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According to the National Center for Health Statistics, the amount of hip replacement procedures performed each year has more than doubled over the last decade. The most common reason for hip replacement osteoarthritis which involves the breakdown of cartilage on the surface of the hip joint. This causes inflammation and pain, necessitating surgery in most cases.

While some situations, such as those involving genetics, trauma, fractures, or arthritis, are unavoidable, there are some steps you can take to ensure you keep your hip joint forever.

What is Hip Replacement Surgery?

Hip replacement is a surgical procedure where the hip joint is replaced by a prosthetic implant called a hip prosthesis.  This procedure may involve a total replacement or a semi-replacement of the joint. A total hip replacement consists of replacing the acetabulum and femoral head while a semi-replacement typically only replaces the femoral head.

Why People Need Hip Replacement Surgery?

People often need hip replacement surgery because their hip joint is being worn down, resulting in osteoarthritis. When the hip joint is worn or damaged to the extent that a person’s mobility is affected and pain is experienced even when resting, it may be time to consider a hip replacement.

Other conditions that can cause hip joint damage include:

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Hip fracture
  • Septic arthritis
  • Ankylosing Spondylitis
  • Bone Dysplasias
Is Hip Replacement the First Choice?

No, when possible.  

Before suggesting a hip replacement surgery, your surgeon may suggest walking aids, or non-surgical therapies involving medication and physical therapy. However, these therapies are not always effective when it comes to relieving pain and improving mobility. Hip replacement may be an option for you if you experience disabling and persistent pain that interfere with daily activities. The extent of this damage should be detectable on x-rays, which will help your doctor decide on the best course of action.

How to Avoid Hip Replacement Surgery

There are several ways to avoid a hip replacement surgery, though these factors will largely depend on the patient’s condition and circumstances. These options may help patients avoid the need for a total or hemi hip replacement procedure.

These options include:

Weight Management:

Preventing a hip replacement surgery begins with maintaining healthy joint through proper weight. Every 10lbs of weight results in 75-100 extra pounds across the joints, breaking down the protective cushion that cartilage provides.

Injections:

Corticosteroids reduce inflammation, which is part of the immune system’s response, which causes pain and swelling.

Physical Therapy:

Strengthening and stretching exercises for the hip can minimize and reduce osteoarthritis pain and stiffness. Keeping these muscles strong and engaged can prevent painful symptoms and complications.

Joint Injections:

Therapeutic injections can provide long-term pain relief and keep patients active. These injections typically involve anti-inflammatory medications injected directly into the hip joint.

Supplements/Medications:

Some conditions, like Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis, benefit from medications like Humira. This medication, called a biologic, suppresses your immune system’s natural inflammatory response, reducing pain and discomfort and slowing down the natural progression of the disease.  In some cases, hip replacement can be postponed indefinitely.

Want More Information? Contact Us

It’s our mission to provide safe and necessary treatment options to our patients. If you are experiencing hip pain or believe you hip replacement surgery, please do not hesitate to contact us at 212-606-1992. You’ll receive an extensive one-on-one appointment so you can choose the best treatment option for you.

The post How To Avoid Hip Replacement Surgery appeared first on Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik.

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Studies have been published that show half of re-do hip replacement surgeries are completely avoidable had the original hip replacement been done better,  Therefore, the most important aspect of a hip replacement is choosing the best surgeon suited to perform the procedure. This task is made easier when you know which questions to ask and what to look for. Some important items to consider are the complication rates that your prospective surgeon has, your own specific needs, your willingness to travel, and the skill of your prospective surgeon. Let’s explore some of those options below

1.Search Within the Right Surgical Specialty

It’s important that you seek out a professional who specializes in the type of procedure you require. Because the human body is complex, orthopedic surgeons have specialties that they are proficient in. If you have been referred for a hip replacement surgery, make sure you choose a surgeon who is fellowship-trained in joint replacement surgery, aren’t pursuing someone whose specialty is in hand orthopedic surgery, for example.

2. Are They a High Volume Surgeon?

High volume surgeons perform procedures frequently, allowing them to perfect their approach and give patients the best care possible. The more procedures your specialist has performed, the more refined their technique and the more skilled they are at detecting small abnormalities. While researching their volume, it’s also important to check and see what their success and complication rates are, as well as research what previous patients have to say.

You will also want to research whether or not they have experience with special or high-risk cases. This will ensure they are equipped to handle your needs and any potential complications that may arise.

3. Check The Surgeon’s Credentials

Not all surgeons are created equally. Make sure you’re working with a surgeon that has a good track record of high-quality education, residency and fellowship training, and that they are working with an esteemed hospital. Additionally, if your prospective surgeon routinely receives new and continuing education on the latest techniques and approaches to their chosen specialty, they tend to have higher success rates. It’s important to find a surgeon who is always learning, and even teaching the latest techniques.

4. Research The Surgeon’s Affiliations

Make sure you are doing your due diligence by researching the facility a surgeon works with as well. Dr. Vigdorchik is affiliated with Hospital for Special Surgery, the best hospital in the country for orthopaedic surgery, an esteemed hospital known for giving their patients the best care through quality surgeons and the latest technology. Surgeon websites often mention their certifications and affiliations, which can be confusing to patients. The most important affiliation to consider is the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

5. Does the Surgeon Conduct Research in Their Specialty?

Research is key to ensuring that the surgeon is keeping up-to-date with information within their specialty. It is also an indicator that they are constantly furthering their education and that they are striving to help patients get better outcomes. Medical breakthroughs are accomplished with cutting-edge medical research, with researchers constantly searching for ways to advance their technique and medicine as a whole.

Dr. Vigdorchik is one of the few national experts who specializes in all types of hip surgery, from same-day discharge to hip replacement to hip preservation. He performs research on how to improve customized hip replacement, robotic assistive techniques, and instruction for prospective residents and students on the proper techniques for hip surgery.

6. How Does the Surgeon Support Their Patients Post-Op?

Do they have a good system to offer their patients follow up care, good instructions for recovery, and post-op physical therapy? These are important options to consider. You’ll also want to research their surgical history to see if they have a track record of successful procedures or if they have dissatisfied patients.

Dr. Vigdorchik offers blogs to his patients, with information such as how to reduce hip pain while running and how to prevent injuries for hip replacement patients during winter. These posts are designed to be another aspect of extended patient care and education to help them learn about their condition, recovery, and the prevention of new injuries. Additionally, Dr. Vigdorchik is well known for the time he spends with his patients. This is an important aspect of your care plan, and it’s the best time for you to communicate any new or developing issues or concerns.

The Difference with Dr. Vigdorchik

Dr. Vigdorchik prioritizes his patients in order to help them understand their treatment plan. The goal is to help them understand exactly what their condition will mean for them, whether or not surgery is necessary, and how their quality of life may be improved if surgery is required.

1.One of the Few Surgeons Specialized in all Hip and Knee Surgeries

Something that sets Dr. Vigdorchik apart is his approach and ability to perform all different types of hip surgery. These include generalized hip surgery, hip diseases, hip preservation surgery, and hip revision. He also performs procedures in other to prevent or manage arthritis during, before, and after hip replacement surgery. This provides his patients with the best treatment options for their condition and lifestyle.

2. Dr. Vigdorchik Uses Robot-Assisted Technology

Traditional hip and knee replacement procedures have been around since the 1960s. The technology involved in them in this time has not deviated much. Robot-assisted technology allows surgeons to provide lasting hip  and knee replacements with lower complication rates. This procedure involves the evaluation of the patient with a 3D model of their anatomy. The surgery is then executed using a robotic arm, designed to guide the surgeon. Dr. Vigdorchik is in control of the surgery at all times, with this device only guiding the procedure. This allows for a higher success rate overall.

3. He is Affiliated with Renowned Hospitals

Dr. Vigdorchik was educated at the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, and he completed his residency at the Detroit Medical Center/Providence Hospital. 

He is also affiliated with American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Association, European Hip Society, International Society of Technology in Arthroplasty, Computer-Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery, and the Eastern Orthopaedic Association.

Currently, he works with the Hospital for Special Surgery, where can be found prioritizing his patients with their treatment plan and performing research to improve hip replacement outcomes

4. Dr. Vigdorchik Strives to Improve the Outcomes for all Joint Replacement Patients

Dr. Vigdorchik joined the Scientific Advisory Board of Intellijoint Surgical, which is the leading advancement of joint replacement through improving education and the technology available to surgeons. Because of his years of experience in robotic surgery and advanced surgical techniques, Dr. Vigdorchik is working to develop a new era of surgical navigation and cost-effective surgical advancements for joint replacement.

Dr. Vigdorchik is one of New York’s top orthopedic surgeons, which makes him an optimal choice for the New York boroughs, Long Island, as well as tri-state area residents.

Want More Information? Contact Us

It’s our mission to provide safe and necessary treatment options to our patients. If you are experiencing hip pain or believe you hip replacement surgery, please do not hesitate to contact us at 646-350-4499. You’ll receive an extensive one-on-one appointment so you can choose the best treatment option for you.

The post How to Choose a Hip Surgeon in New York City & Manhattan appeared first on Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik.

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Since being brought onto the team at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS), Dr. Vigdorchik has worked with his colleagues to bring more light to the incidence of post-operative dislocation in patients with hip replacements. In the past, surgeons understood that spinal function ultimately affects the hips. Thanks to this new evaluation tool, orthopedic surgeons now know that, due to a patient’s spinal positioning, up to “77% of inappropriately positioned hip implants would not have been identified.”

The Hip-Spine Classification in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) has been able to reduce the occurrence of dislocation from 16% down to 3%, as demonstrated through the 222 patient outcomes that were studied and documented throughout this three-year study.

To learn more, click here.

The post At HSS, Dr. Vigdorchik Leads Research To Lower Post-Operative Hip Dislocation appeared first on Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik.

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Last month, Dr. Vigdorchik joined the Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) of Intellijoint Surgical, a Canadian company that is leading the advancement of joint replacement through improving education and technology available to surgeons. With his years of experience in robotic surgery and advanced surgical navigation techniques, he is joining a team of esteemed surgeons who are working to improve the outcomes of joint replacement.
To learn more, click here.

The post Dr. Vigdorchik Joins the Intellijoint Surgical Scientific Advisory Board appeared first on Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik.

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Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik by Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik - 3M ago
What are Hip Flexors?

The hip flexors are a group of muscles found in the front of the hip. They are designed to help you bring your leg and trunk together in flexion movement. These muscles allow your leg to move towards your belly, as well as allowing your torso to bend towards your hip. However, it is possible to strain or even tear your hip flexor muscles through sudden movements or falls.

What is Hip Flexor Pain?

Sudden movements have the possibility of damaging your hip flexors. These movements include sprinting, kicking, or falling. While these injuries can happen to anyone, runners, high contact sports competitors, and hobbyist joggers can also injure themselves.

There are some other factors which contribute to hip flexor strain and pain. These include:

  • Weakened muscles.
  • Not warming up prior to physical activity.
  • Sore muscles.
  • Trauma.
  • Falling.

If you injure your hip flexor, you will feel pain in the part of your hip that meets your thigh. You may notice mild pain and cramping, pulling in the front of the hip, sharp pain when walking, difficulty getting out of a chair or sitting down, or severe pain and spasms. The top of the thigh muscle may bulge and it may be difficult to walk.

Top Causes of Hip Flexor Pain

Hip flexor pain can have causes that are not due to underlying disease. For example, they can be the result of improper body mechanics, pain, or strain. Some examples include trauma, immobilization for long periods of time, overuse, sitting or moving in awkward positions, or muscle stiffness.

Sitting too much

Sitting too much can lead to weakened and atrophied muscles. This can mean that your hip flexor muscles are not accustomed to daily functions and operations, or even out of the ordinary physical activity. In time, you may develop mild hip flexor pain or more severe tears, depending on the activity.

Hip Flexor Strain

You might accidentally strain your hip flexor if you do not warm up properly prior to physical activity, or if you push too hard during physical activity. It is also possible to strain your hip flexor if you are moving heavy furniture or experience a short burst of intense physical activity.

Vigorous Activity

Even if you are accustomed to vigorous physical activity, it is possible to strain your hip flexor. This is accomplished through repetitive movement of the hip flexor muscles, which can cause them to wear and tear over a period of time or during a single but repetitive activity.

Dancing

Dancers are quite susceptible to hip flexor pain due to high impact to the complexes of the leg through dance movements and choreography. While engaging in high levels of physical activity that require the legs to sustain movement for long periods of time, the hip flexor can become torn or strained.

Running

Because the legs are in constant movement while running on hard surfaces, hip flexor pain is extremely common in runners. While engaging in this physical activity, the hip flexor receives repetitive concussive impact as the leg propels the runner forward over long distances. This damage can acute or chronic, though it depends on the level of physical activity the runner engages in and the limits of their own body.

Martial Arts

High impact martial arts are a typical suspect for hip flexor pain. When falling or deflecting attacks, the hip flexor can become damaged due to trauma from oncoming hands, elbows, feet, or contact with the ground. It is extremely important to warm up prior to practice in order to avoid serious pain or injury during physical activity in martial arts.

Treating Hip Flexor Pain

Your doctor may recommend resting the area (if the hip flexor is only strained and not torn) while it recovers. While it recovers, it is recommended you do mild exercises that do not strain the hip flexors. In some cases, you may be prescribed physical therapy, which will include stretching and strengthening the hip flexor and its surrounding supporting muscle group. You will be guided through your physical activity to increase it until you are able to return to normal daily operations.

Contact Us

It’s our mission to provide safe and necessary treatment options to our patients. If you are experiencing hip flexor pain or believe you have injured yourself, please do not hesitate to contact us at 646-350-4499. You’ll receive an extensive one-on-one appointment so you can choose the best treatment option for you.

The post Top Causes of Hip Flexor Pain appeared first on Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik.

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Conducting research to develop the systems, technology, and protocols that can help hip and spine patients gain better outcomes is at the heart of Dr. Vigdorchik’s work. Most recently, he was the lead doctor in a study completed to develop a tool that would make hip replacements an even more successful procedure. This study developed a new method of risk assessment and an algorithm to calculate how likely a patient was to reinjure themselves following a hip replacement as a result of their spinal alignment.

Dr. Vigdorchik’s study found that many patients experience a dislocation within the first 30 days after their surgery and linked this occurrence to whether or not the patient has a concurrent spinal disease.

To learn more, click here.

The post Dr. Vigdorchik’s Hip-Spine Classification System Has Been Featured in Helio and OrthopedicsToday appeared first on Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik.

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Like most of the parts that keep our bodies going, your hips are especially important when it comes to letting you enjoy the activities you love. They help you to walk, to run, and to keep your balance.  They help you hold your weight as you move through life. Healthy hips are something many take for granted–until they experience an injury.

Hip injuries can severely decrease your quality of life and make every step, or even laying in bed, a painful experience. Sometimes the onset and diagnosis of a hip injury is obvious. Sharp, intense pain after an accident may leave you in a hospital bed, staring at an x-ray of a fracture or break during the same day of your injury.

Some hip injury symptoms include dull, aching pain. It may come and go at first, but it will have “perfect attendance” after enough time has passed without seeing a specialist. You may even notice some swelling on the surface of your skin.

No matter how your pain presents itself, it is in your best interest to see an expert immediately. Making an appointment with a specialist is the first step in returning to your active life. Seeking treatment early helps avoid making your current injury worse, or suffering an additional hip injury.

At Dr. Vigdorchik’s practice, he works with all of his patients to accurately diagnose the problem, discuss lifestyle choices, and find a treatment option that works for them. Because he treats hip injuries daily, there are a few common types of injuries that most often present themselves.

Some of the Most Common Hip Injuries

Bad hips are often the punchline of jokes about old age, but the reality of hip health tells a different story. People of all ages and lifestyles injure their hips.

While older folks may be expecting hip pain, younger folks with hip injuries may overlook the aches as “nothing serious.” Whether your pain has been present since birth, an old accident, a new exercise routine, or a recent incident–always see a specialized orthopedic doctor. With the right doctor, you’ll discuss non-invasive treatment options for shorter recovery time and a faster return to good health.

To help you better understand some of the most common hip injuries seen at orthopedic clinics across the US, we’ve put together this helpful guide.

Dislocations

After an intense collision, or force, meets the femur (ball), it can be forcibly pushed out of the socket (acetabulum). Hip dislocations are very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Post-surgical hip replacement dislocations can occur if the treatment plan doesn’t include the most up-to-date approaches on recovery.

Hip dislocations can usually be treated without surgery. After you are comfortably sedated by a qualified anaesthesiologist, your orthopedic specialist will maneuver the femur back into its previous position. With physical therapy, recovery time for this common type of hip injury can be as short as 2 months.

Bursitis

Throughout the body, small cushions called bursae protect our bones and joints. When too much stress is placed on the hip joint, the bursa swells up. When the bursa is larger, it creates a sharp, stabbing pain near the top of the hip. If the injury goes untreated, the pain spreads over a larger area, reaching the outer thigh on the affected side.

Bursitis can be treated with several non-invasive approaches, including physical therapy, activity modification, and steroid injections. If noninvasive treatment is not effective for your unique condition, the bursa can be removed through a small incision on the hip, allowing you to leave the same day and begin your recovery.

Labral Tears

Labral tears are a type of injury affecting the labrum cartilage surrounding the hip socket. The ring of cartilage acts as a cushion and connector between the ball and the socket of the hip. Trauma from an accident, certain hip shapes, and stressful, repetitive movements can lead to a tear in this connective cushion.

Some labral tear symptoms include a locking sensation, general stiffness, or pain in the groin and hip. If left untreated, you may continue to experience these symptoms and increase the likelihood that you’ll develop osteoarthritis. Tears in these tissues are also usually in the company of another injury, making it even more important to seek treatment.

To treat the tear, a good orthopedic specialist will provide a physical therapy and medication regimen to help the cushion heal.

If noninvasive methods do not improve your condition, you may have the option to have a hip arthroscopy procedure to restore you comfort and mobility. During this surgery, your specialist may choose to repair or remove the inflamed tissue.

An experienced doctor will provide a recovery plan and special physical therapy routine after to ensure your recovery time is as short as possible.

Hip Fractures

The hip’s structure is made of two main bones: the ball (femoral head) and the socket (acetabulum). The term “hip fracture” is only used to name a break found in the upper part of the femur (ball). Direct impact to the femur is the usual cause for a hip fracture, typically from a car accident or fall.

Some people are more vulnerable to hip fractures than others. People with osteoporosis, cancer, or stress injuries are more likely to have this type of hip injury. An orthopedic expert can help diagnose whether you can be treated with bedrest, medication, or if surgery is needed.

Those with more severe fractures often have the option to move forward with same-day hip replacements using innovative techniques and materials.

If you are experiencing hip pain, or think you’ve injured your hip, contact us

Pain is a message from the body that must be responded to immediately to ensure you live a comfortable life. If you experience any sudden, severe, unusual, or sharp pain in your pelvic area, be sure to connect yourself with an specialist.

At Dr. Vigdorchik’s practice, you are in the care of an expert committed to exploring noninvasive treatments before surgeries. Start feeling better by seeing a doctor who is advancing the standards of their specialty by providing the highest standard of post-surgical care and recovery. Book an appointment by phone or online to begin your return to good health.

The post The 4 Most Common Hip Injuries You Need to Know About appeared first on Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik.

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Hip arthroscopy is one of the most common and successful orthopedic surgeries available. Unfortunately, that doesn’t make it a routine one for every orthopedic surgeon.

And it’s safe to say that you’d want to avoid needing to have a revision surgery to get the results you want.

That’s why it’s important to choose the right high volume orthopedic specialist to get the best treatment possible. In today’s blog, we’re going to review the benefits of hip arthroscopy, what a “high-volume surgeon” means, and how you can get the best care possible.

What is a High Volume Orthopedic Surgeon?

Being a high volume orthopedic surgeon simply means that they frequently perform a specific type of surgery. In addition to being highly specialized, a high volume arthroscopic surgeon will operate on patients using this procedure over 50 times a year.

The reason you want a high volume orthopedic surgeon is simple: they are skilled and comfortable performing a procedure due to their familiarity with it, and frequency performing it.

The old saying ‘practice makes perfect’ holds true in medicine. High volume orthopedic surgeons, like Dr. Vigdorchik, are not just highly trained. They also perform these specific procedures frequently, allowing them to consistently improve their ability to perform the procedure.

Studies have shown that patients who seek high volume orthopedic surgeons have better outcomes. A 2003 study by Dartmouth found that patients who get procedures by low volume surgeons have a 24% increased likelihood for complications or mortality.

This means that selecting a high volume orthopedic surgeon not only ensures that they are skilled, but complications are less likely.

The Benefits of Hip Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopy differs from traditional open hip surgery due to its minimally invasive approach. With just a few small incisions, Dr. Vigdorchik inserts a scope and tools. By maneuvering the arthroscope, almost all hip conditions can be treated without needing open surgery. Because of this, patients can also expect minimal scarring from their procedure.

Hip arthroscopy procedures happen in an outpatient facility. This is because patients do not actually need a hospital stay after this procedure.  Many patients report feeling an immediate improvement in their comfort following their surgery.

Unlike traditional open hip surgery, hip arthroscopy requires much less recovery time. This allows patients to actually begin walking shortly after surgery and remain mobile. Patients will go through physical and occupational therapy following their procedure. These sessions will aid with proper healing.

Within 3 months, many patients can resume running and complete physical activity without discomfort.

What Conditions are Treated with Hip Arthroscopy?

Dr. Vigdorchik will work with you one-on-one to diagnose the cause of your hip pain and discomfort. Surgery is not the first option in our office, so Dr. Vigdorchik will create a treatment plan aimed at helping you recover without surgery.

However, there are some cases where surgery will be ultimately necessary. Some conditions that require a hip arthroscopy are:

  • Treatment of labral tears
  • Hip impingement
  • Articular cartilage injuries
  • Removing loose bodies in the joint
The Importance of Finding the Right Surgeon For Your Hip Arthroscopy

If you have received a diagnosis that requires hip arthroscopy, or you are experiencing hip pain, finding the right orthopedic specialist is the most important factor in your recovery.

When patients need a second, or revision, hip surgery is not because of complications. Choosing the wrong doctor is often what causes a second surgery to become necessary.

Once you begin to experience hip pain or an injury, contact Dr. Vigdorchik for a consultation. The sooner a patient is seen for their hip pain or injury, the less likely it is that surgery is necessary. Dr. Vigdorchik will work with you to find a diagnosis and treatment option that will restore your mobility and comfort as safely as possible.

The post If You Are Considering Hip Arthroscopy, Why Is It Important to Choose a High Volume Surgeon? appeared first on Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik.

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Staying active is one of the best ways to feel your best at any age. In fact, it’s proven that exercise is essential to keep arthritis at bay and to even prevent it from developing in the first place. Running, jogging, or HIIT exercises are some of the best for our body, boosting both our cardiac health as well as helping our joints stay mobile.

Hip pain is a real problem that tends to slow down many patients and prevent them from comfortably walking, sitting, or spending time doing the activities they love. When hip pain is present, many patients tend to stop their exercise routine due to discomfort. However, if you have been seen by an orthopedic specialist and have been given the green light, you should stay active with just a few adjustments to keep your hip comfortable while you run.

In this blog, we’ll be discussing the methods you can use to reduce hip pain while running.

Studies Have Found that Runners Have Lower Rates of Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a common disease affecting older adults, and it occurs when your immune system begins to attack your joints. Unfortunately, this osteoarthritis typically affects joints symmetrically, making patients with osteoarthritis in their hips experience pain in both joints.

Since arthritis is the most common cause of hip pain, followed shortly by fractures, bursitis, tendinitis and tears, understanding how exercise can impact your hip pain is important.

In a study published in 2017, researchers found that people who ran non-competitively had a lowered risk of developing arthritis than those who ran competitively.

So, if you are currently including running in your exercise routine, it’s a great idea to continue that as long as you have been given the go-ahead by your physician.

What You Can do to Reduce Your Hip Pain While Running

If you’re experiencing pain in your hip while running, it’s important to listen to your body and find out what is causing the discomfort. However, the goal should always be to remain active – so many patients continue to run and exercise to improve or maintain their mobility.

Prevention is the Best Medicine: Stretch and Warm-up

If you are a frequent runner, or want to get into the habit of running, you’ll want to make sure that you’re actively working to prevent hip pain while running.

This means learning about the proper way to warm up to and cool down from your run. Stretches, massages, and protein-filled meals are all ways to keep your body in great working condition while you’re exercising.

Before you jump headfirst into a new exercise routine, you will also want to do some research about the proper form you should be running in so that you can prevent hip pain from developing.

See an Orthopedic Specialist

Whether you’re experiencing the sudden onset of hip pain, or if you’ve been living with discomfort for years, it’s important to see an orthopedic specialist to determine the cause of your pain as well as the best treatment and exercise options for you.

Treatment options such as physical and occupational therapy, corticosteroids, and anti-inflammatory medications can help reduce hip pain while you run without requiring surgical intervention.

If your pain is caused by a damaged or misshapen hip joint, your orthopedic specialist may discuss surgical treatment options, like a same-day hip replacement surgery, that can alleviate or stop your discomfort while giving you back your mobility.

Rest When You Need To

Besides a proper warm-up, you also will want to stretch after any burst of exercise of activity. There are a number of quad, hamstring, hip flexor, glute, stretch that can be done to help prevent and relieve hip pain.

Sometimes, when you are just starting to run, hip pain can be caused from overuse. If you have ever spent an entire day walking and felt sore or stiff the next day, you’ve experienced pain from overuse. Typically, this occurs when someone changes their exercise routine to make it more challenging or when someone suddenly increases their activity level for a special event.

Listening to your body is key. If you feel like the discomfort while running that your feeling is related to tired muscles, slow down and rest. Proactive recovery after exercise is an important step to help your body recover all while avoiding increased hip pain. Foam rolling, massages, and soft tissue treatments are all helpful.

If you are suddenly experiencing pain in your hip while running and you had a fall the day before, stop and see a specialist to check for a fracture.

Wear the Right Equipment

Sometimes, reducing hip pain while running can be solved with a simple change in what you’re wearing.

Everyone’s posture is different and variations in the way you walk could be the root of your hip pain. If you have flat feet, you may be more likely to over pronate when you walk – meaning your ankle tends to lead inward and shift your weight to the inner edge of your foot. In other cases, people may experience supination from a high arch in their foot, which shifts the weight to the outer edge of their foot.

In cases of pronation or supination, your legs may become misaligned and, ultimately, cause pain in your hip joints.

To solve this problem and get relief from the discomfort you’re experiencing, you may be fitted with special shoe inserts for everyday use as well as for when you run. Your specialist may also recommend specific shoe brands that may fit you better and give you the support you need to diminish hip pain while running.

Avoid Running on Dangerous Terrain

Many people think of running and jogging as a summertime activity, but there are a large number of runners who continue to run throughout the winter  months. Though this is a fine choice, we always recommend runners to be cautious when running on wet, sleek, or icy roads.

If you are already experiencing hip pain, running on unsafe surfaces could cause you to change your running stance (to decrease your likelihood of slipping) and, ultimately, cause more hip pain because you are now running without the right form.

Similarly, runners who are out on snowy, icy, sandy, or rainy may be more likely to slip and fall. Falls are a common cause of hip injury and fractures, making safe running habits all the more important.

For runners who want to be cautious and maintain the correct running stance throughout the year, indoor running tracks or treadmills could be safer alternatives to control and prevent hip pain from running.

If you’d like more information about what you can do to reduce hip pain while you run, or while you go about your daily activities, please schedule an appointment with Dr. Vigdorchik to find the best option for you.

The post How to Reduce Hip Pain While Running appeared first on Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik.

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