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Italian liqueurs take center stage in this beer cocktail, which is topped with a splash of pale ale. Coltivare uses Deschutes Mirror Pond Pale Ale.

1½ oz. Amaro Cia Ciaro
½ oz. Fernet-Branca
1 oz. fresh lemon juice
½ oz. rich simple syrup (2:1)
2 oz. chilled pale ale
2 dashes Angostura bitters
Tools: shaker, strainer
Glass: snifter
Garnish: mint sprig

Combine all the ingredients except the beer in a shaker and shake with ice to chill. Strain into a snifter filled with large ice cubes. Top with beer; garnish.

Morgan Weber, Coltivare, Houston

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Just in time for warm weather, long weekends and the requisite day drinking that goes with it, Brooklyn-based brewery Sixpoint has rolled out its new Jammer Session Pack of tart, juicy brews. Based on the original release back in 2011 (a classic gose with sea salt and coriander) and a follow-up lemon-lime version, the Sixpoint Jammers now come in three additional flavors: Tropical, Ruby and Berry. Each brewed with the Jammer’s crisp, tangy base and blended with real fruit juice like pineapple, grapefruit and cranberry, the beers are bright and refreshingly tart, while clocking in at only 4-percent ABV. The Jammer Session Pack includes all five flavors and marks the newest year-round release for Sixpoint. For distribution, see sixpoint.com.

The post Drink of the Week: Sixpoint Brewery Jammer Session Pack appeared first on Imbibe Magazine.

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When the spicy ginger of a classic Dark ‘N Stormy meets the minty essence of a Mojito, a new rum cocktail is born. “When the mint bouquet and sweet smell of rum hits your nose you’ll feel like you’re on the beach,” says Makani bartender Gabriele Mercadante.

1½ oz. aged rum
¾ oz. fresh lime juice
½ oz. honey
½ oz. fresh ginger juice
5-7 mint leaves
½ oz. blackstrap rum, to float
Tools: muddler, shaker, strainer, fine-strainer
Glass: collins
Garnish: mint bouquet

Muddle the mint in a shaker tin, then add the remaining ingredients (minus the blackstrap rum), plus ice. Shake to chill, double strain into a Collins glass filled with fresh ice. Top with soda, float with the blackstrap, then garnish.

Gabriele Mercadante, Makani, Los Angeles

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The post Scurvy Root Rum Cocktail appeared first on Imbibe Magazine.

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Brooke Roberts Photography

If you’ve had a chance to visit our online shop recently, there’s a good chance our new special-edition Negroni cocktail napkins, made in collaboration with Dot and Army, caught your eye. Here’s an inside peek behind the Georgia-based napkin pros.

Beginning at age 8, Jennifer Zamudio got her creative kicks from behind the wheel of a used sewing machine. It was a pastime picked up from her mother, who sewed all of the clothes worn by Zamudio and her three siblings. “She would have me sit on her lap and show me the basics of sewing,” recalls Zamudio. From childhood on, Zamudio channeled her imaginative impulses through her sewing machine, crafting home goods for her extensive Barbie collection followed by backpacks for real-life friends. It was a homegrown hobby that she would one day build into a thriving business.

After majoring in art in college, Zamudio took a job as a teacher in her native San Diego. At home with kids of her own, she found her most impassioned sewing inspiration from the excess waste created by paper towels. “We just ripped them off without even using them all the way and trashed them,” she says. Instead, Zamudio began buying vintage floral napkins, and down the decorated rabbit hole she went. She purchased beautiful old fabrics and started designing her own napkins in kaleidoscopic colors trimmed with delicately sewn borders. Her mix-and-match wares became popular gifts for friends, inspiring her to sell them at the local farmers market. These stints proved successful enough to spawn an Etsy store she dubbed Dot and Army.

The name is drawn from Zamudio’s maternal grandparents Dorothy and Armand, and Dot and Army’s cheery handmade goods are the sweet embodiment of their namesake. “They’re very creative people, kind, generous and giving,” Zamudio says. “They’re really good examples of people you want to be when you grow up.”

The napkins themselves harken back to tablescapes of the family dinners her grandparents would regularly host, making the brand’s homage to them only natural. As Zamudio burned out on teaching, Dot and Army’s popularity soared. Online sales were steady, and wedding coordinators began reaching out to request large numbers of her napkins. It was the affirmation Zamudio needed to quit her day job and take the plunge to full-time. Along with husband, Robert, and two sons, Danny and Gavin, she moved to Georgia six years ago to be close to family, and production for Dot and Army moved in with them. Everyone, including Zamudio’s mom, contributed to the business where they could. “We went from room to room in our house—we kept trading different rooms for the bigger room, and as the business grew, we eventually took over the master bedroom,” says Zamudio, who, nearly four years in at that point, saw the need to upsize. “It’s so scary as a small business owner because you think, ‘Is it going to continue? Can we afford this?’ ” she says.

Kimbrough Daniels

Turns out, it did and she could. After a successful year of renting, she purchased a permanent home for the business. Located in the sleepy but slowly revitalizing downtown Brunswick, Dot and Army’s atmospheric workshop has old tin ceilings and restored hardwood floors dating to the 1800s that add a vintage style reminiscent of the napkins produced within. While the growing sewing operation occupies the back two-thirds of the building, the street-facing front features a neatly arranged retail space bathed in sunlight where Zamudio’s sons learn elements of the business during breaks from school.

From their downtown hub, Dot and Army turns out over 400 handmade dinner, cocktail and lunchbox-sized napkins a day, with orders going to homes, restaurants and bars around the country. On an average morning, Robert arrives at the studio and sews nearly 200 napkins while Zamudio checks emails and gets the kids ready for school. She’ll then arrive at the office, take a prolonged downtown stroll, then sew the day’s remaining napkins while her mom (the brand’s only other full-time employee) works on reusable sandwich wraps, bowl covers, and bibs.

Since Dot and Army’s founding 10 years ago, vintage floral fabrics have become a hot commodity, and Zamudio now bundles more modern varieties for her whimsical mix-and-match goods, but never passes on the opportunity to include old-fashioned textiles. Her offerings have also expanded, as she’s found inspired collaborators in brands like Food52, Of a Kind and Drinking with Chickens. Even with expanded retail, Zamudio remains more committed than ever to the brand’s eco-friendly beginnings, selling her reusable linen “un-paper towels” alongside stainless steel straws and containers, and the newly introduced (and immensely popular) zero-waste utensil wraps. “I think it’s so important, especially these days,” she says of the commitment to sustainability, adding that she plans to continue growth in that direction.

Even with growth in the pipeline, the brand’s core remains the communal nature of a table, inspired by Dot and Army’s dinners. “I feel like people put so much intention and thought into the ingredients they’re using—organic, locally grown, searching for recipes—why not take that extra step and set a table?” Zamudio says. “Putting a napkin on the table sets the tone and makes the people sitting there feel special.”

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With styles that span the flavor spectrum, sherry is a versatile ingredient that lends unique complexity to cocktails. Click here to learn more about sherry, then explore mixing your favorite style in these warm-weather recipes.

As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning
Cold-brew coffee meets red wine, sherry, lemon and tonic.

The B-Side
This low-ABV hit combines fino sherry and gin with fresh citrus, mint and seltzer.

Belafonte Spritz
A refreshing aperitif from Sydney with gin and fino sherry.

Esplanade Swizzle
Mezcal and amontillado sherry meet in this summery swizzle.

Flame of Love
This vodka and fino sherry drink was created at a Beverly Hills bar for Dean Martin.

Lo Sagrado
A semi-tropical, low-abv option for brunch made with oloroso sherry.

Mary Astor
An amontillado and gin cocktail that’s so refreshing, you’ll want a second round.

No Vermouth in Duluth
Fresh lime juice and pineapple syrup brighten this sherry cobbler.

Pisces Rising
Manzanilla sherry shines in this Peruvian pisco cocktail from Leyenda.

Seaworthy’s Goldfinch
Low proof is the name of the game in this refreshing fino highball.

Rebujito Sherry Punch 
A perfect low-proof party punch made with manzanilla sherry.

Sherry and Tonic
An amontillado sherry base makes this gentle enough to sip all afternoon.

Spruce Goose
Gin, amontillado sherry, orgeat, absinthe and cucumber make for a cooling glass of goodness.

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Created with warm nights in mind, this sherry sparkler is a refreshing antidote to summer’s swelter. Balancing the soft salinity of manzanilla sherry with the subtle spice of cinnamon syrup and the bright burst of fresh lemon, it’s a perfect low-proof party punch.

5 oz. manzanilla sherry
2 oz. fresh lemon juice
3 oz. cinnamon syrup
8 oz. seltzer, chilled
Tools: pitcher or punch bowl, wooden spoon
Glass: punch or juice
Garnish: lemon wheel and cinnamon stick

Combine the first 3 ingredients in a pitcher or punch bowl and chill. Once cold, fill the pitcher or bowl with ice, gently stir in the seltzer and garnish.

Because this cocktail is batched and chilled in the fridge, it can be made up to one day ahead of time; simply add the seltzer when serving. Serves 6-8.

Joe Cleveland for Capa, Orlando, Florida

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Cold-brew coffee and orange flower water add new dimension to this genever-based Koffie & Tonic from Singapore.

1 oz. genever
3½ oz. tonic (ATLAS uses Fever-Tree Mediterranean)
1½ oz. cold-brew coffee
3 dashes orange flower water
Tools: barspoon
Glass: highball
Garnish: grapefruit wheel

Combine the genever and tonic in a highball glass with ice and stir to combine. Float the cold-brew on top and garnish.

Jesse Vida, ATLAS, Singapore

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Whenever gin’s story is told, countries like the United Kingdom and Holland are big parts of the historical conversation. But while Northern Europe and England have made their permanent marks on the gin world, the 21st century is seeing gin evolve in myriad directions. Now, distillers worldwide are part of gin’s growing diaspora, with regional and cultural influences making their way into the bottle.

“It’s exciting the way gin distillers around the world are telling stories about places, traditions and cultures,” says Aaron Knoll, a Denver-based gin expert and author of Gin: The Art and Craft of the Artisan Revival. “That’s the biggest evolution I’ve seen in the past few years. You have Australian distillers looking at what the aboriginal peoples were eating, and highlighting the botanical heritage. And South Africa could be the next place for exotic botanicals—the Cape is home to this floristic kingdom of plants unrelated to anything else in the world, plants that can tell the story of South Africa in gin. Gin’s becoming a celebration of the earth’s botanical heritage, where it used to be based just on what was available in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. This narrative of gin, and the story it tells, is a great entry point for the newbie.”

As Knoll notes, classic styles of gin (as well as gin’s predecessor, genever) were largely shaped by the kinds of botanicals that made their way to Dutch and English seaports during the age of exploration—juniper and citrus, along coriander and other spices. But as regulations change around the world, enabling a global boom in craft distillation, distillers are looking to their own botanical heritage for ways to make distinctive gins.

Today, Japanese distillers are turning to regional citrus varieties like yuzu, kabosu and amanatsu, found in Nikka Coffey Gin, or flavors like sakura flower and gyokuro tea, as in Roku Gin. Himalayan juniper, ginger and dried mango are distilled into India’s Hapusa Himalayan Gin, while cascara from a coffee estate on South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal South Coast finds its way into D’Urban Scarlet Gin. Italian distillers evoke their culinary heritage by using Ligurian olives (Taggiasco ExtravirGin) or iris petals and bergamot (Peter in Florence), while lingonberries add a Scandinavian touch to Sweden’s Hernö Gin and Finland’s Helsinki Dry Gin.

Gin’s becoming a celebration of the earth’s botanical heritage, where it used to be based just on what was available in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries.

In Northern California, the distillers at St. George Spirits put their focus on their home region right into the name of their Terroir Gin, aiming to evoke the experience of a visit to Marin County’s Mount Tamalpais. “What we wanted to do was make sure that landscape was faithfully recreated,” says Lance Winters, master distiller at St. George. In developing the gin, Winters and head distiller Dave Smith started with gin’s core botanical, juniper, and used its piney character as a jumping-off point to bring in other aromatics and flavors, ranging from California bay laurel to Douglas fir and coastal sage. But while they had Northern California firmly in mind while creating the gin, they’ve found that this same combination of characteristics has proven evocative of a number of places. “We had the idea of this sense of place, and while we created it in a way we felt was faithfully reproducing the landscape of Mount Tam from an aromatic profile, there are people who’ve told us it brings back such strong memories of their home in Colorado that it brings them to tears,” Winters says. “I’ve had people tell me it reminds them of hunting for mushrooms in Poland, and of their childhood in North Dakota. It has a sense of place, but it’s a poetic sense of place—everybody can make it their own. I’ll get all California woo-woo and say that since we see distillation as an art form, as with art, you can have 100 people look at something and each see something different. They’re making [the gin] their own in a way that resonates with them emotionally.”

With literally thousands of new gins coming not only from the U.S. and Europe, but from Mexico, South America and Australia, distillers are increasingly considering this sense of place when designing new gins. It’s a global story that’s gone on for centuries, and that may just be starting a new chapter. “We’re just starting to scratch the surface,” says Keli Rivers, a Brooklyn-based ambassador for Sipsmith. “You can make gin anywhere, from anything, as long as it has juniper—and juniper from different regions brings different things to gin. It embodies travel, and flavors from different regions—that’s how gin started off, as a way to preserve these flavors, and gin does that better than any spirit I know. To see identity coming out of Mexico, South America, South Africa, using flavors from that area—I can get a little bit more of the color and culture that’s going on there.”

For more on the past, present and future of gin, be sure to check out the May/June 2019 issue, available here.

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For many, the upcoming long weekend is synonymous with the start of summer, so we’ve rounded up some of our favorite summery drink recipes. From brunch favorites to beer cocktails, here’s a full menu of fun ideas for Memorial Day Weekend drinks.

Basil Daisy Recipe
Bright and herbaceous, this vodka cocktail from Charleston’s The Darling Oyster Bar is the perfect summer refresher.

Beer and Loathing Cocktail
A frothy California saison brings a taste of sunshine to this slightly bitter Aperol and grapefruit-based cocktail.

Jägermeister Bloody Mary
A boldly bittersweet version of the classic brunch drink.

Misunderstood Beer Cocktail
Tall, cool and refreshing, this summery ginger-forward sipper from Chicago’s Sable uses a light beer to add effervescence.

New Fashioned
Keep things low-ABV with this spin on the Old Fashioned, which combines saké with an Italian aperitivo and dry red wine.

Palomish
The Paloma gets a spicy twist at No Vacancy in Los Angeles.

Parson’s Negroni Slushy
Bust out the blender for this frosty Negroni Slushy recipe and you’ll have friends flock to the party in droves.

Peach Tea Lemonade
Sweet peach purée mingles with black tea, plus a splash of vodka for a perfectly refreshing warm weather lemonade.

Pineapple Turmeric Margaritas
An extra-earthy take on the classic Margarita.

Price Charles Don’t Surf
A sunny riff on the Army & Navy.

Rib Tickler Spritz 
Consider this spritz recipe a brighter, bubbly version of the White Negroni, with St. Germain elderflower liqueur and Suze.

Strawberry Mango Pineapple Agua Fresca
Looking for a delicious non-alcoholic addition to the weekend’s festivities? The strawberry mango pineapple agua fresca from Los Angeles’ Petty Cash hits the spot.

The post Memorial Day Weekend Drinks Menu appeared first on Imbibe Magazine.

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Sparkling wine lends an elegant bounce to this mix of tequila and grapefruit liqueur.

1½ oz. blanco tequila
1 oz. grapefruit liqueur
¾ oz. fresh lime juice
2 dashes saline solution (1 part sea salt to 4 parts water)
3 oz. chilled cava or other sparkling wine
Tools: shaker, strainer, fine strainer
Glass: white wine glass
Garnish: grapefruit twist

Shake the first 4 ingredients with ice, then strain into a chilled glass and top with sparkling wine; garnish.

Jeff Kinder, The Jazz Estate, Milwaukee 

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