with the Flow! The Clutter-Clearing Tool Kit for an Organized Life. Visit her online at www.org4life.com.

The post Business Tools for Introverts appeared first on Introvert Retreat.

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Introvert Retreat by Janet - 7M ago

I’ve had a library card for as long as I can remember.

A long time ago, I’d browse the shelves and select some books to take home and read over the next few weeks. I still do that occasionally, but I’m far more likely to look for a specific title in the library catalogue, request it, and pick it up when it comes in. But I don’t think I’ve ever asked a librarian to help me choose a book – if I have, it was decades ago.

I probably could have gone on that way quite happily. After all, I’m on track to read 50+ books this year, each selected for one of several reasons:

  • it was recommended by someone I know
  • it frequently showed up on book blogs or social media
  • I picked it up at a used book sale or the Little Free Library that recently opened in my neighbourhood (yay!)
  • I needed something to read and it happened to be available on Overdrive

I enjoyed Modern Mrs. Darcy’s 2015 Reading Challenge and decided I’d participate again this year.

To make it even more challenging, I planned to read the books in the order listed. I was doing great, and was even ahead of schedule (if you count on one book per month) until July when I got to “a book recommended by a librarian or indie bookseller.” Claiming it wasn’t convenient, I jumped ahead to the next one, then continued through the list.

With the end of the year – and the challenge – in sight, I had to admit that my reasons for not speaking to a librarian were just excuses for avoiding social interaction and that I needed to JUST DO IT. I’d have been really annoyed with myself if I didn’t complete the challenge, so I popped over to the library this morning before I could change my mind.

It was actually pretty exciting to have someone pick out five books for me after hearing just three titles I’d enjoyed this year! Definitely worth stepping outside my comfort zone.

I happened to have one of them at home already (borrowed from my sister, who recommended it) and briefly considered thanking her and going home to read the book I already had, but reminded myself that the point of doing the challenge was to expand my horizons, so I chose one of the others and I hope it will be an rewarding end to a great reading year.

Once I’ve read it, I’ll be revealing the titles of all 12 books I chose for the challenge on Away from my Desk. Why not subscribe so you can find out what they are?

Image courtesy of Iosphere at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The post The Librarian appeared first on Introvert Retreat.

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Everyone has the predilection to be more introverted or extroverted in life and business. When building a small business, the importance of understanding how you work cannot be overstated. If you are comfortable working as a part of a team and exude charismatic leadership over your employees, you are likely leaning towards extroversion. If you have a more reserved and a demeanor of self-reflection when working as part of a team, you likely associate with introversion.

There is no guarantee that being introverted or extroverted will result in success, but it is nearly a guarantee that each personality type will take a different approach to business. Click To Tweet

Extroverts will most likely weigh networking as a very important tactic for generating business and nurturing relationships.

Extroverts might find it difficult to manage their impulses and focusing for long periods. If you are the extroverted entrepreneurial type, try implementing a productivity practice like the Pomodoro Technique, which prescribes 50 minutes of focused work followed by a 10-minute break. If you are introverted and do not have a problem avoiding impulses and focusing, you are most likely highly self-motivated and reflective. It’s not the internal impulse that can distract you from the work at hand, but actually the outside interruptions you must manage.

To learn more about how introversion and extroversion can impact business, check out this visual from Fundera:

Contributed by Drew Page, Siege Media

The post How Introverts and Extroverts Manage Their Small Businesses appeared first on Introvert Retreat.

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