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Dear Inquisitive Canine,

I adopted Isla (German Shepherd mix) from a shelter about a month ago.  She’s approximately 9 months old now and she’s very sweet…95% of the time.  However, despite some prior exposure in her young life, to walking on a leash, we can be out for a walk or on a potty trip and for no apparent reason she will go all Cujo on me.  Writhing, bucking, and biting…anything that might work to free her from the restrictive nature of the leash.  There are no other dogs present, no people, no stimuli to warrant Cujo showing up.  She’s just royally ticked off that she’s on that leash and by golly, she wants to be free of it.

The best I can do at this point is to get a death grip on her collar, which affords me some protection from those pearly white, sharp teeth, and calmly talk her down off the ledge.  Sometimes that works on the first go, sometimes not.  Even if I have treats on me, for other pursuits (sit, down, stay), I feel like giving her a treat, once she’s calm from the meltdown, will give her the wrong idea.  I even bought a muzzle, but I’m 64 years old and getting that sucker on her is simply NOT happening.  I am in the process of de-weeding a fenced area in my back yard and giving her the supervised opportunity to burn off some pent up energy, but that may make it worse when she is leashed.

Any suggestions, short of getting one of those padded suits (which won’t bode well in a Texas summer) and toughing it out?

Thanks,

Isla’s Worn Out Mom

Dear Isla’s Mom,

Sounds like you’re both getting quite the workout! It also sounds like there are a few challenges that definitely need to be addressed. We’d be happy to provide a few dog training tips.

  • Triggers – although you mention there’s no apparent reason, if the “Cujo behavior” keeps happening, there is likely a trigger somewhere. Even if it’s an internal trigger such as, “We’ve been out here for X amount of time and now I’m bored and frustrated.” Consider the time-factor. Is it immediate? After she has gone potty? Is it the overall pace of the walk? Would she rather run than stroll?
  • Function of the behavior – Keep in mind that all behaviors have a function – to either get something or avoid something. Does Isla enjoy the Cujo game with you? If she does, and you don’t, then switch up the game. Reinforce the behaviors you like and want, before she goes into her whirling dervish mode. Walking nicely on leash is what you want, yes? Teach her that skill and reward her with treats, petting, praise, and anything else you can give her while out in public. (A game of tug or fetch perhaps?) If you teach and practice those skills first, then she’ll know what the right choice is.
  • Treats – what types of treats are you using? For a situation as challenging as leash walking, you might need to up the game. Higher value such as little bits of boiled chicken or steak might be more motivating for her. Isla will let you know what she prefers. And, make sure she’s hungry. (Not starving.) If you’re feeding her a big breakfast, then going on a walk, she’s less likely to want food. So, use her meals to your advantage while training her.
  • Shape her behavior – because of her age, and this particular challenge, you might want to start out with shorter but more frequent training sessions. Instead of 30 minutes, go for 2-3 10-15 minute sessions. This is especially true if she starts going Cujo at a certain point. For instance, if she’s fine up until the 12-minute mark, then go for 10 minutes. Give her a break then go again. This might be a bit more inconvenient for you, initially, but once she’s trained you’ll be able to venture out for longer periods. It’s also good to practice in lower distracting environments – around your home and yard, before heading out to the streets.

Remember to reward behaviors you like and want, teach Isla what you want, and set her up for success so she learns what the right behavior is and can make better choices.

The post Dealing with Cujo Canine, How to Make Dog Walk More Manageable appeared first on Inquisitive Canine.

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Summertime means vacation time. And for those of you with dogs, you don’t have to miss out. Traveling with your pet is both great for you and your furry friend, but there are a few things you need to consider before packing the treats and hitting the road.

Luckily, New York travel company AllTheRooms is here to help you out. The following are a few tips on how to make travel with your pooch less stressful while ensuring your vacation together is a barking success.

Take a Trip to the Vet

One of the first and more important things to do with your pet before going anywhere out of town is to schedule a visit with your dog’s vet. Ideally, you’ll want to do this with as much advanced noticed as possible (but still within any specifically required timeframes), in case advanced medical care is required. The doc will check to make sure your dog is in good health and suitable for travel. You’ll also want to notify them of where you will be traveling, as your dog might need specific vaccinations.

Confirm Your Mode of Travel and Requirements

The actual journey part of your trip may be the most difficult and potentially stressful time for your pet, so be sure to follow these simple tips.

  • If you’re driving to your destination, think about places you’ll be seeing – and potentially stopping at – along the way. It’s best to not leave your dog alone in the car, especially in a strange environment. Will you be able to bring your dog with you? Will someone be able to watch them? Having another human friend along would be best, so you can tag-team the supervision. Even during shorts stops, like filling up your tank, can cause anxiety if your dog isn’t familiar with their surroundings, so plan accordingly.
  • If you plan on traveling to your vacation spot by plane, train or boat, be sure to confirm with the transport company beforehand that your dog will be allowed on board. Follow any rules or regulations in place and your journey should be much more comfortable for you both. Planning ahead is key!
  • No matter which route or method of transportation, remember your dog’s needs along the way. Breathing some fresh air, stretching their legs, taking a potty break, drinking water – and maybe even consuming a snack can help them feel like they’re getting a little vacay in too.
Plan to Pack Smart

Like you would for yourself and the rest of your family, you also need to plan for what to pack for your pet. Important items we recommend include:

  • An ID tag: Make certain your dog is wearing a collar with an ID tag that contains their name and your current contact information. If locations you’re visiting require a license or rabies tag, make sure you have that with you as well.
  • Paperwork: Take any required paperwork for your pet while traveling. Check you have your pet’s passport allowing them to travel (if required), details of their immunizations and any documents outlining any health problems they have or medication they are taking. These will come in handy if you end up having to take your pet to the vet during your vacation as well.
  • Their favorite item: whether it’s a ball, a blanket or a teddy they’re fond of, be sure to bring it with you to keep your dog feeling happy and relaxed.
  • Something to walk them with: pack your dog’s leash and anything else they would wear for walkies, such as a harness.
  • Toiletries: shampoo in case your pal gets muddy, and their doggy toothbrush to maintain good dental hygiene. Keep any medications they take on you, rather than in a bag, so you can quickly access them if you need to.
  • Food: make sure you pack enough food for the duration of the trip, as well as any treats and chews to keep their tummy full and their spirits happy.
Praise Your Pet

Traveling can be stressful for some dogs and to help them feel at their best, give them lots of positive reassurance throughout the journey. You’ll also want to positively reinforce them for minding their manners during your adventures together. Behaving well in the car, going potty in the right spot, minding their manners in public places (hotels, restaurants, bustling tourist areas) should be acknowledged with lots of fuss! Send the message that they’re great traveling companions. Use toys, treats, and cuddles to reinforce them – maybe even buying them a souvenir.

If your dog acts in a way that’s abnormal for them, they may be slightly stressed. Remember to stay calm yourself so you can think clearly and create a training plan to help. Speak soothingly to your dog and take a break from the journey if necessary.

Bon Voyage

We hope these tips help you and your pet prepare and have a great vacation. Stay organized, positive and safe and you’re likely to have a stress-free getaway with your pooch.

Sage Fitzpatrick is a travel blogger currently living in London. She can be found drinking tea, reading and traveling the world. When she’s not traveling she spends her time blogging about her travels over at A Virtual Postcard.

The post Traveling With Dogs, Stress-Free Strategies appeared first on Inquisitive Canine.

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If you’ve been considering bringing a second (or third…or fourth…) dog into your home, you might be asking yourself questions such as “Should I” “Should I not?” As with most new endeavors, it should begin with a plan – of some sort. In the beginning stages of contemplation, your initial plan might begin with a general pros and cons list. So for this specific blog post, we decided to collaborate with fellow animal advocate Allie Cooper of PetPaw&Tail18. She has graciously provided some helpful info to help you start your journey into answering questions you may have.

There are numerous benefits of having a multi-canine household. But this of course also comes with additional responsibilities. The following is a little pros and cons list we’ve developed for dog owners, to help answer the “should” questions, along with any others they may have come up with. 

Pros Helps Dogs Socialize

PetMD explains that dogs may go into fight or flight mode when faced with strange people, animals, and environment, resulting in experiencing increased stress. Dogs who are not used to being walked in public, seeing new faces and smelling other inquisitive canines might appear shy or even display signs of aggression. It’s very important that puppies get accustomed to these situations early on through force-free puppy classes, where he or she can be introduced to other dogs, people, and situations.

Professional dog trainer and author of Plays Well With Others Pat Miller claims that playtime with other well-trained dogs can teach them social skills. This may result from reading and mimicking appropriate body language and displayed behaviors. Although, it’s vital to ensure that the introduction is gradual and that the older dog they are learning from is well-behaved and non-aggressive. This can help your new puppy become more comfortable, less fearful, and grow into a healthy and happy pooch.

As for older pets, the senior pet wellness article posted by Maryville University adds that they may benefit from getting socialization and companionship, depending on their personality. However, getting older dogs accustomed to other dogs and unfamiliar environments might take more time and patience as they may have already become set in their ways.

More Companionship

Dogs have long been considered man’s best friend and have proven their place as great companions. Having more pets can enhance the physical, emotional and social benefits of pet ownership such as feelings of love and delight. It may also provide more opportunities to create bonds with other pet owners and animal lovers.

More Incentive – and Options for Exercise

Owners will be encouraged to get more exercise when walking or playing with their pets. The study published by BMC Public Health revealed that dog owners added an average of 22 minutes to their daily walk compared to those who did not have dogs. They walked at an average pace of 3 miles per hour which falls under CDC’s prescription for moderate intensity exercise. Considering that lack of movement is linked to obesity, having more than one dog can help owners become more active and health conscious. Furthermore, if different dogs require different exercise durations and methods, owners can provide each dog with what he or she needs while getting twice (or more) exercise sessions themselves.

Cons Added Expense

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Of course, having more than one pet also means having more than one mouth to feed, more than one cuddly body to groom, and more companions to bring to the vet.

Time Magazine’s report shows that small to big dogs typically cost $1,001 to $1,448 annually. The breakdown does not include fees like spay and neuter services or other types of resources that dogs with special conditions might require.

Increased Risk for More Chaos

Dogs will be dogs. And, when humans neglect them, they will often entertain themselves. Sometimes their choices can be good, like playing with enrichment toys or their siblings. Other times, he or she might decide to partake in behaviors we humans would deem destructive. It is the owner’s responsibility to watch after them, train them, and keep them happy and entertained.C

If you have time to go out for walks only once a day, you’ll want to make sure the entire group can go together successfully. If you need to take the dogs’ separately, then you’ll need to adjust your schedule. Will each walk be shorter so you can meet your time commitment? Or, will you need to recruit help?  In addition to our recommendations for hiring a dog walker, make sure this professional can handle caring for multiple dogs at once.

Pawfect Mutt Match or Canine Conflict?

Change can be good, but it can also be challenging. 

If your resident dog is used to flying solo, he or she may look at you in disbelief when meeting their new sibling. On the flipside, he or she might be head-over-paws in love! Take into account there will be an adjustment period – for everyone, dogs and humans – and that the timeframe will be different for each one. 

Training and management can help you all get through the process. If your current dog has behavioral any challenges that need to be addressed, we recommend you do so before bringing another animal into the family circle. (Keep in mind that things can change again once the family dynamic changes).

Final Thoughts

Responsible pet ownership means that you also have to think about how your pets might react to having a new pet in the house. Take some time to weigh these pros and cons before signing the adoption papers, while making sure that everyone — man and animal — is on board for the new pet.

This post was written exclusively for inquisitivecanine.com
Submitted by PetPaw&Tail18

PetPaw&Tail18 runs her own shelter in Ohio with her life partner. She is the proud owner of two beautiful Labradors, Molly and Kiki—Molly being the first rescue of the shelter. She dedicates her life to saving and finding mutts a loving home and cannot imagine not having a dog of her own.

The post The Pros and Cons of Owning More Than One Dog appeared first on Inquisitive Canine.

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We’ve recently been discussing with friends and clients concerns when moving with a pet. Finding rental properties where pets are allowed seems to be challenging. What can be more challenging is keeping a place once you do find one. How can you and your dog (or cat) impress the landlord?

Being inquisitive ourselves we decided to reach out to folks who are experts in this subject. Luckily we found blogger Angela Pearse who is willing to share some of her tips.

Convincing your landlord that a dog living with you is a good thing could be easier said than done if they’ve had a bad experience in the past. But if you know how to pet-proof your rental they might be swayed. Whether you have a new puppy or an older dog, these tips will help prevent your canine from getting into trouble whenever your back is turned.

Dog-Proof Garbage Can

Dogs are scavengers at heart and an easy to access garbage can is too tempting to ignore. You don’t want your dog raiding the rubbish whenever you’re out and causing a mess, so a dog-proof garbage can is a must.

For dogs with a high IQ, you’ll need one with a latch on the lid and a pedal at the bottom. Place it in the corner so they can’t topple it over. If that still doesn’t work, keep it in a locked pantry or laundry room with a closing door.

Pet-Proof Carpet

Rental carpet can take a beating when you have a dog living with you. Even if your dog is housetrained, reassure your landlord you will take steps immediately to pet-proof the carpet/flooring while dealing with any accidents that may occur. You can also consider getting an area rug so that your hardwood floor or tile is protected from any accidents.

Another way you can ensure that carpets stay pristine and fur-free is to make sure your dog is groomed. Trimming nails and claws will also help prevent snags on carpet pile and scratched floors.

Keep their food and water bowls in the kitchen or on a mat to prevent spillages and always wipe their feet after being outside. If you feed your dog with enrichment toys, make sure messes are confined to washable areas.

Dog-Proof Your Furniture

If you’re renting a fully furnished apartment, knowing how to dog-proof furniture is important. Otherwise, you could come home to a shredded couch, gnawed table leg, or some other ‘surprise’ from your furry friend. Please note, if your dog is destroying furniture, takes steps to determine why. It could be related to their physical health, emotional well-being, or simply boredom.

Using positive reinforcement training for teaching them to discriminate where they are allowed to hang out and where they aren’t is important too, so you can trust leaving them alone. Poncho wrote a lovely post teaching this very thing. Check out his tips here.

Again, keeping on top of grooming is essential – things such as nail trimming and cleaning paws will reduce the amount of damage and dirt on floors and furniture.

Some other tried and tested ways you can dog-proof the furniture to keep it looking as good as new include:

  • Buying slipcovers for the couch and armchairs
  • Using removable cushion covers for a quick wash
  • Buying an inexpensive pet seat cover (towels and blankets work great)
  • Regularly using a lint roller to remove fur 
Pet-Proof Your Flooring

Fido may think it’s fun to scoot around on the wood or concrete floors, but your landlord won’t take kindly to scratches and nicks from your dog’s toenails. Here are some ways you can pet-proof flooring:

  • Paw grooming – regularly cutting and filing nails so they don’t dig into floors
  • Buy some inexpensive but heavy rugs to use in dog traffic lanes
  • Apply a layer of protective wax, treat light scratches by reapplying wax
  • Dog booties – condition your dog to wear protective booties
Create a Pet-Friendly Apartment

Part of ensuring your rental is adequately dog-proofed is creating a safe environment for your pet. This can involve using child-safe gates to block off certain areas or keeping doors to the laundry, bedrooms, and bathrooms closed when you’re not using them.

To be extra safe, place medications, cleaners, and laundry supplies in a high cupboard or shelf out of reach. This also goes for foods like chocolate which is toxic for dogs if eaten in large quantities, and you know your dog won’t stop at one square! (Many humans are guilty of this too, so who can blame them).

Another thing to think of when dog-proofing is to cover your electrical cords and place dangling wires out of reach. Some dogs like to chew on cords and end up receiving nasty burns for their efforts. Chewing can also cause wires to short out, spark and start a fire.

Final Thoughts

You’ll have a much easier time finding a pet-friendly apartment if you can demonstrate your dog is well-trained, knows how to make good choices, and is not likely to destroy any furniture, carpet, or walls.

If you have to leave your dog for an extended period of time, ensure their physical and mental needs are met. Enrichment toys, exercise, fun and games, doggy daycare, dog walkers, and pet sitters can help meet their needs while keeping your new rental place pristine. Who knows. Your landlord might not even believe you even have a dog.

Author’s Bio

Angela Pearse is a blogger for Zumper who frequently combines travel with freelance writing. She’s passionate about Art Deco hotels, historical novels, Netflix, hiking and healthy living.

The post How to Dog-Proof Your Rental appeared first on Inquisitive Canine.

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