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Sports and Patriotic Fourth of July Holiday Themed Drinks

Parades, fireworks, picnics, sporting events, concerts and hot weather all help us celebrate / remind us of the Fourth of July holiday. Here are a few cool refreshments paired with the occasion to serve at your home bar as part of the celebrations.



Pimm’s Cup Is The Wimbledon Tennis Championships Signature Drink

Most major holidays seem to have the finals of a sports competition associated with it. Much like U.S. Open golf and Father’s Day, Wimbledon tennis goes with July 4th. While not specifically related to America’s declaration of independence from the British, it is contested over the Fourth of July holiday weekend in Great Britain and watched by millions of American fans. The Pimm’s Cup is a famously hot weather drink that’s very popular in the summer and a Wimbledon crowd favorite.

The tennis matches happen early in the U.S. due to the time change, which means having guests over for brunch. Open up the breakfast bar with a twist by mixing up something different than the usual brunch drinks i.e. Bloody Marys and Mimosas. The Pimms Cup concoction normally has a low alcohol content along with lots of fruits and vegetables as garnishes.


Classic Pimm’s Cup Recipe:

  • 2 oz Pimm’s No. 1 Cup
  • ¼ oz fresh lemon juice
  • 3 - 4 oz ginger ale
  • cucumber slice for garnish

Fill highball glass with ice. Add Pimm’s No. 1 gin based liqueur and lemon juice. Top off with ginger ale and garnish with cucumber. Considered classic by using ginger ale versus lemon - lime soda or lemonade, the cucumber garnish could be considered minimum. Its common and almost expected for a Pimm’s cup cocktail to include several garnishes. Some combination if not all of these popular ingredients are normally added: apples, cucumbers, oranges, lemons, strawberries and mint sprigs.



How To Make Red, White & Blue Layered Cocktails

Want to go patriotic? Then create your own red, white and blue colored libations. Mixing up drink favorites with single colors is the easiest. However, multiple colors in the same drink can be achieved several ways: ice cubes, garnishes, glasses and layers.

Colored ice cubes create themed cocktails to fit any occasion including the 4th of July. Specifically themed Independence Day barware or frosted / colored glasses can be used in combination with the drink’s liquid & garnish colors to fit the festivities as well.


Another red, white and blue beverage option would be layered cocktails known as Pousse-cafes. By arranging the liquids based on their densities, where a lighter liquid is CAREFULLY poured on top of a heavier liquid and so on, the different liquids appear to be completely separate from one another ( at least temporarily ) as if they were solids.

It takes a little patience and some practice but making a Pousse-café is a lot of fun. Pouring each liqueur slowly over the back of a bar spoon so that it then flows down the side of an angled glass works well, but you can also tilt the container.


Red, white and blue drinks go great with New England Patriots themed pigskin parties too.



What Are The Weights Of The Liqueurs & Other Liquids?

Some of the popular red, white (clear) and blue liqueurs used are listed below in order from lightest (lower number for specific gravity) at the top to the heaviest ones at the bottom. Also included are their flavors and expected colors. Brand formulations may vary slightly in weight, flavor and color but these should serve as starting guidelines. Best results will be realized by choosing adjacent layers with larger differences in their specific gravities.


Red, White & Blue Pousse-cafe Chart: ?.?? liquid (flavor) - color

  • 1.00 Water (plain) - Clear
  • 1.04 Cointreau (orange peel) - Clear
  • 1.07 Campari (herbal / bitters) - Bright red
  • 1.09 Cranberry liqueur (cranberry) - Deep red
            Triple Sec (orange) - Clear
  • 1.10 Blackberry liqueur (blackberry) - Dark red
  • 1.11 Blue Curacao (orange) - Brilliant blue
  • 1.12 Cherry liqueur (cherry) - Dark red
            Crème de Noyaux (almond) - Bright red
            Strawberry liqueur (strawberry) - Pink red
  • 1.16 Grenadine (pomegranate) - Deep orange-red
  • 1.14 White Crème de Cacao (chocolate) - Clear
  • 1.17 Anisette (licorice) - Clear
  • 1.18 Crème de Cassis (black currant) - Blood red



More 4th of July Cocktails

Some political cocktails are more patriotic than others but many of them could double as nice options for 4th of July themed drinks too.

Another is the Americano - the name says it all.

And don’t forget the Yankee Punch!

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How Stiff Is Stiff?
“It takes a real man to drink a cocktail out of a tropical skull cup. My dad liked his tie skinny, his shoes polished and his drinks stiff.” ~ My Dad’s Drink*


The most classic of all good stiff drinks is of course a bourbon or scotch neat. That is whiskey ( or whisky ) straight up. The rule of thumb is basically less mixers equals stiffer drinks although the liquors’ alcohol proof matters as well.

Bartenders and mixologists will argue all day about how adding a splash of water releases the flavors, not to add any ice ( or if on the rocks is definitely a must, then use giant round ice balls to minimize melting ) or how chilled drinks should be from cooling the bottle in the refrigerator as opposed to the freezer which will numb the taste buds. Then just to mix things up, new products like Whisky Stones have become popular as a method to chill without diluting the stiffness.

For more ‘neat’ ideas take a look at these cool solutions for ice cold stiff drinks.



One Man’s Opinion

Your dad probably has his own opinion on all this and on Father’s Day that’s the only viewpoint that counts. Stock his bar with his favorites and pour what he wants.

Purity doesn’t need to be strictly enforced to qualify as stiff. Plenty of cocktails are manly drinks your father has either drank before or would like to try on his designated day. Here’s a bucket list of brisk belts of booze for your dad’s bar.


Classic Stiff Drinks For Father’s Day (and other times as needed):

  • Godfather - Scotch whisky and Amaretto almond liqueur.
  • Manhattan - rye whiskey, sweet vermouth, aromatic bitters and a cherry garnish.
  • Martini - gin, dry vermouth and an olive.
  • Negroni - pour some gin on an Americano and lose the soda water. An aperitif no more.
  • Old Fashioned Cocktail - bourbon or rye whiskey, Angostura bitters, sugar cube and water.
  • Papa Doble - Hemingway’s Special Daiquiri with double the rum and no sugar. Potent.
  • Rob Roy - Scotch whisky, Italian vermouth, aromatic bitters and a maraschino cherry.
  • Rusty Nail - Scotch whisky, Drambuie and a lemon twist.
  • Sazerac - rye whiskey, absinthe, Peychaud’s bitters, simple syrup or sugar cube and a lemon peel twist.
  • Sidecar - brandy, orange liqueur and lemon juice.
  • Vieux Carré - rye whiskey, Cognac, Italian vermouth, Bénédictine herbal liqueur, Peychaud’s bitters, Angostura bitters and a twist of lemon peel with an optional slice of pineapple and/or a cherry.



Carrie Underwood - Smoke Break (Official Music Video) - YouTube


Sometimes I Need A Stiff Drink

Some days you just need a good stiff drink and Carrie Underwood sums it up nicely in the lyrics of the song “Smoke Break” from her 2015 album Storyteller.

  • She’s a small-town, hard-working woman just trying to make a living,
  • Working three jobs, feeding four little mouths in a run-down kitchen.
  • When you never taking nothing and doing nothing but giving,
  • It’s hard to be a good wife and a good mom and a good Christian.

  • She said, “I don’t drink,
  • But sometimes I need a stiff drink.
  • Sipping from a highball glass,
  • Let the world fade away.”
  • She said, “I don’t smoke,
  • But sometimes I need a long drag.
  • Yeah, I know it might sound bad,
  • But sometimes I need a smoke break”

  • He’s a big-city, hard-working man just trying to climb the ladder,
  • First generation to go to college instead of driving a tractor.
  • Never had nothing handed to him on a silver platter,
  • It’s hard to be a good man, good son, do something good that matters.

  • He said, “I don’t drink,
  • But sometimes I wanna pop that top.
  • Take a swig and make the world stop,
  • And watch it fade away.”
  • He said, “I don’t smoke,
  • But sometimes I wanna light it up.
  • Yeah, when things get tough,
  • Sometimes I need a smoke break, yeah”

  • So here’s to you and here’s to when the day gets long,
  • Go ahead, I understand if you wanna take a load off.

  • I don’t drink,
  • But sometimes I need a stiff drink.
  • Sipping from a highball glass,
  • Let the world fade away.
  • Yeah, and I don’t smoke,
  • But sometimes I need a long drag.
  • Yeah, I know it might sound bad,
  • But sometimes I need a, sometimes I need a…

  • When the day gets long,
  • When the work’s all done,
  • When the sun sets,
  • When you need to forget,
  • Grab that cup,
  • Mmm, fill it up,
  • Sip it slow,
  • And let it all go.



I Drink Alone - George Thorogood and the Destroyers - YouTube


Need More Proof?

The Destroyers had some fun with this in their song “I Drink Alone” from their 1985 album Maverick when George Thorogood sang:


The only one who will hang out with me is my dear Old Grand Dad.


Whiskey that is.

Old Grand-Dad is a Kentucky bourbon with a cult following that’s high on rye and comes overproof to boot. One hundred and fourteen is seriously stout.

Of course, there’s always “one bourbon, one scotch and one beer” if you need a triple shot of that juice.†



References

* - via now defunct my dad’s drink tumblr, post 4119252607.

† - “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” is a classic blues tune first recorded by Amos Milburn in 1953 that reached the top ten of Billboard’s R&B chart. This drinking song has been recorded by many other musicians over the years including John Lee Hooker in 1966 on The Real Folk Blues and George Thorogood and the Destroyers in 1977 on their self-titled debut album.


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Father’s Day Drinks For Duffers

Golf themed parties are a great way for your home bar to host a crowd of family and friends. Part 3 of our series on golf cocktails starts off with the U.S. Open and its prestigious final round of competition held on Father’s Day. Throw him a bash with some of his fairway foursomes or let Dad enjoy his golf & cocktail book gift set while sipping on one of these delicious recipes and watching the tournament on tv.

Does he love beer? Better change gears and head over here.



US Open Golf Themed Cocktails

Club Cocktail:


Probably named for a sporting club or clubhouse rather than a physical golf club with a shaft, grip and head, this drink recipe was first printed in W.C. Whitfield’s 1939 Just Cocktails book. Which clubhouse though?

Possibly the R&A. Afterall, 1939 was the same year the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, Scotland introduced its 14 club rule. If so, maybe this mixture is better suited as a British Open golf themed drink.

Of course the pineapple juice suggests something tailored to tastes a bit further south. Perhaps The Masters or one of the tournament golf courses back then like the Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas (1941 U.S. Open) or Pinehurst Resort in Pinehurst, North Carolina (1936 PGA Championship).

Then again, it could just be coincidence. Let’s mix one up and speculate.

Pour all of the ingredients inside an ice filled cocktail shaker. Shake well and strain into chilled glassware. Garnish with a lemon peel and strawberry slice.


Club Martini:

  • 1 ½ oz gin
  • ¾ oz sweet vermouth

Substituting sweet for dry vermouth in the classic recipe may celebrate being part of the club, if even briefly. The U.S. Open gets its name by allowing anyone including non-professionals to enter the tournament if they have a low enough handicap and can successfully compete in a grueling series of play off rounds to qualify. That would be pretty sweet for any accomplished duffer.


Golf Cocktail Martini:

  • 2 dashes bitters
  • 1 ½ oz gin
  • ¾ oz dry vermouth

This drink is a variation of the traditional Martini with a two to one ratio of gin to dry vermouth along with a splash of aromatic bitters. Stir with ice and strain into a chilled glass. The classic vee shaped bar ware tees up the next shot above.


Turf Cocktail:

  • ¼ tsp anise flavored liqueur or absinthe
  • 2 dashes Angostura bitters
  • 1 oz dry vermouth
  • 1 oz gin

As one of the four majors, the U.S. Open golf tournament is known for letting the rough grass grow long. This tough turf makes for some challenging and unpredictable shots. Seems fitting to include the Turf Cocktail which may include absinthe, nicknamed the green fairy, to represent swinging through that wild growth. A few surprising twists to this drink include using a couple drops of maraschino liqueur and orange bitters or substituting lemon juice for the bitters altogether. Stir with ice and strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with a twist of orange peel.



Spirit Of The Game »

The Masters Golf DrinksPGA Championship Golf DrinksBritish Open Golf Cocktails

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The Affinity Cocktail Pairs Scotch Affection For Vermouth

The Affinity Cocktail is one of only a few truly classic drinks mixed with Scotch whisky which shows the difficulty of pairing it in the perfect marriage. At least in spirit.

Modern versions of the Affinity Cocktail have sort of settled on a sip similar to a perfect Scotch Manhattan with orange or aromatic bitters, although the original drink recipe was hardly perfect (equal parts French and Italian vermouth). Back then it was closer to a sweetened Scottish Rory O'More or a Robert Burns with sugar instead of absinthe.

Either way, like most Scotch whisky cocktails, the character of this drink is greatly effected by how manly the mixture is. Blended may be best to begin with.



History Of The Affinity Cocktail
First Appeared In Print

The New York Sun initially reported on Monday, October 28, 1907 that,*


There’s another new cocktail on Broadway. They call it the Affinity. After drinking one, surviving experimenters declare, the horizon takes on a roseate hue; the second brings Wall Street to the front and center proffering to you a quantity of glistening lamb shearings; when you’ve put away the third the green grass grows up all around, birds sing in the fig trees and your affinity appears.


The new ambrosia contains these ingredients…


Original Affinity Cocktail Recipe:

  • 1 jigger (1 ½ oz) Scotch whisky
  • ½ jigger (¾ oz) Italian vermouth
  • 1 (medium) tsp powdered sugar
  • 1 dash orange bitters

Shake in cracked ice, cocktail fashion, until thoroughly blended and cooled, then strain and quickly serve. ( Note: would recommend using superfine sugar though instead of powdered to avoid the corn starch and other anticaking agents which adds cloudiness and can affect the flavor. )

During this time period, many cocktails were created to commemorate the opening of a Broadway play and the reference to Wall Street is in relation to the financial crisis known as the 1907 Banker’s Panic which was triggered by a failed attempt to corner the market on United Copper Company stock in October 1907.

Which Broadway play inspired the name for the Affinity cocktail though?

Keep reading below.


Syndication

Syndicated newspaper columns including The Washington Post and others ran the story the following day. The Hartford Courant embellished the details with their own verse which also provided some more clues to the source, writing,†


Well, then the pianola sounds as good as the symphony orchestra. The second one convinces you that trust companies and savings banks are solvent and you want to put your money back. If you take three it seems like Summer, otherwise you’ll buy your wife, or the affinity, a new fur coat. Then it’s time to stop.


“It moved the poet to the following:

  • In its glistening depth is the light of her eyes,
  • In its taste is her honey kiss.
  • There’s a victor’s crown for the man who tries
  • To build me another like this.


If you put another bright red cherry in the last one you will feel like a Belmont as you ride home in the subway.



Divorcons or Let’s Get A Divorce

James Slevin announces on November 8, 1907 a sketch he adopted for vaudeville based on the 1885 book Divorcons! by Emile de Najac and Victorien Sardou may be named Affinity.‡ This does not appear to have happened, although the original title was turned into a play1 which opened at the Playhouse Theatre April 1, 1913 running through May 19, 1913 and was later released as a 40 minute short silent black and white film2 as a comedy drama on December 15, 1915.


His Affinity Is A Miss

His Affinity is released as a black and white short silent film on November 9, 1907.3 This comedy details the adventures of a mild mannered husband, who after deciding to leave his overbearing wife, finds romance with a single girl he meets in the park. Drama ensues.


Good Golly Miss Molly, McGinnity

Good Golly is right when it comes to all the affinity references in popular culture in 1907 and shortly afterwards. Not to be confused with the rock and roll song by Little Richard in 1958, “Molly McGinnity, You’re My Affinity” by composer John W. Bratton was released November 23, 1907. However, this humorous Irish folk song, lyrics below, was not featured on Broadway.4


The Billowy Ecstasy Of Neptunian Soul Kisses

The year 1907’s affinity for affinity has come to a close and the source for the “newest drink on Broadway” as proclaimed by The New York Sun at the end of October does not seem to exist. Unless an advanced preview of an upcoming show served as inspiration for the Affinity Cocktail.

Enter The Soul Kiss, a Broadway musical created by Florenz Ziegfeld all about the subject, which included the song My Affinity, sung by the sculptor in the show sixth on the song list during Act I. It opened January 28, 1908 at the New York Theater and ran for 122 performances until May 23, 1908.5

The play had a behind the scenes production cast that included many of the same players responsible for The Ziegfeld Follies. Familiar names included producers A.L. Erlanger and Marcus Klaw, music by Maurice Levi (and others) and script / lyrics written by Harry B. Smith, who also wrote the Rob Roy operetta which has a drink named after it.

The soul kiss, a tongue in cheek [sic] expression for a French kiss elevated to exaggerated proportions, was supposedly invented by a romance instructor who was quoted in a newspaper interview as saying, “When I exchange soul kisses with my affinity in the planet Neptune, I close the doors, throw myself on a couch, my soul goes out from my body to meet him and I experience a billowy ecstasy.” By the way, at the time, personal lessons could be purchased for $300.

Her description inspired Smith6 to develop the plot for the play which had J. Lucifer Mephisto (Ralph C. Herz) betting one million dollars that sculptor Ketcham Short (Cecil Lean) would not remain faithful to his fiance, model Suzette (Florence Holbrook), under the temptation of a soul kiss from dancer (Adeline Genee). As a follow up, The Ziegfeld Follies of 1908, which debuted on June 15th of that year, contained a comedy spoof mocking the November elections called The Political Soul Kiss where Miss Columbia (female Uncle Sam) tries to find her affinity among the presidential candidates including William Jennings Bryan, Charles Evans Hughes, William Howard Taft and then 2nd term incumbent president Theodore Roosevelt who was not seeking a third.


The Affinity (Play)

Its probably folly to keep searching for the stimulus behind this sip’s sobriquet since The Soul Kiss seems to seal the deal, but there actually was a Broadway play named The Affinity.7 However, in 1907 it was still known as Les Hannetons.

Les Hannetons, which translates to cockchafers (the beetles known as June Bugs), by French playwright Eugene Brieux, was a three act bitter comedy first produced at the Theatre de la Renaissance in Paris, France on February 3, 1906. The controversial play dealt with matrimony and mistresses, treating marriage as a battleground, and gained some infamous notoriety after being banned by censors in both France and England. British stage actor Laurence Irving, who translated Les Hannetons8 into English, performed the play with his wife Mabel Hackney in the United States, first renamed as The Incubus in 1909 and then later renamed again in January 1910 as The Affinity. There were no bureaucratic black outs on Broadway, but the crowds were not amused and the play lasted for only 24 performances at the Comedy Theater on west 41st street.



Behind Your Bar - How To Make An Affinity Cocktail At Home
First Published In A Cocktail Book

Minus the powdered sugar, the Express Cocktail with equal parts Scotch whisky and Italian vermouth plus a dash of orange bitters via Straub’s Manual of Mixed Drinks (1913) appears to be the earliest recipe printed in a cocktail book which comes closest to the original 1907 Affinity Cocktail. However, the first one named the Affinity Cocktail published in a bartending book is the one in The Reminder by Jacob A Didier (1909) and it is a different formulation.9

Its this ‘perfect’ combination of Scotch whisky with French and Italian vermouths along with aromatic or orange bitters that has become the modern classic so to speak.10


Affinity Cocktail Drink Recipe (modern classic):

  • 1 oz Scotch whisky (blended)
  • 1 oz French (dry) vermouth
  • 1 oz Italian (sweet) vermouth
  • 2 dashes aromatic or orange bitters

Measure all the ingredients into a mixing glass with ice and stir well. Strain and serve with a twist of lemon peel (or orange rind to match the bitters if chosen). Adjust the manliness to suit.

David Embury, the author of The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (1948) ratchets up the proportions to a 4:1:1 ratio. When it comes to Scotch though, that’s probably too manly for most.



Similar Mixed Drinks
  • Automobile Cocktail - gin, scotch, sweet vermouth and orange bitters.
  • Beadlestone Cocktail - equal parts Scotch and dry vermouth.
  • Borden Chase - an original Affinity Cocktail with pastis instead of powdered sugar.
  • Emerald Cocktail - half-n-half Irish whiskey and Italian vermouth with a dash of orange bitters.
  • Highland Cocktail - equal parts Scotch and sweet vermouth.
  • Thistle Cocktail - Scotch whisky, Italian vermouth and Angostura bitters.
  • Trilby Variation - a Borden Chase with parfait amour.
  • York Cocktail - Scotch whisky, French vermouth and orange bitters.




References

* - “Live Topics About Town.” New York Sun 28 Oct. 1907: 4. Print.

† - Hartford Courant 29 Oct. 1907: 14. Print.

‡ - “An ‘Affinity’ Sketch.” Variety Magazine Nov. 1907: 6. Print.

1 - Divorcons (the play).

2 - Divorcons (the movie).

3 - His Affinity (the movie).

4 - Molly McGinnity, You’re My Affinity song lyrics:

  • I’ve been a single man all my life.
  • I’ve never wanted to own a wife.
  • No Wedding Bells was the song for me.
  • Money my own, and my evenings free.

  • Now all that’s over, those days are through;
  • You’ve done the trick with your eyes of blue.
  • Molly McGinnity don’t you see?
  • You’re the affinity meant for me.

  • Molly McGinnity, You’re my affinity, Say that you love me, do.
  • In this vicinity, No femininity, Is half so sweet as you.
  • Molly McGinnity, Down at old Trinity, If you will not decline.
  • There’s a doctor of divinity, The Reverend Finnerty, A waiting to make you mine.

  • “Hold on a minute,” says Molly dear,
  • “What’s this affinity word I hear?
  • Is it some kind of a breakfast food?
  • May be its meaning is not so good.”

  • “Whisper,” says I, “‘tis a brand new word,
  • ‘Tis from the French, and it means a bird.”
  • “Oh, if that’s so” says my Molly dear,
  • “Say it again, for I like to hear.”

  • Molly McGinnity, You’re my affinity, Say that you love me, do.
  • In this vicinity, No femininity, Is half so sweet as you.
  • Molly McGinnity, Down at old Trinity, If you will not decline.
  • There’s a doctor of divinity, The Reverend Finnerty, A waiting to make you mine.

5 - The Soul Kiss (Broadway musical extravaganza).

6 - Harry Bache Smith, First Nights and First Editions - An Autobiography (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1931). Print.

7 - The Affinity (the play).

8 - Michael Holroyd, A Strange Eventful History: The Dramatic Lives of Ellen Terry, Henry Irving, and Their Remarkable Families (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008). Print.

9 - That’s not really true, but since the first “Affinity cocktail” published in a bartending book was actually a completely separate recipe altogether, we decided to remove it from the main article content. This drink, which later became known to some as the Violet Affinity cocktail was originally listed with instructions to frappe 2/5 French vermouth with 2/5 Italian vermouth and 1/5 crème de violette; serving in a chilled stemmed glasses via William T. (Cocktail) Boothby, The World’s Drinks And How To Mix Them (San Francisco: Pacific Buffet, 1908), 143. Print.

10 - Other Affinity cocktail variations have appeared along the way including one with equal measures of whiskey, French and Italian vermouths along with 3 drops of Peychaud bitters and a twist of orange peel on top via Ernest P. Rawling, Rawling’s Book of Mixed Drinks - An Up to Date Guide for Mixing and Serving All Kinds of Beverages and Written Expressly for the Man Who Entertains at Home (San Francisco: Guild Press, 1914), 14. Print.

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It seems appropriate to highlight one of the most feminine home bars you’ll ever see on Mother’s Day. This elegant, nearly all white, home bar set features silver trim moulding and front bar foot railing along with black counter and bartops as color accents. Part of Arca’s Pristige Rialto collection, matching furniture and cabinets include the back bar and padded bar stools with the padding detailing accenting all three of the main areas as prominent decor elements in the interior design.

A free standing wall unit contains integrated wine glass racks, shelving, drawers and cabinet areas to store all your barware, supplies, liquor stock and bartending tools / equipment in a combination open and hidden display. The standalone design allows multiple location choices as side / back bars in corner room layouts, as wall offsets and a variety of other arrangements. The pillow pads on the bar’s curving front indicate available barstool seating room for up to three people.

Shown pictured with a couple flutes of champagne cocktails ( possibly a pair of red poinsettia drinks ) and the bottle chilling in an ice bucket, this home’s bar seems stocked and ready for entertaining a Mothers Day or Easter brunch.


(source: arcamobili via trendir)

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Mix Drinks Like A Pro Even If You Can’t Play Golf Like One

Golf themed drinks Part 2 highlights cocktails inspired by the Professional Golfers Association Championship. Beginning in 2019, the PGA is now the second leg of golf’s four major championships and celebrates the pros by reserving 20 places for club and teaching professionals who qualify with low scores in their national tournament.


PGA Championship Golf Themed Cocktails

Mel’s Swing:

  • 1 oz creme de cassis (black currant liqueur)
  • 1 oz melon liqueur
  • 4 oz grapefruit juice

Mel’s swing is something a professional golf coach will constantly try to both improve and make repeatable. Seems fitting that Mel has a swing variation which calls for raspberry liqueur instead of the black currant used in this recipe.


Fore Play:

  • ½ oz almond liqueur
  • ½ oz pineapple juice

Fore! is loudly shouted out on the course as a warning when a golf ball from an errant shot may hit someone. A teaching pro probably hears this a lot from their students when they play. Yes, the name of this shot was ‘sliced’ in two so the drink could be themed for the game. Other recipes of the foreplay cocktail call for equal parts Southern Comfort and Amaretto along with the pineapple juice.


Broken Down Golf Cart:

  • ½ oz almond liqueur
  • ½ oz melon liqueur
  • 1 dash lime juice

Crooked Golf Cart:

  • 1 oz almond liqueur
  • 5 oz cranberry juice
  • 1 splash rum
  • 2 slices lime garnishes

Club professionals will have plenty of golf cart issues to occasionally deal with. Each of these two recipes are mixed together with crushed ice in a glass and optionally garnished with mint leaves.


Nineteenth Hole:

  • 1 ½ oz gin
  • 1 oz dry vermouth
  • 1 tsp sweet vermouth
  • 1 dash Angostura bitters
  • olives as garnish

The PGA Championship became the major’s first tournament to implement a sudden death playoff. Gives a new meaning to the 19th hole.


Derosier’s 19th Hole:

  • ½ oz bourbon whiskey
  • 1 oz rum
  • 2 tsp Drambuie ( Scotch whisky liqueur )
  • 2 tsp creme de cacao ( chocolate bean liqueur )
  • 4 oz coffee
  • 2 oz cream

Maybe the Derosier drink recipe for the nineteenth hole is more appropriate for the PGA. With all the alcohol in this cocktail its kind of like the Long Island Iced Tea of Irish Coffee.



Pour For The Course »

The Masters Golf DrinksUS Open Golf CocktailsBritish Open Golf Cocktails


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How Stiff Is Stiff?
“It takes a real man to drink a cocktail out of a tropical skull cup. My dad liked his tie skinny, his shoes polished and his drinks stiff.” ~ My Dad’s Drink*


The most classic of all good stiff drinks is of course a bourbon or scotch neat. That is whiskey ( or whisky ) straight up. The rule of thumb is basically less mixers equals stiffer drinks although the liquors’ alcohol proof matters as well.

Bartenders and mixologists will argue all day about how adding a splash of water releases the flavors, not to add any ice ( or if on the rocks is definitely a must, then use giant round ice balls to minimize melting ) or how chilled drinks should be from cooling the bottle in the refrigerator as opposed to the freezer which will numb the taste buds. Then just to mix things up, new products like Whisky Stones have become popular as a method to chill without diluting the stiffness.

For more ‘neat’ ideas take a look at these cool solutions for ice cold stiff drinks.



One Man’s Opinion

Your dad probably has his own opinion on all this and on Father’s Day that’s the only viewpoint that counts. Stock his bar with his favorites and pour what he wants.

Purity doesn’t need to be strictly enforced to qualify as stiff. Plenty of cocktails are manly drinks your father has either drank before or would like to try on his designated day. Here’s a bucket list of brisk belts of booze for your dad’s bar.


Classic Stiff Drinks For Father’s Day (and other times as needed):

  • Godfather - Scotch whisky and Amaretto almond liqueur.
  • Manhattan - rye whiskey, sweet vermouth, aromatic bitters and a cherry garnish.
  • Martini - gin, dry vermouth and an olive.
  • Negroni - pour some gin on an Americano and lose the soda water. An aperitif no more.
  • Old Fashioned Cocktail - bourbon or rye whiskey, Angostura bitters, sugar cube and water.
  • Papa Doble - Hemingway’s Special Daiquiri with double the rum and no sugar. Potent.
  • Rob Roy - Scotch whisky, Italian vermouth, aromatic bitters and a maraschino cherry.
  • Rusty Nail - Scotch whisky, Drambuie and a lemon twist.
  • Sazerac - rye whiskey, absinthe, Peychaud’s bitters, simple syrup or sugar cube and a lemon peel twist.
  • Sidecar - brandy, orange liqueur and lemon juice.
  • Vieux Carré - rye whiskey, Cognac, Italian vermouth, Bénédictine herbal liqueur, Peychaud’s bitters, Angostura bitters and a twist of lemon peel with an optional slice of pineapple and/or a cherry.



Carrie Underwood - Smoke Break (Official Music Video) - YouTube


Sometimes I Need A Stiff Drink

Some days you just need a good stiff drink and Carrie Underwood sums it up nicely in the lyrics of the song “Smoke Break” from her 2015 album Storyteller.

  • She’s a small-town, hard-working woman just trying to make a living,
  • Working three jobs, feeding four little mouths in a run-down kitchen.
  • When you never taking nothing and doing nothing but giving,
  • It’s hard to be a good wife and a good mom and a good Christian.

  • She said, “I don’t drink,
  • But sometimes I need a stiff drink.
  • Sipping from a highball glass,
  • Let the world fade away.”
  • She said, “I don’t smoke,
  • But sometimes I need a long drag.
  • Yeah, I know it might sound bad,
  • But sometimes I need a smoke break”

  • He’s a big-city, hard-working man just trying to climb the ladder,
  • First generation to go to college instead of driving a tractor.
  • Never had nothing handed to him on a silver platter,
  • It’s hard to be a good man, good son, do something good that matters.

  • He said, “I don’t drink,
  • But sometimes I wanna pop that top.
  • Take a swig and make the world stop,
  • And watch it fade away.”
  • He said, “I don’t smoke,
  • But sometimes I wanna light it up.
  • Yeah, when things get tough,
  • Sometimes I need a smoke break, yeah”

  • So here’s to you and here’s to when the day gets long,
  • Go ahead, I understand if you wanna take a load off.

  • I don’t drink,
  • But sometimes I need a stiff drink.
  • Sipping from a highball glass,
  • Let the world fade away.
  • Yeah, and I don’t smoke,
  • But sometimes I need a long drag.
  • Yeah, I know it might sound bad,
  • But sometimes I need a, sometimes I need a…

  • When the day gets long,
  • When the work’s all done,
  • When the sun sets,
  • When you need to forget,
  • Grab that cup,
  • Mmm, fill it up,
  • Sip it slow,
  • And let it all go.



I Drink Alone - George Thorogood and the Destroyers - YouTube


Need More Proof?

The Destroyers had some fun with this in their song “I Drink Alone” from their 1985 album Maverick when George Thorogood sang:


The only one who will hang out with me is my dear Old Grand Dad.


Whiskey that is.

Old Grand-Dad is a Kentucky bourbon with a cult following that’s high on rye and comes overproof to boot. One hundred and fourteen is seriously stout.

Of course, there’s always “one bourbon, one scotch and one beer” if you need a triple shot of that juice.†



References

* - via now defunct my dad’s drink tumblr, post 4119252607.

† - “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer” is a classic blues tune first recorded by Amos Milburn in 1953 that reached the top ten of Billboard’s R&B chart. This drinking song has been recorded by many other musicians over the years including John Lee Hooker in 1966 on The Real Folk Blues and George Thorogood and the Destroyers in 1977 on their self-titled debut album.


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Father’s Day Drinks For Duffers

Golf themed parties are a great way for your home bar to host a crowd of family and friends. Part 3 of our series on golf cocktails starts off with the U.S. Open and its prestigious final round of competition held on Father’s Day. Throw him a bash with some of his fairway foursomes or let Dad enjoy his golf & cocktail book gift set while sipping on one of these delicious recipes and watching the tournament on tv.

Does he love beer? Better change gears and head over here.



US Open Golf Themed Cocktails

Club Cocktail:


Probably named for a sporting club or clubhouse rather than a physical golf club with a shaft, grip and head, this drink recipe was first printed in W.C. Whitfield’s 1939 Just Cocktails book. Which clubhouse though?

Possibly the R&A. Afterall, 1939 was the same year the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, Scotland introduced its 14 club rule. If so, maybe this mixture is better suited as a British Open golf themed drink.

Of course the pineapple juice suggests something tailored to tastes a bit further south. Perhaps The Masters or one of the tournament golf courses back then like the Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas (1941 U.S. Open) or Pinehurst Resort in Pinehurst, North Carolina (1936 PGA Championship).

Then again, it could just be coincidence. Let’s mix one up and speculate.

Pour all of the ingredients inside an ice filled cocktail shaker. Shake well and strain into chilled glassware. Garnish with a lemon peel and strawberry slice.


Club Martini:

  • 1 ½ oz gin
  • ¾ oz sweet vermouth

Substituting sweet for dry vermouth in the classic recipe may celebrate being part of the club, if even briefly. The U.S. Open gets its name by allowing anyone including non-professionals to enter the tournament if they have a low enough handicap and can successfully compete in a grueling series of play off rounds to qualify. That would be pretty sweet for any accomplished duffer.


Golf Cocktail Martini:

  • 2 dashes bitters
  • 1 ½ oz gin
  • ¾ oz dry vermouth

This drink is a variation of the traditional Martini with a two to one ratio of gin to dry vermouth along with a splash of aromatic bitters. Stir with ice and strain into a chilled glass. The classic vee shaped bar ware tees up the next shot above.


Turf Cocktail:

  • ¼ tsp anise flavored liqueur or absinthe
  • 2 dashes Angostura bitters
  • 1 oz dry vermouth
  • 1 oz gin

As one of the four majors, the U.S. Open golf tournament is known for letting the rough grass grow long. This tough turf makes for some challenging and unpredictable shots. Seems fitting to include the Turf Cocktail which may include absinthe, nicknamed the green fairy, to represent swinging through that wild growth. A few surprising twists to this drink include using a couple drops of maraschino liqueur and orange bitters or substituting lemon juice for the bitters altogether. Stir with ice and strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with a twist of orange peel.



Spirit Of The Game »

The Masters Golf DrinksPGA Championship Golf DrinksBritish Open Golf Cocktails

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The Affinity Cocktail Pairs Scotch Affection For Vermouth

The Affinity Cocktail is one of only a few truly classic drinks mixed with Scotch whisky which shows the difficulty of pairing it in the perfect marriage. At least in spirit.

Modern versions of the Affinity Cocktail have sort of settled on a sip similar to a perfect Scotch Manhattan with orange or aromatic bitters, although the original drink recipe was hardly perfect (equal parts French and Italian vermouth). Back then it was closer to a sweetened Scottish Rory O'More or a Robert Burns with sugar instead of absinthe.

Either way, like most Scotch whisky cocktails, the character of this drink is greatly effected by how manly the mixture is. Blended may be best to begin with.



History Of The Affinity Cocktail
First Appeared In Print

The New York Sun initially reported on Monday, October 28, 1907 that,*


There’s another new cocktail on Broadway. They call it the Affinity. After drinking one, surviving experimenters declare, the horizon takes on a roseate hue; the second brings Wall Street to the front and center proffering to you a quantity of glistening lamb shearings; when you’ve put away the third the green grass grows up all around, birds sing in the fig trees and your affinity appears.


The new ambrosia contains these ingredients…


Original Affinity Cocktail Recipe:

  • 1 jigger (1 ½ oz) Scotch whisky
  • ½ jigger (¾ oz) Italian vermouth
  • 1 (medium) tsp powdered sugar
  • 1 dash orange bitters

Shake in cracked ice, cocktail fashion, until thoroughly blended and cooled, then strain and quickly serve. ( Note: would recommend using superfine sugar though instead of powdered to avoid the corn starch and other anticaking agents which adds cloudiness and can affect the flavor. )

During this time period, many cocktails were created to commemorate the opening of a Broadway play and the reference to Wall Street is in relation to the financial crisis known as the 1907 Banker’s Panic which was triggered by a failed attempt to corner the market on United Copper Company stock in October 1907.

Which Broadway play inspired the name for the Affinity cocktail though?

Keep reading below.


Syndication

Syndicated newspaper columns including The Washington Post and others ran the story the following day. The Hartford Courant embellished the details with their own verse which also provided some more clues to the source, writing,†


Well, then the pianola sounds as good as the symphony orchestra. The second one convinces you that trust companies and savings banks are solvent and you want to put your money back. If you take three it seems like Summer, otherwise you’ll buy your wife, or the affinity, a new fur coat. Then it’s time to stop.


“It moved the poet to the following:

  • In its glistening depth is the light of her eyes,
  • In its taste is her honey kiss.
  • There’s a victor’s crown for the man who tries
  • To build me another like this.


If you put another bright red cherry in the last one you will feel like a Belmont as you ride home in the subway.



Divorcons or Let’s Get A Divorce

James Slevin announces on November 8, 1907 a sketch he adopted for vaudeville based on the 1885 book Divorcons! by Emile de Najac and Victorien Sardou may be named Affinity.‡ This does not appear to have happened, although the original title was turned into a play1 which opened at the Playhouse Theatre April 1, 1913 running through May 19, 1913 and was later released as a 40 minute short silent black and white film2 as a comedy drama on December 15, 1915.


His Affinity Is A Miss

His Affinity is released as a black and white short silent film on November 9, 1907.3 This comedy details the adventures of a mild mannered husband, who after deciding to leave his overbearing wife, finds romance with a single girl he meets in the park. Drama ensues.


Good Golly Miss Molly, McGinnity

Good Golly is right when it comes to all the affinity references in popular culture in 1907 and shortly afterwards. Not to be confused with the rock and roll song by Little Richard in 1958, “Molly McGinnity, You’re My Affinity” by composer John W. Bratton was released November 23, 1907. However, this humorous Irish folk song, lyrics below, was not featured on Broadway.4


The Billowy Ecstasy Of Neptunian Soul Kisses

The year 1907’s affinity for affinity has come to a close and the source for the “newest drink on Broadway” as proclaimed by The New York Sun at the end of October does not seem to exist. Unless an advanced preview of an upcoming show served as inspiration for the Affinity Cocktail.

Enter The Soul Kiss, a Broadway musical created by Florenz Ziegfeld all about the subject, which included the song My Affinity, sung by the sculptor in the show sixth on the song list during Act I. It opened January 28, 1908 at the New York Theater and ran for 122 performances until May 23, 1908.5

The play had a behind the scenes production cast that included many of the same players responsible for The Ziegfeld Follies. Familiar names included producers A.L. Erlanger and Marcus Klaw, music by Maurice Levi (and others) and script / lyrics written by Harry B. Smith, who also wrote the Rob Roy operetta which has a drink named after it.

The soul kiss, a tongue in cheek [sic] expression for a French kiss elevated to exaggerated proportions, was supposedly invented by a romance instructor who was quoted in a newspaper interview as saying, “When I exchange soul kisses with my affinity in the planet Neptune, I close the doors, throw myself on a couch, my soul goes out from my body to meet him and I experience a billowy ecstasy.” By the way, at the time, personal lessons could be purchased for $300.

Her description inspired Smith6 to develop the plot for the play which had J. Lucifer Mephisto (Ralph C. Herz) betting one million dollars that sculptor Ketcham Short (Cecil Lean) would not remain faithful to his fiance, model Suzette (Florence Holbrook), under the temptation of a soul kiss from dancer (Adeline Genee). As a follow up, The Ziegfeld Follies of 1908, which debuted on June 15th of that year, contained a comedy spoof mocking the November elections called The Political Soul Kiss where Miss Columbia (female Uncle Sam) tries to find her affinity among the presidential candidates including William Jennings Bryan, Charles Evans Hughes, William Howard Taft and then 2nd term incumbent president Theodore Roosevelt who was not seeking a third.


The Affinity (Play)

Its probably folly to keep searching for the stimulus behind this sip’s sobriquet since The Soul Kiss seems to seal the deal, but there actually was a Broadway play named The Affinity.7 However, in 1907 it was still known as Les Hannetons.

Les Hannetons, which translates to cockchafers (the beetles known as June Bugs), by French playwright Eugene Brieux, was a three act bitter comedy first produced at the Theatre de la Renaissance in Paris, France on February 3, 1906. The controversial play dealt with matrimony and mistresses, treating marriage as a battleground, and gained some infamous notoriety after being banned by censors in both France and England. British stage actor Laurence Irving, who translated Les Hannetons8 into English, performed the play with his wife Mabel Hackney in the United States, first renamed as The Incubus in 1909 and then later renamed again in January 1910 as The Affinity. There were no bureaucratic black outs on Broadway, but the crowds were not amused and the play lasted for only 24 performances at the Comedy Theater on west 41st street.



Behind Your Bar - How To Make An Affinity Cocktail At Home
First Published In A Cocktail Book

Minus the powdered sugar, the Express Cocktail with equal parts Scotch whisky and Italian vermouth plus a dash of orange bitters via Straub’s Manual of Mixed Drinks (1913) appears to be the earliest recipe printed in a cocktail book which comes closest to the original 1907 Affinity Cocktail. However, the first one named the Affinity Cocktail published in a bartending book is the one in The Reminder by Jacob A Didier (1909) and it is a different formulation.9

Its this ‘perfect’ combination of Scotch whisky with French and Italian vermouths along with aromatic or orange bitters that has become the modern classic so to speak.10


Affinity Cocktail Drink Recipe (modern classic):

  • 1 oz Scotch whisky (blended)
  • 1 oz French (dry) vermouth
  • 1 oz Italian (sweet) vermouth
  • 2 dashes aromatic or orange bitters

Measure all the ingredients into a mixing glass with ice and stir well. Strain and serve with a twist of lemon peel (or orange rind to match the bitters if chosen). Adjust the manliness to suit.

David Embury, the author of The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks (1948) ratchets up the proportions to a 4:1:1 ratio. When it comes to Scotch though, that’s probably too manly for most.



Similar Mixed Drinks
  • Automobile Cocktail - gin, scotch, sweet vermouth and orange bitters.
  • Beadlestone Cocktail - equal parts Scotch and dry vermouth.
  • Borden Chase - an original Affinity Cocktail with pastis instead of powdered sugar.
  • Emerald Cocktail - half-n-half Irish whiskey and Italian vermouth with a dash of orange bitters.
  • Highland Cocktail - equal parts Scotch and sweet vermouth.
  • Thistle Cocktail - Scotch whisky, Italian vermouth and Angostura bitters.
  • Trilby Variation - a Borden Chase with parfait amour.
  • York Cocktail - Scotch whisky, French vermouth and orange bitters.




References

* - “Live Topics About Town.” New York Sun 28 Oct. 1907: 4. Print.

† - Hartford Courant 29 Oct. 1907: 14. Print.

‡ - “An ‘Affinity’ Sketch.” Variety Magazine Nov. 1907: 6. Print.

1 - Divorcons (the play).

2 - Divorcons (the movie).

3 - His Affinity (the movie).

4 - Molly McGinnity, You’re My Affinity song lyrics:

  • I’ve been a single man all my life.
  • I’ve never wanted to own a wife.
  • No Wedding Bells was the song for me.
  • Money my own, and my evenings free.

  • Now all that’s over, those days are through;
  • You’ve done the trick with your eyes of blue.
  • Molly McGinnity don’t you see?
  • You’re the affinity meant for me.

  • Molly McGinnity, You’re my affinity, Say that you love me, do.
  • In this vicinity, No femininity, Is half so sweet as you.
  • Molly McGinnity, Down at old Trinity, If you will not decline.
  • There’s a doctor of divinity, The Reverend Finnerty, A waiting to make you mine.

  • “Hold on a minute,” says Molly dear,
  • “What’s this affinity word I hear?
  • Is it some kind of a breakfast food?
  • May be its meaning is not so good.”

  • “Whisper,” says I, “‘tis a brand new word,
  • ‘Tis from the French, and it means a bird.”
  • “Oh, if that’s so” says my Molly dear,
  • “Say it again, for I like to hear.”

  • Molly McGinnity, You’re my affinity, Say that you love me, do.
  • In this vicinity, No femininity, Is half so sweet as you.
  • Molly McGinnity, Down at old Trinity, If you will not decline.
  • There’s a doctor of divinity, The Reverend Finnerty, A waiting to make you mine.

5 - The Soul Kiss (Broadway musical extravaganza).

6 - Harry Bache Smith, First Nights and First Editions - An Autobiography (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1931). Print.

7 - The Affinity (the play).

8 - Michael Holroyd, A Strange Eventful History: The Dramatic Lives of Ellen Terry, Henry Irving, and Their Remarkable Families (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008). Print.

9 - That’s not really true, but since the first “Affinity cocktail” published in a bartending book was actually a completely separate recipe altogether, we decided to remove it from the main article content. This drink, which later became known to some as the Violet Affinity cocktail was originally listed with instructions to frappe 2/5 French vermouth with 2/5 Italian vermouth and 1/5 crème de violette; serving in a chilled stemmed glasses via William T. (Cocktail) Boothby, The World’s Drinks And How To Mix Them (San Francisco: Pacific Buffet, 1908), 143. Print.

10 - Other Affinity cocktail variations have appeared along the way including one with equal measures of whiskey, French and Italian vermouths along with 3 drops of Peychaud bitters and a twist of orange peel on top via Ernest P. Rawling, Rawling’s Book of Mixed Drinks - An Up to Date Guide for Mixing and Serving All Kinds of Beverages and Written Expressly for the Man Who Entertains at Home (San Francisco: Guild Press, 1914), 14. Print.

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It seems appropriate to highlight one of the most feminine home bars you’ll ever see on Mother’s Day. This elegant, nearly all white, home bar set features silver trim moulding and front bar foot railing along with black counter and bartops as color accents. Part of Arca’s Pristige Rialto collection, matching furniture and cabinets include the back bar and padded bar stools with the padding detailing accenting all three of the main areas as prominent decor elements in the interior design.

A free standing wall unit contains integrated wine glass racks, shelving, drawers and cabinet areas to store all your barware, supplies, liquor stock and bartending tools / equipment in a combination open and hidden display. The standalone design allows multiple location choices as side / back bars in corner room layouts, as wall offsets and a variety of other arrangements. The pillow pads on the bar’s curving front indicate available barstool seating room for up to three people.

Shown pictured with a couple flutes of champagne cocktails ( possibly a pair of red poinsettia drinks ) and the bottle chilling in an ice bucket, this home’s bar seems stocked and ready for entertaining a Mothers Day or Easter brunch.


(source: arcamobili via trendir)

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