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We cull the internet in search of the latest outdoors-related tidbits, YouTube clips, photos, memes, you name it. Stuff you HAVEN’T seen before, hopefully. If it’s amusing, entertaining, educational or astonishing, you’ll find it here. Check back every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and see what’s new.

Bald eagles are known for being territorial—especially during nesting season—but I’ve never seen anything like this before.

In today’s video, a turkey decoy catches the attention of a bald eagle. The eagle stops to check it out, and decides he’s had enough of this interloper.

Todays Turkey hunt! #merica

Posted by Stokerized Stabilizers on Saturday, April 27, 2019

To be fair, the decoy hen is VERY convincing. Looks like an Avian-X Breeder Hen or Lookout Hen, if I had to guess. 

I can’t begin to guess what made the eagle react to violently, but according to the video’s comments, lots of hunters have seen eagles behave similarly. 

What do you think? Is it worth going home empty-handed if you get to see something this cool? 

 

 

The post Bald Eagle Attacks Turkey Decoy [VIDEO] appeared first on Guide Outdoors.

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We cull the internet in search of the latest outdoors-related tidbits, YouTube clips, photos, memes, you name it. Stuff you HAVEN’T seen before, hopefully. If it’s amusing, entertaining, educational or astonishing, you’ll find it here. Check back every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and see what’s new.

So there you are, fishing down south, and you’ve hooked a monster a cat.

This thing is big. Like, trophy big.

But what’s this? Here comes a gator…and he’s looking for an easy meal.

What would you do? Would you hurry up and try and get the fish in the boat as soon as humanly possible? Or would you chuck your rod in the water and speed away?

hero video fishing

Posted by Hero video fishing on Monday, May 6, 2019

This guy makes the very bold decision to try to land the fish. As you can see, he just beats the gator. Not sure I’d take the chance. Why risk pissing off a hungry gator? There’s only a couple ways that could end.

Thankfully, this gator decides to surrender.

What would you do? Would you turn and run? Or would you stare down the gator and take what’s yours?

The post Angler Hurries to Reel in Catfish Before Gator Gets It [VIDEO] appeared first on Guide Outdoors.

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We cull the internet in search of the latest outdoors-related tidbits, YouTube clips, photos, memes, you name it. Stuff you HAVEN’T seen before, hopefully. If it’s amusing, entertaining, educational or astonishing, you’ll find it here. Check back every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and see what’s new.

It’s turkey season, so I thought a Public Service Announcement was in order.

So here it is: If you’re in snake country, be vigilant in looking for snakes.

Now, this might sound obvious, but as you can see in today’s video from Brent Cary, even a veterean turkey hunter can make a dangerous mistake.

Thankfully, Brent had the presence of mind to look again before he sat down at the base of a tree.

It’s amazing how well-camouflaged the snake is. You can’t blame Brent for not seeing him at first glance. Thank heavens he noticed when he came back.

And the craziest part? Brent had been sitting next to the snake for AN HOUR.

“Why he did not bite me is strictly a blessing from God,” Brent says. We agree.

So be careful out there.

The post Turkey Hunter Sets Gun On a Rattlesnake, Doesn’t Notice Until It’s Almost Too Late [VIDEO] appeared first on Guide Outdoors.

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We cull the internet in search of the latest outdoors-related tidbits, YouTube clips, photos, memes, you name it. Stuff you HAVEN’T seen before, hopefully. If it’s amusing, entertaining, educational or astonishing, you’ll find it here. Check back every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and see what’s new.

A zip-line for trout? It’s not as strange as it sounds.

The Minnesota DNR’s Hutchinson fishery crew made this zipline to help get trout from a trailer tank into Spring Creek earlier this month.

The 300 rainbow trout and 300 brown trout came from Lanesboro Hatchery ahead of trout opener.

Trout zip line into Spring Creek

A zip line for trout? You betcha! Our Hutchinson fisheries crew fashioned this to get trout from the trailer tank into Brown County’s Spring Creek this week. The 300 rainbow trout and 300 brown trout came from the Lanesboro Hatchery and received one last ride before making their way into Spring Creek’s cold water ahead of trout opener. go.usa.gov/xm4mU

Posted by Minnesota Department of Natural Resources on Friday, April 12, 2019

Why a zipline? Because the alternative is carrying a 600 fish down a steep, rocky bank one net-full at a time. No thanks.

This crew looks to have the zipline method down to a science. That’s a good thing for Minnesota anglers, who can look forward to a great season on Spring Creek.

Thanks as always to the good folks at the MN DNR for everything they do to make sure Minnesota remains a destination for all outdoor-related pursuits.

Rumor has it that the DNR plans on hang-gliding a metric ton of walleye into Lake Mille Lacs.

Just kidding.

The post A Zip-Line For Trout? You Betcha. [VIDEO] appeared first on Guide Outdoors.

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The post Federal Ammo: History & Heritage appeared first on Guide Outdoors.

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April 9, 2019 saw the passing of Richard Cole, the last living member of Doolittle’s Raiders.

Almost a full 77 years earlier, on April 18th 1942, 16 B-25 Bombers took off from the cramped deck of the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Hornet.

Doolittle and Cole (in front) with their fellow crew members

The mission, led by famed aviator James Doolittle, was launched a mere 4 months after the dreadful attack on Pearl Harbor.

Getting Ready

Like the rest of the Doolittle Raiders, Cole volunteered for the risky bombing mission with little advanced knowledge. Indeed the crew only learned the rough parameters of the mission indirectly by the requirements of their training.

Already familiar with the B-25 Bomber, Cole was told he needed to reduce the normal 3,000 feet of takeoff distance to an impossible-seeming 500 feet.

Simultaneous to the Raider’s training, engineers elsewhere were taking the standard B-25 plane and trying to increase range as much as possible.

This included removing the complex bombsight and the lower defensive turret. And adding additional fuel tanks wherever space could be found, including in the bomb bay where the team would also have to find room for as much bomb payload as possible.

On April 1st, 1942, the pilots arrived in San Francisco to board the U.S.S. Hornet. The deck was already packed with 16 of the specially-modified B-25 bombers, with the carrier’s normal complement of Navy fighter planes stowed in the decks below.

B-25 bombers packed onto the deck of the U.S.S. Hornet Striking into Imperial Japan

A few days out to sea the pilots were finally given the full details of their mission.

Once the Hornet had reached a distance of 400 miles from the coastline of Imperial Japan, the bombers would launch, carry out their individual bombing plans, before finally landing at designated air fields within Nationalist-controlled China.

Things did not go well.

The seas were rough, making the job of taking off from the dangerously-cramped flight deck even more difficult.

And at a distance of 650 miles, well outside the original take-off area, the U.S.S. Hornet was spotted by Japanese forces. All 16 B-25 bombers were ordered to take off early to get ahead of any report of their arrival.

The first bomber, piloted by Doolittle and Cole, lumbered up into the air and away from the deck while the carrier thrashed wildly back and forth underneath them.

B-25 Bomber taking off from the Hornet

Behind them, thanks to luck and fierce training, the remaining 15 bombers all successfully launched, soaring up into the air before maneuvering and splitting off into the routes each were given to reach their chosen targets.

All bombers delivered their payloads, damaging military and industrial targets within 6 key cities: Tokyo, Yokohama, Yokosuka, Nagoya, Kobe and Osaka.

But the next challenge, safely landing at the designated landing sites, would prove impossible.

Due to the extra distance the bombers had been forced to travel, none of the planes had the needed fuel. Instead, each pilot had to make alterate plans based on their location.

One plane landed in Russia. The others made it to China. All ran out of fuel, forcing the crews to either conduct a crash landing or bail out.

Cole, along with Doolittle, bailed out, jumping from their B-25 and parachuting into unknown territory.

Of the 80 original crew members, 69 made it safely back home. 3 were killed in action, while 8 were captured and were either executed or imprisoned.

While Doolittle initially considered the mission a failure due to the destruction of the bombers, the Raiders were welcomed home as heroes.

The Doolittle Raiders in China

They had bombed the mainland of Japan, proving to the American people that the military planners behind Pearl Harbor were not untouchable.

In the following months of the Pacific War, Japan would commit more and more of its fleet to defense, reducing the number of ships that could challenge American advancement.

For their efforts, Doolittle would receive the Medal of Honor, while Dole received the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Discovery of the U.S.S. Hornet

The carrier which had launched the Doolittle Raid, the U.S.S. Hornet, managed to evade retaliation from the Japanese navy and survived the action unharmed.

It would go on to participate in a number of important engagements in the Pacific War, most notably the Battle of Midway.

But the Hornet would not survive to the end, instead finally succumbing to a hail of armor-piercing bombs near the Solomon Islands.

The final resting place of the U.S.S. Hornet was uncertain until January of 2019, when it was spotted by the crew of the research vessel Petrel during a search of the ocean floor.

Richard Cole, at the age of 103, would be the only member of the raiding crew who would live to see the discovery.

The post Richard Cole, Doolittle Raider appeared first on Guide Outdoors.

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So you’ve recently made the decision to start carrying a concealed handgun. Maybe you’ve gone so far as to choose a gun.

But you’re just getting started. Now comes the hard part: deciding exactly how you’ll be carrying it. Even small guns can be bulky and heavy, and tossing it in your pocket (in most cases) just won’t do.

There’s quite a bit to consider…

  • How important is everyday comfort?
  • How important is concealability?
  • Do you value comfort over fast access? Do you value fast access over safety?
  • What level of retention do you need?
  • How much of your day do you spend standing? How much of your day do you spend sitting at a desk or in your car?
  • How does your body type affect your options?
  • What state laws do you have to abide by?

These are just a sample of the important questions you have to answer before you commit to choosing a method of everyday carry. Each and every holster has its own unique blend of comfort, concealment, retention, and access—and no single holster excels in all areas. To help you get started, let’s take a look at some of the most common holsters and examine the pros and cons of each.

Shoulder Holsters

Shoulder holsters consist of two straps connected in a manner similar to a backpack, with the holster itself mounted on either the right or left side (depending on your dominant hand). Shoulder holsters are among the most comfortable of all methods because your back and torso are supporting the weight of the gun—not your belt. Additionally, the opposite side of the holster can be used for additional magazines, etc. Shoulder holsters work with a wide variety of body types and with larger guns, and are comfortable in all climates, but are among the most difficult to conceal. In addition, drawing your pistol from a shoulder rig often involves sweeping the muzzle past your arm (and any bystanders). Plus, if you want to keep a shoulder holster hidden, you pretty much have to wear a long-sleeved shirt or jacket.

Pros at a glance:

  • Among the most comfortable carry methods
  • Fast draw
  • Can fit larger guns
  • Easy to carry extra mags
  • Works with a wide variety of body types

Cons at a glance:

  • Among the most difficult to conceal
  • Requires you to dress a certain way
  • Drawing often involves flashing yourself and any bystanders
  • Depending on the angle of the holster, you might be flashing people walking behind you

______________________________________________________________

Ankle Holsters
Pro-Tech Nylon Ankle Holster

The ankle holster is one of the traditional methods utilized by Law Enforcement to carry backup, but is also a totaly viable CCW method for civilians. Ankle holsters are comfortable and highly concealable—especially if you wear cowboy boots—but are slow on the draw. To get to your pistol, you have to bend over, lift up your pant leg, undo the retention strap, stand up straight, and hope to engage your target in time. You’re also limited to micro-compact pistols, so no Glock 19 or similar.

Pros at a glance:

  • Highly concealable
  • More comfortable than other methods when sitting, standing still, and walking

Cons at a glance:

  • Very slow on the draw
  • Uncomfortable (maybe even impossible) to run with
  • Limited to micro-compacts and snubbies
  • Pants with a looser fit and/or wider leg are a must

______________________________________________________________

Outside the Waistband (OWB) Holsters
MFT Ruger LC9 OWB Holster

OWB holsters are designed to be worn on your belt, normally between 3:00 and 4:30. OWB holsters are hugely popular and available in a wide variety of configurations and materials—from universally sized leather holsters to Kydex holsters designed for specific models. With lots of options for attachment and retention, you’re very likely to find an OWB holster that’s perfect for you. OWB holsters are most often worn for open carry, but a long, untucked shirt or jacket will keep one concealed in a pinch.

Pros at a glance:

  • Faster on the draw than IWB holsters
  • Available in a huge variety of configurations, cants, and materials
  • Lots of attachment options
  • Multiple retention options
  • Fit most body shapes and sizes

Cons at a glance:

  • Difficult to conceal
  • More exposed than other carry methods

______________________________________________________________

Outside the Waistband / Small of Back Holsters
Guide Gear 4-position Holster

Small-of-back holsters place the handgun directly over the center of the small of your back. This is one of the more comfortable carry methods (as long as you aren’t sitting for long periods), and SOB holsters accommodate larger guns. They’re fairly easy to conceal with a longer shirt or jacket, but can be very uncomfortable if you spend a majority of the day in a car or at a desk. The draw is fairly slow, and there’s a good chance you’ll be sweeping bystanders. Re-holstering is even more of a pain, especially because you can’t see what you’re doing.

Pros at a glance:

  • Comfortable for walking around
  • Can carry larger guns
  • Fairly easy to conceal with a longer shirt
  • Keeps your gun out of your way

Cons at a glance:

  • Slower to draw
  • Not very comfortable to draw
  • Requires blind re-holster
  • Potential for injury if you should land on your back

______________________________________________________________

Inside the Waistband (IWB) Holsters
CrossBreed MiniTuck with M&P Shield

Among the most discrete of all carry methods, inside-the-waistband holsters clip or mount to a belt to allow you to securely conceal a weapon inside your pants. IWB holsters typically sit at the side or rear, and allow for a fairly quick draw. They generally stay out of the way and won’t interfere with sitting or standing—but your placement options might be limited depending on body type. They take some getting used to, and having a holster rubbing up against your skin all day isn’t that fun, but IWB holsters offer a nice blend of comfort, concealability, and accessability.

Pros at a glance:

  • Highly concealable
  • Fairly fast on the draw
  • Won’t interfere with sitting or standing

Cons at a glance:

  • Printing is still an issue
  • Takes some getting used to
  • Might not work with all body types
  • Shirt can interfere with draw

______________________________________________________________

Appendix IWB Holsters
Alien Gear Appendix Holster with Glock 43

Appendix carry has become something of a controversial topic for reasons that might become clear just by looking at the above image. Appendix holsters are typically located between your belly button and your strong-side hip (your right hip if you’re right-handed), allowing for a very fast draw and easy, visual re-holstering. And because there’s more space down the front of your pants than in the hip or rear areas, appendix holsters accommodate larger guns while keeping day-to-day interference to a minimum. Of course, appendix holsters do come with one teensy downside: their proximity to a rather…sensitive…area (not to mention your femoral artery). Oh, and sitting isn’t the most comfortable.

Pros at a glance:

  • Very fast on the draw
  • Easier to conceal than IWB holsters positioned at the hip or rear
  • Can accommodate larger pistols
  • Easy, visual re-holster

Cons at a glance:

  • Proximity to sensitive area
  • Sitting is uncomfortable
  • Might not work with every body type

______________________________________________________________

Belly Band Holsters
Belly band with 2 mag pouches on opposite side

A belly band is a wide elastic belt that features an integrated holster on the front or side. Belly bands keep your firearm tight to your skin for better concealment, and because they ride higher than waistband holsters, they’re typically a lot more comfortable to wear for extended periods of time. That said, waistband holsters offer a more natural draw, so belly bands can take some time to get used to. But all in all, belly bands strike a pretty good balance between comfort, concealment and accessability.

Pros at a glance:

  • Keeps your gun tight to your skin for better concealment
  • Probably the most comfortable option on this list aside from the shoulder holster
  • Can be twisted to adjust position on your body
  • Doesn’t weigh your belt down

Cons at a glance:

  • Draw is not as quick or natural as with a waistband holster
  • Wearing a tight elastic band around your midsection in the middle of summer can get uncomfortable
  • Re-holstering is a two-hand process

______________________________________________________________

Pocket Holsters
The Bulldog Super Grip Holster

Pocket carry is perhaps the simplest and most convenient of all carry methods. Pocket holsters are typically more comfortable to bear, and won’t interfere with sitting or driving like some of the other types will. This alone is a huge advantage over waistline holsters—if it’s more comfortable to carry, chances are you’ll carry more often. That said, pocket carry has its shortcomings, too. You’re limited to the smallest micros and snubnose revolvers, and because you’re drawing out of a more confined space, hang-ups have the potential to slow you down. Also, pockets are dirty, and pocket pistols have a tendency to collect lint. All in all, some good, some bad. If comfort and convenience are high on your list, pocket carry might be for you.

Pros at a glance:

  • Among the most comfortable and convenient of carry methods
  • Pocket holsters won’t interfere with sitting or driving

Cons at a glance:

  • Slow on the draw
  • Limited to the smallest microcompacts and snubbies
  • Gun gets dirty

______________________________________________________________

I hope you found this helpful. Just remember, each and every style of carry has its advantages and disadvantages, and no single holster checks all the boxes. Only you can decide what’s right for you.

Whichever style you ultimately choose, the most important thing to do is to get proper training and practice, practice, practice. Oh, and don’t forget to check your state laws.

Thanks for reading, and feel free to share your thoughts in the comment section below!


The post CCW 101: A Concealed Carry Holster Buying Guide appeared first on Guide Outdoors.

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Hollow point. Trocar tip. FTX. RIP. Frangible.

Those are just some of the many defense-oriented projectiles out there. So how do you choose? If you plan on carrying a pistol every day, your choice of round is almost as important as your choice of pistol. So to help you make the right decision, we’re giving you our top 5 best-selling defensive rounds—so you can see what brands and styles our customers trust with their lives. And really, who knows more than the people who carry these rounds every day?

So here they are, in no particular order.

Hornady Critical Defense

Critical Defense in 9mm

It may not look like a hollow point round, but it is. While other HP rounds feature a hollow cavity, Critical Defense ammo features Hornady’s innovative FTX projectile that maximizes the potential of a hollow point. The FTX bullet features a Flex Tip that expands reliably while avoiding the clogging that can plague other hollow points—so it doesn’t get hung up on clothes, etc. Upon impact, the soft tip compresses into the bullet, initiating immediate expansion across a wide range of velocities. All Critical Defense ammo is loaded in nickel-plated brass cases that resist corrosion and are easy to see in reduced light. 4.9 stars on over 200 reviews should tell you everything you need to know: our customers love and trust Hornady Critical Defense.

Shop Hornady Critical Defense >

________________________________________________________

Liberty Civil Defense

Civil Defense in 9mm. Notice the 2,000 FPS label. That’s brisk, baby.

Liberty knows that speed kills. That’s why they load their Civil Defense rounds with projectiles that weigh in at about half of typical projectile weight. The 9mm Civil Defense ammo, for example, features a 50-grain projectile. Most entries on this list are 115- or 124-grain. With such a light projectile, Civil Defense ammo is blisteringly fast. The aforementioned 9mm rounds travels at an estimated 2,000 FPS—that’s rifle-like speed. Just as unique is the hollow point itself, which is cut extra-deep. Unlike most hollow points that mushroom upon contact, Civil Defense hollow points are designed to fragment. Civil Defense projectiles are capable of punching through barriers without deformation, but once they hit an organic target, they break apart to cause maximum wounding. With offerings for both auto and revolver, Liberty Civil Defense could be the right choice for you.

Shop Liberty Civil Defense >

________________________________________________________

Remington Golden Saber

Golden Saber is your classic duty hollow point round, and there ain’t nothing wrong with that. At the heart of Golden Saber is a high-performance hollow point bullet with a jacket made entirely of cartridge brass—not copper gilding metal. Thicker and stiffer than other bullet jackets, the “High Performance Jacket,” as Remington calls it, releases energy over a longer distance.

And, unlike conventional hollow point bullets, the jacket is nose-cut completely through, promoting controlled expansion to well over 1.5 times the bullet’s original diameter. The nose cuts, configured in a patented spiral pattern, produce larger petals and reduce the nose cavity for optimized mushroom performance.

Over a wide range of velocities, Golden Saber delivers virtual 100% weight retention. The precise hollow point cavity design also maximizes penetration by minimizing lead core deformation. It all adds up to the kind of knockdown performance lives may depend on. It’s also the least expensive round on this list, so you can practice with it. All. Day. Long.

Shop Remington Golden Saber >

________________________________________________________

G2 Research RIP

RIP in .40 S&W. Look at those teeth.

The first thing you’ll notice about RIP ammo is the totally unique and very intimidating projectile. Well, it’s every bit as mean as it looks—and if you’ve seen G2R’s popular marketing video, you already know all about it. The solid-copper, trocar-style RIP (Radically Invasive Projectile) was designed to maximize the dissipation of energy while defeating every known barrier in its path. The trocar design helps stabilize the projectile in travel. As material fills the center, the teeth function like a hole saw, ripping through obstacles like sheetrock, sheet metal, windshields and plywood (not to mention denim and other problematic fabrics). On contact, the RIP creates between 7 and 9 separate wound channels (depending on caliber) that absolutely devastate soft targets. So it really is “the last round you’ll ever need.”

Shop G2 Research RIP Ammo >

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Speer Gold Dot

Gold Dot in .40 S&W

How could any list of carry ammo be complete without one of the oldest and most trusted duty/defense rounds? Speer Gold Dot was the original bonded-core ammo…and it’s still the No. 1 choice of law enforcement worldwide. Speer utilizes Uni-Cor technology, which bonds the copper jacket to the lead core one molecule at a time. This virtually eliminates core-jacket separation through hard impact—so it retains energy and causes more devastation.

Each Gold Dot hollow point cavity is tuned by specific caliber and bullet weight to ensure optimum performance. Speer forms the hollow point cavity in two stages. The first establishes how far the bullet can expand; the second controls the rate of expansion. This patented two-step cavity formation gives Speer engineers incredible control in the design process. Each bullet caliber and weight is tuned for optimum expansion and penetration. That’s why Gold Dot is the gold standard for personal protection.

Shop Speer Gold Dot Ammo >

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So there you have it. Our customers trust these rounds with their safety and the safety of their family.

But don’t forget—it’s important to test ammo in your firearm to see how it performs. Make sure you’re comfortable with the recoil and patterning…and practice practice practice! There’s no substitute for range time.

If you have any questions or comments, leave ’em below, and we’ll do our best to answer. Thanks for reading!

The post The Customer is Always Right: Our Top 5 Best-Selling Defensive Rounds appeared first on Guide Outdoors.

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