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This is a guest blog post by Silas Murphy-Ellis, owner of Murphy Home Inspection in Portland Oregon.

Water in the crawlspace is an issue we see in homes all too often.

To the home buyer, it can be quite alarming to find water in the basement or crawlspace. Water under the home is most often an issue that can be corrected. It’s important to identify the source of the moisture to better understand what course of action can be taken to keep the area dry and to prevent damage to the home or structure. Here is a list of the most common ways that water can get into a crawlspace or basement.

1. GUTTER & DOWNSPOUT ISSUES

One of the most common sources of basement and crawlspace water is poor rainwater management. Debris from surrounding trees and vegetation can all too easily overwhelm and clog gutters and downspouts, causing gutter pooling and overflow, and clogged downspouts.

Underground drainage piping can also become clogged or broken, leaving the downspouts to pour rainwater right next to the foundation.

 
2. NEGATIVE GRADING AROUND THE HOME

Landscaping around the foundation should slope down and away from the home. This will encourage water to drain away from the foundation, and not into the basement or crawlspace. Negative grading is an issue we see all too often as home inspectors, in both new construction and old homes. Also, remember that mulch does not count as grading.  Mulch is porous and water will drip right through it and onto the soil.  Check how deep the mulch surrounding the home is – be sure that the soil is what makes a positive slope, not the mulch.

3. GROUNDWATER, OR SUBTERRANEAN WATER

In some instances, rainwater or snowmelt may saturate the soil around the home, especially in the wetter months of the year or during a spring thaw.  When the soil becomes saturated, the water will find the path of least resistance, which could be the large pit in the ground that was dug for your crawlspace or basement.

4. DRAIN OR SUMP-PUMP NOT FUNCTIONING

Crawl spaces can often be neglected over long periods of time. And not until getting a home inspection do homeowners realize that a drainage system has not been functioning properly. Sump pumps should be checked and serviced annually to ensure they will continue to operate as needed.   Low point drains in the crawlspace can become filled with debris, or by plastic vapor barriers that prevent water from flowing to the drain.

 
5. PERVIOUS FOUNDATION MATERIALS

Foundation waterproofing has become more common, particularly in homes built in the last 20-30 years.  There have been great technological advances in the past few decades but even with the latest technology,  complete waterproofing isn’t a guarantee.

Foundations on older homes may be built of more porous materials such as terra cotta block, brick or CMU concrete block. These materials have more joints or are more porous and may allow more moisture into the home rather than a concrete foundation.  A properly installed drain and trench system or sump pump can still keep moisture levels at an acceptable level.

6. DEFECTIVE WINDOW-WELLS OR VENT-WELLS

Wells surrounding vent openings and windows may not be installed properly. Ensure they are at least several inches above the surrounding soil, and that they are secured to the foundation wall. Otherwise, water may find it’s way around the well and into the vent or window.

7. CRACKS OR GAPS IN THE FOUNDATION

Larger cracks sometimes develop in the foundation over time, as the foundation may have shifted or sank. Especially around areas where rainwater has not been dealt with.  Such as a downspout that has been draining near the foundation for a long time.  This can wash away soil, which can lead to shifting in the foundation.  Cracks are an easy path for water to find.  One solution, if the gap is wide enough, can be to inject an epoxy sealant into the crack to seal the gap.  In the photo seen to the right, the sprinklers were watering up against the foundation.  The excess water found its way through the crack between two separate pieces of the foundation – the footing and the stem wall.

8. LEAKING PIPES AND FIXTURES

Sometimes the easiest source of water to diagnose. When water is observed in the crawlspace, always check above and around the standing water to see if there are any signs of a leak from a distribution or drain pipe.

Tub and shower drains are a common culprit, as well as tiled showers.
9. LANDSCAPE OVER-WATERING

Irrigation sprinkler heads that are directing water near the foundation can bring lots of water near the foundation.  Make sure that sprinklers heads are not pointed near the foundation, and garden beds are not over-watered.

Basements and crawlspaces often go neglected, and some crawlspaces go unchecked for decades, we recommend checking your crawlspace at least twice a year for leaks and issues, the fall and spring are good times to check for unwanted standing water. We also recommend checking your sump-pump or low point drain to ensure functionality.  Standing water near the foundation and footings can lead to soil shifting or settling and can cause structural issues.  A small amount of care and attention can prevent costly future repairs.

Author: Silas Murphy-Ellis, Murphy Home Inspection

The post Nine ways for water to enter your basement or crawl space appeared first on HomesMSP.

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This is a guest blog post by Silas Murphy-Ellis, owner of Murphy Home Inspection in Portland Oregon.

Water in the crawlspace is an issue we see in homes all too often.   

To the home buyer, it can be quite alarming to find water in the basement or crawlspace. Water under the home is most often an issue that can be corrected. It’s important to identify the source of the moisture to better understand what course of action can be taken to keep the area dry and to prevent damage to the home or structure. Here is a list of the most common ways that water can get into a crawlspace or basement.

1. GUTTER & DOWNSPOUT ISSUES

One of the most common sources of basement and crawlspace water is poor rainwater management. Debris from surrounding trees and vegetation can all too easily overwhelm and clog gutters and downspouts, causing gutter pooling and overflow, and clogged downspouts.

Underground drainage piping can also become clogged or broken, leaving the downspouts to pour rainwater right next to the foundation.

 
2. NEGATIVE GRADING AROUND THE HOME

Landscaping around the foundation should slope down and away from the home. This will encourage water to drain away from the foundation, and not into the basement or crawlspace. Negative grading is an issue we see all too often as home inspectors, in both new construction and old homes. Also, remember that mulch does not count as grading.  Mulch is porous and water will drip right through it and onto the soil.  Check how deep the mulch surrounding the home is – be sure that the soil is what makes a positive slope, not the mulch.

3. GROUNDWATER, OR SUBTERRANEAN WATER

In some instances, rainwater or snowmelt may saturate the soil around the home, especially in the wetter months of the year or during a spring thaw.  When the soil becomes saturated, the water will find the path of least resistance, which could be the large pit in the ground that was dug for your crawlspace or basement.

4. DRAIN OR SUMP-PUMP NOT FUNCTIONING

Crawl spaces can often be neglected over long periods of time. And not until getting a home inspection do homeowners realize that a drainage system has not been functioning properly. Sump pumps should be checked and serviced annually to ensure they will continue to operate as needed.   Low point drains in the crawlspace can become filled with debris, or by plastic vapor barriers that prevent water from flowing to the drain.

5. PERVIOUS FOUNDATION MATERIALS

Foundation waterproofing has become more common, particularly in homes built in the last 20-30 years.  There have been great technological advances in the past few decades but even with the latest technology,  complete waterproofing isn’t a guarantee.

Foundations on older homes may be built of more porous materials such as terra cotta block, brick or CMU concrete block. These materials have more joints or are more porous and may allow more moisture into the home rather than a concrete foundation.  A properly installed drain and trench system or sump pump can still keep moisture levels at an acceptable level.

6. DEFECTIVE WINDOW-WELLS OR VENT-WELLS

Wells surrounding vent openings and windows may not be installed properly. Ensure they are at least several inches above the surrounding soil, and that they are secured to the foundation wall. Otherwise, water may find it’s way around the well and into the vent or window.

7. CRACKS OR GAPS IN THE FOUNDATION

Larger cracks sometimes develop in the foundation over time, as the foundation may have shifted or sank. Especially around areas where rainwater has not been dealt with.  Such as a downspout that has been draining near the foundation for a long time.  This can wash away soil, which can lead to shifting in the foundation.  Cracks are an easy path for water to find.  One solution, if the gap is wide enough, can be to inject an epoxy sealant into the crack to seal the gap.  In the photo seen to the right, the sprinklers were watering up against the foundation.  The excess water found its way through the crack between two separate pieces of the foundation – the footing and the stem wall.

8. LEAKING PIPES AND FIXTURES

Sometimes the easiest source of water to diagnose. When water is observed in the crawlspace, always check above and around the standing water to see if there are any signs of a leak from a distribution or drain pipe.

Tub and shower drains are a common culprit, as well as tiled showers.
9. LANDSCAPE OVER-WATERING

Irrigation sprinkler heads that are directing water near the foundation can bring lots of water near the foundation.  Make sure that sprinklers heads are not pointed near the foundation, and garden beds are not over-watered.

Basements and crawlspaces often go neglected, and some crawlspaces go unchecked for decades, we recommend checking your crawlspace at least twice a year for leaks and issues, the fall and spring are good times to check for unwanted standing water. We also recommend checking your sump-pump or low point drain to ensure functionality.  Standing water near the foundation and footings can lead to soil shifting or settling and can cause structural issues.  A small amount of care and attention can prevent costly future repairs.

Author: Silas Murphy-Ellis, Murphy Home Inspection

The post Nine ways for water to enter your basement or crawl space appeared first on HomesMSP.

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Docomomo hosted a unique opportunity to visit the Northwest Architectural Archives at the University of Minnesota this week. We got a fascinating peek at their collection and their 30 miles of underground storage stacks.

Established in 1970 out of a grass roots movement to preserve and restore historical buildings, Northwest Architectural Archives is the repository for the records of architects, engineers, contractors, landscape architects, interior designers, academics, and local professional societies from the Midwest region with works that extend throughout the United States and the world. These records contain: drawings of all kinds, specifications, job files, trade catalogs, research, slides and photographs.

Because it was established in 1970, timing was perfect for collecting and preserving documents from the Mid-Century-Modern period. If you have a home or building you are researching from this time period be sure to check out this extensive resource.

The stacks were impressive, but what made me smile were some of the more quirky drawings that were preserved, such as John Howe’s design for a motor home…

… and a House of Fabric…

Sharlene Hensrud, RE/MAX Results – shensrud@homesmsp.com

The post Northwest Architectural Archives… a treasure trove both historical and quirky appeared first on HomesMSP.

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“In the sweetness of friendship let there be laughter, and sharing of pleasures. For in the dew of little things, does the heart find its morning and is refreshed.” ~ Khalil Gibran, The Prophet

NOTE: I spend my Wednesdays Unplugged from appointments. It’s my day to stay home, enjoy cooking and welcome our kids and grandkids for dinner in the evening. We end our meal with quotes from the Norwegian ‘Quote Cup’ passed on to me from my grandmother. I share a quote and a recipe here each week, and sometimes some photos of family fun. I love trying new recipes…and love getting recipes you would like to share!

We celebrated our joint anniversary with dear friends John and Beata over the weekend… love the photo above of all 4 of us via the mirror at Bellecour where we shared our anniversary dinner. It’s hard to believe we have been sharing laughter and friendship for over 20 years… even harder to believe we have been married 48 years!

RECIPE OF THE WEEK

This is an old recipe, but such a favorite with our family that as I watched them disappear the last time I made them I thought it was time to share again… I first posted it shortly before Obama was first elected President in 2008. These are delicious croutons for salads, but our family likes to munch on them like an appetizer or chips. Most of the time we eat them warm out of the oven, without even adding the Parmesan cheese.

ADDICTIVE HOMEMADE CROUTONS
  • 1 large loaf French bread, not sliced
  • 2 sticks butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced fine
  • Seasoned salt of your choice
  • Parmesan cheese

Cut bread in approximately 1/2 inch squares. Melt butter, olive oil and garlic together. Toss bread cubes in butter mixture. Put single layer of bread cubes on jelly roll pan or roaster. Sprinkle on seasoned salt to taste. Bake in 350 degree oven for about 1/2 hour until golden, turning every 10 minutes during cooking time. Remove from oven and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese while still hot if desired.

The post Wednesdays Unplugged – Addictive Homemade Croutons appeared first on HomesMSP.

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The process of buying a home can be overwhelming at times, but you don’t need to go through it alone.

You may be wondering if now is a good time to buy a home…or if interest rates are projected to rise or fall. The free eGuide below will answer many of your questions and likely bring up a few things you didn’t even know you should consider when buying a home.

Click here to download your free copy of the eGuide, and please get in touch if you have any questions or we can be of help in any way.

Sharlene Hensrud, RE/MAX Results – shensrud@homesmsp.com – 612-419-0560

The post Thinking buying about a home? Download your free Summer 2019 Buyer Guide appeared first on HomesMSP.

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Nestled in the residential bowels of Northeast Minneapolis on a sleepy little park side block, four churches stand.

Minneapolis Northeast is well known for many things. Its breweries, churches and diverse heritage make this area a treasure for history and belonging.

One of the many things to celebrate here is the one city block that contains four whole churches within its boundaries. Whether or not they should be noted with this “honor” by the Guinness book of world records may be still in discussion. However it is true that these four churches were built and still stand on one city block in Minneapolis Nordeast. All built between 1899 and 1911.

South of this block lies Logan Park with beautiful houses surrounding it… and some notable restaurants are found further west along 13th Avenue, including Anchor Fish & Chips and award-winning Young Joni.

So, this block is one of the only blocks in the entire world known to be home to four churches, one on each corner, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. The largest of the quad, Emanuel Lutheran (2), was built in 1899 in Gothic Revival style. In 1904 Elim Baptist (1) built its new structure next door, followed by St. Peter’s Lutheran (4) in 1905 and Immanuel Lutheran (3) in 1911.

Three of the four churches built on the block were Scandinavian communities of faith. Emanuel Lutheran was Swedish, Elim Baptist was Norwegian, St. Peter’s was Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran. Immanuel was another Lutheran church, this one of German descent.

Though time has taken its toll on these noble brick structures Elim Baptist church was renovated in 1986 and still sits proudly on that block. It made us smile when we saw a whole row of parking stalls next to an entrance door reserved for ‘SENIOR PARKING’.

The other initial congregations have changed hands and denominations over the last 100 years but the churches still stand. Stop by, walk the block and the neighborhood and look for the cornerstones. It has loads of history.

The post Four Churches on One City Block… a Guinness World Record only in NE Minneapolis appeared first on HomesMSP.

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You know you want to buy a home, you know you should watch your credit, but what to do? There are a few things that can affect your credit report and some are easy to fix.

Make sure your payments are on time! That is the easiest thing you can do.

Keep your credit card balances low -you don’t need to pay them off but keep the balance at about 30% of the available credit. It’s called the utilization rate – that makes a huge difference in your credit score and can be one of the easiest things to fix. There are times where paying a credit card down can increase your score quickly and I’ve seen scores go up 30-50 points depending on what you do.

Don’t have too many inquiries. Mortgage inquiries are different – you can have more than one mortgage company pull your credit report and it is suppose to count as one inquiry within a 30 day window. That doesn’t mean other things might not affect it. Going shopping and having stores pull your credit so you can get 10% off  your purchase will affect your score. You can open many store cards but typically only one mortgage – unless you are trying to qualify for more than one home!

Avoid collections and other negative items. Collections will affect your score quickly.

Check your credit score using a program like credit karma and then contact your lender. They will pull your credit report and chances are it will be different than credit card reports and programs like credit karma. But checking your own credit gives you an idea of where you are at! Once you are ready, make sure you keep your credit in check!

Leslie Vanderwerf,  NMLS ID#335509, American Mortgage & Equity Consultants, Inc., An Equal Housing Lender, NMLS#150953 – Email – Website

The post What affects your credit score? appeared first on HomesMSP.

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I spend a lot of time listening to audiobooks via Audible, and I find myself recommending books to people almost daily, none of which have anything to do with home inspections. When I meet with big-time book readers, we end up recommending a bunch of books to each other. I have a hard time remembering all of my favorites, so I put together a list of my most-recommended books. Then I decided to share it here as a blog post. Why not? Readers are leaders, learners are earners, books are a uniquely portable magic, and all that jazz. Here’s my list.

Must-read books for everyone
  • The Miracle Morning, by Hal Elrod. Wake up early and start every day with these six routines. They’ll change your life.
  • The Slight Edge, by Jeff Olson and John David Mann. It’s compound interest applied to your life.
  • How to Win Friends and Influence People, by Dale Carnegie & Associates. I used to think that this book was about being manipulative, but that’s not it at all. It’s about being a more successful person in business, relationships, and life. I listen to this book every year to help keep the lessons at the front of my mind.
  • Think and Grow Rich, by Napoleon Hill. Timeless principles for success. There’s some weird stuff in this book (sexual transmutation, the sixth sense), but it’s interesting and thought-provoking.
  • The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results, by Gary Keller, Jay Papasan. How and why you should focus your efforts on the stuff that achieves the highest results.
  • The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen R. Covey. Again, timeless principles, excellent life lessons.
  • The Five Love Languages: The Secret to Love That Lasts, by Gary Chapman. While we all have our own natural love languages that we speak, the recipient might need to hear a very different language. This is an excellent book on relationships and communication for anyone, not just married people.
More books for everyone
  • First Things First, by Stephen R. Covey. Get your priorities straight, plan, and spend time working on important stuff that isn’t time-sensitive. That’s the easiest stuff to never touch, but it’ll make the biggest impact in your life.
  • Outliers: The Story of Success, by Malcolm Gladwell. Fascinating stories of success, explaining how circumstances can have as much to do with success as anything else. I’ve re-told so many stories from this book, especially the one about why elite Canadian hockey players are all born at the beginning of the year.
  • Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions, by Dan Ariely. Humans are not rational beings. We decide with emotions. Fascinating stuff here.
Parenting Books

For perspective, my son is 11 and my daughter is 8.

  • Solve Your Child’s Sleep Problems, by Richard Ferber. My son still wasn’t sleeping through the night at 8 months, and after reading this book, I was able to fix that in two or three days. Amazing.
  • The Miracle Morning for Parents and Families, By Hal Elrod, Lindsay McCarthy, and Mike McCarthy. This incorporates the principles of The Miracle Morning, but there’s a ton of great parenting advice in this book on how to make your family stronger.
  • How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk, by Adele Faber, Elaine Mazlish. The title is pretty self-explanatory. I found myself saying to myself over and over again “oops, I shouldn’t say this, I should say that.”
  • How to Raise an Adult, by Julie-Lythcott-Haims. This is a liberating book. A game-changer. There are a ridiculous amount of parents who over-parent, making their kids into helpless adults who can’t live without their parents. I’ve given my kids a lot more responsibility since reading this book. I’m planning to re-read this book every year until my kids are no longer living at home.
  • Gist: The Essence of Raising Life-Ready Kids, by Michael Anderson and Timothy Johanson. This book is very similar to How to Raise an Adult. Don’t over-parent, don’t waste your time doing all this stuff that won’t work. In fact, all of this over-parenting will have the exact opposite of what you want.
  • Peaceful Parent, Happy Siblings: How to Stop the Fighting and Raise Friends for Life, by Dr. Laura Markham. Lots of good advice here for parents of siblings who don’t always get along.
  • Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters, by Meg Meeker. This book convinced me that it’s impossible to raise a girl who won’t suffer through a lot of emotional trauma. Girls have it rough, but dads can make it a lot better. I will definitely listen to this book again in a couple of years.
  • Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood, by Lisa Damour, Ph.D. This book taught me what to expect from my daughter in the coming years, and taught me how rebellion and pulling away is normal and expected for every teenager. This will help me to not take a lot of these behaviors personally. Hopefully. There is so much helpful advice here, and it’s not just about girls.
  • The Family Board Meeting: Is Business Success Hurting Your Family?, by Jim Sheils. This is a super-short read, discussing the importance of quality time vs. the quantity of time with your kids. Here’s the short version of this short book: do 1-on-1 dates with your kids and keep your phone off. But seriously, read the book.
Business
  • The E-Myth Revisited, by Michael Gerber. Own a small business? Thinking of starting one? This is a must-read. The myth is that because you’re a skilled worker, you will also be a successful entrepreneur. This book made me realize that every business ought to be run like a franchise. Systems, systems, systems.
  • Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose, by Tony Hsieh. Happy employees deliver excellent service. Company culture is critically important.
  • Hug Your Haters: How to Embrace Complaints and Keep Your Customers, by Jay Baer. My guidebook to dealing with customer complaints. Every business owner ought to read this, and anyone in customer service ought to read this too.
  • Youtility: Why Smart Marketing Is About Help Not Hype, by Jay Baer. Thinking of starting a business blog? A business Facebook page? A business podcast? Read this book.
  • Building a StoryBrand | Clarify Your Message so Customers Will Listen, by Donald Miller. If you’re a business, don’t be the hero; be the guide.
  • Profit First, by Mike Michalowicz. Pay yourself first, don’t pay yourself with whatever is left over after your expenses. This was covered at the very beginning of The Richest Man in Babylon. This book gives very specific advice on how to make sure that this is done. This book ties in nicely with The Slight Edge, which I recommended above in my must-read list of books for everyone.
Leadership
  • Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us, by Daniel H. Pink. I debated putting this at the top as a book for anyone, because it’s so fascinating and because I’ve recommended it so many times. People are not motivated by money; they’re motivated by autonomy, mastery, and purpose.
  • Good to Great, by Jim Collins.
  • Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter, by Liz Wiseman and Nicky Wazim.
  • Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action, by Simon Sinek
  • The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, by John Maxwell. Just about anything else by John Maxwell.

Next week, I will return you to your regularly scheduled blog about houses and home inspection topics.

Author: Reuben SaltzmanStructure Tech Home Inspections

The post Reuben’s Recommended Reading appeared first on HomesMSP.

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It’s finally summer and with the brutal winter that occurred throughout most of the upper Midwest and beyond, people want to be outside. When working with sellers, one of the things I advise them on during a Home Staging Consultation is to treat almost any outdoor living space as additional square footage.

I know it is not counted towards the square footage total in valuing your home, but many buyers gravitate towards the outdoor spaces and you need to give them priority.

Whether it is a deck, patio, screened in porch or front porch, they all need to be addressed.

With a front porch it is the first thing the buyer sees and it creates such a homey, cozy spot that they can see themselves enjoying quiet time with a cup of tea or a book and watching the world go by. 

If it is a back deck or patio it invites them to spend a balmy summer night barbecuing with friends, making s’mores with kids or taking a nap.

These areas should have flowers but also furniture. A dining table perhaps, chairs for gathering, and don’t forget the throw pillows!! Outdoor throw pillows can be purchased anywhere for very little dollars and they add fun, zest and ambiance.

Okay okay you don’t need as many as me. LOL

Take a look at your outdoor space and get it in top selling condition along with the rest of your home; and don’t forget to keep it spider and cobweb free.

The post Outdoor Living Spaces When Selling Your Home appeared first on HomesMSP.

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Have you been thinking about selling your home but wondering if your house will sell because it isn’t a first-time home buyer house? There has been a lot of talk of how houses priced around $250,000 are selling quickly, but bigger houses are harder to sell. The chart below reflects that the supply increases as the price goes up, but houses prepared and presented well are also selling quickly in higher price ranges.

The three houses in the photo above were in the $450,000-$650,000 price range, and all three had offers within a day of hitting the market. The hard work the sellers invested into getting them ready to sell paid off!

Wondering what you should do to get your home ready to sell? I would love to meet with you… contact me to set up a time for a free consultation!

Sharlene Hensrud, RE/MAX Results – shensrud@homesmsp.com

The post Sold! Sold! Sold! Not just first-time homebuyer homes appeared first on HomesMSP.

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