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Heatlie Barbecues by Alex - 4M ago

From pancakes and pizza to baked seafood, slow-cooked roasts and even lasagne, today’s barbecues can be used to cook just about any meal – not to mention the traditional chops and snags. But have you considered using your barbecue to whip up dessert?

Barbecues that feature a stainless steel hotplate, such as Heatlie’s Island Gourmet Elite, are ideal for cooking dessert, though be sure to clean the barbecue plate before cooking the sweet stuff so the flavours don’t mix!

In-season fruit is a great option for cooking on the barbecue, particularly fruits that hold together well, such as peaches, apricots, nectarines, banana and pineapple.   Fresh fruit sautéed lightly on the hotplate, served with ice-cream or marscapone, or drizzled with chocolate, is a super-tasty and easy-to-prepare barbecue dessert that has plenty of wow factor.

Fruit skewers are a good option for kids – simply assemble your chosen fruit on the skewer, lightly sprinkle with sugar and gently cook until golden brown. However, when barbecuing fruit be sure to use sugar and sweet marinades with caution – though the high sugar content helps with caramelisation, if overdone it can cause the fruit to burn.

For a quick, delicious dessert that will impress your guests cook in-season stone fruit with the barbecue hood down until the fruit softens, then sprinkle with vanilla sugar and serve with mascarpone. Believe it or not, you can even cook a pudding in the roaster. My family loves a sticky date pudding cooked on the barbie – though you to prepare the dates and sauce on a regular cooktop, the pudding itself can be cooked on the hotplate with the roasting hood down.

Dessert pizzas are another popular option that translates well to the barbecue, particularly if you have a barbie with a solid steel hotplate as it provides a great surface for cooking. Simply roll your dough (either homemade or from your local Italian deli) to fit your pizza tray then experiment with sweet flavours like strawberries drizzled with chocolate sauce, melon and marscapone or finely chopped apple sprinkled with brown sugar and cinnamon.

Finally, for a cheat’s barbecue dessert, simply warm up store bought brioche, waffles, pancakes or donuts on the hotplate and served with whipped cream.

I hope these ideas will inspire you to incorporate dessert into your next barbecue. Why not try our recipe below created by Heatlie ambassador and ex-Masterchef finalist, Laura Cassai.

Andrea Mead

Owner, Heatlie Barbecues

 

Caramelized spiced pineapple with vanilla icecream

Makes 8

Ingredients:

  • 1 pineapple
  • 1/3 cup spiced mead
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ½ cup demerara sugar
  • Vanilla icecream

Method:

  • Top and tail the pineapple, then cut off the skin. Cut into quarters, de-core and cut the quarters in half again
  • Place the pineapple in a bowl and pour over the spiced mead and leave to sit for 10 minutes so the pineapple soaks up the mead
  • Roll the pineapple in the sugars and place on a skewer
  • Place on a preheated flattop bbq grill and cook for about 8 minutes, constantly turning, to ensure even caramalization.
  • Serve with a scoop of vanilla icecream
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Think barbecue and most of us will expect meat to be on the menu. But with Roy Morgan Research recently finding that almost 10 per cent of Australians identify as vegetarian*, it’s a good idea to have a few veggie-friendly barbecue dishes up your sleeve.

Likewise, people who are vegetarian shouldn’t shun the barbecue. Modern barbecues with solid steel hotplates, like Heatlie’s Island Gourmet Elite, are ideal for cooking vegetable stir-fries, pancakes, omelettes and flat breads – basically anything you can cook in a frypan or wok. A solid steel hotplate is also a much healthier option than an open-grill barbecue, as food isn’t exposed to the naked flame, which can cause carcinogens. A good quality hotplate will also require a minimal amount of oil for cooking – I use a light olive oil spray on the hotplate before cooking stir-fries and most vegetable-based dishes and find this works a treat. A barbecue with a roasting hood is also a vegetarian’s friend, enabling you to bake dishes like spinach and ricotta ravioli, veggie lasagne or moussaka.

Whether you’re a vegetarian, are planning to entertain veggie-loving family or friends or just want to get more out of your barbecue, why not try some of my meat-free ideas for your next barbecue.

Pizza perfect – people are often surprised when I tell them I often cook pizza on my barbecue hotplate. In reality, it’s so easy and a great option for vegetarians and carnivores alike. Simply roll your dough (either homemade or shop bought) to fit your pizza – I find a thin base works best on the barbie. Top with a generous layer of tomato sugo then with fresh, ripe tomatoes and chunks of mozzarella, taking care not to overload the base with too many ingredients or it may go soggy. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes with the hood down, checking regularly, and scatter fresh basil leaves over before serving. (If you don’t have a hood you can still cook a pizza on the barbie but allow an extra 5-10 minutes.) Another veggie-friendly topping is finely sliced kipfler potatoes (washed but not peeled), sprinkled with extra virgin olive oil and sea salt.

Vegetable skewers – cut red onion, capsicum and zucchini in large chunks and soak in a vinaigrette of 80% red wine vinegar and 20% extra virgin olive oil, one red chilli and two sprigs of rosemary and thyme for as long as possible – a day is great. When you’re ready to barbecue, assemble the vegetables and cherry tomatoes onto wooden skewers, alternating between the various ingredients. (The Heatlie Island Gourmet Elite doesn’t give off a flame so there’s no need to pre-soak the skewers, however you might need to do this depending on your type of barbecue.) Cook on a low hotplate and turn frequently until the vegetables start to caramelise and are just cooked. Drizzle the reserved vinaigrette over the skewers and serve with a green salad.

Barbecued vegetables – chop potatoes and pumpkin into large chunks and tumble into a large roasting dish. Add quartered red onions, chunks of zucchini, a few whole unpeeled garlic cloves and scatter over some fresh rosemary, then drizzle with extra virgin olive oil, a squeeze of lemon, sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Place the baking dish on the barbecue with hood down and cook for approximately 40 minutes on a medium heat, or until just vegetables are just tender, then crumble over feta and cook for a further ten minutes. This veggie feast is great served with fresh basil pesto or a Chimichuri sauce made from parsley, garlic and vinegar, along with warmed flat breads.

Haloumi burgers – slice haloumi into one-centimetre thick pieces and cut a red or yellow capsicum into strips. Fry the haloumi on the hotplate until golden brown and the capsicum until just soft. Cut sour-dough buns in half and briefly toast on the hotplate, then remove. Assemble the burgers with salad greens, the haloumi and capsicum, topping with a dollop of pesto or tomato chutney. You could also add grilled eggplant, zucchini or finely sliced pumpkin to your burger.

*http://www.roymorgan.com/findings/5264-meat-free-health-conscious-anxious-australias-vegetarians-201310272327

 

Barbecued field mushrooms stuffed with roasted capsicum and couscous

Serves 5

Ingredients

  • 5 field mushrooms
  • 1 red capsicum
  • 1 green capsicum
  • 250g couscous

Method

Prepare couscous according to packet instructions.

De-seed red and green capsicums and cut in half. Roast capsicum on hotplate until medium soft, then remove and cut into small, even pieces, approximately two centimetres square.

Remove the stems from the field mushrooms and wash the caps carefully.

In a bowl add roasted capsicum and couscous and mix together. Place mixture evenly inside the five field mushrooms, then place on the hotplate on a high heat until cooked. Serve with a green salad and fresh natural yoghurt.

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My family and I love to travel – both for business and pleasure – and experiencing authentic food, fresh produce and the dining culture of our destination is always a priority. As a self-confessed barbecue tragic, I love to check out what the locals are barbecuing, and I’m always amazed by the different types and interpretations of ‘barbecue’ that we see on our travels – everything from rudimentary wire racks over coals to shiny, flat-plate barbecues and mobile set-ups on wheels.

But the best thing about experiencing a barbecue on foreign shores is that it provides an insight into how the locals live and an opportunity to eat how they do. I find the best way to discover a country’s barbecue culture, particularly in Asia, is to head for the nearest market. Here you’ll find all sorts of barbecuing going on, often at ridiculously cheap prices, and using all manner of ingredients and techniques. Check out what’s on offer, ask the locals for recommendations and enjoy.

Seeing how barbecues are used in other countries also reminds me just how versatile these handy devices can be, and provides amazing inspiration for our home barbecue. Whether it’s whipping up a stir-fry, cooking crepes and flat breads, or even steaming fish and seafood, the barbecue is arguably the most versatile cooking appliance in most homes.

To follow is a list of some of our most memorable barbecue adventures. I hope it provides inspiration for your next barbie – whether it’s at home or abroad.

China – in Shanghai we discovered the tastiest breakfast ever. The cook used a flat-plate barbecue (like Heatlie’s Island Gourmet Elite) and spread a thin crepe mixture on it to make a large circular shape. He then sprinkled on a few herbs – think spring onion, parsley and coriander – and chilli paste, then topped this with a crunchy wonton and wrapped up the crepe.

Cambodia – we couldn’t pass up delicious beef skewers which had been freshly cooked over coals after resting in a marinade of chilli and fish sauce. Once cooked, the meat was placed into a crunchy Vietnamese roll and topped with coriander; the wooden skewer was then skilfully removed.

Vietnam – we enjoyed delicately grilled plantains, also on skewers for easy handling, which were sweet and delicious. Try at home with unripe bananas.

Los Angeles – the birthplace of the Food Truck phenomenon, where a variety of dishes are cooked on a barbecue, usually located in the back of a van. Our favourites were freshly-made soft tacos filled with barbecue pork, salad and topped with red onion and guacamole.

LA Food Truck Tacos 

  • 400g chicken thighs
  • 1/4 small red cabbage
  • 1 carrot
  • bunch coriander
  • 1 lime
  • Guacamole – bought or homemade
  • Sour cream
  • Jalapenos
  • 6 corn tortillas – bought (or try making these at home with masa harina as they do in Mexico – these work beautifully on the Heatlie Island Gourmet Elite.)
  • Heat the barbecue plate and cook the chicken thighs. Allow to rest and cool slightly, then pull apart ready to serve in tacos.
  • Finely shred the cabbage and mix with the grated carrot, coriander and juice of the lime.
  • Heat the tortillas on the barbecue flat-plate. Warm through for about 20 seconds, then remove from heat and pile with chicken, salad, jalapenos, guacamole and sour cream.
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Offering year-round entertaining, extending your living space and adding value to your home, it’s little wonder that Aussie home owners have embraced outdoor kitchens with enthusiasm.

However, there are traps for young players, so whether you’re adding an outdoor kitchen to an existing home or incorporating one into a new build, it’s important to do your research and plan carefully before taking the plunge.

As a first step talk to your local council about relevant regulations as some require professional plans to be drawn up for the project and submitted to council for approval. Some authorities also require a flame failure device to be connected to gas barbecues. This feature can’t be retro-fitted, so it pays to seek out a barbecue that has one fitted at time of manufacture, such as Heatlie’s Island Gourmet Elite. Speaking of gas you’ll also need to consider whether you want to go for LPG or Natural Gas, as natural gas connections need to be installed during the building process.

Another big consideration is position, particularly if you want to use your outdoor kitchen year-round. Outdoor kitchens that lead seamlessly from a home’s internal living areas or kitchen are ideal, but free-standing, gazebo-style kitchens can also work well. Consider also whether you want to incorporate a dining area or even a relaxed alfresco living space, complete with big-screen TV and bar area.   And don’t forget to think about how you can make the most of any views and privacy factors, and protecting your outdoor kitchen from the elements with a roof or sail.

Your budget is also something to consider early. Do plenty of research before you start and be realistic – as well as building materials you’ll need to factor in appliances and a barbecue, bench-tops – even floor coverings and furniture.

The next big decision is whether you opt for a built-in outdoor kitchen designed and constructed by a builder or a modular system, which are cost-efficient and often easy to install. Also consider whether your outdoor kitchen will be a fully-contained external kitchen – complete with fridge, sink and bench-tops – or simply an extension of your existing kitchen.

When it comes to bench-tops, granite and stone are popular options for outdoor kitchens, mainly because most barbecues need to be installed into a non-combustible bench. The exception is the Heatlie Island Gourmet Elite, which is designed specifically for outdoor kitchens. You can install this unit into any type of bench-top – even MDF and wood – as it’s been designed to deflect heat away from the bench.

Of course, the barbecue is the centrepiece of any outdoor kitchen and it pays to choose wisely.

My best tip is to buy for the long-term – choose a unit that offers a ten-year warranty, that’s made in Australia and that offers the ability to buy customised products and spare parts down the track. This approach will definitely save you money in the long-term. Also consider whether you really need a hood – or it just for looks – and beware of gimmicky trends like infra-red burners, lava rocks and ceramic brickettes – in my experience, they often don’t live up to the hype.

There’s no doubt that creating an outdoor kitchen has many benefits, however it pays to do you research, budget wisely and think carefully about what type of kitchen will suit your family’s needs.

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When my husband and I first bought Heatlie Barbecues a colleague told us that a typical customer started barbecuing on a round, three-legged portable gas barbecue like everyone had in the 1970s and 80s. Then, when they wanted something more substantial and impressive, they graduated to an outdoor kitchen-type unit, complete with five-burners, half grill, a giant hood big enough to fit a small pig on a rotisserie, warming rack, wok burner on the side and cupboard underneath. Once they realised that they rarely used the grill section – or that it was prone to flare ups, always burnt the sausages and was impossible to clean – they changed to a unit with a steel hotplate and optional roasting hood, like Heatlie’s Island Gourmet Elite.

With so many different types of barbecues on the market today, how do you know which is the right one for you? As a first step, consider how you will use the barbecue. Do you regularly entertain for large crowds, or will you use your barbecue for everyday family meals? These factors will determine the durability you require, the size of the cooking area and any extra features you may need, such as roasters and cabinet space.

Next, think about where your barbecue will sit. A shiny, freestanding five or six-burner – complete with bottle opener, infra-red burners, side tables and a host of bells and whistles – makes a statement in any backyard, and may be the right option if your barbecue is going to sit on a pergola or deck.

If you’re shopping for a barbecue to fit into an outdoor kitchen, then consider whether you want a unit that is integrated into the bench, or one that slides in from the front. Consider also the type of bench-top you have – if it’s made from a combustible material like laminate or wood, then look for a model like ours which can be installed directly into any type of bench-top.

Of course, the whole point of having a barbecue is to create delicious food, so it’s vital to consider the type of taste and flavour you want to achieve when barbecuing. If you love the smokey taste of a flame grill, then consider one of the charcoal models that are popular overseas. On a recent trip to Cambodia my family dined on fresh seafood cooked over coals in front of us on the beach, the delicious result being succulent seafood juicy with the flavours of the sea.

On the practical front, many barbecues are a nightmare when it comes to cleaning, so this is another important consideration when choosing. Check how easily the barbecue plate can be cleaned with a flat scraper, and consider the amount of flat areas compared to grills and other added features – they make look good on the showroom floor, but they are notorious for collecting fat and grime and are often difficult to remove.

Finally, don’t fall into the trap of buying the cheapest unit on the market. For longevity and quality you can’t beat Australian-made. Not only is it a good investment, your purchase will help the local economy and create jobs – and that’s got to be a good thing.

Andrea Mead

Heatlie Barbecues

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Summer is the season for barbecues and most units get a work-out over the Christmas and New Year holiday period. But is there too much of a good thing? Even the most die-hard outdoor cooking fan can get tired of the same old foods and set-up, so in the interests of taking your barbecue repertoire from boring to brilliant, we asked Andrea Mead from Heatlie Barbecues to share her tips on how to reinvigorate your barbecuing for the New Year.

Plan that outdoor kitchen – fully functioning outdoor kitchens are a hot exterior design trend that shows no sign of disappearing. Adding an outdoor kitchen to your home will create extra living space and add value to your home, and will take your outdoor entertaining to a whole new level. However, it’s not a job to be taken lightly. Planning is key, and you may require council approval. Consider also layout and position, the sort of look you’re after and what appliances you need. Another important consideration is the type of benchtop you use – Heatlie’s Island Gourmet Elite is designed especially for outdoor kitchens and can be installed directly into any type of benchtop, even wood and MDF.

Mini-makeover – if a full outdoor kitchen isn’t an option, then how about giving your outdoor entertaining area a mini-makeover? Firstly, spruce up your outdoor dining setting by giving it a pressure clean and add some brightly coloured cushions. Reposition your barbecue so it’s close to the entertaining area and handy to a table and fridge, if possible. Buy a few wooden boards and platters for serving food and a new centrepiece for your table. Consider creating a theme for our outdoor entertaining zone to create a sense of occasion.

Give it some love and attention – how many times have you geared up for a barbecue and discovered at the last minute that your unit hasn’t been cleaned after the last time you used it. Get into the habit of cleaning your barbie after use – your unit will stay looking good longer and will transform an onerous task into a quick, five-minute job.   Scrape the hotplate immediately after use. If it’s particularly messy lift out the hotplate once cooled and give it a quick blast with a pressure cleaner. Remove and empty the fat container and you’re good to go again.

Rethink your menu – though the traditional Aussie barbie is still a favourite, why not extend your barbecue repertoire to include pizzas, roasts and vegetable dishes? A barbecue with a solid steel hotplate, such as Heatlie’s Island Gourmet Elite, allows you to cook anything that you would normally prepare in a frying pan or work – stir-fires, pancakes, flat-breads and even pizza. Simply roll your dough (either homemade or from your local Italian deli) to fit your pizza tray – I find a thinner base works better on the barbecue.   Spread a good layer of tomato sugo on the base and top with prosciutto and bocconcini. Be sure not to overload your pizza with too many ingredients, or the dough may become soggy, and cook for 15 to 30 minutes. Seafood is a natural on the barbecue, with whole and filleted fish, prawns and squid all ideal for cooking on a solid steel hotplate. If you’ve got a roasting hood then why not try cooking a leg of lamb, a chicken (see recipe) or beef roast – you can even use it to cook lasagne or to bake fresh fruit for dessert.

Upgrade to a new model – did your BBQ just make it through Christmas? Were there flames coming out causing a dragon-like effect and charring your veggies to a crisp? If so you might want to consider investing in a new unit. It pays in the long run to choose a good quality, Australian-made unit with steel hotplates, ribbon burner, an optional roasting hood and flame failure safety device. Consider also whether you need LPG or Natural Gas, particularly if the new barbecue is for installation in a new kitchen as Natural Gas connections need to be done at the construction stage.

Keep it healthy – long gone are the days when barbecuing meant dousing your hotplate in oil and charring food beyond recognition. A solid steel hotplate enables you to cook a range of food with a minimal amount of oil. Think roast veggies, haloumi burgers and grilled veggie kebabs. Likewise, using a hotplate – rather than an open grill – means that food isn’t exposed to an open flame, reducing the build-up of harmful carcinogenics on food.

Whole Butterflied spiced chicken

Serves 2-4

Ingredients:

  • 1 whole chicken, butterflied
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely diced
  • 3 long red chilli, finely diced, 2 being used for garnish
  • 1 Tbs smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp hot paprika
  • 1 tsp sweet paprika
  • 1 Tbs ground cumin
  • 1 Tbs ground coriander
  • 1 Tbs ground fennel
  • 1tsp dried chilli flakes
  • Sea salt flakes
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Pepper
  • To serve: Lime cheeks, coriander leaves and sliced chillies

Method:

  • In a large mixing bowl add all the spices, chilli, garlic and extra virgin olive oil and mix well. Marinate chicken for a few hours or overnight for a better result. Season with salt and pepper
  • Place the chicken on a preheated bbq grill skin side down and cover with the lid and cook for about 8 -10 minutes until golden and charred. Flip the chicken over and continue to cook until the chicken has cooked through, about 5-8 minutes
  • Serve with lime cheeks, coriander and chilli
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One of the hottest outdoor design trends is the outdoor kitchen. But like any home renovation project, careful planning is required. Andrea Mead, owner of Australian barbecue manufacturer Heatlie, gives us her top tips:

Position – think about the outdoor kitchen’s proximity to other areas of the house, privacy and how to optimise any views.   Choosing the right position will help ensure you can use your outdoor kitchen year-round.

How will the space be used? Will you be entertaining large groups or using the outdoor kitchen for smaller, family meals? Do you require a lounge area, as well as a place to eat? A flexible lay-out that can adapt to both is ideal.

Budget – set a realistic and well-researched budget. As well as building materials, appliances and a barbecue, consider floor coverings, shading and furniture.

Built-in or modular system – there are many module-based systems on the market which are cost-efficient and look fabulous. However, if you aiming for a more customised and personally designed space it can pay to engage a builder who will design and construct an appropriate outdoor kitchen for your home.

Appliances – is the area going to be an extension of your current kitchen, or will it be a complete, fully contained outdoor kitchen with fridge, sink, bench-top and barbecue? Keen to get the most out of their outdoor kitchen, many people now choose to install both a barbecue and oven – wok burners are also popular. Be sure to also consider any water and electrical connections you may require.

Choosing the right barbecue – the barbecue is the centrepiece of any outdoor kitchen so it’s vital to choose the right one. Heatlie’s new Island Gourmet Elite is the only barbecue that fits all outdoor kitchens, negating the need to install a custom-made bench.

Bench-tops – many barbecues need to be installed into a non-combustible bench like granite or stone. An exception is the Heatlie barbecue – because the design deflects heat away from the bench it can be installed into materials like MDF and wood.

LPG or Natural Gas – natural gas is easy, convenient and always available, assuming you can access it in your area. Most barbecues have an option of LPG or Natural Gas, however it pays to make this decision when you design your outdoor kitchen so the natural gas connection can be installed during the building process. Some barbecues, such as Heatlie units, allow for a retro-fitted natural gas system, but it’s best to make this decision before you purchase your barbecue. (A licenced gas fitter needs to make the conversion and installation.)

Check local regulations – each state has different requirements for outdoor enclosures. You may need to have plans drawn up and submitted to your local council for approval. Many authorities require a flame failure device to be connected to gas barbeques – this is a standard feature of the Heatlie Island Gourmet and can be fitted to all other Heatlie barbecues at time of manufacture. This feature cannot be fitted after manufacture, so be sure of what you need before your make your purchase.

Protection from the elements – a roof or sail will protect your outdoor kitchen from the rain and sun and encourage you to use the area year-round. Your appliances, barbecue and cupboards will need to be protected from the elements – even stainless steel barbecues and appliances will rust if exposed to weather.

For more information on Heatlie, including retailers across Australia, visit www.heatlie.com.au.

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Bring your veggies outside and embrace meat-­free barbecuing for fresh and healthy meals

Think ‘barbecue’ and most of us will expect meat to be on the menu. But with Roy Morgan Research recently finding that almost 10 per cent of Australians identify as vegetarian. It’s a good idea to have a few veggie-friendly barbecue dishes up your sleeve.

Likewise, people who are vegetarian shouldn’t shun the barbecue. Modern barbecues with solid-steel hotplates such as Heatlie’s Island Gourmet Elite are ideal for cooking vegetable stir-fries, pancakes, omelettes and flat breads — basically anything you can cook in a frypan or wok.

A solid-steel hotplate is also a much healthier option than an open-grill barbecue as food isn’t exposed to the naked flame, which can cause carcinogens. A good-quality hotplate will also require a minimal amount of oil for cooking — I use a light olive oil spray on the hotplate before cooking stir-fries and most vegetable-based dishes and find this works a treat.

A barbecue with a roasting hood is also a vegetarian’s friend, enabling you to bake dishes such as spinach and ricotta ravioli, veggie lasagne or moussaka.

Whether you’re a vegetarian, are planning to entertain veggie-loving guests or just want to get more out of your barbecue, why not try some of these tasty meal-free ideas?

PIZZA PERFECT

People are often surprised when I tell them I cook pizza on my barbecue hotplate. It’s so easy and a great option for vegetarians and carnivores alike. Simply roll your dough (either homemade or store bought) to fit your pizza. I find a thin base works best on the barbie. Top with a generous layer of

tomato sugo (sauce), then fresh, ripe tomatoes and chunks of mozzarella, taking care not to overload the base with too many ingredients or it may go soggy. Cook for 15-20 minutes with the hood down, checking regularly and scatter fresh basil leaves over before serving. If you don’t have a hood. allow an extra 5-10 minutes.

Another veggie-friendly topping is finely sliced Kipfler potatoes sprinkled with extra-virgin olive oil and sea salt.

VEGETABLE SKEWERS

Cut red onion, capsicum and zucchini into large chunks and soak in a vinaigrette of 80 per cent red wine vinegar and 20 per cent extra-virgin olive oil. one red chilli and two sprigs of rosemary and thyme for as long as possible – a day is great. When you’re ready to barbecue. assemble the vegetables and cherry tomatoes onto wooden skewers. alternating between the various ingredients. Cook on a low hotplate and turn frequently until the vegetables start to caramelise and are just cooked. Drizzle the reserved vinaigrette over the skewers and serve with a green salad.

BARBECUED VEGETABLES

Chop potatoes and pumpkin into chunks and tumble into a large roasting dish. Add quartered red onions, chunks of zucchini, a few whole, unpeeled garlic cloves and scatter with some fresh rosemary. Drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil, a squeeze of lemon. sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Place the baking dish on the barbecue with the hood down and cook for approximately 40 minutes on a medium heat or until vegetables are just tender. Crumble over feta and cook for a further 10 minutes. This veggie feast is great served with fresh basil pesto or a chimichurri sauce made from parsley. garlic and vinegar along with warmed flat bread.

HALOUMI BURGERS

Slice haloumi into lcm-thick pieces and cut a red or yellow capsicum into strips. Fry the haloumi on the hotplate until golden brown and the capsicum until just soft. Cut sourdough buns in half and briefly toast on the hotplate before removing. Assemble the burgers with salad greens. haloumi and capsicum. topping with a dollop of pesto or tomato chutney. You could also add grilled eggplant. zucchini or finely sliced pumpkin to your burger.

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