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In this installment of our Best of Gluten Free in Paris series, we satisfy your sweet tooth with a selection of sugary sweet gluten free spots. A trip to Paris without indulging in a pastry, tarte, or gateau, is hardly a trip to Paris. But for those with diets that don’t necessarily allow for all that flaky crust it can be hard to find a place to get your sweet treat fix. 

Top: Yummy and Guiltfree. Above: Grom

Luckily, Paris has a growing number of options for those who want to skip the gluten but keep their sweets. Here are a few of our favorite places to pop in for dessert or an afternoon snack: 

VG Pâtisserie / Sitron

Sitron serves up pastry goodness with all the bells and whistles- chocolate ganache, whipped cream, pâte feuilletéé– we love when it comes to eating dessert in France. Foucade Paris makes gluten free spins on classic French desserts, including a zesty tarte au citron and selection of beautiful éclairs.

Foucade Paris

Onyriza is another gluten free pastry shop focusing on classic French desserts. In January you won’t want to miss their Galette des Rois. Vegans should take note of VG Pâtisserie, which is 100% vegan as well as gluten free. 

VG Pâtisserie

Yummy & Guiltfree specializes in sweet waffles covered in melted chocolate- what’s not to love?

Yummy and Guiltfree

In the summer months, head to Grom, a gelato shop where the cones and cookies are all gluten free. 

Grom

Related Links

Written by Emily Dilling for HiP Paris. Looking to travel? Check out Haven In for a fabulous vacation, or long term, rental in Paris, Italy, France or elsewhere in Europe.

Sitron / Yummy & Guiltfree

The post Gluten-Free in Paris Part 4: Paris’ Best GF Sweets appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

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In what will likely be some stiff competition for the Big Mamma Group’s La Felicità, internationally acclaimed Italian food hall Eataly has finally opened their 39th outpost in Paris, the first in France. Located behind the BHV in the heart of the Marais and spanning 4,000m2 over three floors, this massive marketplace is an epicenter of Italian gastronomy. 

Top image: Ali Postma. Above images: Thibaut Voisin.

Eataly Paris Marais features seven eateries, including a pizzeria, pasta restaurant, osteria, aperitivo bar, caffè, and gelateria with ice cream made by the famous glacier-chocolatier Venchi. There is a produce market including a macelleria (butcher), panetteria (bakery), salumi e formaggi and pasta fresca. There is also an outdoor fruit and vegetable market, plus the largest Italian wine cellar in Paris with over 1,200 labels.

Ali Postma

A small supermarket offers artisanal Italian products and ingredients, such as olive oil, balsamic vinegar, passata (tomato purée), pesto, pasta, coffee, and nougat. You can also buy homeware and kitchenware, including Bialetti coffee makers and pasta machines. And to top things off, there’s a cooking school open to the public.

Thibaut Voisin

The eateries and market surround a central piazza, where you can enjoy an Aperol Spritz with the sun pouring in from the glass roof above, created by Scottish artist Martin Boyce. In oversized letters on the wall sits the word Fraternité, the theme for Eataly Paris Marais. The French word expresses friendship, solidarity, and mutual understanding. It also refers to the notion of “brotherhood,” which makes sense considering two of the largest and most renowned cuisines in the world—Italian and French—have united under the same roof.

Ali Postma

And a brotherhood certainly exists between the two. As Eataly founder, Oscar Farinetti, says, “French people have always shown great appreciation for Italian food.” And the appreciation is evident, with Parisians lining up to get in since opening day.

Ali Postma

Grocery shopping can be a difficult affair on Sundays in Paris, with supermarkets often closing early or not open at all. So, Parisians and visitors to the city will be pleased to know that Eataly is open seven days a week until 11:30pm.

Eataly Paris Marais – 37 Rue Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie, 75004.

Ali Postma

Related Links

Virgile Guinard

Written by Ali Postma for HiP Paris. Looking to travel? Check out Haven In for a fabulous vacation, or long term, rental in Paris, Italy, France or elsewhere in Europe.

The post Eataly Paris Opens Its Doors appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

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In what will likely be some stiff competition for the Big Mamma Group’s La Felicità, popular Italian food hall Eataly has opened their 39th outpost in Paris, the first in France. Located behind the BHV in the heart of the Marais and spanning 4,000m2 over three floors, this massive marketplace is an epicenter of Italian gastronomy. 

Top image: Ali Postma. Above images: Thibaut Voisin.

Eataly Paris Marais features seven eateries, including a pizzeria, pasta restaurant, osteria, aperitivo bar, caffè, and gelateria with gelati made by the famous glacier-chocolatier Venchi. There is a produce market including a macelleria (butcher), panetteria (bakery), salumi e formaggi, pasta fresca; and an outdoor fruit and vegetable market; plus the largest Italian wine cellar in Paris with over 1,200 labels. 

Ali Postma

A small supermarket offers artisanal Italian products and ingredients, such as olive oil, balsamic vinegar, passata (tomato purée), pesto, pasta, coffee, and nougat. You can also buy homeware and kitchenware, including Bialetti coffee makers and pasta machines. And to top things off, there’s a cooking school open to the public.

Thibaut Voisin

The eateries and market surround a central piazza, where you can enjoy an Aperol Spritz with the sun pouring in from the glass roof above, created by Scottish artist Martin Boyce. In oversized letters on the wall sits the word Fraternité, the theme for Eataly Paris Marais. The French word expresses friendship, solidarity, and mutual understanding. It also refers to the notion of “brotherhood,” which makes sense considering two of the largest and most renowned cuisines in the world—Italian and French—have united under the same roof.

Ali Postma

And a brotherhood certainly exists between the two. As Eataly founder, Oscar Farinetti, says, “French people have always shown great appreciation for Italian food.” And the appreciation is evident, with Parisians lining up to get in since opening day.

Ali Postma

Grocery shopping is a difficult affair on Sundays in Paris, with supermarkets often closing early or not open at all, so Parisian’s will be pleased to know that Eataly is open seven days a week until 11:30pm.

Eataly Paris Marais – 37 Rue Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie, 75004.

Ali Postma

Related Links

Virgile Guinard

Written by Ali Postma for HiP Paris. Looking to travel? Check out Haven In for a fabulous vacation, or long term, rental in Paris, Italy, France or elsewhere in Europe.

The post Eataly Paris Opens Its Doors appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

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Parisian dining habits have been changing over the last decade or two, largely in part thanks to innovative international chefs. One trend that is sticking, and becoming increasingly popular also with French chefs, is small plates. Forerunners like Mary Celeste and Inaro are now making way for a new wave of nibbles with both French and foreign influences. Here are some of the best new small plate restaurants in Paris.

Top image: A L’Ombre – Pierre-Lucet Penato / Above images: Les Françaises

Les Françaises

It’s worth trekking to the 17th arrondissement just to go to this fabulous, fun, and stylish new Parisian small plate venue, which has injected a much-appreciated dose of chicness and originality to the Batignolles nightlife scene. The long dining room is both elegant and relaxed, the perfect setting to sample their range of tapas à la francaise and cocktails.

Les Françaises

The seasonal menu highlights exceptional ingredients in beautifully presented dishes such as organic œuf mimosa topped with trout caviar, bass, and clementine ceviche and confit de canard with roasted pears. Their inventive cocktails are inspired by great French women, such as Françoise Sagan and Simone de Beauvoir, and include original liquors and homemade syrups.

87 Rue Legendre, 75017 Paris

A l’Ombre

Enjoy the flavors of Provence without having to jump on the TGV at this attractive addition to the vibrant food scene in the 11th. The luminous dining room has an inviting feel with exposed brick walls, colorful cushions, and typical South of France straw accessories—not quite a terrace in Aix or Arles, but close!

A L’Ombre – Pierre-Lucet Penato

Their menu features traditional Provençal small plates including tapenade, Tomme de Provence with onion confit and exquisite Château d’Estoublon olive oil, pissaladière tart, and pastis-infused terrine. They also have a few seasonal main courses and an épicerie section.

10 rue de la Folie-Méricourt, 75011 Paris

A L’Ombre – Pierre-Lucet Penato

La Reine Mer

Some of the best-quality fish and seafood in Paris is served up at this unique fishmonger/small plate joint also in the 11th arrondissement. Grégory Areinx has scanned the coastlines of France to find the highest level and most sustainable produits de la mer. These can be bought to cook yourself at home or enjoyed around their stainless steel countertops, in keeping with the look of a fish shop.

La Reine Mer

Small plates on offer at lunch include seafood salads, house-smoked salmon, and their trademark “sandfishes,” spring rolls filled with raw fish and marinated vegetables. Dinner features more elaborate tapas like lobster gyozas, grilled scallops with carrot and Tonka bean purée, or smoked squid with hummus and roasted Datterini tomatoes.

1 rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud, 75011 Paris

LAvant Comptoir du Marché

A precursor to the small plate movement in Paris, star chef Yves Camdeborde has expanded on his two popular Avant Comptoir venues with this new branch at the Marché Saint Germain. In line with its location, the focus here is on small plates made of traditional market products with a contemporary twist.

L’Avant Comptoir du Marché

The chalkboard menu changes often and features shareable portions such as ham croquettes, boudin noir macarons, pig trotters, and even charcuterie made by his brother. These high quality bites are wonderfully paired with a commendable list of mostly natural wines.

14 Rue Lobineau, 75006 Paris

L’Avant Comptoir du Marché

Raw Saint-Germain

After the success of their restaurant in the Marais, Marie and William Pradeleix have crossed the river with this fresh new Left Bank outpost. A concept little explored in Paris, as you might gather from its name, the restaurant only serves food that is either raw or lightly cooked.

RAW

The  couple’s origins from the Basque country are apparent in their pintxos and jamon iberico, while their love of Asian cuisine is seen in the cod sashimi with pickled mango and the veal tataki with edamame and granny smith apple, and quintessential French is not overlooked with their scallops with foie gras—all of which go very well with the house sangria.

44 rue de Fleurus, 75006 Paris

A L’Ombre – Pierre-Lucet Penato / La Reine Mer

Related Links

Les Françaises

Written by Lily Heise for HiP Paris. Looking to travel? Check out Haven In for a fabulous vacation, or long term, rental in Paris, Italy, France or elsewhere in Europe.

The post Paris’ Best (New) Small Plate Addresses appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

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A quintessential Paris experience is spending time in its coffee shops, sipping a café au lait and people watching from a terrace. In this installment of our Gluten-Free in Paris series we share with you a few spots where you are sure to find a delicious gluten-free pâtisserie to go with your coffee.

Belleville Brûlerie

The craft coffee movement has been steadily picking up speed since the Paris-based roasters like CoutumeBelleville Brûlerie, and Café Lomi set up shop in the city. Cafes that serve specialty coffee can generally be trusted for their attention to detail with everything else they serve.

Coutume

However, not all coffee shops are gluten-free friendly, so here’s a list of places where you are sure to find a gluten-free goodie to go with your caffeine fix. 

Café Lomi – Gonçalo Silva Photography

Wild & The Moon, now has six locations in Paris, serving up cold-pressed juices and plant-based dishes for a more holistic clean-eating experience. All coffee drinks are available in vegan form and the latte list (chai, golden, rose, charcoal…) is so exhaustive you’ll want to keep coming back until you’ve tried them all!

Wild & The Moon

Gluten-free options abound on a menu that ranges from avocado toast made with gluten-free bread, a variety of super bowls comprised of kelp, kale, and quinoa, and pick-me-up bars that pack in all kinds of natural protein sources for a perfect midday snack. Here you’ll even find gluten-free beer for an early evening apéro.

Wild & The Moon

JUDY refers to itself as a “cantine qualitarienne,” meaning that even if its menu is entirely meat-, gluten-, lactose-, and sugar-free, the focus here is above all on quality. Homemade, locally sourced, organic ingredients go into JUDY’s juices, plant-based dishes, wholesome desserts, and craft-roasted coffee.

JUDY

While not all Paris cafes are completely gluten-free, many of them are sensitive to customers who don’t do glu. Ob-La-Di serves a gluten-free granola and a small selection of other gluten-free baked goods, for example. 

Ob-La-Di

Some of our other favorite gluten-free coffee shops in Paris include Le Cairn Coffee Shop and Bob’s Bake Shop

Café Lomi

If you’re hungry for more than gluten free baked goods, check out our previous post on the best gluten-free lunch spots in Paris. Watch this space for more gluten-free goodness with our next post in the series, Gluten-Free for the Sweet Tooth. 

Coutume – 47 Rue de Babylone, 75007.

Belleville Brûlerie – 14 Rue Lally-Tollendal, 75019.

Café Lomi – 3 ter Rue Marcadet, 75018.

Wild & The Moon – 55 Rue Charlot, 75003 and other Paris locations

JUDY – 18 Rue de Fleurus, 75006.

Ob-La-Di – 54 Rue de Saintonge, 75003.

Related Links

  • The best gluten-free bakeries in Paris.
  • Where to go for a delicious gluten-free lunch in Paris.
  • The best gluten-free restaurants in Paris.
Coutume

Written by Emily Dilling for HiP Paris. Looking to travel? Check out Haven In for a fabulous vacation, or long term, rental in Paris, Italy, France or elsewhere in Europe.

Café Lomi – Adrien Lorieux



The post Gluten-Free in Paris Part 3: The Best GF Coffee Shops appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

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Over the last eight years or so, the Parisian district known as SoPi, South Pigalle, has seen a gradual evolution from a somewhat seedy and sleepy residential area bordering the red light district into one of the hippest neighborhood of Paris. This movement is proving to be more than a passing trend thanks to a steady stream of inventive restaurants, contemporary cafés, and original shops. Here are some of our favorite recent openings:

Mamiche – Clara Ferrand

Mamiche 

Not all Parisian bakeries have been created equally, and the queues trailing outside this new-wave boulangerie du quartier are a clear sign of its uniqueness. The bakery’s two owners, Victoria and Cécile, add an extra dose of passion, fun, and exceptionally high-quality ingredients into their signature “miche” loaves of bread, super-moist cookies, cinnamon-laden babka, and extra-buttery traditional viennoiseries.

45 rue Condorcet, 75009 Paris

Papilles – Ali Postma

Papilles 

Meaning taste buds in French, this coffee shop and café is definitely tantalizing those of neighborhood residents and beyond. In keeping with its slogan of “du bon manger all day,” Papilles proposes a delicious menu of contemporary French-meets-Anglo breakfast and lunch fare. Favorites include crumpets decked out in poached eggs; greens and bacon from The Beast; original croque-monsieurs using bread from aforementioned Mamiche, shitake mushrooms, and tangy mimolette; and pancakes topped with fresh fruit and lime whipped cream.

77 Rue Rochechouart, 75009 Paris

Bloc de l’Est

Bloc de l’Est

This cool concept store has added a touch of 1950-80s Soviet style to the wardrobes and apartments of SoPi locals since opening in early 2018. The brainchild of design trendsetters Marina Mussat and Kamila Sokolska, the shop presents a very select range of clothing, jewelry, and homeware, all Made in France and some exclusively designed for the shop, alongside Kamila’s excellent collection of sleek Soviet-era furniture.

28 Rue Condorcet, 75009 Paris

Saul’s

Saul’s

Residents of the 9th arrondissement no longer need to trek across town to the Marais to get good Israeli street food thanks to this new spot by the folks behind the nearby Pizza Di Loretta. Settle in on a tall stool in their minimalist interior for a Saul’s Bowl of quinoa, flavorful falafel, grilled sweet potato, pineapple, and pomegranate seeds; or grab an overflowing pita sandwich topped with roasted cauliflower and tahini to devour in the park up the street, a view of Sacré-Coeur gleaming in the distance. 

 66 Rue Rodier, 75009 Paris

L’Atelier Mala

 L’Atelier Mala

As many Parisians know, it’s very difficult to get truly authentic Chinese food in Paris as most caters to a tamer French palate. L’Atelier Mala is rectifying this. Although owned by three French entrepreneurs, the restaurant was born out of their love of China and the menu of Sichuan specialities got the Chinese stamp of approval. This includes dishes like dumplings, noodle, rice, veggie and meat options… with a dash of famous Sichuan pepper. Start or finish your meal with a Tsingtao beer or spicy cocktail in their speakeasy style bar found in the basement.

56 rue Notre Dame de Lorette, 75009 Paris

L’Atelier Mala

Impronta 

The once traditional market street of la rue des Martyrs has seen an increase in contemporary gastronomy adresses since the appearance of the British eatery Rose Bakery a decade ago (who also incidentally have two new addresses in the area). This 21st -century gelateria is among the latest additions. A trial venture of the founder of Italian ice cream chain Amorino, this ice cream shop serves a variety of delicious, all-natural, vegan, unprocessed ice creams and sorbets, as well as organic salads, cold-pressed juices, tea, and coffee.

42 Rue des Martyrs, 75009 Paris

Related Links

Written by Lily Heise for HiP Paris. Looking for a fabulous vacation, or long term, rental in Paris, Italy, France or elsewhere in Europe? Let us know. We can help!


The post What’s New in Paris’ SOPI (South Pigalle) Neighborhood? appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

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Everyone who knows me knows that I am a burger addict. I was a burger addict in Melbourne and that has certainly not changed in Paris. In fact, when I moved here I made it my mission to try all of the veritable burger joints in the city in a quest to find the best burger around. Here are the results:

Top image: Bio Burger. Above images: Le Ruisseau

Le Ruisseau

I’m not the first to call Le Ruisseau the best burger in Paris, but I’m going to have to say it again. They simply cannot be beat. From the mouth-wateringly good Tom Burger with tomme de vache au cidre fondue, to the hangover-perfect Spicy BBQ Cheddar Burger with guacamole and Tabasco (hot tip: add bacon).

Le Ruisseau

The burgers are generously sized, the meat perfectly cooked, and the frites maison perfection (the dipping sauce is so tasty you’ll likely ask for more). The meal also comes with a much-needed salad, which always makes me feel somewhat less guilty—at least I’m getting my greens right? The onion rings are also a standout.

Le Ruisseau – Ali Postma

PNY

While the burgers are smaller, and the sides extra, PNY is a hot contender. The classic? The Return of the Cowboy, which comes with nine-month aged cheddar, an oversized onion ring, bacon, and homemade BBQ sauce.

PNY – Viande Végetale (right)

Vegetarians rejoice because after seven years of work by the organization Beyond Meat, PNY is the first in France to offer the exclusive “viande végétale” patty, which apparently cooks, looks, and tastes just like its meat counterpart. It can be added to all of their burgers for an extra 2.90€. Check out their newest restaurant in Pigalle, PNY Voyager, for a futuristic, space-craft like restaurant decked out with 1000 vinyl records and 10 craft beers on tap.

PNY

Bio Burger

If you want to feel a bit better about your burger eating habits, Bio Burger is for you: All of their ingredients are 100% certified organic, 80% of their suppliers are based in France, and they aim to eliminate plastic in their restaurants.

Bio Burger

Being half Dutch, my favorite is the Avocado Bacon, which comes with organic Gouda cheese from a Dutch-owned farm in the Loire region. You have a choice of fries or coleslaw as an accompaniment and drinks include organic citronnade, iced tea, sodas and beer.

Bio Burger

Blend 

Get a little bit fancy at Blend Burger with their new limited edition Il Tonino burger, which comes with Italian blue goats cheese from Sardinia, white truffle, and edible dandelion flowers; or the Came burger, with AOP camembert from the Fromagerie Réo in Normandy, maple syrup caramelized bacon, honey, cumin mustard, and cider jelly. Then there’s the Ring burger, with two different 18-month aged melted cheddars, beer-fried onion rings, Texan barbecue sauce, and bacon. Fried chicken, sweet potato fries, coleslaw, and salads are also available.

Bio Burger / Blend Burger

For something a little more fast-food style, there’s always Five Guys. But you don’t always have to go to a dedicated burger joint to find a great burger in Paris. Some of Paris’ many bistros also do a mean burger and fries. If you have any hidden gems for us, share them in the comments!

Related Links

Written by Ali Postma for HiP Paris. Looking for a fabulous vacation, or long term, rental in Paris, Italy, France or elsewhere in Europe? Let us know. We can help!

The post The Best Burgers in Paris appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

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In this installment of our Best of Gluten-Free in Paris series, we round up our favorite spots to enjoy a gluten-free lunch among friends. Cozy and welcoming, the following restaurants will make you want to linger a little longer, and maybe even have a second round of gluten-free dessert! 

Top and above images: Bears and Racoons

GF eating in Paris isn’t limited to just loaves of bread—it’s possible to enjoy a whole meal sans gluten if you know where to go! These gluten-free restaurants can be reserved for your next lunch without any worries about off-limits menu items. 

Café Mareva serves sweet potato waffles with a large selection of toppings, making it a fun spot for a casual lunch.

La Guinguette d’Angèle

La Guinguette d’Angèle is a great address for vegetarian and-gluten free lunch options, with fresh salads and homemade cookies standing out. 

Café Pinson is a go-to for a gluten-free lunch, fresh-pressed juice, and laid-back environment. Bears and Raccoons is a perfect little GF sandwich spot.

Abattoir Végétal

42 Degrés specializes in raw food, with mostly vegan and gluten-free options. If you are looking for organic options that are also vegan and gluten-free, check out Abattoir Végétal in the 18th arrondissement. 

Breizh Café

Another classic Paris eating establishment often overlooked by the sans gluten set is Breizh Café. This famed crêperie serves homemade buckwheat galettes that are 100% gluten-free and 100% delicious. 

Bears and Racoons

Looking for more gluten free goodness? Here are our favorite gluten free bakeries in Paris. Also, be sure to check back for our next installment of the Gluten Free in Paris series when we share the city’s best GF coffee shops.

Café Mareva – 38 Rue du Faubourg-du-Temple, 75011.

La Guinguette d’Angèle – Restaurant: 6 Rue de Tournon, 75006. Restaurant/Takeaway: 2 Rue du Général Renault, 75011. Takeaway: 34 Rue Coquillière, 75001.

Café Pinson – 6 Rue du Forez, 75003.

Bears and Raccoons – 21 Rue Richard Lenoir, 75011.

42 Degrés – 109 Rue du Faubourg Poissonnière 75009.

Abattoir Végétal – 61 Rue Ramey, 75018.

Breizh Café –  14 Rue des Petits Carreaux, 75002. 109 Rue Vieille du Temple, 75003. 1 Rue de L’Odeon, 75006. 31 Rue des Batignolles, 75017.

Related Links

  • You can find more gluten-free sweets at Cassiopée.
  • Read about the Paris bakeries that are going gluten-free over at The Independent.
  • For a gluten-free guide to Paris, head over to Road Affair.

Written by Emily Dilling for HiP Paris. Looking for a fabulous vacation, or long term, rental in Paris, Italy, France or elsewhere in Europe? Let us know. We can help!

The post Gluten-Free Paris Part 2: The Best GF Lunch Spots appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

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If you want to get into Refettorio Paris, an exclusive restaurant in the crypt of the Madeleine church in the 8th arrondissement, your best bet is by signing up to do the dishes. While the star-studded list of guest chefs—including acclaimed restaurateurs Alain Ducasse, Anne Sophie Pic, and Tatiana Levha—makes Refettorio sound like the pop-up event of the century, this dining experience is not intended for foodies with Instagram accounts. Refettorio aims to save its tables for those in need: refugees, low-income families, the elderly, and people “in situations of social vulnerability.”  

Refettorio Paris – Featured image top: Freddy Gutierrez/ Above: Shehanhanwellage

Building on the existing social restaurant housed in the church, Le Foyer de la Madeleine, which serves homemade seasonal meals at affordable prices (7-9 ) to 250 people daily, Refettorio uses its star power to serve gourmet meals to underserved communities. The restaurant is the brainchild of Food for Soul, a non-profit association founded by chef Massimo Bottura and Lara Gilmore. The Paris incarnation of the concept follows on the heels of successful sister Refettorio restaurants in Milan, Brazil, London, Modena, and Bologna. 

Refettorio Paris – Jean Blaise Hall

The Parisian chapter embraces the group’s mission statement by repurposing 130 kilograms (286 pounds) of donated “surplus ingredients” and thereby reducing food waste. Refettorio chefs then transform the donated food that would have been disposed of into meals that feed 100 people a night. Dinner is reserved for people with a Refettorio card and is completely free.

Refettorio Paris – JR / Shehanhanwellage

Refettorio Paris not only provides a healthy, gastronomic dining experience to those with little access to high-quality cuisine and ingredients, it also offers the full restaurant experience, attentive servers and all. Added touches come from world-renowned artists and architects, such as JR and Nicola Delon, who contributed their talents to create a stimulating and welcoming fine dining environment. 

If you’re interested in volunteering at Refettorio, visit their website to find out how you can work in the kitchen or dining room, or even help organize food donations and fundraisers. 

Shehanhanwellage

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Written by Emily Dilling for HiP Paris. Looking for a fabulous vacation, or long term, rental in Paris, Italy, France or elsewhere in Europe? Let us know. We can help!

The post Refettorio Paris: Feeding the Needy With Fine Dining appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

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Main Image: La Cantine du Troquet / Above: Le Cherche Midi

I don’t know what it is about the rue du Cherche-Midi. When I mention the street to friends and colleagues, they invariably mention a personal link; they lived there as a student, they once had a lover on the corner near the convent, they regularly visit on the way to their therapist’s office.

Poilâne

Connoisseurs have known the rue du Cherche-Midi for the country bread and butter cookies (called punishments!) baked in wood-burning ovens at Poilâne bakery since the 1930s. They still flock there, sometimes crossing Paris for one of their buttery, carmely apple tarts. 

Poilane

Parisians are happy to make a detour for Le Cherche Midi, one of the city’s best Italian restaurants since 1978, with a daily menu of fresh pastas and primi piatti served in a cozy room. Their antipasti and focaccia are highlights of any meal and the house-made tiramisu is simply perfect.

Le Cherche-Midi / Anima

Tried and true, those two addresses were, for many years, the best food Cherche-Midi had to offer. Then, about three years ago, something changed and the street became a foodie destination, a cornucopia of goodness spilling over to the side streets and byways. 

Atelier Vivanda – Nicolas Buisson above & Thai Toutain (left)

One of the first to start the trend was Michelin-star chef Akrame Benallal with Atelier Vivanda. A carnivore’s haven, the tiny atelier is all about steak and potatoes. The beef is tender, tasty, and cooked as they should be, but the potatoes. Oh, the potatoes. I’m not naming names, but pommes dauphines may have brought a tear or two to a grown woman’s eyes, and are only rivaled by the hazelnut-studded mashed potatoes and nutmeg-laced gratin. 

Le Cafe – P Monetta

The most recent addition is Alain Ducasse’s Le Cafe. Looking like a Brooklyn joint, with bright lights and barstools, the neo-café offers filtered and espresso coffees, as well as a surprisingly delicious  “like a beer” cold-press coffee served in a pint glass. The educated baristas are happy to help patrons select bags of beans to go, all of which are roasted at M Ducasse’s soon-to-be-public torrefactor near Bastille.

Mamie Gateaux

Beating the trend by about a decade, Mamie Gateaux is a quant culinary antique shop and a lunch place those who appreciate a good quiche, tart, cake, or pie. Every day the Japanese chef features two different quiches, each with a butter-laden crust that is dry and flaky and melts in the mouth. For dessert there are lemon meringue pies, chestnut cakes, seasonal fruit tarts, and fresh scones. 

Quinsou

Up the street from Mamie is Michelin-starred Quinsou. In a refreshingly relaxed dining room with faux-cement tile floors and rustic resin pots, Antoinin Bonnet serves exquisite dishes from a minimalist menu that offers guests a choice between two hors d’oeuvres, two starters, and two mains. The white radish entrée presented complex layer of flavor, while the truffle risotto was light and airy. Wines are natural, the bread is baked fresh daily, and the menu changes every two weeks. 

La Cantine du Troquet

Red booth seating lines the stone walls at Basque chef Christian Etchebest’s La Cantine du Troquet. Everyday the team posts the seasonal menu featuring carefully sourced products from across the country, with a particular focus on southwestern favorites like razor clams and acorn-fed pork. This is a favorite haunt for rugby stars from France and around the globe. 

Sauvage, translating to wild, was originally a trendy wine bar featuring untamed, natural wines. Locals loved the novel idea, friendly host, and original tapas he started to serve. Now a few years later, owner Sébastien Leroy has expanded with a plywood-clad dining room. Dishes feature surprising marriages, like foie gras with apricots, or tuna with raspberry and coriander, and they change seasonally.

Anima

Anima is a Rive Gauche gem created by the group who shaped Racines and Le Bon Saint Pourçain. In a mid-century chic dining room where the gold-tiled wood-burning stove reigns, Italian chefs throw together calzone, eggplant parmesan, and a small handful of other dishes, each better than the last. The stars of the meal are the pizzas made with fior di latte that lingers on the palate with a flavor so delicate it’s tempting to skip dessert.

Anima

One of the first foodie destinations on the street, Café Trama, is still a regular treat. Marion Trama runs the room while Papa works the miniature kitchen and Maman makes some of desserts. The croque-monsieur with truffle salt is an eternal favorite, but the daily specials like beef cheeks or sautéed cèpe mushrooms are delicious. The desserts are unforgettable; an affogato with hazelnut praline, a meringue with lemon cream, or moist chestnut cake. Miam! 

Le Cherche Midi

Gluten-free, vegetarian, dairy-free, carnivore… there is something for every eating style at this welcoming lunch spot where wild flowers grace the tables and tea supplies line the walls. The kitchen at Simple has an uncommon gift for making healthy foods that just taste good. From a budda bowl to the tarte du jour, each dish features the best produce of the season. Simple is also a great place to stop for an afternoon smoothie, refreshing tea, and irresistible poached pear chocolate dessert.

Poilâne – 8 rue du Cherche-Midi

Le Cherche-Midi – 22 rue du Cherche-Midi. +33145482744

Atelier Vivanda – 20 rue du Cherche-Midi. +33145445044

Le Café Alain Ducasse – 47 rue du Cherche-Midi

Mamie Gateaux – 66 rue du Cherche-Midi

Sauvage – 55 rue du Cherche Midi. +33145488679

Quinsou – 33 rue de l’Abbé Gregoire. +33142226609

La Cantine du Troquet – 79 rue du Cherche-Midi

Anima – 78 rue du Cherche Midi. +33140479041

Café Trama – 83 rue du Cherche Midi. +33145483371

Simple – 86 rue du Cherche Midi

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Written by Sylvia Sabes for HiP Paris. Looking for a fabulous vacation, or long term, rental in Paris, Italy, France or elsewhere in Europe? Let us know. We can help!

The post The Best Restaurants on Paris’ Rue du Cherche-Midi appeared first on HiP Paris Blog.

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