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Identity Designed by David Airey - 3w ago

Nationalmuseum is Sweden’s museum of art and design. The collections comprise of paintings, sculptures, drawings and prints from 1500-1900 and applied arts, design, and portraits from early Middle Ages up until present day.

The site in Stockholm has undergone a massive 5-year renovation project — it has created a modern museum environment that is better for both the art, the exhibitions, and for visitors. Nationalmuseum on Blasieholmen in Stockholm was designed by the Berlin architect Friedrich August Stüler in 1866, and it is with his original architecture in mind that Wingårdhs and architect Erik Wikerstål has opened up, restored, and modernised the building.

Jane Wentworth Associates and Hat-trick Design are a long standing partnership, with a successful track record in developing strategic brands for cultural organisations such as the Natural History Museum, Imperial War Museums, and the University of Westminster. Our work with Nationalmuseum began with a thorough review of its current brand and a clear understanding of its ambitions for the future.

Working together with all the museum’s staff, we developed a strategy to redefine what a museum of the future could be, by creating meaningful encounters between people and art.

This bold vision was the inspiration for a new visual identity that needed to create a dynamic platform for the future, whilst respecting the museum’s rich heritage. At the heart of the new identity is a logotype reflecting the Museum’s distinctive architecture and featuring a ligature — or typographic linking — of an ‘n’ and an ‘m’, to reflect the connection between past and future.

As well as celebrating the brilliance and diversity of the collections through bold use of imagery, the balance of old and new is also maintained through use of classical letter forms applied in a contemporary way. Both serif (Chronicle) and sans serif (Akzidenz) fonts are used throughout, creating consistency and flexibility across a huge range of applications.

More from Hat-trick Design and Jane Wentworth Associates.

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Identity Designed by David Airey - 3w ago

Lola Tara is a luxury fashion brand with a debut collection exclusively featuring jumpsuits and playsuits. We were responsible for the positioning, identity, garment branding, packaging, and website design.

The brand idea centres around the insight that choosing to wear a jumpsuit is a bold and liberating choice: a single garment that the wearer can style in her own unique way offers more freedom to just dress and seize the moment in life.

This chic, low maintenance outfit is perfect when travelling, working, or partying, defining itself as the choice for women who are confident, bold, and constantly on the move.


The visual identity features typography that represents the jumpsuit silhouette in the form of the three A’s in the logo, and rolls this out to create the broader typographic style.

The three A’s also represent the three strong women behind the brand: the founder, her sister, and her mother (Lola). The A figures expand across the identity to symbolise the Lola Tara tribe growing across the globe.


The founder is a fashion model living in the USA and Europe with roots in Nigeria. This broad geographic citizenship has informed the tone and feel of the identity with photography that captures various worldwide locations. The copywriting further reflects this using different languages and juxtaposing international scenes with playful pop culture references.

Print items were created using GF Smith Colorplan in ebony, dark grey, and park green, with a variety of foil blocked elements. The packaging was designed to heighten the luxurious feel.


The brand imagery features models of different ethnic backgrounds in the same strong stance as seen in the logo motif. The models were photographed against backdrops that reflect the diversity of locations and settings in which the garment collection is perfectly at home.

More from Afterhours.

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Identity Designed by David Airey - 1M ago

Petbarn has been delivering expert pet care in Australia for nearly twenty years and they know the importance of delivering the best for our pets. The rise of convenience supermarkets that now offer a diverse range of pet products was beginning to impact their business. Petbarn needed to deliver a differentiated brand experience to elevate their brand above and beyond the cold, corporate, and value-driven face of the competition. We needed to remind consumers why they, and their pets, love Petbarn.

Inspired by the weird and wonderful personalities of the pets we care so much about, we helped transform Petbarn’s identity into a living, breathing, tail-wagging brand. We worked with Australian illustrator/animator, Marco Palmieri, to create the family of furry, feathered, and scaly friends who make up the new identity and reflect a business shift from utility to love and care.

More from Landor.

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Identity Designed by David Airey - 2M ago

Located in the heart of east London, Three Waters is a development of more than 300 new apartments, designed to combine city living with a waterside lifestyle. Here, the three waters of Bow Creek, the Limehouse Cut, and the River Lea meet in London’s fastest growing area. Raised gardens, roof terraces, and private balconies offer cityscapes with headspace and with the Tube and DLR moments away, Three Waters offers Zone Two living with Zone One journey times.

A joint development between Mount Anvil and Peabody, the team appointed us to define the name, creative strategy, and branding and advertising that positioned the development within the realms of “disruptive luxury.” The branding was followed by an extensive rollout across print, digital, and environmental graphics.

The brand identity centres around a calligraphic mark made with ink and water. The three lines represent the characteristics of each waterway that surrounds the development. Bow Creek, The River Lea and The Limehouse Cut, each represented by a linear form, have their own characteristics, whether that’s a tidal rhythm, man-made canal, or meandering river.

The brand is supported by hand-rendered calligraphic elements, used for illustrations and infographics, reflecting the ebb and flow of the water.

The branding comes together in the brochure design, which is divided into three sections through a bespoke tab system.

The visual identity is underpinned by the core proposition “Minutes from the City, metres from the water.” This is accompanied by a suite of creative headlines such as “crafted by the water,” and “close to the City, connected to the world.” A neutral colour palette of earthy tones and concrete grey is a nod to the development’s unique location. Highlights in bright red reference the London red brick of the development’s architecture, whilst a bespoke suite of icons combine style and functionality.

We art-directed a photoshoot and brand film to capture the quality of life that living by the water offers, whilst also reinforcing that key central London landmarks and business centres are just minutes away.

We worked with the in-house team at Mount Anvil to ensure consistent application of the brand across the globe, from the UK marketing suite through to launch events in Asia. Comprehensive brand guidelines serve to protect the new identity system, and today we continue to support the brand in the delivery of key print and digital marketing material.

With thanks to Wonderhatch for photography and film production, and Millerhare for CGI and animation.

More from Lantern.

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Identity Designed by David Airey - 3M ago

Abad is a family furniture design company in Getxo, Spain. They’re in a new business stage they’ve called “Abad: The recomposition” where the keys products are formed with a mixture of materials, concepts, and textures.

The identity was developed upon the idea of “texture collectors.” We designed the logo and marketing pieces based on sample boxes of geologists and collectors: the box is Abad’s product catalogue, and the filing dividers are the business cards.

Tahoma is the typeform selected for the logo and as the main typography. We were looking for something masculine and Tahoma fit perfectly.

In Abad’s collection they show the materials’ universe, craftsmen, and processes. We developed Abad’s furniture catalogue in an attempt to catch the attention of furniture editors, and to stand out from all the other proposals the editors receive.

With the 3D catalogue we wanted to activate senses in the receiver such as touch and smell to evoke the universe of Abad products and to awaken the potential customers’ curiosity.

We produced a total of 52 customised boxes, each lined with Napura thermo-reactive paper. We chose that paper because if we apply heat while embossing the logo on top of each box the paper changes colour (as you can see in the pictures). Additionally, we fell in love with the particular shade of blue.

Models for including inside each box were created with a 3D printer, and the photographs were printed in digital inkjet in order to achieve the quality of offset in such a short run.

For the website, we thought of the concept as “creating the web” as if we needed to fill a physical space with all the elements we wanted to share and show: the products, the texts of the different sections, and the Abad brothers themselves, of course! We recorded a video that tells the process.

More from Marina Goñi.

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Identity Designed by David Airey - 3M ago

A new brand identity for All 4, designed in collaboration with Channel 4’s in-house agency 4creative, includes a new All 4 logo — a 2D version of the classic logo with a streaming “Playbar” at its core — and an adaptive digital-first experience across social media and VoD, mobile, big screen, and desktop.

With a disruptive and rapidly evolving entertainment landscape, the challenge was to develop a sleek, new identity that worked alongside the newly unified Channel 4 brands while creating a distinct, seamless, and next-generation experience for All 4.

In action, the Playbar expands horizontally to become an infinite stream that guides, frames, and connects every piece of content, showcasing the vast library of shows available. The angle of the leading edge of the 4 is used consistently to create a sense of forward momentum and is a strong graphic element of the look. In motion, it’s fluid, slick, and effortless. Suggesting scrubbing through the timeline, revealing show images and titles through silky-smooth parallax motion.

Two vibrant accent colours, a sharp yellow and an acidic teal, bring a refreshing energy and digital quality to the look. This is offset with a deep grey that adds a premium feel, while the use of Channel 4’s Headline brand font in its boldest, italic weight throughout creates confident typographic language. From simple, clear headings online to unstructured, offset layouts in print and social and on-air.

Every aspect of the brand has been refined to create a digital-first user experience. With the Playbar integrated into everything from the UI and actual streaming bar in the All 4 app when watching content to on-air promos, social stories with a powerful use of typography and strikingly graphic outdoor billboards.

More from DixonBaxi and 4creative.

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Identity Designed by David Airey - 3M ago

Buto is an intelligent video hosting platform, helping professional organisations engage, retain and build their audiences using online video. Originally conceived in 2009, Buto has since served clients such as Shell, Mitsubishi, England Rugby, and Thames Water.

Andy (the Buto CEO) contacted us after being recommended by one of our previous contacts. He sent an email, we set up a meeting in person, and it all went from there.

Buto’s old logo

Buto were going through some internal changes, had realised their users were shifting, and also felt their current (previous) look was dated and didn’t match their offering. We were asked to create a new look that reflected who Buto are today — to appeal to their current audience and potential users. The previous identity wasn’t robust or well thought-out, it was cobbled together when the company was originally conceived, and elements were added to it over the years.

Our collective research and insight highlighted how Buto offered video hosting with ease and warmth to a professional client base; with clear, in-depth data being at the forefront.

The visual identity is based upon a 30 degree angle; synonymous with ‘play’ buttons and isometric grids. Using the 30 degree angle in an upward trajectory evokes positivity, giving the perfect visual metaphor that encapsulates Buto’s personality, and the impact the platform has on clients’ video content and statistics. The 30 degree angle is a constant thread running through the logotype, iconography, illustrations and colour landscapes. A play icon is also introduced in certain applications, utilising a variety of finishes and effects – adding a playful, tactile element.

From start to launch, the project took nine months. The concept presentation, approval, and finalisation was speedy, but bringing applications inline took some time. The Buto team have an internal developer that we worked closely with to produce the website. The wordmark is an adaptation of Cera Pro. We felt the typeface reflected the spirit and personality of Buto and their team – warm, friendly and personable.

More from Two of Us.

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Identity Designed by David Airey - 7M ago

Issho translates as “together” in Japanese, so the idea of “togetherness” was a theme throughout the restaurant branding, with kintsugi being at the very core. Kintsugi is an ancient Japanese art form where repairing an item with gold joins makes the object more desirable than before. Often different pieces of pottery are used like “patches” with varying patterns, colours and textures.

Issho logo exploration

To quietly echo this theme, the logo uses a “double s” glyph within a hanko seal.

The copper join is used in a singleminded way across all menus and printed items. The join is sometimes on its own in a way that disrupts the copy — like on the food menu — and at other times the join is shown with different finishes and patterns. The drinks menu, for example, has a pattern in one section, a UV varnish in another, and a colour in the third.

We tried many different techniques to get the kintsugi join working in a controllable way so we could combine the elements and menus together with one continuous crack. We went from drawing in different mediums to smashing porcelain.

In the end what worked best was to simply tear paper and then reattach with a gap and scan. The cracks were then isolated and retouched to get the correct feel. That process was discovered in the concept stage, and worked so well it was carried through to artwork. It was time consuming, especially making all of the printed items connect, but in the end it added an extra level of detail that was really worth it.

We created three modern patterns with the Japanese/British London-based pattern house, Eley Kishimoto.

Pattern research

As the restaurant is based in Leeds, The British pattern features the white rose of Yorkshire, and to complement some of the water details in the interior (including fish scale screens) the Japanese pattern was created with an ichimatsu stream reference.

A third pattern brings both of these elements together. The black and white version of the third “together” pattern was also used in the ceiling of the interior.

Working with Eley Kishimoto was a real pleasure, particularly seeing how they create modern patterns from traditional sources. They have a very single-minded and concept-driven approach, and were able to apply contrast between the British patterns (embellished, romantic, tight, and filled) and the Japanese patterns (spaced, simple, graphic, and loose).

We created six large posters showing Japanese/British people, shot by Laura Lewis and Benjamin Bentley, and joined with copper foil. British and Asian models were sourced and shot in a simple portraiture style.

The crack was created using the same technique as with the menus, before an incredibly large rub down was made and applied (this needed very calm hands). The artwork was then framed and hung in various locations within the restaurant space.

A distressed metal plate with a copper kintsugi join was used for the restaurant signage, with warm light boxes used for directional signage in reference to a traditional Japanese paper lamp-stand.

Finally, we had more than 50 small kintsugi plates made to act as the bill holders for the end of the meal.

Kintsugi plates in the kiln

Dutchscot elsewhere on Identity Designed: Meraki.

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Birmingham’s history is one of creating; of craft and of industry, a history in which design sits at the very heart. Why the city has never had a design festival — whilst other UK cities have well and truly flown their design flags with great pride — is a mystery. A group of Midlands makers, maestros and misfits felt the time was right to remedy this. June 2018 saw the launch of the Birmingham Design Festival — a celebration of the dynamic design industry in the second city and surrounding areas.

Setting up a design festival is no small task — the sponsorship, the venues, the speakers, the logistics — all enough to make the mind melt, but one of the toughest asks is getting the message out there and inspiring people to come along and get involved. Here lies the job of the brand. Luckily the Birmingham Design Festival team consisted of a number of designers that ply their trade in this particular area — Luke Tonge, Ash O’Brien from Two of Us and Paul Felton from Common Curiosity.

From the outset we were keen that the branding had real substance and longevity. We wanted to develop a visual identity that trod a delicate balance of representing the city of Birmingham and its design industry, whilst swerving any overused clichés.

Birmingham has been known as the “City of a Thousand Trades” and “the workshop of the world.” They’re sayings ingrained in our city, and a reputation us Brummies are all proud of. This reputation for craft and the handmade felt like something we should absolutely look to bring to the fore and harness in the brand identity.

Through our research we uncovered a rich graphic language in existence for centuries — found in hallmarks. A hallmark is a series of marks containing letters, numerals and symbols, struck on metal items to denote the content of the piece, the maker behind the design and any distinguishing characteristics. Hallmarks date back to the 4th century AD — silver bars marked as belonging to Emperor Augustinian around AD 350 represents the oldest known form of consumer protection. This graphic system has continued to modern day and is prevalent in the jewellery industry — one of Birmingham’s most famous exports. The link between this system, making jewellery, and Birmingham felt like a perfect fit. Birmingham also has its own Assay Office, one of only four in the UK. We thought we could look to harness this graphic lexicon that is intrinsically linked to Birmingham’s historical and contemporary craft, but re-appropriate it for a contemporary forward-looking festival.

We began to create a series of graphic shapes inspired by existing hallmarks and experimented with including letters, numerals and symbols relevant to the Birmingham Design Festival. We liked how we could be flexible with this system of “carriers” and elements within, so created not a single logo, but a system whereby multiple and ever-changing logos could be developed. The elements are all rooted in the same aesthetic so consistency is maintained by the parameters of colour, typeface, and the system itself. This allows us to be flexible with the construction and arrangement.

The carriers will hold the name/acronym and the year of the festival, and we have also developed a BDF monogram in the shape of an anchor — a nod to Birmingham’s assay mark. Each year, the festival will have a theme that becomes the driving force behind the programme of events.

The single word “Forward” has sat proudly under the city’s coat of arms since 1838 as it grew from a town to a city, and it felt like the perfect theme for the inaugural festival. The triangle (or arrow) that’s used also references a hallmark symbol relating to an old Birmingham assay mark.

The ongoing colour palette is blue and grey, inspired by the Birmingham coat of arms, with accompanying colours defined by the yearly theme. This year, complementary red, green, and yellow hues were selected — all energetic and progressive colours.

Typography also plays a key role in the identity, and we have a suite of three typefaces. Cornelia is used in the wordmark and was selected for its similarities to the old factory and warehouse signage still visible on many of Birmingham’s institutions of craft and manufacturing. Noe Display is our primary typeface, selected for its chiselled serifs that again reference Birmingham’s industrial heritage and share visual similarities to the hallmarks. And finally we wanted to pay homage to Birmingham’s most famous type designer John Baskerville, so our body copy is set in Baskerville.

More from Luke Tonge, Ash O’Brien, and Paul Felton.

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Identity Designed by David Airey - 9M ago

The Two Anchors is a unique new food concept created by Jonathan White and Phill Lewis. The concept is experimental and ambitious, with new menus created every week using fresh, seasonal, and sustainable ingredients. Situated at Ogmore-by-Sea, it embraces the simple idea that everything tastes better outdoors. They take no bookings and have no tables, customers just rock up, buy their food, and enjoy it on the beach. When the they run out of food, they close for the evening — so the best way to ensure you can get your Two Anchors fix is by following @thetwoanchors on social media, where they post their latest menus and opening times.

For all the hard work and creativity that goes on behind the scenes, the end product is really simple: Beautifully cooked fish by the sea. We love what they do and we can’t wait to see where they take their brand next.

Photography

We had the pleasure of experiencing the whole concept at Ogmore-by-Sea while doing a photoshoot for them. We aimed to capture the fresh ingredients, the skilled cooking techniques, the personality of the people, and the sense of location. Here’s a small selection of the photographs we took on a warm summer’s evening (and more here).

Creating a custom typeface

Inspired by our client’s picket fence set-up and the beautiful textures of their food and equipment, we created a custom headline typeface to help capture the brand personality.

We made a stamp in a similar shape to their picket fencing, and discovered that you could create almost any letterform with just a few prints. Combining the bold and unique lettering with the gritty textures from the stamp created a result that represented the sustainability and honesty of the food concept.

Social media

Apart from face-to-face, the way The Two Anchors communicate with their customers is through social media. So we wanted to ensure that the quality and personality of their brand was accurately and consistently represented through the posts on their social presence.

Photo by Matthew Browne.

More from John & Jane.

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