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There’s no escaping the technological world — and who would want to? According to Bullhorn’s 2018 North American Staffing & Recruiting Trends Report, staffing and recruiting firms are diving in head first. In fact, 52 percent of firms anticipate an increase in tech spending.

If you’re one of those, it’s critical anything you spend money on is used effectively and efficiently. Because as a staffing pro, you have no time to waste when filling clients’ open positions.

Not only are they paying you to fill the role, but also the longer it remains open, the more strain your clients experience. And, let’s be honest, the faster you fill that position, the higher your fill rate becomes — impressing all current and potential clients, and allowing you to focus on the next open position.

With digital interviews, you have the power to help clients screen candidates faster by giving them in-depth insight into each candidate they review. This allows the best candidates to stand out to your clients and improves placement speed.

Let’s take it a step further by improving your digital interview experience for candidates and clients:

Coach candidates on best practices

The more you prepare candidates, the better their chances of impressing your clients. Start by ensuring candidates understand why digital interviews are an important part of the process. Explain how employers and hiring managers will see a much clearer picture of their skills and qualifications. Arguably more important, employers will also connect with candidates on a relatable, personable level — allowing them to make a faster assessment and move forward.

Once candidates understand the importance of digital interviews, guide them through best practices by offering resources, such as best interview practice guides, tips on attire, how-to guides to answer frequently asked questions, and tips on finding the perfect interview location.

Further take control of the candidate experience by bringing candidates into your office to complete digital interviews. Set up a professional background and walk them through the interview in real time.

By giving candidates the opportunity to deliver the best version of themselves, clients will receive top-quality videos with their most critical questions answered.

Take control of one-way #digitalinterviews by bringing candidates into your environment. #staffing
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Collaborate on insightful questions

Questions are at the heart of every interview. Each question must be insightful, giving clients a deeper look behind candidates’ resumes.

To do this, it’s critical you collaborate with clients to come up with the questions they need candidates to answer.

Together, prepare questions that will help clients get to the bottom of the question, “what would make you feel confident to move forward with a candidate?” Based on your clients’ responses, craft questions together that allow candidates to demonstrate their skills, qualifications, work style, personal interests, attitude, and drive.

Then, use these specific questions during digital interviews. When you send clients your shortlist of candidates, they’re now receiving the exact information needed to make a quick and informed decision.

Impress clients with top candidates

Show candidates the days of educated guesswork recruiting are over. You are now sending them only top candidates — and your digital interviews are proof.

When you share the video interviews with clients, be sure to point out how you structured the questions around what’s important to them.

The videos add an additional element to your typical presentation which makes your candidates more tangible to clients. As a result, your clients will be empowered to take quicker action on who they want to move forward with.

A pro tip is to mutually agree on a deadline for clients to provide you with feedback the interviews you send over. This keeps your process moving and will ultimately lead to faster placements.

Are You Asking the Best Questions? Your interview questions need to get you the most useful information for your clients from the start.

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It can be difficult to run an understaffed business. When you’re understaffed there is more work coming in than people to do it.

As a business owner or manager, you may feel frustrated by many things. Perhaps you’re noticing a high employee turnover rate, an alarming rise in customer complaints, and an increase in overtime costs. You may also feel you’re falling short of your business goals, constantly need to extend project deadlines, and don’t have enough people to take on new clients.

And, of course, you know your business is in trouble if your staff looks exhausted and you haven’t taken any time off for weeks on end.

Fortunately, if you go about it the right way, you can find new candidates quickly following this simple recruitment process:

4 Steps to Finding the Right Candidate

When you want to recruit, interview, and onboard the right person for a specialized job, you should research the position, write a job description, review incoming resumes, and interview promising candidates.

Research the position

Find out what other companies are doing by checking out their job descriptions on job boards. Scan job descriptions similar to the one you’re planning on advertising. Understand what skills and experience employers are seeking.

Put yourself in the shoes of a potential candidate to distinguish between well-written and poorly-written job descriptions. What keywords are smart recruiters using in their job titles? How are they describing the job? What salary range are they offering?

Now set yourself the task of writing a job description that is as good or better. Make a list of all your needs. What do you expect your new employee to do? What characteristics are you seeking? For instance, you may need an industrious person if you run a fast-paced business. Interestingly enough, candidates who earn online degrees often happen to be highly industrious. This may be because they study for their online classes after already putting in a hard day’s work.

Write a job description

Your job description should be warm and inviting. Try to paint a picture of your workplace, identifying all the best things about it.

Provide a clear and meaningful job description. Think about what keywords your ideal candidate will look for and insert them into your job description.

Accurately describe the job’s responsibilities, detail the requirements, and don’t forget to mention any rewards, perks, spiffs, and benefits. In short, try to be encouraging by writing in a friendly, conversational, and informative way.

Review incoming resumes

If you wrote an excellent job description, you will receive many resumes.

When reviewing resumes look for the following features:

  • Quantitative evidence of achievements in previous jobs
  • Longevity at various jobs
  • Clear explanations about employment gaps
  • Signs of steady career progress
  • Errors in grammar, spelling, and dates
  • An inventory of skills and experience
  • Hard and soft skills related to your advertised job
Interview promising candidates

The next step, of course, is to interview promising candidates. When they come to the interview, find out why they want the position and to work for your company. Also, try to discover their strengths and weaknesses on the job, their professional achievements, and what they are looking for from a job besides a paycheck.

If the interview goes well, check all references from past employers. If the candidate’s information turns out to be accurate, invite them to join your organization.

Wrap-Up

In summary, when things get hectic in your office, you must act fast to hire the right person. The longer you postpone it, the more chaotic your business will become. The process goes smoothly if you systematically research the position, write a good job description, meticulously review all incoming resumes, carefully interview the best candidates, and check all references. Chances are you may be pleasantly surprised at how many talented people you’ll be able to find for the job.

About the Author

Robert Cordray is a former business consultant and entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience and a wide variety of knowledge in multiple areas of the industry such as corporate leadership, employee engagement, workplace culture, and entrepreneurship. Robert earned a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) from the University of Chicago.

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Clients love your staffing firm because your team isn’t afraid to dig in and do the dirty work. You hold nothing back when searching for candidates, finding their qualifications beneath massive piles of resumes, and matching only top candidates with clients’ demands.

The trust clients give your team to screen for candidate fit before sending selections to their inbox is both an honor and a burden. Unfortunately, the potential you see in a candidate may not always read loud and clear to clients.

When clients don’t clearly see why a candidate matches with their company, it slows the hiring process and creates a sense of dangerous uncertainty. The need to find clarity faster is likely why 55 percent of companies are increasing investment in virtual interviews, the fastest growing area of spending in talent acquisition, according to Deloitte’s HR Technology Disruptions 2018 Report.

In the report, Josh Bersin discloses, “Discussions I’ve had with many talent acquisition leaders indicate that video interviewing has moved beyond screening and is poised to become the next
iteration of an assessment center…”

As the new ‘assessment centers,’ virtual interviews will give staffing firms the power to gain in-depth insights of candidates to share with clients. Clients who have videos of top candidates in their hands will have the power to make informed and effective hiring decisions.

To help you and your staffing team understand how to use virtual interviews to enable clients to better gauge for fit, we reached out to our experts. Here’s what they had to say:

Gain deeper insights into candidates’ skills

Our clients get access to a wider pool of candidates when we hire virtually. Virtual interviews are used in several ways during our screening process. We really sell the opportunity in job descriptions and candidates must jump through of a number of hoops demonstrating an ability to follow directions (rare), their attention to detail, and a desire for the job.

As we hire project managers to develop into operations managers, we need confident leaders with strong interpersonal skills. Candidates can talk a good game over the phone, but when we request video screen shares to walk through a skills test, we get a clear picture. It tests their ability to work with online tools and their confidence with skill fundamentals.

Mandi Ellefson, Founder of Hands-Off CEO

Candidates talk a good game on the phone but #videointerviews give you the clearest picture. @MandiEllefson
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Discover professionalism early on

A live or recorded virtual interview will also show you and your clients if candidates present themselves professionally, and give you a look at their people skills. I scheduled an interview with someone who I initially thought was fantastic, then saw the disorderly messy office behind them.

I knew in the first minute that they weren’t the right fit.

Mandi Ellefson, Founder of Hands-Off CEO

Focus specifically on candidate fit

I used a two-way, live virtual interview to screen a candidate and gauge their fit for a client. During the interview, I could tell they were a good fit for my client. They spoke very eloquently, seemed like a positive person, and someone who would, overall, be a pleasure to be around. They also seemed smart and knowledgeable about the company and its goals.

I recorded our two-way virtual interview. This allowed me to later edit out the parts I felt my client wouldn’t need to see. I kept the parts that really highlighted the candidate’s strengths and qualities they could contribute to the position.

To further ensure my client was focused on gauging the candidate’s fit, I reminded them of the qualities they should be looking for in candidates. I also painted a picture of a candidate that seems perfect, but, in actuality, is not a good fit for the position.

Nate Masterson, HR Manager of Maple Holistics

#Virtualinterviews allow #staffing pros to highlight candidate strengths and fit. @MapleHolistics
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___

Learn how staffing firms just like yours are using video interviews to drive more placements.

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Millennials now officially outnumber Baby Boomers and make up more than 1/3 of the working group in the US. They are dominating businesses, establishing their own firms, and startups.

But the most significant number of millennials are working 9-5 jobs. This number seems to be growing steadily, and at the same time changing the traditional workplace setup. Whether it is the typical 9-5 work environment or remote jobs, they are revolutionizing the underlying ideology of working. This change is not only producing the best results for companies but also inspiring others to think out of the box.

Does this change really work in favor of companies? Yes, for sure.

Big companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft focus more on the needs of millennials for a better work environment, employee retention, and long-term company growth. For example, Apple gives a lot of perks like time off for non-birth parents and big discounts on Apple products. These benefits influence how millennials choose the right place to work.

Let’s find out exactly what millennials need in their workplace.

Ability To Network

Millennials depend largely on networking and communication with their teams. Gone are the days where meetings were held in meeting rooms and only the manager talked. Now, new age workers gain the most out of one-on-one conversations or group discussions. This brings out the best ideas and most importantly, connects them with other team members.

Regular catch-ups with colleagues are proven to increase teamwork efficiency and enable millennials to get constructive feedback. Managers and higher corporate workers also realize that constant feedback and good communication with millennials has a significant effect on work goals.

Career Development

Career advancement is a big factor for millennials. They think beyond landing a job and want career development opportunities in their workplace. They are keen to enhance their skill sets and leverage their existing expertise.

Companies like Google, Amazon, Zapier, and many more provide programs for their workers to improve current skills and develop new ones. These programs can come in the form of fully-funded university programs or the chance to take online courses,  whichever helps the employee achieve his or her goals. This way, the company makes their employees feel more valuable and in turn, employees feel more motivated to succeed and contribute more to the organization.

It’s a win-win situation.

Flexibility

A Deloitte survey reveals that 50% of millennials want flexibility at work or wish they can choose when they start and finish work. They don’t want to be confined to cubicles to be productive at work. It’s vital for them to be able to work anywhere, whether it is from home or when they are on vacation.

Flexible work arrangements are a must for millennials to take a job. More and more companies are turning towards the virtual workforce as they realize it’s the best way to keep employees happy and get the work done. In fact, 70% of global workers opt for remote work at least once a week. These figures show the growing trend of virtual work and why millennials favor this. Flexibility in work means the ability to put family first and feel less stressed while working.

Technical Advancements

Millennials have a unique talent: they use technology to make work more efficient. Although they have gotten a bad rap for being so dependent on technology and their attachment to their phones, the truth is, millennials utilize technology to complete their work faster and more efficiently.

Whether it is communicating with team members using chat programs like Slack or conducting virtual meetings using GoToMeeting, millennials make use of apps and figure them out sooner than most workers of other generations.

Millennials appreciate being given the tools they need to execute their jobs. When they feel that their needs are met, productivity improves and so does retention.

Focus on Social Causes

Probably the most significant and most valuable trait of millennials is their desire to contribute to social and economic causes. They expect companies to focus on social causes and give back to society.

A lot of companies realize the weight of this requirement and they offer their employees a chance to participate in social, environmental, and health programs. Millennials are the largest age group contributing to these efforts. It is commendable that millennials are becoming aware of the growing concerns like pollution, literacy, poverty, and deforestation. Their awareness has a compounding effect on making the world better for everyone.

Better Benefits

Millennials want more from their jobs. Though the paycheck plays a big part in their job selections, it’s more about what other benefits they’ll get. Perks like paid vacations, health benefits, and subsidized company shares steer their interest in landing a job.

Because there are a lot of other ways to earn money nowadays, millennials won’t stay at a company if they feel they are not compensated well. They are willing to do more and work hard to justify the benefits they receive from their employers.

Studies also suggest that there is a 47% increase in the number of millennials diagnosed with depression. This number can be reduced if companies play their role in providing better healthcare programs and introduce workplace support programs focusing on the mental health of their workers.

Competitive Environment

Growing in personal and professional fronts is vital for millennials. One thing that contributes heavily to their job selection is a competitive work environment. They want to learn and grow instead of just sitting at their desk clocking in hours. Having a healthy competition with their colleagues boosts their productivity.

Regular team challenges encourage employees’ competitive spirit and helps achieve their work goals. This kind of environment pushes them out of “slack mode” and gives them the productive motivation.

Wrap-Up

Millennials have great qualities to positively impact a company’s growth and culture. Giving them a conducive environment where they can maximize their skills and discover their potential helps them stay longer and contribute to the success of your organization.

About the Author

Sireesha is a career blogger and founder of Crowdworknews.com. She loves discovering new ways to earn money online through legitimate online businesses and side hustles. She has successfully grown her online business from scratch to a full-time gig in just two years. Sireesha has been featured on websites like Moneyish, Payoneer, Side Hustle School, and MyCorporation.

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Digital interviews are splitting the hiring process wide-open. They’re giving candidates more power over their own interview experiences while showing hiring professionals a colorful, honest, in-depth look at candidates. It’s no surprise 31.2 percent of talent acquisition pros in our 2018 Growth Hiring Trends in the United States report told us they’re adding digital interviews to their strategy this year.

Beyond the deeper look at candidates, these interviews are showing what it really means to implement easy-to-use, time-saving technology while keeping a personal and positive candidate experience intact.

As an in-house hiring professional, you have two main goals: impress candidates and bring dedicated, talented new hires to your team. Digital interviews allow you to seamlessly do both. They give candidates power over the often exhausting and disengaging job search experience by putting them in charge of their own scheduling and experiences. Additionally, they lessen time-to-hire and show candidates your company is capable of adapting as the world of technologically evolves.

On the flipside, your team is given deeper, more meaningful insights on candidates. With digital interviews, they see personalities, passions, and skills firsthand. This is done while also shortening the hiring process by ending the need for long, time-consuming screening calls.

To effectively do this, you need to follow these tips for the ultimate digital interview experience:

Open up your schedule

Your calendar is personal and usually private. So when you open it up to candidates using an interview scheduling tool — allowing them to choose an interview time and put themselves on it — you’re already cultivating a meaningful connection.

Sending candidates an invite to your calendar also gives them the opportunity to work around their busy work and personal lives. With this simple step, you acknowledge them as individuals who have lives outside of your interview and prove your company offers a desired level of respect and flexibility.  

Customize parameters for each question

Video interviewing is often a new experience for candidates. It’s important to keep this in mind while setting parameters for one-way video interview questions. You’ll want to find a balance between making candidates feel comfortable and also receiving candid responses.

If you’re asking a personal question, for example, you don’t need to be restrictive with the number of takes a candidate has to answer. This gives candidates an ample amount of time to find their interview-groove. However, when asking more technical, skill-based questions, it’s important you gain detailed insight. Do this by limiting the number of takes to improve your chance of receiving off-the-cuff, honest responses.  

An unlimited number of takes during #digitalinterviews allows candidates to take a breath and show their best self.
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Keep it personal

Just because you’re not present for one-way video interviews doesn’t mean you can’t personalize the candidate experience. Create intro and outro videos to give your candidates a deeper, more meaningful look into your company.

During intros, played before each one-way interview, introduce yourself and your company to allow candidates to preview your culture and atmosphere. Outros, played after each one-way video interview, are the perfect opportunity to personally thank candidates for their time and provide them with the next steps.

Ask the right questions

Candidates are always searching for the ‘right’ answer to impress hiring pros. But your team also needs to keep candidates motivated with interesting and intentional questions.

So, you’re tasked with finding the perfect mix between personal, professional, and fun. Each question needs to serve a specific purpose. They can show your company’s personality or give candidates a chance to express themselves beyond their resumes. For example:  

  • Personal: What is the most recent book you read and why?
    • “Use this question to get insights into their core personality: are they a learner, do they love history and details, or romance and fun?” — Laura Handrick, staff writer at Fit Small Business
  • Professional: Consider that you and all our other applicants for this job are equal in terms of experience, education, etc. What do you think might give you the competitive edge over the others?
    • “This sometimes catches people off-guard. Listen for where they think they can add value, or if there are other skills they haven’t presented as their areas of expertise.” — Jana Tulloch, human resources professional at DevelopIntelligence
  • Fun: If you could be a superhero, what would you want your superpowers to be?
    • “This question usually catches the candidate off guard, but not in a way that will stress them out. This is a great way to show the candidate that they can give a real human response without any fear of getting the answer wrong. It breaks the tension of an interview and puts everyone at ease.” — Scott Wesper, hiring coordinator at Arch Resources Group
Recommended Reading: For more interview question tips, check-out our Go-To Guide for Perfect Interview Questions.
Give a glimpse of diversity

If you’re like the majority of companies in LinkedIn’s Global Recruiting Trends 2018 report, diversity is shaping how you plan to hire in the years to come. To appropriately mold the diversity of your company, it’s important to express what diversity means to your current team.

Offer candidates a chance to relate with your team members by showing your team’s diversity through your branded, digital interview experience. Include employees with different backgrounds to pre-record interview questions, participate in intro and outro videos, and in other branding images and videos on your site.  

To heighten the positive experience and connect it even deeper to diversity, give your employees the opportunity to come up with questions based on their diverse and inclusive experiences with the company.

Gain deeper insight into candidates

You’ve asked all the necessary questions to understand if candidates have the right skill set, qualifications, and work history to meet your needs. Now, give them the opportunity to really impress you and give more insight into their personalities and skills by asking open-ended questions.

For example:

  1. What question do you wish we would’ve asked? What would your answer have been to this question?

This question opens the door for candidates to discuss something they feel you need to know about them. As they give you more important information, you’re also gaining insight into what other companies are asking candidates. This gives you ideas for important questions to add to future interviews.

  1. If you were part of our recruiting team, how would you better guide candidates through their digital interview experience?

This question gives you a direct glimpse of how candidates view your digital interview experience. Now, you can improve your strategy to give other candidates an even better candidate experience.

Are you ready to improve your candidate experience? Digital interviews can help you impress top talent and give candidates an experience to remember.

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Congratulations! Your company has grown significantly, and you’re now an enterprise-sized organization. You’ve been successful in rapidly expanding your team and are eager to keep your talent acquisition strategy rolling.

There’s only one issue: hiring for a larger company puts a lot more on your plate. The tactics you used as a small and medium-sized business won’t be as effective now that you have over five hundred employees. There are more positions to fill and it takes longer to make decisions.

Luckily, there are digital interviews. While the tool is great for companies of all sizes, it is especially helpful for bigger organizations developing a more efficient hiring process.

By instituting the right digital interview practices, you can refine your talent acquisition strategies so they better match your enterprise-sized needs. This will ensure you continue to find great talent as your team evolves and grows. Here are three approaches to the digital interview process as an enterprise-sized company to help ensure success:

  1. Prioritize collaboration

As you know, as a company grows, its organizational structure changes. One person can confidently make hiring decisions for a smaller team, but an enterprise requires more decision-makers. It’s not uncommon for a hiring manager, a member of the HR department, and a head of talent acquisition to weigh in on hiring decisions. Figuring out how to build effective collaboration into your strategy is vital.

The digital interview process lets multiple people view and share their opinion on each candidate. But with so many team members involved, in order to keep opinions organized, you need to take the time to establish expectations about how each person will provide feedback on candidates.

Enterprise-sized companies need to focus on collaboration during the #digitalinterview process.
Click To Tweet

Practical tip:

A great digital interview platform facilitates collaboration. But it’s up to you to use the tool in a way that works for your team. Once multiple people are involved in the hiring process, agree upon a standard of communication.

For example, some decision-makers will not want to move forward with a candidate after watching the digital interview. There needs to be an understanding of how they share this information with others. If each person just says ‘no’ in the comments, no one will learn what candidate traits were red flags.

Each team member should share three reasons why they don’t want to move on with a candidate. If anyone disagrees, they can directly address the concerns raised by another collaborator. This keeps the discussion focused and limits any needless debates.

  1. Set realistic timelines

Likely, you’ve encountered the unfortunate consequence of increased red tape as your company grows. There are more steps to the hiring process, but rushing through is not an option. Enter the “hurry up and wait” dynamic of an enterprise hiring processes.

At the same time, enterprise-sized companies have more positions to fill, and every day a position is vacant hurts the team. There’s pressure to move quickly while remaining thorough. So finding a realistic balance for your organizational and candidate deadlines will help reinstate your sanity.

Practical tip:

If you’ve noticed your time to hire has gotten out of control, conduct trial runs with digital interviews to reign it back in. Ask a few employees to record mock interview responses. Don’t give them a timeline, but track how long it takes most to respond. This will give you a more realistic idea of how long you should wait for candidates to complete this hiring step. If individuals with full-time jobs can record their digital interview in a few days, motivated job seekers can as well.

Then, give members of the hiring team a deadline for submitting their thoughts on the mock interviews. If people struggle to give their feedback in time, find out why. Work with each individual to develop a plan so they can respond in a more timely manner.

Maybe they would be more successful reviewing the digital interview of one candidate each day instead of several over a week. Or they may prefer getting the option of assessing candidates while on their morning commute via mobile. The trick is finding a timeline that works within your new hiring team’s schedules rather than forcing them to make drastic changes.

  1. Give every member of the hiring team a purpose

You’ll see that the digital interview process makes it easy for multiple people to be involved in a hiring decision. While having a variety of perspectives allows you to identify top talent more easily, you don’t want too many hands in the pot. This will lead to back-and-forth discussions your organization doesn’t have time for.

While every person on your hiring team needs to be involved in the decisions, make sure that everyone has a distinct purpose in regards to reviewing digital interviews. Each individual can focus on a different aspect of candidate assessment. This way the process is thorough, but not redundant.

Keep your hiring team focused by giving each person a candidate trait to evaluate. #hiringtips
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Practical tip:

Remember that the digital interview process isn’t only about filling a vacancy. Each new team member should be inspired by the company mission statement and values. If a candidate doesn’t align with the overarching goals of the organization, they won’t help move the company forward.

Before reviewing digital interviews, remind your team about how this role fits into the larger picture. Talk about what values and passions will help a candidate identify with the purpose of the role. Then, make sure your hiring team is looking for these traits when assessing candidates.

This will help them see that their observations and decisions have meaning. They are ensuring the new hire is just as inspired by the company mission as the rest of the organization. This will keep them from making arbitrary choices just to fill a position quickly.

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If talented, motivated workers are a company’s bread and butter, visionary leaders are the secret sauce that fuels innovation and growth.

Identifying that dream team may seem like an ever-elusive dream of management and HR alike, but often the challenge is thinking outside the box to find those who aren’t obvious leadership material. Oftentimes this means looking internally to promote team members, rather than bringing in a big shot from another company.

Although outwardly the logical choice would be to hire someone who already possesses the necessary skills and background to fill a role, internal mobility can be more beneficial for a number of reasons. A professor at Wharton School of Business stated that not only do external hires perform worse during their initial two years in a position than internal workers, they are also more likely to quit sooner and are paid more. In fact, external hires may cost an organization anywhere from 18% to 20% more than internal hires.

Deloitte found that almost 90 percent of employers surveyed agree that a solid internal mobility program to encourage promotions and development would boost retention and keep on star players. Despite this, only a third had a similar program in place at their organization. Clearly, there’s a huge talent pool organizations are overlooking in their search for better talent. Ironically, the ideal candidate may be just down the hall from those making the hiring decisions.

Of course, the perfect candidate may also lie on the outside, and excluding one group or the other can cut out potential talent. What you should be looking for is potential. Whether you’re looking inside or out, here are a few tactics to try out and uncover the potential of your leadership position candidates

Ask really good questions

Regularly scheduled one-on-ones or periodic reviews are prime time to ask employees telling questions. These are especially important for employees who you may not necessarily spend much time supervising or working directly with. Jot down a few outstanding executive interview questions to include in your next round. These may be anything from asking which leadership traits they admire to something he or she is striving to learn at the moment.

Look at previous role responsibilities, not just titles

Weighing a leadership candidate’s eligibility based on a glance at previously held positions is a huge mistake. Titles may reveal a rough idea of what level of responsibility a position entailed, but n no way are they comprehensive. Some companies to even inflate job titles to make them sound sexier and attract talent. What the individual did while holding that title is what uncovers leadership experience.

Evaluating behavior with others

If this candidate is an internal employee, how has he or she interacted with peers in the past? Is the person a team player who makes a point to help others or a lone wolf? For external candidates, keep an eye out for how they navigate meeting you and others in the company. Not only do leaders need to possess a strategic outlook, they should also exhibit tremendous interpersonal skills to mentor others and motivate.

Taking initiative in past positions

Similar to how university admission processes review students’ past involvement and examples of initiative, managers should assess how often (if at all) a candidate has gone out of his or her way to reach goals. This could be spending extra time to train a new hire when it’s not their responsibility, holding brainstorming meetings to inspire a team, or identifying solutions to a problem that they weren’t asked to solve.

How does he or she communicate

First, take a look at the open leadership position in question and evaluate what traits are most needed. Is this a position in the candidate would need to work closely with team members to strategize or a client-facing role to which others report with results? Popular personality assessments like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator are used by HR departments across industries to identify employees’ preferred communication styles to best optimize how information gets transmitted.

Sometimes the best solution to a problem has been right in front of you the whole time. Before investing more time and funds to find talent elsewhere, evaluate your own company’s workforce to see if there’s a future leader brimming with potential.

About the Author

Brett Farmiloe is the current CEO of digital marketing agency, Markitors, and previously helped co-found a leadership search firm. He frequently contributes thought pieces on leadership and marketing strategy to publications like Forbes and Huffington post.

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This year, many organizations have upped their game to find and hire more diverse talent. You’ve probably reached out to new candidate sources or posted job ads on a wider variety of websites. But chances are, you’re still not seeing the results you want in regards to your diversity hiring initiative.

In fact, the 2018 Global Recruiting Trends report from LinkedIn found that 38 percent of companies are still having trouble finding diverse candidates. An additional 14 percent find it difficult to get these job seekers to move past the interview process.

This is because diversity hiring isn’t just about finding great candidates from a variety of backgrounds. It’s about showing there’s a place for them at your company. It doesn’t matter how many diverse job seekers you reach if they don’t think they’ll be accepted in your organization.

To truly improve diversity hiring, you need to reexamine your hiring process. By looking at it through the eyes of a diverse candidate, you can see where there are issues that are disengaging these job seekers. Here are three factors to reconsider:

Being inflexible with interview scheduling

There are many types of candidate diversity — far more than race, gender, and sexual orientation. You’re looking for candidates who have different backgrounds and experiences that will improve your organization. Chances are these candidates don’t have a schedule like yours.

Diverse candidates might be single parents. They could be the primary caretaker for an elderly relative. Their current job might mean they work long hours or an inconsistent schedule. So even if you find a great candidate, sending them only one or two options for an interview that fall within your business hours could be an issue. Without realizing it, you’re excluding them from moving forward in the hiring process.

By using one-way digital interviews, however, there are no constraints from conflicting schedules. If it’s the only time available, candidates can record their responses at four in the morning. Then you could review their interview during your normal workday. Candidates will see you’ve taken their unique needs into consideration making them more likely to continue in the hiring process.

To improve your company’s diversity, every candidate needs an equal opportunity to interview….
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Having a non-diverse hiring team

Diverse candidates want to know they have a chance to succeed with an organization. They need to know there are paths in place to help them get where they want to be professionally. If every employee they meet during the hiring process is a white male manager, it will cause doubts about your true dedication to diversity.

Create a diversity hiring team of volunteer employees who want to help with this mission. These employees should come from every level of the organization and be willing to talk honestly about their employee experience.

Then get the team’s feedback about the hiring process. See if there were certain steps or signs that made them worry about the organization’s diversity. For instance, you might not notice in your panel interviews, all the interviewers are caucasian or all the employee testimonials on your career site are from men. These insights will show you how you can incorporate the diversity team into the hiring process.

Not asking follow-up questions

One of the biggest advantages of a diverse workforce is bringing in new ideas. A team can work on a problem for weeks with no progress. But then, bringing in a different set of eyes leads to the perfect solution. Because diverse candidates often have a new way of looking at things, you need to adapt your interview process.

Many hiring professionals ask the same interview questions year after year. You’ve learned what responses are a sign of a good candidate. Yet, always looking for the same answers also leads to hiring the same types of employees.

When interviewing diverse candidates, know that you might get answers you’ve never heard before. Don’t immediately dismiss these as wrong. Take the time to ask follow-up questions. This will give you insight into the candidate’s thought process as well as a better understanding of who they are and of what they are capable.

Asking follow-up questions lets you see things from the candidate’s perspective….
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Having a diversity hiring strategy is a great way to improve your organization. But if you want to attract and retain different candidates, you need to consider how your hiring process looks to them. With this new perspective, you assure diverse job seekers there is a place for them in your organization.

Want more tips for improving your hiring process? Check out our digital interview toolkit here!

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