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Note: This blog post is not about horse health. Instead, it is a personal story about another animal I care deeply about. Please take some time to read and share this blog post.  I truly believe this is an important and worthy cause. My Personal Story I have been a practicing equine veterinarian for 25 years.  Before that, I grew up […]
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Sunny, a 10 year old paint gelding, was given his routine vaccinations. A day later, there was some swelling at one of the injection sites in his neck.  After talking to her veterinarian, the owners gave him some bute. He seemed to improve for a while, but suddenly the swelling worsened, he spiked a fever of 104, and he stopped […]
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Infectious diseases are important causes of equine suffering and mortality. You have a vital role in preventing these diseases in your horses. Vaccination is ONE important tool we have to reduce these diseases in our horses. But it’s not as simple as going to the feed store and buying a guarantee that your horse won’t get sick. To be the best […]
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 Fancy, a 20 year old quarter horse sustained a severe heel bulb laceration. Her owners had tried a variety of topical wound ointments, but the wound actually became larger, and developed severe proud flesh. We first saw Fancy 3 months after injury. We removed excessive proud flesh and kept the limb bandaged for 30 days. The wound improved, but stopped healing at […]
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While there are several more common diagnoses for a horse that is suddenly, inexplicably SEVERELY lame, sole (foot) abscess is the most common cause. Most horses with sole abscess are very lame at the walk, and some cannot bear weight at all. Early or small sole abscesses may cause less severe lameness. In most cases, horses with sole abscess become increasingly lame […]
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WHAT IS EQUINE LAMENESS? Lameness is a term used to describe a horse’s change in gait, usually in response to pain somewhere in a limb, but also possibly as a result of a mechanical restriction on movement. We all think of lameness when a horse is obviously limping, but lameness may only cause a subtle change in gait, or even just […]
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#1 Abdominal Pain, Colic Signs Perform Whole Horse Exam™ (WHE) Assess Color of Mucous Membranes Assess Demeanor or Attitude Assess Gut or Intestinal Sounds Assess Manure Assess Capillary Refill Time (CRT) by examining Gums Give Intramuscular (IM) Injection Give Oral Medication Sand Sediment Test Handle Horse With Colic #2 Lower Leg Wound Assess Wound Assess Lameness at the Walk Bandage Limb […]
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This cartoon is obviously a joke, but as a long-time equine veterinarian, scenarios like this are too familiar to me. Misinformation (usually found on the Internet – a/k/a “Dr. Google”) leads caretakers to make guesses about their horse’s condition rather than contacting a veterinarian.   Of course, many horses heal fine without veterinary help, and sometimes the information found online is helpful. […]
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Over the years, I have heard many stories about how horse owners “cured” their colicy horse by loading it onto a trailer and driving it around for a while – the so-called “Trailer Ride Cure” for colic. It is a little more complicated than that… Remember that the word “colic” simply refers to the signs a horse shows when it is in abdominal pain due […]
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A percentage of horses that experience colic and are treated by a veterinarian in the field will continue to show signs of colic after the veterinary visit. When that happens – for the life of the horse – it becomes critical to make rapid decisions about how to proceed. As a horse persists in colic pain over time, it becomes more […]
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