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As Hypatia finalizes its new governance structure, we regret to announce that we will be postponing the Hypatia Diversity Grants until 2020. This includes individual as well as project grants. In the meantime, we invite you to plan and prepare your application materials for the next submission period. We look forward to reading your submissions in 2020! To read more about the Hypatia Diversity Grants and the application process, please visit: https://hypatiaphilosophy.org/hypatia-resources/hypatia-diversity-grants/

The post Diversity Grants Postponed Until 2020 appeared first on hypatia.

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The Editors’ Annual Report 2017 covers an overview of editorial activities, reports on submission and review activities, distribution highlights, and special initiatives.

The post Annual Report 2017 appeared first on hypatia.

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The Editors’ Annual Report 2018 covers an overview of editorial activities, reports on submission and review activities, distribution highlights, and special initiatives. Although the 2018 annual report would typically not be written until all the data from Wiley and from our own reports become available for 2018, it is being written in December 2018 because of the editorial transition taking place in January 2019. It also covers information and metrics supplied by Wiley for 2017. Similar metrics for 2018 will available in Spring 2019 from Wiley.


The post Annual Report 2018 appeared first on hypatia.

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The Editors’ Annual Report 2018 covers an overview of editorial activities, reports on submission and review activities, distribution highlights, and special initiatives. Although the 2018 annual report would typically not be written until all the data from Wiley and from our own reports become available for 2018, it is being written in December 2018 because of the editorial transition taking place in January 2019. It also covers information and metrics supplied by Wiley for 2017. Similar metrics for 2018 will available in Spring 2019 from Wiley.


The post Annual Report 2018 appeared first on hypatia.

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Hypatia’s Individual Diversity Grant competition for January 1, 2019 will be postponed until the June 1, 2019 deadline because of the transition between editorial teams. In June we welcome applications for Diversity Project Grants as well as for Individual Grants.  

The post January 2019 Diversity Grant Postponed appeared first on hypatia.

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Hypatia deplores the recent fraudulent actions of Peter Boghassian, James Lindsay, and Helen Pluckrose. They have violated a cornerstone of acquiring and disseminating knowledge—trust—as well as many of the ethical norms of academic publishing. Hypatia, along with many other journals from a wide range of disciplines, is a member of the Committee for Publishing Ethics (COPE) and subscribes to its principles. Hypatia will publish neither essay submitted to us.

Hypatia is a pluralist feminist philosophy journal whose leaders, authors, and readers understand that feminism is not a monolith. We expect feminists to disagree with each other about many matters. We also expect those who submit manuscripts to use their own names, argue for positions that they support, represent data and the positions of others fairly, and engage deeply with relevant scholarly literature. It is especially important for journals that want to encourage submissions by younger and marginalized scholars to avoid placing unnecessary hurdles in the way of submitting and revising manuscripts, to “desk reject” very few manuscripts, and to give extensive comments on submissions.  This is what we try to do at Hypatia. At the same time, we hope to revisit our procedures to see whether we can better screen for fraud in ways that will burden neither the very authors we hope to encourage to submit their work nor the reviewers we ask to give their time to their important task.

The post Statement Concerning Fraudulent Submissions appeared first on hypatia.

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Hypatia Special Issue: Conjure Feminism: Tracing the Genealogy of a Black Women’s Intellectual Tradition

Volume 36, Issue 1, Winter 2021

Guest Editors: Kinitra Brooks, Kameelah L. Martin, and LaKisha Simmons

We are excited to announce a call for papers for a special issue of Hypatia on “Conjure Feminism,” African diasporic feminist scholarship that explores the long history of black women’s active construction and maintaining of a generative cosmological framework that centers spirit work as that sacred space where the physical and spiritual worlds meet. Conjure feminism privileges diasporic women’s knowledge and folkloric practices of spirit work, inclusive of U.S., Caribbean, and South American, as well as West & Central African spiritual traditions in which women of African descent engage. Its cosmological framework provides Black folx the fluidity necessary for survival and thriving while constantly shifting in a world that will kill you. Mainstream Black folx have long claimed the wisdom of their familial matriarchs—particularly those in the U.S. South and the Global South—yet have always felt the necessity to add and many times replace this knowledge with more learned and ultimately Western intellectual pursuits.

Through articulating Conjure Feminism, we call into being a theoretical lens through which one recognizes the Divine Feminine and the natural world as consorts; and it is from this immaculate coupling that black women pull their intuition, second sight, incantations, and rituals that allow them to thrive in a world hostile against their mere existence. Conjure Feminism’s adherents include Tituba, Zora Neale Hurston, Marie Laveau, Nanny of the Maroons, Yaa Asantewaa; women who we see as not only activists but philosophers and intellectual matriarchs of Conjure Feminism. We must interrogate why these women were not considered philosophers in the traditional mode while simultaneously placing them in that very regard.

We invite work by scholars across the disciplines (African Diaspora Studies, Critical Philosophies of Race, Religious Studies, Anthropology/Ethnography, Afro-Latin American Studies, Folklore, History, Food Studies, Medical Humanities, and/or Women’s and Gender Studies as examples) to consider these questions as they relate to black women’s spiritual work, #blackgirlmagic, histories of black performance, black feminist and womanist literatures and media, black grandmothers, radical black midwives and doulas (in the past or present day), and black homemaking and homesteading. Papers that explore ideas of “Conjure Feminism” as an African diasporic phenomenon/philosophy and are located in North America, the Caribbean, Latin America, Africa, and Europe are encouraged. Each submission to this special issue should consider at least one of the following in constructing their theoretical frameworks: black women’s world making; theorizations of life, death, afterlife, or ancestors; womanist theologies and spiritualities; black feminist ethics; ontologies of black womanhood; black feminist philosophies; black women’s epistemological traditions.

Possible topics may include:

  • Histories of Conjuring as resistance to oppression
  • Black Conjure Feminist Foremothers
  • Black Women as Life Sustaining: For example, the histories of black midwives, black women and folk medicine, radical black doulas, black motherhood.
  • Black Feminist Art and Performance: For example, artists that work at the intersections of past, present, and future and consider African diasporic memory, landscape and earth, the transatlantic slave trade.
  • Transatlantic Understandings of Conjuring: For example, cross-national and transnational belonging, female orisha/loa as a source/site of conjure feminism.
  • Black Feminist Interventions in Afro-Pessimism: For example, black feminists’ musings on notions of “death” and social death, black feminist understandings of fertility, black feminist (re)readings of classic texts caught up in the debates.
  • Black Women, Gardening and Food Studies: For example, the organization or inheritance of black mothers’/grandmothers’ gardens, tending to the earth, food as African diasporic memory, histories of folk medicine, herbal remedies.

Submission deadline: August 1, 2019

Manuscripts intended for review as articles should be 7,000 to 10,000 words, excluding notes and bibliography, prepared for anonymous review, and accompanied by an abstract of no more than 200 words. In addition to articles, we invite submissions for our Musings section. These should not exceed 4,000 words, excluding notes and bibliography. All submissions will be subject to external review. For more details please see Hypatia’s submission guidelines.

Please submit your manuscript to: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/hypa. When you submit, make sure to select “Conjure Feminism” as your manuscript type, and also send an email to the guest editors indicating the title of the paper you have submitted: Kinitra Brooks (kinitradbrooks@gmail.com), Kameelah L. Martin (kameelah.martin@outlook.com), and LaKisha Simmons (kisha@umich.edu).

The post CFP Special Issue: Conjure Feminism: Tracing the Genealogy of a Black Women’s Intellectual Tradition (Submissions due 8/1/19) appeared first on hypatia.

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After an extensive search, a new editorial team for Hypatia has been enthusiastically and unanimously accepted by the Search Committee, chaired by Kim Hall, the Task Force, chaired by Sally Haslanger, Serene Khader, and Yannik Thiem, and the newly reconstructed Nonprofit Board, chaired by Linda Martín Alcoff.

The new Co-Editors are: Bonnie J. Mann, Erin McKenna, Camisha Russell, and Rocío Zambrana, all of the University of Oregon. Sarah LaChance Adams from the University of Wisconsin – Superior, will take on the role of Managing Editor. Their five-year tenure will begin January 1, 2019.

The new editorial team is very diverse, both philosophically and demographically. They state that “Our first priority as an editorial team will be to build on Hypatia’s already strong reputation by increasing both the philosophical and the demographic pluralism of the journal.” We are confident that under their editorship Hypatia will be an important resource for feminist thinking that is philosophical, interdisciplinary, and intersectional.

This will be the second time Hypatia has found a home at the University of Oregon. The Philosophy Department at the University of Oregon is recognized as one of the foremost PhD-granting programs nationally and internationally to feature feminist philosophy as a key area of research. Its faculty includes recognized experts in a broad range of feminist thought. In Spring 2018 the University of Oregon had eighteen PhD students working in feminist philosophy as a central focus; seven of these were international students.

The new editorial team will be supported by the University of Oregon’s Philosophy Department and the Center for the Study of Women in Society, a research center that promotes scholarship on gender and sexuality. They will also be supported by the University of Wisconsin – Superior.

The Task Force and Nonprofit Board want to express our deep appreciation for all the important work done between July 2017 and December 2018 to keep Hypatia running. In particular, we would like to thank the Hypatia Interim Co-Editors: Ann Garry, Serene Khader, and Alison Stone, and Managing Editor, Miranda Pilipchuk, as well as the Interim Co-Editors of Hypatia Reviews Online, Joan Woolfrey and Simon Ruchti, and HRO Managing Editor, Maja Sidzinska.

The post New Editorial Team Chosen for Hypatia appeared first on hypatia.

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Diversity Project Grants were awarded to:

Sandrine Bergès and Saniye Vatansever (Bilkent University), “Supporting Women in Philosophy in Turkey” a multi-part project including a student conference, mentoring, workshop, and speaker series.

Andrea Pitts (UNC Charlotte) and Perry Zurn (American University), “Trans Philosophy Project,” a multi-faceted project including a trans philosophy conference, a trans resource initiative including best practices and bibliography.

Nancy Tuana and Emma Velez (both Penn State University), “Toward Decolonial Feminisms,” partial support for conference speakers.

Four Individual Grants were awarded to graduate students for conference papers that contribute to diversifying feminist philosophy or philosophy in general:

Jonathan Kwan (CUNY), Rebecca Monteleone (Arizona State University), Valérie Simon (University of Oregon), Tiia Sudenkaarne (University of Turku)

The post Congratulations to the Hypatia Diversity Award Winners appeared first on hypatia.

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