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The Sunday Paper #268

July 14, 2019

Congratulations to Lou Ellen Plummer from North Carolina for winning last week’s giveaway. Thanks to everyone else for participating!

Paper of the Week: Peace Paper

Drew Matott, who runs Peace Paper Project is on Paper Talk this week! Like so many papermakers I talk to, Drew stumbled upon the medium by chance. Drew is the co-founder of Combat Paper and Peace Paper Project, programs which involve turning meaningful pieces of old clothing into handmade paper and works of art. We chat about the unique business model of Peace Paper and the most recent developments, including a DIY Hollander beater and St Pauli Paper, a new papermaking studio in Hamburg, Germany. Enjoy our conversation!

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In The Studio:

I’m making flax paper a few ways in the studio. I cooked a batch in a 20% solution of soda ash and then made flat sheets, flax leather (air dried, spritzed with water and then restraint dried) and watermarked flax paper. Now I have a second batch that I’m beating without cooking. What you see here is the raw (uncooked) flax almost finished in the beater. It is such a stringy fiber! I’m hoping to be able to pull thicker sheets with the raw stuff, and all of these papers will be available in my online paper sale next month!

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Papery Tidbits:

  • Santa Fe area peeps! I’ll be at the Gerald Peters Gallery, 1011 Paseo de Peralta, next Saturday, June 20th, at 2pm for an artist’s reception. Join me if you can!
  • I’m a member of the Craft Industry Alliance, and I can’t say enough about how much I get out of the organization: access to articles about running a business, a fantastic forum on facebook that always has multiple answers to my questions, and discounts which have paid for my membership! Learn more here.

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Growing Paper was born in Cape Town when Founder Roxanne Schumann was at a friend’s wedding and couldn’t help but feel bad about all of the beautiful wedding stationary that was going to waste because no one could keep it forever. This thought inspired Schumann to think of ways that paper could be reused, and the idea of seeded paper was born.

Seed paper labels and gift cards designed by Lize Beekman.

I love these giant flipbooks! A pair of enormous, solar-powered, steel-and-glass enclosed flipbooks designed by teenagers are now on display in Dumbo’s Pearl Street Triangle (my old stomping grounds). If you want to experience the moving pictures for yourself, bring a friend — one person needs to crank a handle on the side of the devices to let another enjoy the show.

Dumbo BID. Spin the wheel: To watch the flipbooks in action, on person must turn a handle on the side of each five-foot-high contraption.

Christine Aaron’s Memory Project is a fascinating installation that involved collecting memories from the Larchmont Mamaroneck, NY community. Some memories were written on specialty gampi paper, others were audio recorded, and the collective memories were woven into an audio and visual art installation exhibited at Mamaroneck Artists’ Guild in 2017. The resulting artwork represented a joining of voices, where both participants and the audience listened to, read and shared one another’s memories in the community they all call home. You can read and listen to the recorded memories here, and there’s also a catalog about the project.

“Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now” from the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery is on display through Aug. 25 at the Mississippi Museum of Art, and is the first major museum exhibition to explore the art form. The museum-curated companion exhibition, “A Closer Look: Silhouette Artists in Antebellum Mississippi,” highlights work by early 19th century “scissor artists” and their winter social-season visits to New Orleans, Natchez and Vicksburg. The article is fascinating in that it touches on racial and LGBTQ issues through the silhouette.

Unidentified Artist, “Flora and Bill of Sale,” 1796. cut paper on paperboard with pen and brown ink. Stratford Historical Society, Stratford, Conn. This work is part of “Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now” at the Mississippi Museum of Art.

You know I love paper and light. Check out Kiruma: an illuminated kirigami lamp of a Castle in the Sky.

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Featured this week in my Studio shop:

Playing With Paper, my films about paper, the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (now 1/2 price) and Handle With Care, an artist’s book.


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If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support!

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The Sunday Paper #267

July 7, 2019

Paper of the Week: RCWAMP Giveaway!

This month’s giveaway includes a “flock” of mini-origami cranes, four sheets of lokta paper in dark brown and cream, and a lovely floral picture frame with places to hold three pictures. This prize is generously donated by the Robert C. Williams Museum of American Papermaking in Atlanta, GA. Click here to enter!

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In the Studio: 

It was super fun to have Peter Thomas come through town last week! He and his wife Donna are the Wandering Book Artists and they drive this sweet caravan around the country for part of each year. Peter gave me this quick video tour.

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Papery Tidbits:

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Here’s an interesting perspective on the future of Japanese papermaking. It is a story about a 50-something Japanese man who studied business in Seattle and returned to Japan to continue making the thinnest Japanese paper.

Once indispensable for the daily life of Japanese, washi — literally ‘Japanese paper’ — was used not only for writing and painting but also for sliding doors, room dividers, lampshades and umbrellas. (AFP/Kazuhiro Nogi)

I love upcycling! Allegra Murray turns sentimental book pages, sheet music, maps and letters into handmade paper roses.

If you’re in Paris, an exhibition on the art of paper funeral offerings in Taiwan is on view at the Quai Branly Museum through October 27th. Burning papier-mache vehicles, houses and other objects for the deceased to use in the afterlife is part of Taiwan’s traditional funeral rites.

Paper offerings in the form of furniture and appliances are displayed in the living room of a “ghost house” at the “Palace Paradis” exhibition at the Quai Branly Museum in Paris. Photo: CNA

From roses to handmade houseplants, these are prettier and more pc than plastic plants. Corrie Beth Hogg shows you how to make them in her book, The Handmade Houseplant.

This blog post is plant-centric, so I’ll stick to the theme. Here’s a beautiful video of a really cool book: The Book that Grew.

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Featured this week in my Studio shop:

More plants! Papermaking with Garden Plants & Common Weeds, the Paper Weaving Online Class, the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (now 1/2 price) and Vertices, an artist’s book.


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If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends!

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The Sunday Paper #266

June 30, 2019

Paper of the Week: Kraft Tex Paper

Is it paper or cloth? It’s hard to get the specs on what kraft tex is made of, but it is a papery material that you can throw in your washing machine! It comes on a bolt, like fabric, and it feels like something between paper and leather. It cuts more like paper than cloth and can be stitched by hand or in a sewing machine. This image shows one of the upcoming projects (a reusable book cover with pockets) in the Twelve Months of Paper project book (new name to be revealed soon). That cute penguin paper clip is made of paper too! Kraft tex is available in fabric stores and online.

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Intern In the Studio: 

It’s fun to have an intern in the studio from time to time. Tino Ward is here for two weeks. He’s making a dent in my scrap box by collaging decorative papers onto large handmade cotton/abaca base sheets.

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Papery Tidbits:

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This a nice profile of Tim Barrett, a professor at the University of Iowa, author of Japanese Papermaking & European Papermaking Techniques, and recipient of a MacArthur Award. I had a lovely conversation with Tim a few years ago that you can listen to on Paper Talk. Tim has mentored many students through the Center for the Book at the University of Iowa, and here’s a story about one of his students, Isabella Myers, who received a Fulbright grant to travel to Cambodia to study and re-create century-old manuscripts.

Director of The Center for the Book Timothy Barrett shifts paper pulp during a paper-making demonstration at the Center for the Book in North Hall on June 18, 2019. Graduate students were shown how to shift pulp to create sheets of paper. (Katie Goodale/The Daily Iowan)

15-year old Teddy McRitchie’s In Bloom design won the Youth Award at Wearable Art Mandurah in Australia. His design features a cotton dress that opens up into a half circle and has about 225 handmade paper flowers and about 445 handmade paper leaves.

Teddy McRitchie’s In Bloom design won the Youth Award at Wearable Art Mandurah.

Check out these cute Japanese tea bags that come alive in your cup! Ocean Teabag has come up with 50 clever designs.

This is a lovely video documentary of “Living Quilt for Santa Rosa“, a public art project by artist Jane Ingram Allen that shows progress of the “quilt” from the installation of sheets of paper with embedded seeds to blooming flowers over a six-month period.

I have to admit, as a child of the TV generation, I find it challenging to bury myself in a book, but I enjoyed this article about the pros of reading a physical book. “To open a book is to meditate. I’m alone with the author. There are no pop up ads to compete with the narrative; no phone calls to interrupt a unique voice systematically unfolding its story…” I have to admit, as a child of the TV generation, I find it challenging to bury myself in a book.

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Featured this week in my Studio shop:

My artist’s book, Tangential, the Paper Weaving Online Class, the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (now 1/2 price) and a video tutorial on how to make Party Lights.


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If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends!

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The Sunday Paper #265

June 23, 2019

Paper of the Week: Papillon Papers

I recently interviewed the proprietors of Papillon Papers on Paper Talk (see below). Here you see one of their beautiful old/new designs. They cut the block and hand printed a design they resurrected from the 18th century on Indian cotton rag handmade paper.

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In the Studio: Madeleine & Vernon Wiering on Paper Talk

Vernon & Madeleine Weiring, a father-daughter team based in Grand Rapids, Michigan, recently launched their company Papillon Papers. I fell in love with some of the gorgeous decorated papers I’ve seen on their website and wanted to learn more about them, especially after reading that they call themselves design archeologists – how cool is that? – they dig through the past to find designs and decorated papers and resurrect them. In this episode we talk about how they look through old books, mostly from the 19th century, seeking decorative end paper designs that appeal to them, and then bring theses sheets that have been hidden under the covers of old books back to life! Listen to our conversation to find out how they are doing this.

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Papery Tidbits:

  • Click here to watch the video trailer and learn more about my Paper Weaving online class. I have a few supply kits left (or use up some of your paper stash!) and will begin shipping those later this week. Class runs July 10th – August 14th, and a new lesson is delivered each Wednesday.
  • I’m a member of the Craft Industry Alliance, and I can’t say enough about how much I get out of the organization: access to articles about running a business, a fantastic forum on facebook that always has multiple answers to my questions, and discounts which have paid for my membership! Learn more here.

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Ryan Villamael uses paper cutting to investigate the nature of borders, the tactile representations of history, and the decay of civilizations. This one has to do with Manila, in the Philippines. Paper becomes a “paradise lost,” an overgrowth of leaves, an eloquent latticework of remnant cartography. Part of the installation is the play of light and shadow that expands and repeats the work.

Here’s what’s happening over in Club Paper: LeeAnn Meadows hosted a group who made the collapsible party lantern from my Paper Illuminated online class; Lucie Bee experimented with collaging & stitching paper and fabric; Jo Sparks made this hedgehog out of a book; and Sarah Morgan created this plaited paper basket. You can join Club Paper – there are 3 questions you have to answer to join the group – this keeps the spammers out.

Oh my goodness, these are too cute! I love the Japanese collapsible chochin lantern form and have experimented with it quite a bit. These caps are made by a chochin lantern-making business. They come complete with an adjustable leather strap and the use of natural materials give them a great amount of breathability, making them cool to wear on hot summer days.

The show Sheets of Paper closed awhile ago, but I find it’s premise so interesting. Three artists took a 5′ x 7′ sheet of paper and turned it into a work of art. Talk about a blank canvas! Squire Broel created his charcoal drawing on the floor and then decided to install it in the same fashion.

This is a great article about The Japanese Paper Place, a retail shop in Toronto specializing in, you guessed it, Japanese papers.

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Featured this week in my Studio shop:

Learn how to make a shadow ornament, the Paper Weaving Online Class, the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (now 1/2 price) and LandEscape, an artist’s book.


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If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends!

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Helen Hiebert Studio Blog by Helen - 2w ago

The Sunday Paper #264

June 16, 2019

Congratulations to Selena Dixon from Dallas for winning last week’s giveaway. Thanks to everyone else for participating!

Happy Father’s Day! Both of my kiddos are traveling home this weekend, and I reminded them to bring home a little something for their pop. A string of texts ensued, with one saying they were going to one-up the other in terms of gift giving. This certainly wasn’t my intention, but it made me think about how much joy we get from giving (and she’s actually bringing him something he requested, so I think she had the advantage… if this is a competition).

Paper of the Week: Washi

The word washi comes from wa meaning ‘Japanese’ and shi meaning ‘paper’. Washi is made using fibers from the inner bark of the paper mulberry (kozo) bush, the gampi tree, or the mitsumata shrub. As the number of producers of washi dwindles in Japan, my hope is that interest in the unique papers will grow. Sukey Hughes spent a few years in Japan back in the 1970’s and wrote an amazing book called Washi, the World of Japanese Paper in which she documented a wide variety of papers that were still being made by hand back then. There are several companies that import Japanese papers to North America, and I’ve promoted many of them on this blog. The papers you see below are from Washi Arts and show the custom paper pack for my upcoming Paper Weaving online class. I love introducing participants to new papers, but I always encourage them to incorporate their own papers to create unique weavings.

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In the Studio: Paper Weaving Online Class

I’ve painted the floor in my studio and rearranged! I’ve purged quite a bit, but am still amazed at how much stuff I have. Next week, I’ll share some pictures.


Earlybird pricing for Paper Weaving ends tomorrow (June 17th)! Click here to watch the video trailer and learn more about this online class. If you’re thinking of joining us and want to order the paper kit, tomorrow is also the deadline for that, or if you prefer to use your own papers, you can register right up until class begins. Class runs July 10th – August 14th, and a new lesson is delivered each Wednesday.

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Papery Tidbits:

  • I’m a member of the Craft Industry Alliance, and I can’t say enough about how much I get out of the organization: access to articles about running a business, a fantastic forum on facebook that always has multiple answers to my questions, and discounts which have paid for my membership! Learn more here.

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Speaking of Japanese paper, Kurotani is a village in Japan where paper has been made for centuries. It’s a place that you can visit and try your hand at making paper yourself.

Here’s an interesting off-shoot of Combat Paper’s process of having veterans turn their uniforms into sheets of handmade paper. Desiree Hagen is turning the clothing of loved ones who have passed away into handmade sheets that she’ll create portraits on. What an interesting and loving way to go through the grieving process. 

Ryan Gary creates paste-up street art murals that dot the Walla Walla Valley in Washington State. He uses wallpaper paste, construction paper, gold glitter paper, painted paper, and photocopied drawings that he tears apart. This piece (which caught my attention) was applied to fencing on the Whitman College campus just before Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

These paper parachutes sound very practical (although you wouldn’t catch me using one – I don’t enjoy the feeling of falling – but they aren’t meant for human use). Natalie Yam, a 12th grader at the Anglo-Chinese School in Singapore, is working on a parachute design to carry light packages for disaster relief. Since these types of parachutes are generally meant for single use, paper is strong enough and it degrades naturally (compared to nylon). Sounds like a win win to me.

This is a pretty incredible story about how Gao Guangli, who was born with cerebral palsy and is able to move only his mouth, makes a living and holds a Guinness world record for his origami.

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Featured this week in my Studio shop:

Playing With Paper, the Paper Weaving Online Class, the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (now 1/2 price) and Handle With Care, an artist’s book.


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If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends!

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The Sunday Paper #263

June 9, 2019

Paper of the Week: Origami Paper Giveaway

The June project in the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar is an origami Candy Dish, designed by Trinity Adams of Paper For Water. This giveaway features a selection of origami papers that are printed with Japanese chiyogami paper patterns on one side, and a matching color on the other side. It also includes an origami candy dish, the June project in the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar. Click here to enter the giveaway – the entry form doesn’t always appear on mobile, so try  your desktop if you’re having issues.

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In the Studio: Paper Weaving Online Class

Paper Weaving is now open for registration! Click here to watch the video trailer and learn more about this online class. Turn your decorative papers into paper weavings (or purchase the supply kit when you register). Class runs July 10th – August 14th, and a new lesson is delivered each Wednesday. If you’d like to learn more, I’m hosting a free webinar on June 11th at 11am PST (info at the link).

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Papery Tidbits:

  • Remember the Science Friday segment I mentioned about DNA in books (specifically in the animal parchment used in old books)? A reader sent me this fascinating article about DNA collected from the crumbs produced from rubbing old books with erasers.
  • Have you listened to my recent podcast interview with Sarah Horowitz?
  • The Rhinoceros Project is still collecting funds to create a life-size watermarked sheet of paper using an embroidered cloth as the mould surface.

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Origami is making waves in so many arenas. Spacecraft, cars and people’s heads could be better protected against dangerous impacts thanks to an origami-inspired ‘metamaterial’ that creates a “counterintuitive” response to forces.

A paper model of a metamaterial that uses folding creases to soften impact forces and instead promote forces that relax stresses (Credit: Kiyomi Taguchi/ University of Washington)

Check out these interesting paper collages (connected with paper pins!) by Frida Orupabo, who is interested in how people see, and how the ways of seeing influence perception of such things as race, sexuality, gender or family. 

Frida Orupabo, “Untitled” (2018) collage with paper pins mounted on aluminum 139.7 x 116.8 cm

Who knew? In 1958, when photographer Inge Morath arrived at Saul Steinberg’s apartment to make a portrait, he came to the door wearing a mask he had fashioned from nothing more than a brown paper bag and a marker. Over the next several years, they collaborated on the Masquerade series of portraits (which became a book in 2000), inviting friends and colleagues to pose for Morath wearing Steinberg’s playful, deceptively simple disguises.

Saul Steinberg + Inge Morath

Sometimes you have to see something in person. I’d like to know more about this Fenlajian paper that’s made in China and seems to be coated with gold leaf. This reminds me of Elaine & Donna Koretsky’s book, The Goldbeater’s of Mandalay, an account of a remarkable bamboo paper, made entirely by hand, for use in the goldbeating process. Perhaps there’s a connection.

It looks like paper towels became a thing in the 1930’s, but this article has some clever ways to use fewer of them (including what came before – cloth napkins).

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Featured this week in my Studio shop:

Playing With Paper, the Paper Weaving Online Class, the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (now 1/2 price) and Handle With Care, an artist’s book.


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If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends!

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The Sunday Paper #262

June 2, 2019

Paper of the Week: Double Sided Origami Paper

When I was in Korea about 10 years ago, I went to an amazing paper store in Seoul that had more origami paper than I could even imagine. I’m guessing there are shops like that in Japan (I’m finally planning to visit in 2020 to attend the IAPMA Congress). But I digress… it is June and today I’m featuring a specialty origami paper from the June project in the 2019 Twelve Months of Paper Calendar. The papers in this pack of 6.25″ square sheets feature traditional chiyogami prints, and the fact that they are double-sided really enhances this project!

The project is a candy dish, designed by 9-year old Trinity Adams of Paper For Water. She told me how  sat down on a rock while traveling and tried to fold a fortune teller (you remember those things you folded in grade school)? Well, she made a mistake and invented this candy dish instead!

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In the Studio: Sarah Horowitz on Paper Talk

My recent interview with Sarah Horowitz is now on the podcast. Sarah and I have been accountability buddies for several years now, talking weekly about business-related issues. Sarah is a printmaker based in Leavenworth, Washington, who also makes drawings and artist’s books. We talk about how her parents fostered her artistic interests by always providing her with access to materials and art classes as she was growing up. She attended Hampshire College in Massachussetts, where she ended up focusing on printmaking. After college, she honed her printmaking skills at studios in Switzerland and Scotland before returning to the Northeast, where she got involved with the book arts community. Eventually, she ended up on the West Coast when she was looking for a community print shop to work in. She tells me how she discovered there were more papers to print on than Rives BFK, and we discuss one of her artist’s book projects in detail, which involved custom handmade paper. Sarah talks about the reciprocal process of printing on paper, as she explores how the paper responds to her imagery and the ink, and how her plates print on the surface of the sheet. We also have a long discussion about how she pigments and sizes Japanese papers to obtain the exact colors she wants and the tooth that allows her pen to glide smoothly across the surface for her drawings. Enjoy our conversation!

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Papery Tidbits:

  • Did you listen to Science Friday this week? There was a segment about parchment (pre-paper made from animal skins) and how a researcher came up with the idea of studying the DNA in books! I can’t find it at the link (but I know I heard it), so you may have to listen to the whole episode.
  • Rachel Hazell’s PaperLove online ecourse begins June 17th. Click through to find instructions for a Five Minute Artist Book and get a taste for the kind of things you will learn in the PaperLove ecourse. As a reader of The Sunday Paper, you will receive a 10% discount (enter code NEWIDEAS at checkout).

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A couple of years ago, I had the pleasure of making a few stitches on the Rhinoceros Project, Anne Beck and Michelle Wilson’s life-size watermark of Albrecht Durer’s “Rhinoceros.” Nearly six hundred people, of all ages and walks of life, have contributed stitches. Now complete, they are seeking funds to create the finale of the project: a life-size watermarked sheet of paper created using the embroidered cloth as the mould surface. When complete, the two works will be companion pieces, suggestion presence and absence, and the slight of rhinoceros species today. Read more and help them reach their goal here. I encourage you to take a peek at the budget on the fundraising page. Projects like this really do cost money to execute!

Check out this flag made of crocheted crepe paper. It is 33″ x 55″ and signed by Meta Schmitt of Oklahoma in about 1936. The 48-star flag was probably made to display at a patriotic gathering, like a Fourth of July or a “Welcome Home Soldier” party.

Someone entered a Massachusetts home and cleaned it, leaving these toilet paper roses as a parting gift. Does that count as breaking and entering? I’d be happy if that happened to me!
My friend Jenny Pinto is the creator behind Oorjaa in Bangalore, India. We spent a month together in 2000 when she was an intern in my Portland studio. I remember testing the banana fiber she brought form India and comparing it to the abaca I had (from the Philippines). Jenny runs a papermaking studio that pumps out a lovely range of illuminated paper pieces. It has been such fun to watch it bloom through the years.

Click through to watch and listen to this animated + super sweet scroll book, called a crankie, by Sarah Gowan.

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Featured this week in my Studio shop:

Papermaking with Plants, a Package of 3 Films that you can download, the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (now 1/2 price) and Alpha, Beta, …, an artist’s book.


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If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends!

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The Sunday Paper #261

May 26, 2019

Paper of the Week: Paper In the Field

My friend and colleague Andrea Peterson has a new book out, called In The Field (available via this link or by calling Hook Pottery Paper at 219.362.9478). Andrea has been living and working with plant fibers she grows and collects for over 20 years on her farm in northwest Indiana.

The book is a quick read and an asset for any papermaking studio. I love how she describes cutting fiber in the field: “I use a European scythe custom fit to my body to cut down an area of phragmites, but a corn knife or machete will do just as well. Papermaking is a very physical activity. Use the tool that fits the task and does not wear on the body in an uncomfortable or harmful way. Keep tools sharp and well cared for and they will be your best friends.” The book is filled with many other words of wisdom about gathering, cooking, beating, sheet forming, pressing and drying sheets of plant paper. If you like learning in person, Andrea is hosting an In the Field: A Professional Natural Fiber Papermaking Workshop in her studio this June.

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In the Studio

Twelve projects are designed and a selection of unique papers have been selected for the 2020 Twelve Months of Paper project book and custom paper pack. I’m busy writing instructions and taking photos of the projects. Which ones look intriguing to you?

Top: Architectural lantern, Cubicard by Lore Spivey, Pop-Up Groundhog by Marianne Petit, Batik Lantern. Middle: Origami Card, Criss-Cross Accordion Lantern, Needle Book by Hedi Kyle & Ulla Warchol, One-sheet Tree. Bottom: Handmade Heart, Woven Notecard, Floral Strip Book, Notebook with Pockets.

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Papery Tidbits:

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There’s some fun sharing going on over in Club Paper. Carol Rue made her son’s wedding invitations, Jo sparks created a paper bouquet, and Elizabeth Teviotdale shared her accordion book, which was part of the The Illustrated Accordion exhibition at the Kalamazoo Book Arts Center.

Congrats to The Morgan Conservatory for receiving its first NEA grant! The grant will support a six-month-long artist apprenticeship program. The conservatory will invite two artists, Hong Hong and Claudio Orso-Gaicone, to create new work and act as mentors to engage Northeast Ohioans through hands-on art-making activities. Hong (pictured below) and Orso-Gaicone will also provide adult studio workshops and offsite community arts workshops, give artist talks and exhibit work during their residency.

What is this guy doing? Why he’s participating in a paper airplane competition in Salzburg, Austria. Who knew there were such events? For one weekend only, competitors were out to see who could launch their “fighter aircraft” the furthest, loop the loop most spectacularly, or keep their plane in the air the longest.

Paper, scissors and… a bit of glue is all competitors can use to produce their “aircraft” (AFP Photo/ALEX HALADA)

After the 2013 publication of Nick Basbanes’ On Paper, book artist Tim Ely called the author and requested the unbound sheets of the book, just as they appeared off the press. Five years later (earlier this spring), the artist sent Basbanes a note saying the book was ready, and had it shipped to Massachusetts under the most careful of conditions. What a treat for the author!

Artist Tim Ely’s reimagined edition of Nick Basbanes’ book, On Paper. CREDIT: NICK BASBANES

This is a really sweet NYT article: The Comeback of the Century: Why the Book Endures. It includes a reference to origami by Michelle Obama and Pat the Bunny, one of my children’s childhood favorites.

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Featured this week in my Studio shop:

Playing With Paper, Vertices, the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (now 1/2 price) and info about the Paper Weaving online class, which begins July 10th.


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If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support!

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The Sunday Paper #260

May 19, 2019

Paper of the Week: High Shrinkage Abaca

Here’s a photo of a collection of pieces in progress made from high shrinkage abaca. This fiber will never cease to amaze me, and I had a fun weekend sharing my love with a group in Boulder (read on).

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Out of the Studio

Last weekend I was in Boulder, teaching a workshop to members of the Handweavers Guild of Boulder. What a great group! The guild is over 50 years old, and they have a full week of activities every month, including meetings, a workshop and lectures. When they invited me, I thought I’d teach paper weaving, but they wanted to do papermaking. With all of the prepping and shlepping involved, I don’t take my papermaking show on the road very much these days. But high shrinkage abaca proved to be a suitable travel companion. My prius was packed to the gills with prepared pulp, buckets, Arnold Grummer’s moulds & deckles + their press, vats, pellons, and more. You get the picture! The workshop was held in the classroom area of a yarn shop, which was perfect, and we didn’t even get the mop out once.

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Papery Tidbits:

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PaperLove is an online ecourse with the lovely Rachel Hazell, whom I interviewed on Paper Talk a few months ago. Click through to find instructions for a Five Minute Artist Book and get a taste for the kind of things you will learn in the PaperLove ecourse. If you decide to sign up, enter the code NEWIDEAS. As a reader of The Sunday Paper, you will receive a 10% discount! This ecourse begins June 17th.

If you are in Charleston, SC, this looks like an amazing show. The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art presents a solo exhibition by Jennifer Wen Ma that investigates the history and social landscape of Charleston, including a series of community dinners featuring performances and guided conversations. I love this description: “One must then push through a flower portal reminiscent of a botanical birth canal, emerging from darkness into the garden of light.”

(Image Courtesy of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art)

I was delighted to find a new (to me) source for handmade paper wedding invitations and other paper paraphernalia at the tail end of this article, which contains lots of pics of her product! Share Studios, run by Stephanie Hare, is located in Philadelphia and her website is lovely too. The writer did a lovely job of crediting all of the people involved – you can even find out about the calligrapher, printer, and where they got their wax seals and special stamps (and so much more).

I thoroughly enjoyed Anderson Cooper’s interview with Mark Bradford on 60 Minutes, about his life and his work with paper.

Artist Mark Bradford shows Anderson Cooper one of his pieces

I also found this paper performance by Aïdée Bernard calming and beautiful.

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Featured this week in my Studio shop:

LandEscape, The Papermaker’s Companion

 the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (now 1/2 price) and info about Paper Weaving.


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If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends!

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The Sunday Paper #259

Congratulations to Ashisha from Santa Fe for winning last week’s giveaway. Thanks to everyone else for participating!

May 12, 2019

Paper of the Week: Japanese Linen
Happy Mother’s Day to each and every one of you; if you aren’t a mother, you have a mother! It’s May, and we are still having snow storms here in the high country. Have you created this month’s Twelve Months of Paper Project? It’s an Architectural Tree that I designed for the 2019 how-to book.
This design is cut out of a single sheet of Japanese linen card stock. The only thing that gets removed are the little punched out stars.This paper comes in a variety of colors and two weights, and I love the texture! You can find it through Mulberry Paper and More or Washi Arts.

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In the Studio: Nancy Cohen on Paper Talk

I had the pleasure of interviewing Nancy Cohen on the podcast. Nancy is a New Jersey artist who was introduced to handmade paper during a residency program at Dieu Donne Papermill in New York City in the early 1990’s. She became entranced with paper as a material, and she talks about the similarities and differences she finds between paper and glass, a material she also works with. Nancy creates all of her work without a papermaking studio – she brings wet sheets that she makes at Dieu Donne back to her own studio – and she is pushing the medium in really interesting ways. We discuss the life cycles of her installations, which she often exhibits multiple times, her pulp drawings that were recently on view in NYC, and how she helped her son and daughter-in-law create their handmade paper wedding invitations gorilla style. Have a listen!

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Papery Tidbits:

  • Awagami Mill in Japan has a residency program in the fall of 2019. I am tempted to apply!
  • The Women’s Studio Workshop is raising funds for a parent residency grant. What an appropo cause to donate to today! Will you join me?
  • I’m currently seeking a sponsor for each month of the Twelve Months of Paper. Contact me if you are interested in promoting your company in the book, on this blog and on Paper Talk.

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You’ll see the paper wedding dress if you click the last link, but these paper gowns made by first year Design Formation students at Langara Collegeare in Vancouver are pretty impressive!

Dutch artist Bob Matthysen makes some incredible forms with abaca! I enjoyed this video about his work, even though I don’t speak Dutch. Follow him on facebook to keep up with his latest paperings.

© 2019 Bob Matthysen

I love this new book by Ioana Stoian, called The A–Z of Motherhood. Within the pages, there are 26 words that map the first two years of her adventure as a new mother. Each page of handmade paper is dyed with the color that corresponds to its specific word, amplifying the energy of the emotions, and the range of colors are highlighted in the unique piano hinge binding.

© 2018, Ioana Stoian

Has this show traveled to your area? The Asian Lantern Festival is taking over parks and zoos across the country and showing off thousands of colorful handmade paper lanterns in open, green spaces. Next up: Cleveland. This must be a sight to behold at night!

And last, but certainly not least! Check it out, a wedding dress made from paper!

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Featured this week in my Studio shop:

50 Revolutions (my artist’s book about motherhood), The Papermaker’s Companion

 the Twelve Months of Paper Calendar (now 1/2 price) and a Panel Shade online class.


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If you read this blog regularly, would you consider making a donation to support the research, writing, design and delivery of The Sunday Paper? Click on the paper button at the left to learn how. Or, perhaps you’re interested in promoting your business in The Sunday Paper.

Thanks to everyone who has already pledged your support!

SHARE THIS blog post with your paper-loving friends!

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