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Hiking in Finland by Hendrik Morkel - 5d ago

“Golden rays/ frosty winds/ a great day!”

I am now on Patreon. If you feel that you get value out of The Week In Review, my articles and videos - become a Patron for as low as a cup of coffee!

Outdoor News

Watch the Brotherhood of Skiing.

Shooting against the light.

Alex writes about Smartphone photography for outdoor writers, and Max says good bye to a trusted friend.

Going to the mountains, fjells or forests? Here’s some thinking about why to hire a Guide.

Liz writes about The Face of a Burnout.

Many more are much happier without their eyes glued to their cellphones: Alex goes offline on the Cape Wrath Trail, Erika was relaxed and had more time for things that matter during her Social Media-free January, and then this: We’ll look back at our Smartphones like Cigarettes.

The Bergfreunde have a huge Sale with up to 70% off on selected items.

At Backcountry.com you can take an additional 20% off gear to get yourself outside!

Salewa makes some pretty great ski-touring kit, and now you can win some in this Bergzeit competition - you just have to answer a simple question!

For the photographers amongst you this Outdoor Research photography competition is worth noting - submit an #AlpineAdventure image and win a cool outfit for your next winter trip!

If you rather fancy a trip to the Piz Palü with ORTOVOX and Bergzeit - here’s your chance!

Or head to the Salzburger Saalachtal with the Bergzeit and Norrøna team, learn about Avalanche Safety and enjoy a great Freeride adventure.

Trip Reports

Escape to Cuba on La Ruta Mala.

Join Peter in the Lakeland Winter Wonderland.

This ski tour in Poland looks amazing, beautiful scenery! [Polish]

Watch how Drew and his family hike on the Camino Portuguese from Porto to Barcelos.

The skiing conditions in South Tyrol and Italy look amazing. [Italian]

Iñaki takes us along on the Via Alpina 1.

Hate the snow? Go sports climbing in Leonidio, Greece! [German]

Grizzly Country - YouTube

Jones Gap State Park Waterfall Hike.

Mike hikes the Abbott Ridge Trail at Glacier National Park.

Winter Walking on the MacGillycuddy Reeks.

Agnieszka is out backpacking on the GR48 Sendero de Sierra Morena. [Polish]

The best ski touring days of the year. [German]

Kathrin was hiking in Oregon on the South Sister Trail. [German]

Dennis was hiking on the Urwaldsteig. [German]

Treeline (2019) - YouTube
Gear Reviews & News

Uli published his impressions from the ISPO. [German]

Raf looks at the new climbing gear at OR.

Paulina reviews the Arc’teryx Sabria Pants.

Alan likes the Inov-8 All-terrain Pro Mitts.

Dennis elaborates why a quilt makes a lot of sense in a hammock. [German]

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Impressions from a family skiing trip to Åre, Sweden!

Disclosure: This journey was supported by the local tourism bureau and partners, but I did not got paid to write about this trip. As you know: I’m keepin’ it real and tell you how it is - I maintain full editorial control of the content published on Hiking in Finland. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on blogger transparency and affiliate links.

After my visit to Åre in the autumn I knew I wanted to come back, and that I should bring my family so we can experience the beauty of the Swedish mountains together! Again we travelled by ferry and train to this little village, which is in the midst of preparing for the Åre 2019 FIS Alpine World Ski Championship which start next week! As usual, this is a photo-intensive article which gives you a taste of the stories which will come when I return from the ISPO 2019 in Munich and some skiing in Vorarlberg!

Our 3-year old daughter learned to ski ❤️ The smile on her face is amazing, and we are so proud of her!

Similarly, our 7 year old son also improved his skiing by bounds! While he learned to ski some years ago in Vuokatti this year in Åre he went big and bold! I had many great runs with him, and look forward to many more!

Also my wife and me had some time with one of the friendly Ski School instructors! I got a reminder on how to better control my skis and tips on getting down steep, shitty runs.

There also was some night skiing.

And visits to the village for some Pizza, swimming, coffee and grocery shopping.

Of course there was lots and lots of great skiing on the slopes.

And even a superb ski tour to the top of Åreskutan!

Everywhere there were signs of the Åre 2019 FIS Alpine World Ski Championship - if you want to see more from Åre and the world-class ski stars, make sure to check out the Åre 2019 website to follow the spectacle. You also could just hop on a train to Åre and view it live - and if the weather forecast holds on, it should be quite a good time for some of your own skiing, too! After my visit to Munich and Vorarlberg I’ll write up in detail everything there is to know about a family skiing visit to Åre, so make sure to subscribe via RSS to not miss any post! You already can view some more photos on in the Åre 2019 Album on Flickr.

I am now on Patreon. If you feel that you get value out of my articles and videos - become a Patron for as low as a cup of coffee a month! Or if you enjoyed this & other articles buy me a coffee on PayPal - I work Full-Time on Hiking in Finland to bring you inspiring trip reports, in-depth gear reviews and the latest news from the outdoors. You also could subscribe to the rarer-than-ever Newsletter and follow along on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Youtube for more outdoorsy updates!

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Hiking in Finland by Hendrik Morkel - 1M ago

Happy New Year too all my dear ultralight backpacking, packrafting, bikepacking, ski-touring, hiking and camping friends!

Dear Readers, another year has passed and I hope you, your friends and family had a few relaxing days, a good start into 2019 and that your backpack didn’t get that much heavier with all them luxury items which Santa dropped off for you =) I spend December mostly with work and then took over the holidays a few free days, and then planned out my 2019 - as an entrepreneur that’s something which is quite important. I also set out a few goals, for example I want to run more each week, become a better skier, and be more efficient with my time. I also hope to make 2019 financially a better year for me than 2018, and I have outlined a few ways I can achieve that.

The long planned blog refresh will have to wait still a bit I reckon, as I plan to concentrate more on my Youtube Channel. If you haven’t subscribed yet I’d appreciate it if you check it out, and if it is something to your likes hit that subscribe button. Here is a video I shot a couple of weeks ago, for example, though don’t worry: The Blog isn’t going away and I will maintain it regularly (more on that underneath).

On the other hand I grew pretty tired of Instagram, which is a time-consuming beast which I will fed less in 2019. I still enjoy Twitter while Facebook is alright, but both of these are good ways to get in touch with me if you have a question - or just .

Trip-wise I decided to put my feet where my mouth is - and that means more trips in Finland, as well as Sweden and Norway. I am very happy that Climate Change is such a huge topic in normal Media and Politics right now, and hence I decided to take on a lot less assignments which require me to fly. I will fly to the ISPO in Munich later in February (even if I don’t like the city + fair that much) as it is a good place to meet new clients and start new projects. Plus I will again film a lot of videos about new exciting gear! After the fair I will head to Vorarlberg with my friend Björn from St. Bergweh for some skiing, and then I have some cool ideas for inspiring winter trips here in Finland.

Of course there will also be The Week In Review and detailed gear reviews, trip reports and the one and other opinion piece here on the blog! And as always: If there is something you’d like to see or read - let me know in the comments or on Twitter! Thank you so much for reading, and I am looking forward to inspire and entertain you in 2019!

PS: I am now on Patreon. If you feel that you get value out of my articles and videos - become a Patron for as low as a cup of coffee a month!

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Hiking in Finland by Hendrik Morkel - 2M ago

What is in every backpacker’s rucksack? A warm, puffy jacket to put on in brakes and at camp. On my last trips that puffy jacket was the Rab Microlight Alpine Jacket for me, and it already has become a favourite piece of kit.

Disclosure: This article has been supported financially and with gear from Rab. As you know: I’m keepin’ it real and tell you how it is - I maintain full editorial control of the content published on Hiking in Finland. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on affiliate links & blogger transparency.

Time

The Rab Microlight Alpine Jacket arrived in time for autumn backpacking trips with me, and has been along on two long backpacking trips this fall, and several photography assignments. It has seen over three weeks of use, and will see many more!

Function

Well, for me this is a jacket which stays in the backpack until I stop to make a break or arrive at camp, where it comes out and on. Depending on the weather and pace it also gets worn when on the move, but as I am running easily hot I find wearing a down jacket for hiking absolutely not good as I quickly am sweating too much then. But for outdoor and landscape photography it is great again - especially right now as the temperatures are only around -7°C and windy. But I digress. The main function of a down jacket is obviously to keep the wearer warm in cold weather.

Features

The features as Rab sees them:

  • Pertex Quantum inner and outer fabric
  • 750FP Ethically-Sourced European Goose Down
  • Rab Fluorocarbon free Hydrophobic Down developed in conjunction with Nikwax
  • Micro stitch-through baffle construction
  • Adjustable hood with laminated brim and flexible polymer peak
  • Diverted hood baffle lines for an anatomical fit
  • YKK reverse coil front zip with insulated zip baffle and chin guard
  • 2 YKK reverse coil harness compatible hand pockets
  • YKK reverse coil chest pocket
  • Clean finish elasticated cuff construction
  • Hem construction with dual drawcord adjustment
  • Comes with a Stuff sack

Technical Innovations

In recent reviews this is usually a section where I write “Nope, no innovations here.” Well, not this time! We got a hood which lays flat when not on your head - really nice! The Responsible Down isn’t super-new anymore, though nevertheless it is good to see that this jacket uses Ethically-Sourced European Goose Down, which is Hydrophobic on top.

Quality

Rab wouldn’t be where they are today if they wouldn’t make high-quality kit, and the Microlight Alpine Jacket is no exception.

Weight

My red Microlight Alpine Jacket weighs 377 g in Size S, with the included Stuff Sack adding 12 g.

In use

One of my first ultralight garments was the Rab Microlight Vest, a great piece of kit, so when I saw the Microlight Jacket at the ISPO earlier this year I knew I wanted one and take it out into the hills. Since it has arrived this jacket has not disappointed and it has been used a lot since - as it has been fresh outside in recent weeks it was good to have a light and warm jacket to put on when I head out to shot videos or take photos.

The main use obvious remains for me as an insulation piece when I go backpacking. For that I need the jacket to fulfil three things: It needs to be light, it needs to pack down small & compact as it will be the majority of the time in the backpack, getting carried around, and the third thing is that it needs to be warm - or toasty as I like to say! As you can see from the photos here, on the accounts of being light & compact the Microlight Alpine scores very well, and I find it a toasty warm jacket, too. While many people like to use a down jacket as a midlayer, it’s that only for me if it really, really cold. I wear the Microlight Alpine usually at camp over a shirt and midlayer, and thanks to the DWR coating of the Pertex fabric it also withstands some rain and keeps the wind at bay.

So after a day of being carried around, being put on in breaks throughout the day, the down jacket comes on as soon as I arrive at camp. If it is raining I will put the Microlight Alpine on and put my hardshell over it, though even when it has Hydrophobic Down I don’t want to wet out the down jacket. I’ll potter around camp with the jacket on, usually taking photos and videos till late at night when the conditions are good, and then get to sleep. That’s where the Rab Microlight Alpine Jacket can perform it’s third crucial task: Rolled together into the hood it makes for a comfortable pillow. I stopped carrying a pillow several years ago and now always use a puffy insulation garment for that task, and the Microlight Alpine makes for a comfortable and warm pillow to rest my head on.

The Microlight Alpine has not one, not two, no, it has three zippered pockets. Hallelujah! I love zippered pockets. There’s so many down jackets which have no zippered pockets - and while that saves weight I always find that a shortcoming. Zippered pockets mean you can not lose the things you put in them (if you remember to close the zipper!) and especially if I am out taking photos or videos that is so useful. In them pockets I can store my remote, filters, cables and other things, without needing to worry that they drop out when I scramble around to look for a better perspective.

Now the Microlight Alpine has a hood, and it is a good and warm one. It has a brim and peak and both are really well implemented in my opinion, they let you see everything but keep possible snow or rain out of your face. The only thing which I find not super is that the adjustment cords are on the inside of the jacket, I prefer these on the outside as it makes it easier to adjust them. On the inside there is also a fleece lining around the area of your chin and neck, which feels much better against the skin as a cold zipper.

Could be better

Well, I always could do with an even lighter jacket - maybe one which is filled with 1000 cuin down and is made from a 7D fabric?! Seriously though, I find it slightly annoying that the adjustment cords for the hood and hem are on the inside of the jacket, which for me means I need to adjust them with the jacket open. On the plus side, if you do this at home when you get the jacket, and not at -10°C in a freezing cold wind, you probably will be fine! Sometimes it also feels that the jacket needs a wee bit long to loft (that the down decompresses) but I don’t think this has a huge impact of the warmth - at least I always felt warm as soon as I put it on.

Bottomline

Throughout the last ten years I have used many down garments, though I often tend to come back to those favourites when I can. The Rab Microlight Alpine Jacket has already become such a favourite - it is toasty warm, packs compact and is light. It looks good on photos which for my work is pretty important, too. The three zippered pockets are wonderful, and if it is only to have my hands out of the cold wind. When I head out on a photo shoot this is an essential piece along from autumn till spring, and it will find it’s way into my backpack year-around when I go out backpacking where it also performs well as a pillow. It has the freedom of movement to also allow me to go ice climbing and ski-touring in it, so I will try that this winter with it, too - after all, it is made for the alpine!

More photos in the Flickr Album.

Where to buy it

At a recommended retail price of 230€/ $250 it is priced similarly like other jackets in this category, but you can regularly find it with a good discount here and there. If you need a new down jacket and want to support me, buy via one of these affiliate links and I will get a small commission from your purchase, at no extra costs for you. In North America you can but the Microlight Alpine at Backcountry, Campsaver and REI, while in Europe you can get it at Alpinetrek.co.uk and at Bergfreunde or check the Widget underneath to find another Retailer:

Disclosure: There are affiliate links in this article to help finance the website. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on affiliate links & blogger transparency.

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Hiking in Finland by Hendrik Morkel - 3M ago

Autumn is my favourite backpacking time and in October I was fortunate enough to go backpacking in the Pyrenees. Along for this one week long trip through three countries was the Osprey Exos 48, a lightweight pack which carries extremely well.

Disclosure: This article has been supported financially and with gear from Osprey. As you know: I’m keepin’ it real and tell you how it is - I maintain full editorial control of the content published on Hiking in Finland. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on affiliate links & blogger transparency.

tl;dr

The Osprey Exos 48 is a lightweight backpack which carries loads up to 15 kg very comfortable. I found the 48 l of Volume enough for a week long backpacking trip with all my camera gear and Drone and think it would be an ideal backpack for people who look for a lighter backpack which doesn’t brake the bank. For all the details watch the video and read the review.

Osprey Exos 48 Backpack REVIEW - YouTube
Time

I received my Osprey Exos 48 in January 2018 and have used it on a several day trips and a week long backpacking trip in the Pyrenees of Andorra, Spain and France. Overall it has been used for close to two weeks.

Function

The function of a backpack is to carry your gear in comfort from A to B. The idea behind a lightweight backpack is that it isn’t weighing 2+ kg empty, but significantly less, making the hiking part of a trip more comfortable. The backpack also should protect your gear from the elements and allow fast & easy access to important pieces of gear which you need on the go.

Features

Straight from Osprey’s Website, here are the features of the Exos 48:

  • AirSpeed™ ventilated trampoline suspended mesh backpanel
  • ExoForm™ mesh hipbelt and harness
  • Stow-on-the-Go™ trekking pole attachment
  • FlapJacket™ top cover for use without lid
  • Internal hydration sleeve + Compatible with Hydraulics™ and Hydraulics™ LT Reservoir
  • Light weight peripheral frame
  • Removable sleeping pad straps
  • Single ice axe loop
  • Removable top pocket with mesh pocket and key clip
  • Sternum strap with emergency whistle
  • Stretchy front + side pockets

Technical Innovations

There’s for me no technical innovations in this pack, though as the Exos came out several years ago it was one of the first lightweight backpacks with a ventilated back panel, and also the Stow-on-the-Go trekking pole attachment system was innovative back then.

Quality

It is a very well made pack that surely will keep you happy for many, many hiking & backpacking seasons to come, and the 48 l Volume pack is great if you’re looking for one backpack which does it all - from day trips to one week long hikes in the backcountry.

Weight

My Osprey Exos 48 in Back length L weighs 1.185 g empty, and the removable lid is 120 g.

In use

So I have used the Exos 48 on my seven day backpacking trip through Andorra, Spain and France where I carried around 17 kg of weight at the start of the hike, that was with water, food for 7 days and around 6 kg of camera gear. It’s a lot of weight and as someone who really doesn’t like to carry heavy loads seeing that number is scary. However, the reality was that it was not so bad. In part the ExoForm shoulder straps and hipbelt are responsible for that, because they are so damn comfortable that even such a heavy load was acceptable to carry. With every meal consumed the pack also got lighter and hence it got easier and more comfortable to carry the backpack. The difference between the Levity and Exos I have shown in an article in the spring and now, after a lot of use of both packs, I have to say that I find the Exos for my needs the better pack, even if it is 400 g heavier.

What makes it better for me is not just the additional volume of the pack (that 3 l extra of the Exos means I can carry my camera gear a lot easier inside the pack!), but especially the Stretchy Side Pockets of the Exos which are making it for me more useable. My friend Martin bought the Levity 60 after he read my review in the spring, but also the production model of that pack had not very stretchy side pockets (something that I complained about in my Levity review) and so I usually had to give him his water bottle and stow it away again. That’s not a problem if you hike with a friend, but if you hike Solo then it means stopping, taking the pack off, getting your water, packing it back and then putting the rucksack on again. With the Exos I can get everything in the side pockets while I move, which I really love.

I also feel that the little bit of extra volume of the Exos makes it more versatile pack for most people. The 48 l pack can be used on day hikes and on one-week long backpacking trips, and also people who just start out with lightweight backpacking and own more bulky & heavier gear will find it easier to get it in the Exos and carry it in more comfort. I also liked that there were two lid pockets - that meant for me more organization as I could stow less important things like my Passport and keys, which I still want to keep close, in the Mesh pocket, while the more important stuff - phone, wallet, map, spare battery - goes in the top pocket. Funnily enough I’m flexible enough to also open and close the top lid pocket, which allows me to access the things in there with the backpack on my shoulders.

The Airspeed backpanel, compression straps, Ice Axe loop and other features of the Exos work well, and the pack also is highly water-resistant - at least during rain and snow all the content stayed dry, also without a rain cover. The material is durable and one doesn’t need to treat the pack super-carefully, and the shoulder straps accept the Peak Design Capture Clip just fine (it’s a tight fit, but it goes on there).

Could be better

I’d take the flap off which protects the drawcord closure of the main compartment when one doesn’t want to use the lid pocket. That probably will make the pack around 25 g lighter, and it won’t get in the way when one uses the lid.

Bottomline

At 1.185 g in Size L the Osprey Exos is a fantastic backpack for people who come from a more traditional approach of backpacking & who are lightening up their load or for ultralight backpackers who want to have a backpack which carries really comfortably. The thick ExoForm shoulder straps make carrying loads of up to 15 kg an enjoyable affair, though the lighter the pack the more comfy it will be. I feel the ideal weight is around 12 kg with kit, food and water for this pack, so if that’s your usual weight with consumables you probably really will enjoy this pack. I liked the spacious and easy to access stretchy side pockets, the front pocket can swallow a lot of gear, and the two lid pockets helped me with keeping my stuff organized. I didn’t miss Hipbelt pockets at all, and could have done without the lid flap and Stow-on-the-Go trekking pole attachment thingy as I rarely use poles and always will use the lid, but other than that I found it an amazing pack. Add in that it’s fairly easy to find it for around 150€ or less and you’ll understand why it is such a popular backpack!

Where to buy it

Get the Exos at your favourite local Osprey Retailer or online at Bergfreunde and Alpinetrek.co.uk in Europe. In North America order it at Backcountry.com (currently 25% off!), REI, CampSaver.com, Moosejaw and Summit Hut. This are Affiliate Links.

Disclosure: There are affiliate links in this article to help finance the website. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on affiliate links & blogger transparency.

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The most absurd shopping week of the year is starting, and I think you should not buy anything.

(Look who is talking, right?!)

Lets be realistic: Unless you started with the hobby of backpacking, climbing, packrafting or trailrunning just last weekend you likely own already everything you need. And if you were hiking for the first time in your life this month - well, the garments and pack you wore are just fine for the next three hiking weekends at least. So in stead of investing your hard earned €$£ over the next weeks into things you very likely don’t need, invest it into something good. Support a NGO like Protect our Winters or 1% For The Planet, go eat out with your friends or family, or use that money to go on a trip (Here you can find some inspiration). Hell, you even could become a Patreon of this website and support my writing, photography and videos!

Saying no to bargains and shiny new gear is hard (as you can see above, I have had a hard time in the past). If you absolutely have to shop I’d appreciate if you use any of the following affiliate links. These have ZERO extra costs for you and I get a wee commission from your purchase. There’s a wide list of possibilities, from shopping at your favourite flavour of Amazon, to more specialised stores like evo and Alpinetrek.co.uk where you can shop for high-quality equipment & garments and support me at the same time. So, in no particular order, if you get the shopping bug and want to do something good to me without any extra costs to you, use these links for your Black Friday/ Cyber Monday/ Holiday shopping:

Or if you need some inspiration, check out some of my favourite backpacking gear:

Thank you!

How much did you spent on your last piece of outdoor gear? And how much did you support your favourite blogs in the last months? If you enjoy The Week in Review & other articles buy me a coffee - I work Full-Time on Hiking in Finland to bring you inspiring trip reports, in-depth gear reviews and the latest news from the outdoors. You also could subscribe to the rarer-than-ever Newsletter and follow along on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Youtube for more outdoorsy updates!

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Hiking in Finland by Hendrik Morkel - 3M ago

Through red shrubbery/ up the empty mountain/ good I sleep

How much did you spent on your last piece of outdoor gear? And how much did you support your favourite blogs in the last months? If you enjoy The Week in Review & other articles buy me a coffee - I work Full-Time on Hiking in Finland to bring you inspiring trip reports, in-depth gear reviews and the latest news from the outdoors. You also could subscribe to the rarer-than-ever Newsletter and follow along on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and Youtube for more outdoorsy updates!

Outdoor News

Excuse the long-ish break, I was outdoors and had technical problems. Now’ I’m back home for a while and will catch up with blogging and videos!

Chris Townsend is remembering Peter Hutchinson, the man behind Mountain Equipment and PHD.

Alex finally shot an image he had been visualising for a long time. Congratulations!

There are not enough women at the E.O.F.T. - time to talk about this issue! [German]

Keith wrote about depression in his last book, and now he penned down 15 Steps to Help with Depression.

You now can buy Martin’s book Hoamatroas. [German]

How to go bouldering outdoors - but right.

It’s getting cold outside - time for Merino Wool Baselayers!

Get 20% Off One Full-Priced Item With Code: TAKE20NOVEMBER at Backcountry.com.

Get up to 30% off at the REI Gear Up Get Out Sale till 19th November, and members can save also 20% off one full price item.

Win the Black Diamond Recon Stretch Pants and Jacket.

And in this competition you can win googles, a helmet and some cool shades from Julbo!

If all you want is to travel then enter here and go to Tirol for five days and hike a glacier!

Finally, if you are more into backpacking then this Photo contest where you can win a pack and sleeping bag might be more up your alley.

Trip Reports

Jeremie’s Fall to Fall Journal is AMAZING - a must read & see.

Paulina was at the Calpine Fire Lookout.

Max takes us fishing on tributaries.

The “No Wainwrights” Lake District Backpack.

Winter is coming.

Ryan takes us along on his Altiplano Traverse.

Mark took Enni on an Overnighter in Nuuksio.

A Classic Tokyo Hike: Mt. Takao to Mt. Jinba.

Climbing in Squamish, British Columbia.

Salomon TV | Skier vs Drone - YouTube

Stephen returns to the GR10.

Sweet and Sauerland is a three-day bikepacking loop in the midwestern German region of Sauerland, and if you need a reason to take your bike to Germany this could be it!

Mark wrote a Beginners Guide to Multi-day Dirt Rides.

A family hike to the Großer Widderstein. [German]

Chad gives an update on his JMT thru-hike.

Remnants of Rosa.

Impressions from the Tahoe Rim Trail.

Climbing the Forbidden Mountain of the Caucasus.

Packrafting in Russia. [Spanish]

And Erika went out for a Hochtour-Hike & Fly to Obergurgl. [German]

A Testimony To Congress | Margaret Murie in Defense of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge - YouTube
Gear Reviews

I reviewed the Therm-A-Rest NeoAir Uberlite.

Agnieszka shares her favourite gear from her CDT thru-hike. [Polish]

Dennis tests the hamaka Hyperlight Hammock. [German]

Derek reviewed the Hammock Gear Netted Hammock.

Drew reviews the Arc’teryx Norvan LD Trail Shoes.

Andrew takes a look at the Altra Tusher boots.

Part 2 of the The Ultimate Alaska Backpacking Gear List looks at equipment like trekking poles, quilts and shelters.

Dan, Kim and Janine share their Outdoor Gear of the Year.

Gear Talk with Jason Klass is BACK! This time Jason looks atthe Supercat Alcohol Stove.

Disclaimer: There are affiliate links in this article to help finance the website. Read the Transparency Disclaimer for more information on affiliate links & blogger transparency.

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