Loading...

Follow Cult Critic: The Film Magazine on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

 

FILMS OF THE MONTH – JANUARY 2019

 

CATEGORY: ANIMATED FILM

 

BEST ANIMATED FILM

The Follies of H. Dwiggins Ostrich

Directed by Jaime L.B. Schell

United States

CATEGORY: COMMERCIAL / ADVERTISEMENT

 

BEST COMMERCIAL / ADVERTISEMENT

Autotorino. A history of passion

Directed by Carlo De Agostini

Italy

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Oxford Through the Lens

Directed by Douglas Vernimmen & Robbie Dickson

United Kingdom

CATEGORY: DEBUT FILMMAKER

 

BEST DEBUT FILMMAKER

Siddhartha

Directed by Avijit Roy

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Unexpected Confrontation

Directed by Luis Lobato Macedo

Portugal

Time Perspectives

Directed by Ciro Sorrentino

Italy

FINALIST

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Directed by Abhimanyu Kukreja

India

CATEGORY: DOCUMENTARY FILM

 

BEST DOCUMENTARY FILM

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Directed by Abhimanyu Kukreja

India

CATEGORY: EXPERIMENTAL FILM

 

BEST EXPERIMENTAL FILM

WAVE

Directed by Dishant

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

A Home History

Directed by Tomaso Aramini

Italy

FINALIST

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

CATEGORY: FAMILY / CHILDRENS FILM

 

BEST FAMILY / CHILDRENS FILM

Bultir Result

Directed by Pinaki Sarkar

India

CATEGORY: FEATURE FILM

 

BEST FEATURE FILM

VIRAAM

Directed by Ziaullah Khan

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Black Gold

Directed by Aaron Huggett

Canada

CATEGORY: FILM / VIDEO POSTER

 

BEST FILM / VIDEO POSTER

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

GOWOK THE INS AND OUTS OF A WOMAN’S BODY

Directed by Steve Masihoroe

Indonesia

CATEGORY: FILM ON WOMEN

 

BEST FILM ON WOMEN

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

CATEGORY: FILM ON DISABILITY ISSUE

 

BEST FILM ON DISABILITY ISSUE

LAID-BACK APPROACH

Directed by Gino Ceriachi

Italy

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

PREFECT

Directed by Diana Cignoni

United States

CATEGORY: HORROR / SCIENCE FICTION / GENRE FEATURE FILM

 

BEST HORROR / SCIENCE FICTION / GENRE FEATURE FILM

Breaking Wheel

Directed by Michael McCallum

United States

CATEGORY: MUSIC VIDEO

 

BEST MUSIC VIDEO

One With Earth Song

Directed by Sairam Sagiraju

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Remembering Love Eterne

Directed by Joseph Villapaz

United States

CATEGORY: ONE MINUTE FILM

 

BEST ONE MINUTE FILM

Stay with me

Directed by Nahuel Srnec & Eduardo Hunter

Argentina

CATEGORY: PHOTOGRAPHY

 

BEST PHOTOGRAPHY

Secrets of the Flower and Willow World

Photographer Robin Yong

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Vitha

Photographer Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

CATEGORY: SHORT FILM

 

BEST SHORT FILM

Achentannos

Directed by Antonio Maciocco

Italy

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

ABHIYOG

Directed by AADITYA BHARDWAJ

India

The Domestic Fly

Directed by Áron Horváth

Slovenia

Tell me..

Directed by Revant Bhatia

India

FINALIST

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

Aunty Ji

Directed by Adeeb Rais

India

Lat

Directed by Hemant Shirsat

India

Benarasi Angoothi(The Ring from Benaras)

Directed by Revant Bhatia

India

INNER CITY

Directed by ASHUTOSH JHA

India

FIRST SIN

Directed by Vineed Menon

India

CATEGORY: SILENT FILM

 

BEST SILENT FILM

Cyclamen

Directed by Davide Canali

Italy

CATEGORY: CULT FILM / UNDERGROUND FILM / EXPLOITATION MOVIE / MIDNIGHT FILM / PARA CINEMA

 

BEST CULT FILM

X

Directed by Scott J. Ramsey

United States

CATEGORY: TRAILER / TEASER

 

BEST TRAILER / TEASER

Oxford Through the Lens

Directed by Douglas Vernimmen & Robbie Dickson

United Kingdom

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

CATEGORY: TRAVEL FILM

 

BEST TRAVEL FILM

A PLACE CALLED MUSTANG

Directed by Santanu Ray

India

CATEGORY: TREATMENT / SYNOPSIS

 

BEST TREATMENT / SYNOPSIS

Sadistic Pleasure – Synopsis

Written by Arun Lobo

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

8 Days with a Militant

Written by Harshwardhan Patil

India

100 things you should know about women

Written by Harshwardhan Patil

India

CATEGORY: WOMEN’S FILM

 

BEST WOMEN’S FILM

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

CATEGORY: YOUNG FILMMAKER

 

BEST YOUNG FILMMAKER

Luna

Directed by Eva Peljhan

Slovenia

CATEGORY: STUDENT FILM

 

BEST STUDENT FILM

Balance

Directed by Raymond Limantara Sutisna

Singapore

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

ABHIYOG

Directed by AADITYA BHARDWAJ

India

Mirchi Cafe

Directed by Mehkansh Kathuria

India

SIEGE

Directed by Deeptanshu Sinha

India

FINALIST

Windows

Directed by Akvilė Žilionytė

Lithuania

Departures

Directed by Nicolas Morganti Patrignani

Italy

Beyond The Pointy Hat

Directed by Shannon Meilak

Australia

Ode to Broken Things

Directed by Shiv Verma

India

Memoirs of Saira & Salim

Directed by Eshwarya Grover

India

F=MALE

Directed by VIKESH SINGH, HARSH BAGRODIA

India

ROSHNI

Directed by HARSH BAGRODIA, VIKESH SINGH

India

Dog Day

Directed by SHREYASH SRIVASTAVA

India

BADLAO

Directed by VIKESH SINGH, RITIK PARMAR

India

Mei (The Truth)

Directed by Harish, Dinesh Kumar , Vignesh Vijithran

India

Nigazhvugal (Journey of Emotions)

Directed by Harish

India

Mugathirai (Mask)

Directed by Harish

India

Vithdhai (fear for  something)

Directed by Harish

India

Panopticon

Directed by Rachel Luxford, Saranne Weekes

Australia

A piece for two hands

Directed by Akvilė Žilionytė

Lithuania

Iyakkunar (Director)

Directed by Harish

India

Pas à Pas

Directed by Lachaud Marie

France

Naangu (Four) Film Version

Directed by Harish

India

Vizhiyoram Oruthuli (Tears in my eyes)

Directed by Harish

India

CATEGORY: ACTOR

 

BEST ACTOR

INNER CITY

Actor SAHARSH KUMAR SHUKLA

India

CATEGORY: ACTRESS

 

BEST ACTRESS

THE ROLE OF A LIFETIME

Actress Véronique PICCIOTTO

France

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

INNER CITY

Actress TINA BHATIYA

India

CATEGORY: CINEMATOGRAPHY

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Vitha

Cinematography by Harshvardhan Singh

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

INNER CITY

Cinematography by WINSTON JOSE

India

CATEGORY: DIRECTOR

 

BEST DIRECTOR

THE ROLE OF A LIFETIME

Directed by Marc Saez

France

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Black Gold

Directed by Aaron Huggett

Canada

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

Unexpected Confrontation

Directed by Luis Lobato Macedo

Portugal


INNER CITY

Directed by ASHUTOSH JHA

India

CATEGORY: EDITING

 

BEST EDITING

INNER CITY

Edited by Basu

India

CATEGORY: FILMSCORE – SOUNDTRACK

 

BEST FILMSCORE – SOUNDTRACK

INNER CITY

Scored by Hriju Roy

India

CATEGORY: PRODUCER

 

BEST PRODUCER

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Produced by Elizabeth Coffey, Saurav Dutta & Abhimanyu Kukreja

India

CATEGORY: SOUND DESIGNING

 

BEST SOUND DESIGNING

Vitha

Sound Designed by Preyas Sangeet

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Sound Designed by Devabrot Chaliha

India

CATEGORY: SUPPORTING ACTOR

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Black Gold

Actor Rick Amsbury

Canada

CATEGORY: MOBILE FILM

 

BEST MOBILE FILM

Decision (Faisla)

Directed by ABHIJIT SINHA

India

 

FILMS OF THE MONTH – JANUARY 2019

 

CATEGORY: ANIMATED FILM

 

BEST ANIMATED FILM

The Follies of H. Dwiggins Ostrich

Directed by Jaime L.B. Schell

United States

CATEGORY: COMMERCIAL / ADVERTISEMENT

 

BEST COMMERCIAL / ADVERTISEMENT

Autotorino. A history of passion

Directed by Carlo De Agostini

Italy

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Oxford Through the Lens

Directed by Douglas Vernimmen & Robbie Dickson

United Kingdom

CATEGORY: DEBUT FILMMAKER

 

BEST DEBUT FILMMAKER

Siddhartha

Directed by Avijit Roy

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Unexpected Confrontation

Directed by Luis Lobato Macedo

Portugal

Time Perspectives

Directed by Ciro Sorrentino

Italy

FINALIST

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Directed by Abhimanyu Kukreja

India

CATEGORY: DOCUMENTARY FILM

 

BEST DOCUMENTARY FILM

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Directed by Abhimanyu Kukreja

India

CATEGORY: EXPERIMENTAL FILM

 

BEST EXPERIMENTAL FILM

WAVE

Directed by Dishant

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

A Home History

Directed by Tomaso Aramini

Italy

FINALIST

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

CATEGORY: FAMILY / CHILDRENS FILM

 

BEST FAMILY / CHILDRENS FILM

Bultir Result

Directed by Pinaki Sarkar

India

CATEGORY: FEATURE FILM

 

BEST FEATURE FILM

VIRAAM

Directed by Ziaullah Khan

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Black Gold

Directed by Aaron Huggett

Canada

CATEGORY: FILM / VIDEO POSTER

 

BEST FILM / VIDEO POSTER

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

GOWOK THE INS AND OUTS OF A WOMAN’S BODY

Directed by Steve Masihoroe

Indonesia

CATEGORY: FILM ON WOMEN

 

BEST FILM ON WOMEN

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

CATEGORY: FILM ON DISABILITY ISSUE

 

BEST FILM ON DISABILITY ISSUE

LAID-BACK APPROACH

Directed by Gino Ceriachi

Italy

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

PREFECT

Directed by Diana Cignoni

United States

CATEGORY: HORROR / SCIENCE FICTION / GENRE FEATURE FILM

 

BEST HORROR / SCIENCE FICTION / GENRE FEATURE FILM

Breaking Wheel

Directed by Michael McCallum

United States

CATEGORY: MUSIC VIDEO

 

BEST MUSIC VIDEO

One With Earth Song

Directed by Sairam Sagiraju

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Remembering Love Eterne

Directed by Joseph Villapaz

United States

CATEGORY: ONE MINUTE FILM

 

BEST ONE MINUTE FILM

Stay with me

Directed by Nahuel Srnec & Eduardo Hunter

Argentina

CATEGORY: PHOTOGRAPHY

 

BEST PHOTOGRAPHY

Secrets of the Flower and Willow World

Photographer Robin Yong

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Vitha

Photographer Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

CATEGORY: SHORT FILM

 

BEST SHORT FILM

Achentannos

Directed by Antonio Maciocco

Italy

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

ABHIYOG

Directed by AADITYA BHARDWAJ

India

The Domestic Fly

Directed by Áron Horváth

Slovenia

Tell me..

Directed by Revant Bhatia

India

FINALIST

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

Aunty Ji

Directed by Adeeb Rais

India

Lat

Directed by Hemant Shirsat

India

Benarasi Angoothi(The Ring from Benaras)

Directed by Revant Bhatia

India

INNER CITY

Directed by ASHUTOSH JHA

India

FIRST SIN

Directed by Vineed Menon

India

CATEGORY: SILENT FILM

 

BEST SILENT FILM

Cyclamen

Directed by Davide Canali

Italy

CATEGORY: CULT FILM / UNDERGROUND FILM / EXPLOITATION MOVIE / MIDNIGHT FILM / PARA CINEMA

 

BEST CULT FILM

X

Directed by Scott J. Ramsey

United States

CATEGORY: TRAILER / TEASER

 

BEST TRAILER / TEASER

Oxford Through the Lens

Directed by Douglas Vernimmen & Robbie Dickson

United Kingdom

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

CATEGORY: TRAVEL FILM

 

BEST TRAVEL FILM

A PLACE CALLED MUSTANG

Directed by Santanu Ray

India

CATEGORY: TREATMENT / SYNOPSIS

 

BEST TREATMENT / SYNOPSIS

Sadistic Pleasure – Synopsis

Written by Arun Lobo

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

8 Days with a Militant

Written by Harshwardhan Patil

India

100 things you should know about women

Written by Harshwardhan Patil

India

CATEGORY: WOMEN’S FILM

 

BEST WOMEN’S FILM

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

CATEGORY: YOUNG FILMMAKER

 

BEST YOUNG FILMMAKER

Luna

Directed by Eva Peljhan

Slovenia

CATEGORY: STUDENT FILM

 

BEST STUDENT FILM

Balance

Directed by Raymond Limantara Sutisna

Singapore

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

ABHIYOG

Directed by AADITYA BHARDWAJ

India

Mirchi Cafe

Directed by Mehkansh Kathuria

India

SIEGE

Directed by Deeptanshu Sinha

India

FINALIST

Windows

Directed by Akvilė Žilionytė

Lithuania

Departures

Directed by Nicolas Morganti Patrignani

Italy

Beyond The Pointy Hat

Directed by Shannon Meilak

Australia

Ode to Broken Things

Directed by Shiv Verma

India

Memoirs of Saira & Salim

Directed by Eshwarya Grover

India

F=MALE

Directed by VIKESH SINGH, HARSH BAGRODIA

India

ROSHNI

Directed by HARSH BAGRODIA, VIKESH SINGH

India

Dog Day

Directed by SHREYASH SRIVASTAVA

India

BADLAO

Directed by VIKESH SINGH, RITIK PARMAR

India

Mei (The Truth)

Directed by Harish, Dinesh Kumar , Vignesh Vijithran

India

Nigazhvugal (Journey of Emotions)

Directed by Harish

India

Mugathirai (Mask)

Directed by Harish

India

Vithdhai (fear for  something)

Directed by Harish

India

Panopticon

Directed by Rachel Luxford, Saranne Weekes

Australia

A piece for two hands

Directed by Akvilė Žilionytė

Lithuania

Iyakkunar (Director)

Directed by Harish

India

Pas à Pas

Directed by Lachaud Marie

France

Naangu (Four) Film Version

Directed by Harish

India

Vizhiyoram Oruthuli (Tears in my eyes)

Directed by Harish

India

CATEGORY: ACTOR

 

BEST ACTOR

INNER CITY

Actor SAHARSH KUMAR SHUKLA

India

CATEGORY: ACTRESS

 

BEST ACTRESS

THE ROLE OF A LIFETIME

Actress Véronique PICCIOTTO

France

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

INNER CITY

Actress TINA BHATIYA

India

CATEGORY: CINEMATOGRAPHY

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Vitha

Cinematography by Harshvardhan Singh

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

INNER CITY

Cinematography by WINSTON JOSE

India

CATEGORY: DIRECTOR

 

BEST DIRECTOR

THE ROLE OF A LIFETIME

Directed by Marc Saez

France

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Black Gold

Directed by Aaron Huggett

Canada

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

Unexpected Confrontation

Directed by Luis Lobato Macedo

Portugal


INNER CITY

Directed by ASHUTOSH JHA

India

CATEGORY: EDITING

 

BEST EDITING

INNER CITY

Edited by Basu

India

CATEGORY: FILMSCORE – SOUNDTRACK

 

BEST FILMSCORE – SOUNDTRACK

INNER CITY

Scored by Hriju Roy

India

CATEGORY: PRODUCER

 

BEST PRODUCER

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Produced by Elizabeth Coffey, Saurav Dutta & Abhimanyu Kukreja

India

CATEGORY: SOUND DESIGNING

 

BEST SOUND DESIGNING

Vitha

Sound Designed by Preyas Sangeet

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Sound Designed by Devabrot Chaliha

India

CATEGORY: SUPPORTING ACTOR

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Black Gold

Actor Rick Amsbury

Canada

CATEGORY: MOBILE FILM

 

BEST MOBILE FILM

Decision (Faisla)

Directed by ABHIJIT SINHA

India

 

FILMS OF THE MONTH – JANUARY 2019

 

CATEGORY: ANIMATED FILM

 

BEST ANIMATED FILM

The Follies of H. Dwiggins Ostrich

Directed by Jaime L.B...

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

 

FILMS OF THE MONTH – JANUARY 2019

 

CATEGORY: ANIMATED FILM

 BEST ANIMATED FILM

The Follies of H. Dwiggins Ostrich

Directed by Jaime L.B. Schell

United States

CATEGORY: COMMERCIAL / ADVERTISEMENT

 BEST COMMERCIAL / ADVERTISEMENT

Autotorino. A history of passion

Directed by Carlo De Agostini

Italy

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Oxford Through the Lens

Directed by Douglas Vernimmen & Robbie Dickson

United Kingdom

CATEGORY: DEBUT FILMMAKER

 BEST DEBUT FILMMAKER

Siddhartha

Directed by Avijit Roy

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Unexpected Confrontation

Directed by Luis Lobato Macedo

Portugal

Time Perspectives

Directed by Ciro Sorrentino

Italy

FINALIST

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Directed by Abhimanyu Kukreja

India

CATEGORY: DOCUMENTARY FILM

 BEST DOCUMENTARY FILM

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Directed by Abhimanyu Kukreja

India

CATEGORY: EXPERIMENTAL FILM

 BEST EXPERIMENTAL FILM

WAVE

Directed by Dishant

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

A Home History

Directed by Tomaso Aramini

Italy

FINALIST

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

CATEGORY: FAMILY / CHILDRENS FILM

 BEST FAMILY / CHILDRENS FILM

Bultir Result

Directed by Pinaki Sarkar

India

CATEGORY: FEATURE FILM

 BEST FEATURE FILM

VIRAAM

Directed by Ziaullah Khan

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Black Gold

Directed by Aaron Huggett

Canada

CATEGORY: FILM / VIDEO POSTER

 BEST FILM / VIDEO POSTER

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

GOWOK THE INS AND OUTS OF A WOMAN’S BODY

Directed by Steve Masihoroe

Indonesia

CATEGORY: FILM ON WOMEN

 BEST FILM ON WOMEN

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

CATEGORY: FILM ON DISABILITY ISSUE

 BEST FILM ON DISABILITY ISSUE

LAID-BACK APPROACH

Directed by Gino Ceriachi

Italy

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

PREFECT

Directed by Diana Cignoni

United States

CATEGORY: HORROR / SCIENCE FICTION / GENRE FEATURE FILM

 BEST HORROR / SCIENCE FICTION / GENRE FEATURE FILM

Breaking Wheel

Directed by Michael McCallum

United States

CATEGORY: MUSIC VIDEO

 BEST MUSIC VIDEO

One With Earth Song

Directed by Sairam Sagiraju

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Remembering Love Eterne

Directed by Joseph Villapaz

United States

CATEGORY: ONE MINUTE FILM

 BEST ONE MINUTE FILM

Stay with me

Directed by Nahuel Srnec & Eduardo Hunter

Argentina

CATEGORY: PHOTOGRAPHY

 BEST PHOTOGRAPHY

Secrets of the Flower and Willow World

Photographer Robin Yong

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Vitha

Photographer Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

CATEGORY: SHORT FILM

 BEST SHORT FILM

Achentannos

Directed by Antonio Maciocco

Italy

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

ABHIYOG

Directed by AADITYA BHARDWAJ

India

The Domestic Fly

Directed by Áron Horváth

Slovenia

Tell me..

Directed by Revant Bhatia

India

FINALIST

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

Aunty Ji

Directed by Adeeb Rais

India

Lat

Directed by Hemant Shirsat

India

Benarasi Angoothi(The Ring from Benaras)

Directed by Revant Bhatia

India

INNER CITY

Directed by ASHUTOSH JHA

India

FIRST SIN

Directed by Vineed Menon

India

CATEGORY: SILENT FILM

 

BEST SILENT FILM

Cyclamen

Directed by Davide Canali

Italy

CATEGORY: CULT FILM / UNDERGROUND FILM / EXPLOITATION MOVIE / MIDNIGHT FILM / PARA CINEMA

 

BEST CULT FILM

X

Directed by Scott J. Ramsey

United States

CATEGORY: TRAILER / TEASER

 BEST TRAILER / TEASER

Oxford Through the Lens

Directed by Douglas Vernimmen & Robbie Dickson

United Kingdom

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

CATEGORY: TRAVEL FILM

 BEST TRAVEL FILM

A PLACE CALLED MUSTANG

Directed by Santanu Ray

India

CATEGORY: TREATMENT / SYNOPSIS

 

BEST TREATMENT / SYNOPSIS

Sadistic Pleasure – Synopsis

Written by Arun Lobo

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

8 Days with a Militant

Written by Harshwardhan Patil

India

100 things you should know about women

Written by Harshwardhan Patil

India

CATEGORY: WOMEN’S FILM

 BEST WOMEN’S FILM

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

CATEGORY: YOUNG FILMMAKER

 BEST YOUNG FILMMAKER

Luna

Directed by Eva Peljhan

Slovenia

CATEGORY: STUDENT FILM

 BEST STUDENT FILM

Balance

Directed by Raymond Limantara Sutisna

Singapore

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Vitha

Directed by Avishkar Bharadwaj

India

ABHIYOG

Directed by AADITYA BHARDWAJ

India

Mirchi Cafe

Directed by Mehkansh Kathuria

India

SIEGE

Directed by Deeptanshu Sinha

India

FINALIST

Windows

Directed by Akvilė Žilionytė

Lithuania

Departures

Directed by Nicolas Morganti Patrignani

Italy

Beyond The Pointy Hat

Directed by Shannon Meilak

Australia

Ode to Broken Things

Directed by Shiv Verma

India

Memoirs of Saira & Salim

Directed by Eshwarya Grover

India

F=MALE

Directed by VIKESH SINGH, HARSH BAGRODIA

India

ROSHNI

Directed by HARSH BAGRODIA, VIKESH SINGH

India

Dog Day

Directed by SHREYASH SRIVASTAVA

India

BADLAO

Directed by VIKESH SINGH, RITIK PARMAR

India

Mei (The Truth)

Directed by Harish, Dinesh Kumar , Vignesh Vijithran

India

Nigazhvugal (Journey of Emotions)

Directed by Harish

India

Mugathirai (Mask)

Directed by Harish

India

Vithdhai (fear for  something)

Directed by Harish

India

Panopticon

Directed by Rachel Luxford, Saranne Weekes

Australia

A piece for two hands

Directed by Akvilė Žilionytė

Lithuania

Iyakkunar (Director)

Directed by Harish

India

Pas à Pas

Directed by Lachaud Marie

France

Naangu (Four) Film Version

Directed by Harish

India

Vizhiyoram Oruthuli (Tears in my eyes)

Directed by Harish

India

CATEGORY: ACTOR

 BEST ACTOR

INNER CITY

Actor SAHARSH KUMAR SHUKLA

India

CATEGORY: ACTRESS

 BEST ACTRESS

THE ROLE OF A LIFETIME

Actress Véronique PICCIOTTO

France

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

INNER CITY

Actress TINA BHATIYA

India

CATEGORY: CINEMATOGRAPHY

 BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Vitha

Cinematography by Harshvardhan Singh

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

INNER CITY

Cinematography by WINSTON JOSE

India

CATEGORY: DIRECTOR

 BEST DIRECTOR

THE ROLE OF A LIFETIME

Directed by Marc Saez

France

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Black Gold

Directed by Aaron Huggett

Canada

Selfie

Directed by Dr Shubhra Basu Aich

India

Unexpected Confrontation

Directed by Luis Lobato Macedo

Portugal


INNER CITY

Directed by ASHUTOSH JHA

India

CATEGORY: EDITING

 BEST EDITING

INNER CITY

Edited by Basu

India

CATEGORY: FILMSCORE – SOUNDTRACK

 BEST FILMSCORE – SOUNDTRACK

INNER CITY

Scored by Hriju Roy

India

CATEGORY: PRODUCER

 BEST PRODUCER

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Produced by Elizabeth Coffey, Saurav Dutta & Abhimanyu Kukreja

India

CATEGORY: SOUND DESIGNING

 BEST SOUND DESIGNING

Vitha

Sound Designed by Preyas Sangeet

India

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Rockumentary: Evolution of Indian Rock

Sound Designed by Devabrot Chaliha

India

CATEGORY: SUPPORTING ACTOR

 BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Black Gold

Actor Rick Amsbury

Canada

CATEGORY: MOBILE FILM

 BEST MOBILE FILM

Decision (Faisla)

Directed by ABHIJIT SINHA

India

The post MONTHLY RESULT : JANUARY 2019 appeared first on Cult Critic Film Magazine.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Cult Critic: The Film Magazine by Cult Critic - 2w ago
Trumped

Directed by Rodrigo Vázquez  |  Review by Helen Wheels

Criminals, terrorists, or activists? The line is blurry when you’re passionate about change, as the young comrades come to realize, in Rodrigo Vázquez’, “Trumped.” Vázquez gives us the story of a plan to push back against an ever increasingly corrupt system and turns it into a raucous ride as the scheme takes on a life of its own. When an opportunity for political leverage presents itself, the group gets serious about starting a revolution. After all, how hard can it be navigating a political scandal? It appears they have a chance to instigate much-needed change by first proving their target is unfit for office. Why not go for it while there’s an opening?

Vázquez’ stellar lead cast is a diverse group staring Tessa Hart as Rey — the leader. Hart takes on the role as if she’s been there before. There’s no trouble believing the fire that burns inside her character to take down seedy politician Neil Laplage, played by Neil Summerville. As the momentum of their plans builds, so increases her commitment to seek justice. Her girlfriend, Angela portrayed by Nansi Nsue is the activist that sparked the fire in Rey’s heart. They feed each other’s desire for change as they build their crew to take action against Laplage.

Erin Wilson as Caitlin — the arms dealer, reminds me of the character Leanne Taylor, played by actress Emma Myles, in Orange is the New Black. Wilson’s character so closely resembles Myles’ that I wonder if she used Myles’ performance as a character study for Caitlin. The persona works perfectly in this instance; Wilson’s character is self-assured with her weapons and has enough knowledge to be frightening. She’s kind of a redneck, in American terms; yet, somehow, she’s a likable character in all her gun-loving glory.

Like his co-stars, Carlos Mapano as Kato — the ninja janitor, is believable and highly entertaining. Kato is a hyper-active Filipino man who is concerned about being deported to the wrong country because somehow the government messed up his paperwork. He is the link, in my mind, to the underlying message about unjust immigration laws that are harming immigrants worldwide. Vázquez is shedding light on the issue of unfair and illegal immigration laws. He’s also using this fictional platform to make the point that the oppressed are going to rebel eventually. Citizens act out daily, all over the world, some in more politically correct ways than others.

Another commentary that “Trumped” touches on is the rise of the influencer in social media. Vázquez character Anna — played by Mia Lacostena, is Laplage’s daughter from an affair with a Polish woman. He’s kept their relationship hidden to avoid scandal. When Anna hooks up with the crew after them initially kidnapping her, the whole thing takes on a “Patty Hearst and the Symbionese Liberation Army” feel. Anna is their lucky charm that happened by accident. In addition to her position as the secret lovechild of the politician they want to take down, Anna is also a social media celebrity with thousands of followers. Though she comes off as a superficial social media maven, Anna turns out to be much deeper than anyone realized. Oppressed and brushed aside, she is ready, willing, and able to spread the word about her father’s illegal activities. Score!

Speaking of score, the film’s soundtrack provides a narrative of its own that alludes to the eternal struggle between the elite who are in control and those whom they oppress. It moves between bluesy renditions of songs that may have been sung by slaves in the cotton fields, to upbeat jazzy tunes, or Latin guitar that fit perfectly with an action sequence. In one of my favorite scenes, the score is reminiscent of a big top circus as Kato attempts to twirl his pistol like some gunslinger from a western. Though “Trumped’s” subject matter is serious, the comedic performances keep us entertained. Beneath the humor, however, lies a warning.

Ultimately, Vázquez film “Trumped” has a message that says there’s a fine line between activist, criminal, and terrorist. What that line is has something to do with how we treat each other individually, and how far we’re willing to bend our morals to make a point. How can we be held as criminals when the system is broken? Perhaps we need these starry-eyed activists to set us back on the right path as a society. Trumped is the winner of “Free Speech” Category at the Cult Critic Movie awards and is nominated for Jean Luc Godard Award, 2019. Viva la Revolucion!

Helen Wheels is an independent filmmaker, freelance writer, and visual artist. She has produced, directed, worked as a set designer and scenic painter, and has been an assistant director on dozens of films. Wheels graduated from Shoreline College with an AAAS in Digital Film Production and is continuing toward her MFA in New Media Communications.  Known for her eye to detail and advanced research skills, Wheels is currently researching historical events for her latest script and is in the process of developing her online writing business.

The post Trumped appeared first on Cult Critic Film Magazine.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Role of a Lifetime

Directed by Marc Saez  |  Review by Riya Saha

The casting couch scenarios have become a popular niche which is not unknown to us. As Wikipedia defines it: The casting couch, casting-couch syndrome, or casting-couch mentality is the exchange of sexual favors by an employer or person in a position of power and authority, from an apprentice employee, or subordinate to a superior in return for entry into an occupation, or another career advancement within an organization. The term casting couch originated in the motion picture industry, with specific reference to couches in offices that could be used for sexual activity between casting directors or film producers and aspiring actors.”

This short movie “The role of a lifetime”, is directed by Marc Saez who won 9 Awards in different American Festivals and has a Special Mention In Pontaut Combaut ( France) between 2011 and 2013. And something coming from his end must have an epitome of power, grace, and fiction and drama.

Though the entertainment industry has everything glamorous about it, the dark side remains hidden — the side where female actors are abused in exchange for roles in the entertainment industry. A director who thinks to make a film on this topic with a little twist is something we do not normally expect.

So, until now your smart mind has already made a guess what the movie is all about! Yes! It is about corruption, the abusement that many of the aspiring actors experience in the entertainment industry.

The case of Harvey Weinstein shook the show business up to the point that everyone became more aware of this fact. And here Véronique Picciotto made Oliver Hemon pay for his mistakes which he thought was amusement.

What really works in this film is the way the screenplay interplays the protagonist and the story. She has an all-around transformation which made the character emblematic. The film works flawlessly with really good cinematography and editing pace.

“The Role of a Lifetime” is a political, social, psychological drama about all the struggles that a woman has to go through in her life in today’s world. A powerful film which is made more powerful by its hopeless ending. Director’s creativity is incomparable maybe he signified failure as the pillar to success for all those who are fighting in the real world.

Lastly, I would like to summarize three things that made the movie spicy and a must watch: it is a woman-oriented film, it surely has a great story that anyone will love, the voice of Eva Saez echoes throughout the movie providing more power.

Moreover, those who feel sick to watch a long 2 hours film, director Marc Saez with his power-packed thriller with definitely steal your heart and all within 13 minutes. Cheers to Véronique Picciotto for her powerful acting. THE ROLE OF A LIFETIME is dedicated to all the actresses and aspiring ladies who sometimes feel sick due to lack of courage. Stand Up, fight because until and unless you stand strong for yourself success won’t ever be by your side.

Riya Saha is a Kolkata based writer, editor, journalist and cinephile. She has completed her masters with Journalism and Mass Communication from Calcutta University and currently working as a freelance journalist. Having a great interest in world cinema made Riya join Human Lab Corporation. She is passionate about setting goals and achieving them. She enjoys reading, writing, travelling, socializing and meeting people. She is also very fond of watching International movies.

The post The Role of a Lifetime appeared first on Cult Critic Film Magazine.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Firefox Guardian

Directed by Gunjan Menon  |  Review by Riya Saha

It is not often that we come across powerful, mindful and independent women who have thoughts to change the planet. The director of ‘The Firefox Guardian’, Gunjan Menon is a 25-year-old passionate wildlife filmmaker from India who has recreated a strong monitoring film with a message of protecting the red pandas. In fact, through her film, she made a smart attempt in bringing few unknown faces into limelight who has sacrificed their life for protecting wildlife.

This film is not only a conglomeration of life stories which work hard with the passion for protecting nature but also play an important role in depicting woman empowerment. And why not we have two great ladies the director herself and the unconventional warrior Menuka.

The lady director is a red panda fan from the age of sixteen and surely she did her best in filming the story of adorable fluff balls. Wildlife films are not only a smart attempt to spread awareness but actually, it proves the real condition of these animals. And as usual, people only believe the things that they see and hear.

In the words of Director Gunjan Menon, “ 2016, I came across an article that said there could be fewer than 2500 red pandas left in the wild. These were my favorite animals and it was something that shook me completely. I was pursuing my Masters in Wildlife Filmmaking in Bristol, UK and it was the time when we had to research ideas for our degree films. I knew in my heart this was what I wanted to bring people’s attention to. I’ve always wanted to film red pandas in the wild but I never had the resources but this time, I decided to finally go ahead with my passion and find a story that would be worth telling. I read about Menuka during my story research and I could resonate with her and wanted to give her story a platform to reach the world. She’s an exceptional woman and leaves everyone who meets her inspired. It was challenging to film someone who’d never been on the camera before nor spoke the same language as me but our shared passion for red pandas made it possible to bring the story out to the world.”

This film provides a unique window into the lives of the Forest Guardians and through their eyes, the life of the rarely documented endangered Red Pandas in the wild. Any movie that can pull on your heartstrings deserves a really good rating. The film is shot in Nepal; I felt the aesthetics of the Himalayas are well portrayed. The dense forests and the carefree clouds really made me nostalgic. All thanks to this young director who gave this humble story of professionalism, and wildlife care. Surely ‘The Firefox Guardian’ has a strong message to inspire people all around the world.

So, what are the genres we encounter in the film? – Nature, wildlife, conservation, environmental, activism, women, feminism, endangered, humans and wildlife. All within just a 12 min story. The score captures the emotion of the movie perfectly, and if you’re a true Red Panda lover, I guarantee you’ll you will love to watch the movie for a few more times. Considering Menuka as the lead, her story is worth listening. Guys, let’s get some time and hear what Menuka has to say!

Riya Saha is a Kolkata based writer, editor, journalist and cinephile. She has completed her masters with Journalism and Mass Communication from Calcutta University and currently working as a freelance journalist. Having a great interest in world cinema made Riya join Human Lab Corporation. She is passionate about setting goals and achieving them. She enjoys reading, writing, travelling, socializing and meeting people. She is also very fond of watching International movies.

The post The Firefox Guardian appeared first on Cult Critic Film Magazine.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Glimpse

Directed by Chandrika Abhang  |  Review by Moumita Deb

Adapted from Harvey’s August Heat, The Glimpse, at the very exposition, convincingly shapes up the looming suspense, with a series of montages, captured as fragments of the artist’s elusive imagination, making a journey through his hallucinating mind. With a poignant reflection on, how universe signals us in mysterious ways, the suspense is retained throughout the scenes, even at the very end.

This not only gives us enough space to imagine what would happen eventually, but also makes us think deeply about decision, death, and destiny. Withencroft, the professional artist, is powerfully mirrored as the victim of malignant fate which broods over his very existence and the sinister stone mason, whose pieces of work surprisingly indicate each other’s future, meet by strange coincidence, for the first time in an oppressively hot day, but, can they avoid the dreadful fate? If they make the avoidance, will they meet the similar adverse destiny again?

This accident is different. It is not a single crime with criminal and victim. It is rather a coincidence in which both are victims. Who is then the criminal in this movie? Neither of the two. Those artworks are innocent. The heat not only refers to the temperature but also refers to the aura and condition. A symbol, which impresses their fretful senses and fortunes. Who is the criminal then? Providence? Imminent Fate? Destiny? Adventure! Withencroft’s “best” painting for Atkinson, or her “beautiful piece of” gravestone for Withencroft, or the horrible heat?

The originality of the plot creates a strong sense of adventure as the suspense intensifies and unfolds layer by layer. The accident forms the basis of the paranormal occurrences, most of which remain unjustified and unanswered. Two strangers unconsciously know the other’s correct information, either the appearance or the name and birthday. The low angle shots add magnificently to enhance the built-up tension. Coincidence gains predominance as an integral part of their supernatural but dreadful fate.

In the very first scene, the viewer is made to substitute into the protagonist’s weird world of strange and uncanny coincidences. Contrast to the artist’s sensible tone; the viewers get more and more nervous as the victim experiences the amazing incidents one after the other, as fate draws him closer to his inevitable death. The viewers may feel a little scared, but curiosity motivates them to keep on watching, just like an adventure with a sense of looming fear. If there has to be a criminal, it would be destiny ushering in the premonition of death.

The protagonists cannot avoid their fates which are pre-decided by divine intervention, but they can try to get control of the situation themselves and fight against the adverse destiny. Two embittered souls, unknown to each other, whose glimpses of the other’s possible future suggest that one of them will be murdered and the other will be the murderer. The Glimpse, however, differs from most horror movies because the mood throughout the bulk of the movie is unusually somber with an approaching uncertainty than being too scary. Director has a simple, yet appealing style, and he doesn’t feel the need to announce how horrible – or horrifying – his character’s experience is. The movie opens with the protagonist – an artist, in his home, alone, creating a detailed sketch in his confused mind of horrible memories and haunting images.

One of the fascinating aspects the director deals with is its sense of place. Knowing how important it is to establish a sense of place in a creative piece, he manipulates the sense of place so we feel that we viewers are walking in a dream. The oppressive heat and the imminent thunderstorm are the only indicators that the protagonist is entering a potentially threatening situation, the only harbingers of eerie events that the plot provides. Generally, his voice is nonchalant as he relates his experience.

But the ending is still unnerving, and frustratingly ambiguous. The reader is left to infer the protagonist’s fate at the end of the film, although one possibility may seem obvious. One is left intrigued by the mood shift in the last scene and allured by the story that Harvey created. The moody score brings out the atmosphere of this tale of dark impulses, now unleashed by the rising storm in contrast to the too long exposure to the heat and dust while the film is replete with many interesting “semi-twists,” that culminates in the building up of a major twist. However, the explanation of the story’s bizarre coincidences remains unanswered.

Moumita is a Kolkata based independent filmmaker and film critic. She holds a post- graduation degree in English literature from Jadavpur University. Reading novels of a wide range of authors of all genres from classic to contemporary has always been Moumita’s passion and calling. She also takes a strong liking in playing the Spanish guitar & has participated in quite a few concerts. Moumita has done her certification course in Cinematography, Video Editing and Filmmaking

The post The Glimpse appeared first on Cult Critic Film Magazine.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Moments in Paradise

Directed by BelloPropello  |  Review by Helen Wheels

Moments in Paradise is a one-minute animation sequence from Switzerland, that is a meditation on the beauty of our natural world and how quickly it can be destroyed. The short film is exquisitely animated with colorful green alienlike forms that appear to be trees, which sprout from the ground and continue to grow with jewellike leaves and embellishments. With blue skies overhead, it looks like the artist’s rendition of paradise. Until the fluffy white clouds begin to darken. The clouds become increasingly blacker when sadly, a giant lightning bolt destroys the mother tree.

The main tree may represent the tree of life from legend. Tree of life symbolism spans across many races and religions with slightly different meanings in each, but with an overarching metaphor that shows us the connectedness of all things. These trees may also represent a metaphorical journey. In BelloPropello’s animated film “Moments in Paradise” the journey is from the innocence of birth and beauty to ashes. Such is the cycle of life. However, we are left to make our own assumptions about what it all means.

Without any narrative to assist in telling the story, the filmmaker instead utilizes music from sounddogs.com and sound effects by ambientmixer.com to create a backdrop for the drama which grows before our eyes. The music starts out much like the visuals, meditative, and we feel as if there’s something spiritual about the animation. As the animation gains intensity, so does the music. They sync perfectly to insight the feeling of disaster and loss — and the feeling of emptiness that remains. Your mind struggles with the reality — is that all there is — it’s over — the end? The fiery finish of the short animation leaves us wanting more as if there should be a follow-up to the tree’s destruction. An apology, maybe?

In the end, BelloPropello’s “Moments in Paradise” leaves us feeling as if there is something that we could have done to prevent this tragedy. We want to save the mother tree, and though there is no mention of any human’s hand in its destruction, we still feel that somehow people were to blame. Perhaps the darkening of the clouds represents the ever-growing threat of humankind upon nature. Alternatively, we could be sensing that we are indeed helpless against the fury of mother nature and it’s only our ego that makes us believe otherwise. One thing is for certain, BelloPropello’s one-minute animation “Moments in Paradise” leaves us wanting more.

“Moments in Paradise” took home the award for Best One-Minute Film from the Cult Critic’s Movie awards. To date the filmmaker has four animations to their credit on IMDB and “Moments in Paradise” was the first, produced in 2015. With animation titles such as Dystopia (2018), and Cupid Is Not A Terrorist (2017), I think we’re safe in assuming that BelloPropello is committed to producing animations that are more than mere entertainment. They are stories that look deeply into the psyche of the human condition and animate the images for us to examine.

Helen Wheels is an independent filmmaker, freelance writer, and visual artist. She has produced, directed, worked as a set designer and scenic painter, and has been an assistant director on dozens of films. Wheels graduated from Shoreline College with an AAAS in Digital Film Production and is continuing toward her MFA in New Media Communications.  Known for her eye to detail and advanced research skills, Wheels is currently researching historical events for her latest script and is in the process of developing her online writing business.

The post Moments in Paradise appeared first on Cult Critic Film Magazine.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Cult Critic: The Film Magazine by Cult Critic - 2w ago
Grit

Directed by Eileen Abarrca, Jordan Auten  |  Review by Helen Wheels

Frankie is a sexually liberated and self-assured independent single woman. Until the day her doctor puts her on notice that she’s quickly approaching infertility. You can almost hear the tick-tock of Frankie’s biological clock once she gets the news of her impending barren womb. It doesn’t help that it seems most of her female friends are pregnant. Then somehow, through no fault of her own, she ends up spending a baby shower holding a toddler. Her interactions with the tiny human convince her she needs a baby of her own. It’s now or never, and so she’s inspired to do everything she can to manufacture a child before it’s too late.

Co-directors Eileen Abarrca and Jordan Auten’s short film, “Grit”, follows Frankie — played by Abarrca, as she nears forty, and suddenly realizes that motherhood seems important. Abarrca and Jauten take a serious subject and turn it into a drama with some full-fledged comedic laugh out loud moments. Frankie’s unapologetic decision to get pregnant without letting anyone in on the secret provides all the comedy in this thirteen minute and fifteen-second short film. She goes about getting the job done in the same no-nonsense manner we imagine that she’s taken care of her life as a single woman. She doesn’t have a serious boyfriend, but that doesn’t appear to be an issue in Frankie’s mind. She needs a man for one thing only, and he doesn’t need to give her permission. Ultimately, Frankie wants a baby, but she doesn’t see any need for the traditional trappings that go along with motherhood.

Eileen Abarrca wrote, co-directed, and plays the lead role of Frankie in her short film Grit. She says in her director’s statement, “I wrote this film because, in today’s society, many women are pursuing their educations, starting their own businesses, becoming financially independent, traveling the world, and investing in themselves before having children. I wanted to see positive examples of women like this on the screen.”

A woman’s right to choose whether she will have a baby is always an area of debate. We have long thought of mothers regarding their position more so than seeing a woman as an individual who has a baby. Abarrca and Auten fearlessly comment on the loneliness of an individual woman’s right to choose. The directors do so in such a way that leaves the topic of abortion by the wayside. However, we still are forced to consider the men in this movie. Do they have a right to know that Frankie is using them as a dispensary? I feel like they do, but this question wasn’t a consideration in the movie. “Grit” is a thought-provoking exploration from a single woman’s point of view that is as funny as it is serious. Frankie is nearing an age when her options of becoming pregnant are thinning. If she isn’t in a committed relationship, then should she make the choice to have a baby and raise it alone?

Helen Wheels is an independent filmmaker, freelance writer, and visual artist. She has produced, directed, worked as a set designer and scenic painter, and has been an assistant director on dozens of films. Wheels graduated from Shoreline College with an AAAS in Digital Film Production and is continuing toward her MFA in New Media Communications.  Known for her eye to detail and advanced research skills, Wheels is currently researching historical events for her latest script and is in the process of developing her online writing business.

The post Grit appeared first on Cult Critic Film Magazine.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Cult Critic: The Film Magazine by Cult Critic - 2w ago
9to5

Directed by Filippos Tsapekis  |  Review by Prarthana Mitra

There is no end to Greeks and their dabbling in tragedies, goes the popular saying. The same can be said for the filmmaking talent that constantly emerges from the country’s “weird wave,” even after poster boy Yorgos Lanthimos set sail westward.

On that note, Filippos Tsapekis’s latest short offers a promising set piece for the Grecian oeuvre on the contemporary global stage. 9to5 lifts off from the classical battle between the mortal realm and the unknown while extrapolating dystopian elements to make a statement about the very modernist concept of ennui-laced exhaustion, tying it back to the titular feeling of always running out of time amid the break-neck pace of this world.

Yet, the short film which runs for about 12 minutes has none of the bearings of a cautionary tale, nor does it attempt to hide its gravity behind a darkly comic veneer like most of its peers.

Tsapekis is very serious about the thematic overtures of his work, but never over-conscious even as he builds up to a momentous final climax which serves both as exposition and an epilogue. The basic premise is simple: In the world of 9to5, tiredness is forbidden and those found guilty are relegated to a lower life. For those truly weary souls, the choice of easeful death awaits.

The film’s protagonist, a lawyer, puts himself in the unenviable situation of having to prove he is not tired, governed as he is by omniscient and invisible forces that forbid bodily and mental exhaustion, for reasons that unknown. Nowhere are the moral ramifications of such a mandate manifest in the film, as it leaves it to the viewers to arrive at their own interpretation. It is also not clear whether the totalitarian world Tsapekis paints is a social commentary on the utilitarianism of late capitalism, or if it’s more akin to the grossly automated world we live in—which cares only about productivity and encourages the burnout culture.

These adjudications are, in fact, secondary and subjective; the film’s ability to elicit such diverse readings that deserve to be delved into in greater detail. The cinematic impact of this short banks itself greatly on the convincing performances of actors Yiannis Papadoupoulos and Kora Karvouni, the brilliance of which is enhanced by Eirini Bitta’s script which withholds more than it gives away and Pantelis Mantzanas’s exquisite cinematography which draws out the sinister and the bleak at once.

Yiannis with his nervous twitches and Kora as the authoritarian representative who is not fooled by his attempts to hide his weariness depict the constant struggle of power, while a dystopian gymnasium serves as the backdrop for most of the action. The film unfolds in the form of a conversation that soon takes the form of trial, where the lawyer tries to defend his innocence against all the odds. The sense of a surveillance state is palpable like the interrogation he is subjected to, while Yiannis tries his best to escape the dismal fate that lies in store for a tired man. One must, after all, imagine Sisyphus happy.

The final scene is a single take which tracks across a warehouse floor after Yiannis has failed his test. It is also the first time we get an inkling of the punishments meted out to those who fail it, and those who wish to be eternally exempted from the state of awakening. The film closes to a melancholic Theremin score, played to a powerful image of sleeping bodies that are as good as dead. As the end credits roll up, this image of surrender conveys the existential dichotomy of Tsapekis’s world— true rest can arrive only at the cost of death.

Prarthana is presently in between odd jobs and obtaining her master’s degree in literature. She loves modern poetry and meditative cinema. Based out of Calcutta, Prarthana observes people, football, films and enjoys writing about all three. Of late, she relates to Frank Ocean’s music. Her writing experience consists of writing for various sites such as Try Cinema, The Indian Economist, Doing The Rondo, Saintbrush and various academic journals.

The post 9to5 appeared first on Cult Critic Film Magazine.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Cult Critic: The Film Magazine by Cult Critic - 2w ago
You and Me

Directed by Mrigank Dubey  |  Review by Triptayan Chatterjee

Abrupt sound of the running car and the humble turning of the relationship between two characters is captured uniquely with camera and sound device in a very important moment of the film. This is the actual starting of the incidents taking places in the life of the human being. After introducing the monotonous normal livelihood Director Mrigank Dubey gives the masterstroke here in his short film YOU AND ME. An offbeat way of life with calm and quietness, a sudden come back of early college day in the lives of Nishanth and Manjistha has made the theme of the film universal as well as like a journey through the center of a heart. The straight forward direction of the theme, a single line plot without any complex sub-plot, Capturing the moments of the events with an efficient camera, added with a beautiful soundtrack and natural acting, YOU AND ME has been a unique creation by the Director, who is a real storyteller of the human mind. Here is the feature of the film latent with its wonderful all-around characteristics.

An unknown side of the depth of life is uniquely described in the film. It can not be called a triangle of love. What actually shows is the reality of life covered with the social and psychological parameter around. The most important scene is the sound of passing a car when Nishant and Manjistha are sitting in a car. The sound symbolizes that the real story is starting here. Before the sound, it is only the introduction of the film storyline. Nishant and Manjistha are college friends. Nishanth proposed her but it was not accepted. Now Manjistha got married and went away and came back to the same city. At this moment they meet again and go for a trip on a Sunday in a deserted place. Nishanth again proposed her, but again refused. Nishanth promised to wait for the rest of the life. Both were unhappy in their life but did not face each other for a making a new dimension of life.

The script and the screenplay are delicately written. It is clear that the pace of the script is just by the pace of the evolution of life and the relationship between two persons. Film language is prominent in the turning and gradual opening of the mysteries of the relationship. Instead of shots, the sound scoring is used as the explanatory symbol. The camera works with extreme clarity. Music is so calm and explanatory that it seems to explain the depth of the story time to time. The conclusion has been just like a short film.

Theoretically, a short film should not bring any concrete conclusion of the message. A message will keep a question always for the viewers, that is what is the next? Here we should focus on the last scene. This scene is tremendously artistic. An empty sitting bench by the side of a lagoon or something like that is showing that the story of life continues and the answer is yet to be given. Director Mrigank Dubey can claim overwhelming credit for this artistically commercial film. Though short but it is a complete film.

Just if we go through the film, it is visible clearly that life and it’s chemistry and mathematics is not at all having speed. Everything has its own pace, we can’t avoid it. To maintain the pace, the screenplay, cinematography, editing, sounds have entirely have gone at par with the storyline. The storyline is also heart touching particularly for those who has never got a stable life of love. The basic instinct of human character has been delicately narrated in the film YOU AND ME by Mrigank Dubey.

Triptayan is a filmmaker looking for a different horizon. Earlier a journalist Triptayan has done intensive research on film language and made different documentaries so far. He is now concentrating upon feature film in a vast landscape. Professionally a teacher, Triptayan has also passion for making films threaded with the international and universal thoughts.

The post You and Me appeared first on Cult Critic Film Magazine.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview