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ImpactADHD by Impactteam Lead - 2d ago

Welcome to Tea & Tips, where we respond to burning questions from parents and educators — taking aim on one topic at a time, guiding you to improve communication, confidence and calm.

Tea & Tips: Sibling Challenges - YouTube

Diane:
Sibling challenges. I've got two, and you've got more than two, and this happens all the time. If you've got two kids that are at completely different levels -- and maybe the older kid has executive functioning issues, the younger kid doesn't, or vice versa-- and your expectations are going to be different for different ones. And you're going to have different rules for one of them than the other, and one of them goes: "It's not fair."

Elaine:
Or, "You're babying her." You're not, you're not parenting enough. Right. There's lots of judgment from one of the kids about how you're handling the other kid. If that kid needs more support or more accommodations.

Diane:
And I like what you used to say about what fair really means.

Elaine:
Well, so I used to tell my kids -- so I have three, right? -- that fair does not mean the same. And when they would say it's not fair, because I heard that a lot, my response was: "I know it doesn't seem fair" (because I wanted to acknowledge their experience. Acknowledgement and then Compassion.) "I get that that doesn't feel good. And I want you to trust me. I promise you that I will make sure that each of you gets what you need, from me and from each other, but you're not going to need the same thing. So you're not going to get the same thing. I'm going to make sure you get what you need and she gets what she needs and it's not always going to be the same. And that's what's gonna make it fair."

Diane:
Well, and I think part of it is coming up with a simple explanation. If you've one kid who's really good at sports, and you've got one kid that's really good at art, you're not gonna make your sporto do art, and you're not gonna make your art kid do sports. You're going to say, well this is what you need, this is what you like. And it's kind of the same parallel. And I think kids get it a little bit more and it feels differently. Fair.

Elaine:
And so if you, if you play to the strengths and help them see that, I think that's another way for them to accept it differently. Or like, okay, I'm good at this, but I'm not good at that. And what about, (you know, all of our kids are great at everything.) Having said that, to really help them see how they do certain things because they're better at it and not others, helps them understand that everybody else has some things they're better at or not than others as well.

Diane:
And the other thing which we talk about in another video is, is making sure everybody understands what's going on with when each kid.

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The post Sibling Challenges appeared first on ImpactADHD<sup>®</sup>.

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The Worst Bully

It's National Bullying Prevention Month. For those of us with children who struggle socially, we know how important it is to raise awareness about the dangers of bullying in the veritable playground of children's lives.

But, what about adults? Is bullying a relevant discussion for us? We've all heard about Cyber-Bullying, Road Rage, and workplace Anger Management issues (grown-up language for bullying behavior). Bullying is one of those themes that starts in childhood and persists throughout our lives.

The worst bully, though, is the one who resides within us. That's the hardest one to avoid – and the ONLY one you can actually do something to change!

I confess to being a big, bad bully. Not necessarily to my friends (who definitely get the kindest me), or to my family (at least, I hope not). I don't scream a lot, and I make an effort not to avoid controlling others. That's not the kind of bully I'm talking about.

Where I lack compassion, however, is for myself. If I spoke to my friends or family the way I speak to myself, all too often, I'd be identified as someone to fear or avoid.

So, I'm a bully. So are you, by the way. And no bully is more dangerous than the one who lies within.

The Inner Gremlin

Most of us live with an internal bully, the ultimate gremlin voice who tells us what we're doing wrong, and how we can do no right. (Diane wrote a great blog on this. See: Silence.) It is a common refrain for me to tell my clients to “Put the Stick Down.”

Really, have you ever noticed how much time you spend hitting yourself over the head?

“I'm such an idiot.” “How could I have been so stupid?” “What was I thinking!” or maybe, “I can't do anything right.” “There's no way I can do that,” or “Why would they want me, anyway?”

These messages sound familiar? Not only are you likely to recognize them, but you probably know how to push your own buttons, to use them at just that weak moment when they'll hit a vulnerable spot.

Of course, the bully does not act alone. Like Malfoy and his goons in "Harry Potter," the internal bully is protected and energized by the world of popular culture  -- television, movies, magazines, etc.

Consider those messages of the pop culture – you should be… thinner, smoother, smarter, sexier. It doesn't matter what should be more, our internal critic only wants to remind you that you are not all that!

Our gremlins internalize these social images, and then cruelly turn them back on us like the button on a bomb — it's going to explode, and there's nothing you can do to stop it.

Tame The Beast

So how do you tame the bully within?

  • First, recognize it. Pay attention to the messages you tell yourself. If you hear yourself saying things you'd never say to someone you love, then stop. What's true? Are you really stupid, or did you make an honest mistake? Don't let your bully get away with speaking lies and pretending they're truth.
  • Second, commit to failing forward. When you vow to learn from your mistakes without making yourself “bad,” you'll dis-arm your inner critic. Mistakes are a critical part of the learning process. Cut yourself some slack.
  • Third, stop making excuses, or blaming others. When you begin to take responsibility for your “stuff,” it becomes simple to separate the “stuff” from your personal worth. When you “own your stuff,” you'll earn greater respect from others, and you'll naturally start to put the stick down. In other words: accept life's “whoops” factor; mistakes happen.

For pop culture-induced bullying, try curiosity. You might want to pretend to be a reporter and ask yourself, “Is it REALLY true that everyone else is thinner and smarter than me?” Substitute your particular gremlin voice, but you get the idea.

The bottom line, here, is that you can change a bully's behavior when that bully is you. When you do, you'll teach your children to do the same. Now THAT's what I call standing up to a bully!

The post Model Self-Respect For Your Kids: Tame The Bully Within appeared first on ImpactADHD<sup>®</sup>.

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In a world filled with so much information, literally at our fingertips, how do we narrow our focus to practical and applicable tools for our daily lives? And how is that different in the world of ADHD?

The solution I use with my clients: the 3 M's will help you COPE.

Clutter represents deferred decisions. Nowadays, we move so fast we are often distracted. We can't or don't exercise the discipline needed to make quick, in-the-moment decisions and follow-through on making them happen. This is especially true of the flood of stuff in our homes. Consequently, surfaces are covered and piles accumulate.

When we do decide to buckle-down and get organized, many of us lack the ability to create order out of chaos, to choose the right system of containers & tools. We are overwhelmed by the mere thought of where to start.

To reduce clutter and create some breathing room, set a goal to tackle the 3 M's: Minimize, Maximize, & Maintain.

Minimize

Find some peace in your hectic life, you must minimize. This is easier said than done with ADHD in the mix, so consider finding a “Body Double” who will help you purge, and then you do the same for her. This can be a friend, or a paid organizer. Think in terms of 4 piles: trash, recycling, keep or donate.

Maximize

Learn to maximize the way space is used and take advantage of the available space you have. Start small, with one area at a time, and tackle your home surface by surface, closet by closet.

Maintain

Order is a constant process, fluid and changeable, and there is joy in the journey. When we continually minimize the amount of items in a space, maximize the use of the available space, and pay attention to keeping it maintained, we have a plan to keep things organized and peaceful.

Once you've decided what to keep, and are on the path to maintenance, it's time to take things to the next level of detail and C.O.P.E:
  • Categorize (group like items together)
  • Order (put things in order)
  • Proximity (put things near where they will be used)
  • Ease of Use (make sure things are easy to access)

Don't underestimate how simple this sounds—it's really effective to put a little bit of extra thought into where and how to store items you decide to keep.

Now, some people would prefer to have someone else handle organization, leaving them free to do other things that are more natural and enjoyable, and there's no shame in that! When you have ADHD it can be particularly helpful to have support and assistance in the process. Just in case you want to tackle organization on your own – and remember to consider a body double if you do -- here are a few more tips to keep you on track:

  1. Set boundaries around when, where, and for how long you are going to “get organized.” Set an appointment with yourself, use a timer, and be specific about where you are going to focus your energy. If you tend to get caught in “zigzag organizing” -- jumping from room to room or area to area – then take on two projects at a time and when one gets boring, move to the other. But limit yourself to only those projects! Set a timer for 15 minutes before the end of your scheduled session, and begin to straighten up so that you can leave the space livable until your next session.
  2. Start with the obvious by working with items that are already out in the open, on the floor, countertops, entry-ways, spilling out of baskets/containers, etc. Do not go pulling stuff out of drawers and closets before you have cleared out the obvious clutter. It could lead to overwhelm and possibly abandoning the effort entirely.
  3. Set yourself up for success by making sure you are free from distractions. Turn off the phone, get coverage for the kids (or give them a job), don't plan to leave in the middle of the process for another appointment, and be sure to have supplies like sorting containers, big trash bags, sticky notes for labeling, a big black marker, cleaning stuff, and the vacuum for those dust bunnies that will pop up during the process!
  4. Make sure the organizing session is fun by playing inspirational music (whatever that means for you), making sure there is enough light in the space to see what you are doing, having scheduled breaks with special goodies to snack on, and having a reward in place for when you complete the task!

Finally, remember that there is no shame in asking for help, either from a professional or from a trusted friend who will keep you on track, without judgment. It helps make organizing happen more quickly, and with greater success.

The simple skills outlined above are applicable to numerous areas of life, not just getting organized. Learning them and teaching them to your children will have wide-reaching and lasting benefits. Good luck and Happy Organizing!

The post Organizing 101: The 3 M’s Will Help You C.O.P.E. appeared first on ImpactADHD<sup>®</sup>.

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Not Just Fantasy

Increased focus and attention. Better sleep. Reduced stress, anxiety, and depression. Happier kids, and calmer parents. It can seem like a pipe dream for parents of Complex children. I know I thought so, once upon a time. But we can start making these things a reality. How? Mindfulness.

While certainly not a fix-all for all the symptoms and challenges, practicing mindfulness can help lighten the load we face every day.  With mindfulness, you might not be living the dream all day, every day – what fun would that be!? But you will see a remarkable difference in yourself and your kids.

Starting a Mindfulness Practice

Mindfulness doesn’t need to be mystical or complex: it is simply focusing your attention on the present and increasing awareness. The big question: How?!  A few paths to consider:

  • Meditation
  • Breathing exercises
  • Yoga
  • Mantras
Practice Makes Mindful

It’s not the specific method that matters; it’s about finding a way to get out of your head and quiet the distractions. This will be different for everyone.

The keyword to mindfulness is “practice.” You’re not going to be able to meditate for an hour your first time. You may not be able to meditate for five minutes your first time! That’s ok. Take small steps. Literally! If you or your child can’t sit still, try a meditation walk.

I started my own mindfulness practice by making the commitment to be completely there. Not all the time – I’m only human! – but in manageable chunks. I decided that each day in the shower, I would be absolutely present: I’d feel the soap on my skin, smell the shampoo, listen to the water rushing. This way, I quiet the distractions, worries, and anxieties that otherwise swirl through my head. Now that’s a refreshing shower!

That’s what mindfulness is: letting go of all the “stuff” that can drag you down and sap your energy. It enables you to reduce stress and increase focus, to be a calmer, more responsive parent.

Helping Your Kid Practice Mindfulness

Research shows that practicing mindfulness has powerful benefits for children (especially complex ones!) . How can you encourage your kids become more present and aware of themselves?

  • Start with yourself. How did you teach your child to talk? By talking to her and around her. It’s the same with mindfulness: you teach by example. Many parents have their own practice. If not, cultivate one. Start in the shower! Or set aside 5 minutes to meditate.
  • Let your kids see you practice. When you have a mindfulness strategy or practice, let your kids see it.  If, for instance, you feel your stress level rising, say, “Wait a second, honey. I’m going to take a deep breath and calm down because I feel myself getting upset.” Mindfulness can be as simple as taking deep breaths or waiting a few seconds before responding to a situation. Whatever you do, make sure you share it clearly with your children. 
  • Involve them. Keep it simple. You could, for instance, sit quietly all together for 5 minutes in the morning. If bedtime is a struggle or your child has sleep difficulties, try setting aside time each evening for relaxing with soothing music. The great part is that, as your child grows, she can take these techniques and adapt them to her developmental level.
The Benefits of Mindfulness

Increased mindfulness can help your kid become more aware of when she’s getting off-balance, and ideally add a step before an emotional outburst.  Most of our kids go from 0 to 60 in no time flat. With mindful awareness, she may get to 20 and realize, “Wait, I’m upset. I need to stop and breathe.”

When she has a clearer brain, she can tap into her executive function in a way that is not accessible when she’s completely overwhelmed and stressed. She can tap into emotional regulation and behavior management. Not at first, perhaps, but with regular practice, she’ll get there.

Remember that this is a process, not an endpoint. Try different approaches and see what works. The goal is not to develop your kid into a master yogi or a Tibetan monk; it’s to help her manage her stress or emotions in a healthy way, and become more aware of what’s going on around her.

Does practice make perfect? No! But practicing mindfulness does create powerful changes for the whole family. Life won’t be perfect; there’ll be bumps, bruises, twists, and turns. But you, and your kids, will be much better equipped to handle them.

Sanity Is Not Optional

Freaking out? Want to recover your SANITY? We can help you gain the clarity you need. Talk to us and find out HOW!

Sign Up

The post How to Stop the Madness and Get Happier Kids – and Parents appeared first on ImpactADHD<sup>®</sup>.

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ImpactADHD by Elaine Taylor-klaus - 1w ago

It’s tough to decide how much of ourselves — our time and our lives — to give to our kids. As a Mom of kids with ADHD, I lean toward giving-myself-away. What about you?

Many parents feel torn between choices for their kids, and choices for themselves. Often, parents make decisions from a sense of obligation and duty. They want to do what is best for their children, but they have not figured out how to do that and still consider what is best for themselves. As a result, they tend to feel resentful, angry, and guilty.

Resentment and guilt aren’t good for anyone in the family.

So, what’s the solution? I have come to realize that it’s REALLY important for parents to do things for ourselves that make us – happy.

That may mean considering ourselves when we make decisions about how to use our time. I want my kids to understand that sometimes I make decisions for them, and sometimes I make decisions for myself.

I still have a tendency to give myself away. But now, when I spread myself too thin, I’m aware that I’m doing it, and there is (often) a method behind the madness.

I am firmly committed to my own pursuit of happiness. I have put myself back into the equation, and it’s made all the difference – for myself AND my family.

The post Happy Parents are Good for Kids appeared first on ImpactADHD<sup>®</sup>.

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What would it be like to enjoy an entire day of calm? What about enjoying this on a consistent basis? You can. Even if you have the most challenging children.

But let’s make sure we define what calm is. Calm is not an absence of noise, problems or chaos around you. It means that no matter what is happening around you, you experience calm inside AND begin to spread that calm to those around you.

Instead of your environment changing you into a Crazy Mom or Freak Dad, YOU begin to change your environment. In order to achieve this, you don’t need superhuman capabilities. This is for everyday Moms, Dads and kids. We must understand a few bedrock principles that will guide us to 24/7 Calm.

The Calm Creed

    • 1. I cannot control other people, how they behave or how they react.
    • 2. I cannot control situations and circumstances—most are beyond my control.
    • 3. When I react to people and circumstances, I surrender power over my emotions.
    • 4. I can only control one thing in life—my emotions, my actions, my reactions.
    • 5. No matter how my child behaves, I control myself. When I “lose it,” I lose my authority. I spread and create the calm I want.

Make a Conscious Choice to Remain Calm

    • Realize that we cannot control our kids, nor should we want to. Our primary job as parents is to control ourselves and model proper behavior. How many of us throw adult tantrums when something goes wrong, then expect our children to remain calm? No matter what your child or spouse does, remain calm. Screaming or withdrawing emotionally only makes the situation worse. When we are calm, we can be fully engaged and solve problems instead of creating more of them.

Demonstrate Self-Respect

    • We are not responsible for our children’s behavior, attitudes and actions. If your child is in a bad mood, so be it. Choose not to give in to or join his pity party. If your child comes into the kitchen barking orders, you are not obligated to respond. Walk away calmly, go about your business and let your child know that when he’s ready to be polite, you’ll help him with breakfast. If your child refuses to do his homework, then he will suffer the consequences at school. Our children need to learn that they are responsible for their choices, and you are responsible for yours.

Assume a Calm Posture

    • Each time you approach your child or spouse, ask yourself, “Do I want to have a conversation or a confrontation?” Instead of standing by and barking orders, sit down, put your feet up and relax. It is much harder to yell and lecture when you assume a calm posture. Kids are drawn to adults who sit—sitting says, “I am in control, everything is okay and I want to connect with you.”

Take Care of Yourself

    • Exercise, walk your dog, pray, listen to music—do whatever helps you feel at peace. Make a decision that no matter what your child or spouse does, you are only responsible for your actions. This liberates parents and frees children to be responsible for their choices.

Be the Calm in the Storm

  • The most effective way to calm an emotional child is for us to be calm. Instead of threatening an upset child, we need to draw the child into our calm. Sit down and begin to color with crayons or build with Legos. Play catch or do push-ups with your child. Invite him into your calm. This will freak him out at first, because he is used to seeing you get upset. What you are communicating, though, is (1) Your actions cannot control or manipulate me and (2) No matter how out of control you may feel, I am a rock you can count on.

You’ll be surprised at how your children (and spouse!) begin to calm down once you do.

The post Staying Calm 24/7 When You or Your Kids Have ADHD appeared first on ImpactADHD<sup>®</sup>.

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ImpactADHD by Elaine Taylor-klaus - 2w ago
The Art of Letting Go

It’s times like these when I realize that parenting is a life-time lesson in letting go. It’s easier said than done, but life is always better when I accept those things that I cannot control, and focus instead on making deliberate choices about how I spend my time.

At this moment, the piles are high on the desk around me, the hour is looming late, the children will soon arrive in need and want of my attention and time, and there is a finite deadline of a plane to catch tomorrow.

I cannot possibly “get it all done.” In fact, I can’t really get most of it done. All I can do is the best I can with the time, and energy, I have left. So what am I going to do about it?

Find Your Peace & Calm

Well, I’m going to write a bit. I’m lucky that writing actually brings me a bit of peace and calm. Some people like to organize, but I like to write. It organizes my brain. Then I guess I’ll look around and determine what would make me feel better if I handle it before I leave. I don’t mean cleaning out the mystery jars in the refrigerator, though certainly that would be nice. But what will make it easier for me when I get back? What will best support my family and me?

The subject of how to make choices between difficult or conflicting options, and how we choose to spend our time, has come up several times this week, with a friend and a client. Each was deliberating about a challenging decision in her life. Each felt obligated to do something optional that they did not really want to do. For each, I asked, “how would it help you?” to make one decision over another. Both responded quizzically. They’d never really thought about it.

Dismissing The Shoulds

We get caught up in “the shoulds” of life, don’t we? I should invite this friend over, I should make an appearance at that event, I should volunteer at my kids’ school, I should, I should. What makes it so hard to ask myself, “What do I want to do?” Perhaps more difficult for many of us, what makes it so hard to answer?

I find that many of my peers have a hard time feeling comfortable ‘wanting’ for themselves. I understand this intimately, because I think I lived the first 40+ years of my life trying to fulfill everyone else’s expectations of me. At some point, through coaching, I realized that my expectations are just as valid as everyone else’s. In fact, this is my life! Maybe my thoughts and feelings are even more important than what others think I should be doing! At first, that was a pretty radical realization.

Doing What I Wanted

My life changed when I decided to spend a year making an effort to do what I wanted, and to stop acting purely out of obligation. Okay, so I’m not a big fan of cooking and cleaning, but I do really have a strong motivation to be a good mom and create a safe, healthy home for my family. I stopped making appearances, and started paying attention to that inner voice when I found myself compelled but not excited to do something. Was I doing it for a good reason? Was it my reason, or someone else’s?

So what’s this have to do with my getting out of town tomorrow?

In the limited hours I have remaining, I plan to take a few moments (when I’m done writing this blog) to get clear about what will help me feel settled when I return. I’m not going to ask myself, “what should I do before I leave?” because that puts me in a place of obligation and pressure. Instead, I’m asking myself, “What will help me leave with a sense of comfort?”

For example, bedtime with my kids is a top priority, as I want to leave them in an emotionally strong place and there is nothing quite like snuggling and routine to offer that. I also want to have a family dinner. Again, can’t beat the value of that!

What Else Matters?

I don’t really care about the clothes I bring, so the laundry I was hoping to get done probably won’t happen. As for arrangements for child coverage, I do want to double–check that. I may not be much for logistics, but when health and safety is in order, it’s a priority.

Getting the package sent to my daughter in California? Wait. Figuring out what to read on my trip? Critical. You get the picture. Letting go of the need to “get it all done” gives me the gift of being able to choose what’s important at the moment.

Now I’m still likely to try to fit more in than I have time, and I’m guessing I will ‘lose some sleep on it’ with a delayed bedtime. But when I get on that plane tomorrow with my husband, bound for parts unknown to celebrate our 21 years together, I can guarantee one thing: I won’t look back at what I didn’t get done, and will look forward to what’s in store for us! And that is my idea of getting it ‘all’ done!

The post Can’t Do It All, Not Even Trying appeared first on ImpactADHD<sup>®</sup>.

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ImpactADHD by Elaine Taylor-klaus And Diane Demps.. - 2w ago

Welcome to Tea & Tips, where we respond to burning questions from parents and educators — taking aim on one topic at a time, guiding you to improve communication, confidence and calm.

Tea & Tips: How To Help My Kids Manage Time When I'm Not Around - YouTube

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The post How To Help My Kids Manage Time When I’m Not Around appeared first on ImpactADHD<sup>®</sup>.

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You love your child, unconditionally and will do anything for him/her. That 24/7 job is hard enough, but with something extra like AD/HD, your job as a parent can feel overwhelming, exhausting, and somewhat of a marathon. Constantly assessing and making adjustments are not one-time events, they are a series of tweaks and changes requiring sustained effort. All this because you want your child to feel happy and succeed. Right?

So, what about you? It’s easy to focus your attention and energy on getting the help or support that your child needs, but have you been forgetting about yourself in this process?

When you take care of yourself you can better care for your child. The more you “fill your own bucket,” the more energy, love, patience, time, compassion … did I mention energy? …you’ll be able to give your child. Sounds easy enough. But how do you do this?

Dr. Paul Nussbaum, author of Save Your Brain, teaches that a great way to care for yourself is to create a proactive, brain-healthy lifestyle. There are five key steps to a brain-healthy lifestyle: nutrition, physical activity, mental stimulation, spirituality, and socialization.

  • Step One: NutritionA. Your brain is a complex organ that requires Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs), or omega-3s, to work at its optimal level. EFAs help the brain communicate.* There is a growing body of evidence that supports that omega-3 EFAs also have a therapeutic implication for ADHD, Autism and other learning challenges.

    B. Next, eat a rainbow. Colorful fruits and vegetables contain “phytochemicals,” compounds that are naturally produced by plants to protect themselves against viruses, bacteria, and fungi. Research suggests that a diet containing phytochemicals can help protect against cancers, heart disease and other chronic illnesses.

    C. Eat actual food. The body uses whole grains, protein, veggies, fruit and healthy fats most efficiently. Increasing nutrients, while avoiding artificial additives, reducing refined sugar and reducing saturated, unhealthy fats will make a difference in how you feel and function. Besides, according to the Mayo Clinic, healthy choices early in life lower the risk of brain related disorders.

  • Step two: Physical ActivityYou know exercise and movement is good for your body, but it turns out it is also important for a healthy brain. Movement and exercise increase blood flow to your brain and reduce inflammation, improving cardiovascular, joint, brain and metabolic health. Exercise also improves the body’s ability to detox itself, improves mental balance, elevates mood, and reduces depression, anxiety, and irritability. It increases patience and self-esteem, and supports recovery from food addiction by increasing the release of dopamine.

    How much exercise do you need to get brain benefits? A study published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found that mental health benefits were observed after 20 minutes of physical activity, though the more exercise and higher intensity, the better the effects.

  • Step three: Mental StimulationNew learning promotes new connections in the brain. Playing Scrabble, Monopoly or other board games is good for your brain health! Keep your brain active with Sudoku, Chess, Charades, Poker, Bridge, any game that keeps your brain active and thinking in new ways. Reading, writing and new learning involve structural, chemical and functional health-promoting changes in the brain, too. Life-long learning leads to longevity and a healthy brain reserve.
  • Step Four: Spirituality Meditation and relaxation techniques such as deep breathing and yoga can help you slow down and turn inward for balance and symmetry. Learn to rewire negative thoughts by seeing mistakes as opportunities to learn. Use self-talk to identify your mistake and verbally problem solve some solutions, you’ll set an example for your child to follow. Your brain can adapt to a chaotic world, but it will function more efficiently if it gets inward reflection and rest. Go ahead– take a slow, deep breath right now!
  • Step Five: Socialization Socialization is important to brain health. It provides an opportunity for communication, critical thought, creativity and emotional expression. People who isolate or segregate themselves have been shown to be at greater risk of developing dementia than those who remain integrated into society. So think about activities you enjoy and engage in them. Isn’t it great to know that socializing and having fun in your community will help ward off vulnerability to neurodegenerative diseases as you age?

    One great example is the “Impact ADHD” community. Here you’ll find a nurturing environment that promotes socialization between like-minded families experiencing parenting a child with AD/HD. Just what your brain needs!

As a parent, you can take care of your own brain, teach by example, and provide the tools to help a child navigate the terrain of life. As you do, your children will learn to value and take care of their brains, too.

Special Note: The body does not make EFAs, so we must consume it from food or supplements. Research shows that the safest and most reliable source of omega-3 EFAs is a high quality fish oil supplement, manufactured in an oxygen-free environment to ensure freshness, molecularly distilled to remove environmental toxins, and third party tested according to international standards for purity and freshness levels.

The post Take Care of Your Brain, Take Care of YOU appeared first on ImpactADHD<sup>®</sup>.

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Triumph Out Of Tragedy

This is the story of how a recent school shooting actually helped a mom realize that she had had a huge success – she had effectively taught her son to ask for help. You’ll love this one.

Tammy is an active member of our community, at different times over the years supported by training programs, group coaching and private coaching. As a parent, she has put in a great deal of effort – and she has begun to see the benefit of her hard work with all of her kids, in different ways.

For Diane and I, it has been a privilege to witness Tammy’s growth as a parent and to celebrate with her the progress her sons have made. She has gradually overcome her “shoulds” and learned to support and guide her children effectively, setting clear boundaries and holding her sons accountable with compassion and respect. Tammy is now quite adept at implementing the coach-approach, and it supports her as she raises several complex children.

Tammy’s most complicated child is her youngest, a 14-year-old boy whose many challenges in life and learning have been quite pronounced since he was adopted as an infant. With a mixture of sadness and celebration, Tammy shared this heart-warming story with me, and I asked her if I could share it with all of you – because I believe it offers hope and clear guidance. And heaven knows we could all use that!

Celebration in the Midst of Sadness

Sadly, you probably already know that there was another school shooting last week. As parents, these conversations are not getting any easier; for many of us, we’re running out of ways to assuage our children’s concerns.

After Tammy’s 14-year-old son found out about the recent shooting, he didn’t say anything to his mom at first. The following day, after taking some time to process it, he had this conversation with his mother:

Son:              Mom, did you hear about the school shooting yesterday?

Tammy:         Yes.

Son:              Mom, did they catch the guy who did it?

Tammy:         Son, it was a student.

Son:              Oh. Mom, it is really sad that no one paid too much attention to him and tried to help him.

As the conversation continued, Tammy and her son thoughtfully discussed the details of yet another horrible incident. They agreed that it was terribly sad. She asked her son what he thought that boy must have been feeling.

Son:                 I bet he was lonely, sad and angry. Too bad he didn’t know how to ask for help.

Tammy:            (after picking herself up off the floor): Son, isn’t it right that you learned to ask for help?

Son:                 Yes.

Tammy:            If you learned to ask for help, what does that mean?

Son:                 Oh, you taught me how to ask for help mom.

Mom:                You know, son, that in some families, kids are told to never ask for help.

Son:                 Mom, I love you!

Some Kids Just Don’t Know How

According to Tammy, she told her son that some kids are told to never ask for help because she wanted to give him permission, somewhere along his journey, to let a friend know that it was okay to ask for help. With that information, she expects that he could be (majorly) helping a friend; he might even accompany his friend in seeking help – and she thought that would help him feel good about sharing a little bit about the times he has had to ask for help.

The Importance and Difficulty of Asking for Help

At ImpactADHD®, we preach the importance of asking for help – for parents, and for kids. Everything we do, really, is designed to encourage parents to ask for the help you need; and ultimately, to empower your kids to learn how to ask for and accept help  — from you and from others.

So what makes it so important to ask for help – and so difficult?

It’s important because … no one does anything alone. Everyone needs help, even though most people don’t like to admit it. Besides, if we really want our kids to accept the help we offer them, the best way to do that is to model that behavior.

It’s difficult because … as parents, we get caught up in the belief that we ‘should’ do things on our own, that we ‘should’ know how to help our kids manage their complex issues, or that they’ll eventually grow out of it. We convince ourselves that things will get better if we just try harder, or if we read one more book, or if we hire a tutor, or….the list goes on. Whatever the reasons, we avoid seeking the help we need – that is, help for us, not just for our kids.

It’s not that much different for our kids. They struggle with a wide range of issues that make it difficult for them to manage their lives, but they don’t want to need help – from us, or anyone. They feel they ‘should’ be able to do what their peers can do, and they just want to feel like everyone else. So they avoid admitting that they’re struggling, and they resist the help that is offered to them.

Trust is at the Core of Asking for Help

The most successful people in the world learn to recognize and overcome obstacles by asking for help and support, which is why “Asking for Help” is essential to teach kids with complex issues. The value of asking for help — while a difficult skill to transfer — will profoundly support kids, now and throughout their lives.

At the core of asking for help is trust – trust that it’s okay to need help, trust that people will meet our request with openness and acceptance rather than judgment or shame, trust that we can indeed overcome the obstacles in our path. If you think about it, it requires a certain kind of vulnerability to ask for help – and that can be really scary.

As parents, there are so many complicated issues that we’re navigating that it can be really difficult to figure out where to start. But nothing is more important that being inactive, connected relationship with our kids, and letting them know that it’s okay to be human. That connection is grounded in trust, and trust is the key to giving themselves permission to ask for help.

When our kids trust us, and other adults in their world, they learn to rely on those relationships to seek help when they need it. Ultimately, that is what will motivate your kids to seek your guidance in year’s to come. That ability to ask for help will set them up for a lifetime of success.

The post Teach Your Kids to Ask for Help – A Mother’s Success Story appeared first on ImpactADHD<sup>®</sup>.

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