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Our friends at Packaging Digest created this fun short quiz. They noticed how similar the packaging was for perfume bottles as it was for liquor bottles. The quiz shows you a picture of each with the logo removed and you have to guess if the bottle you are looking at is designed for perfume or liquor. See if you can tell the difference. It only takes a few minutes.

Take the quiz.

https://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/perfume-or-liquor-does-the-package-tell-you-2018-08-28

The post Perfume or liquor? appeared first on MBS Advisors Recruiting.

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National Adirondack day! The first national celebration of the Adirondack chair was June 21st. The iconic chair dates to 1903, and its design is all American. The proclamation of National Adirondack day was declared this year by Adams Manufacturing, a producer of durable, useful outdoor furniture made of plastic.

Let’s prevent such a mental lapse in the future. Mark your calendar now for other notable celebration days upcoming in the next few weeks.
July 6: National Fried Chicken Day
July 7: World Chocolate Day
July 22: Pi Approximation Day
July 30: National Whistleblower Appreciation Day
August 10: National S’mores Day
August 15: Relaxation Day (I’m in!)

p.s. To Adams Manufacturing–The Adirondack could be America’s greatest contribution to world chair design. Wouldn’t it make sense to celebrate National Adirondack day next year on July 4?

Sources:

Thanks to Plastics News writer Bill Bregar for raising the issue.
https://www.plasticsnews.com/blog/celebrating-national-adirondack-chair-day-why-not-its-all-american

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_minor_secular_observances#July

The post How did I miss it? appeared first on MBS Advisors Recruiting.

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Chart courtesy of MAPP and Plastics Business Magazine

How much do you earn at your current job? OK, that’s the number. Now add $8,850. (Do you feel better?)

The value of an average employee benefits package in the plastics industry is $8,850 per employee, according to survey results from MAPP and ARPM. The components may include employer contributions toward health, vision, dental, and life insurance, 401(k) contributions…some offer childcare, legal assistance or fitness coaching!

Read more about your $8,850 in this article from Plastics Business, written by Ashley Turrell, Membership and Analytics Director, MAPP: https://plasticsbusinessmag.com/articles/2019/cost-of-benefits-continues-to-rise-for-manufacturers/

MBS Advisors is a proud member of MAPP. Learn more about the Manufacturers Association for Plastics Processors (MAPP).

The post Paycheck plus appeared first on MBS Advisors Recruiting.

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Our friends at Mueller Prost recently posted a great article entitled False Resumes are on the Rise: Top 5 Best Practices to Avoid a Costly Bad Hire.

The article goes into detail about what you should do BEFORE you hire that too-good-to-be-true candidate, touching upon topics from background checks to standardized testing. Incorporating some of these ideas could save you from hiring the wrong person and help you hire the right one! (Of course, we can help with your selection as well!)

References:

False Resumes are on the Rise: Top 5 Best Practices to Avoid a Costly Bad Hire
Written by: Angela K. Abfall, CFE; Certified Fraud Examiner and Timothy M. Grace, CIA, CISA, CISM, CRISC; Director of Technology Risk Advisory Services both with Mueller Prost CPAs + Business Advisors

http://www.muellerprost.com/article/7291/False-Resumes-are-on-the-Rise-Top-5-Best-Practices-to-Avoid-a-Costly-Bad-Hire.aspx

The post Best Practices to Avoid a Costly Bad Hire appeared first on MBS Advisors Recruiting.

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Having only been in the plastics industry for 5 short years, I have conflicting feelings on the use of plastics. Of course, I want to save the environment–who doesn’t? I hear all the anti-plastic media hype with pictures of sea turtles that are trapped in the beer can holders. I see the pictures of plastic waste in the ocean and it breaks my heart. That’s what it’s supposed to do. What I don’t hear about is how much plastic has changed our lives for the better.

Let’s paint a picture. Imagine you are going in for surgery tomorrow and you need to have an IV put in, guess what that tubing is made of? Yep, you guessed it, PLASTIC, or silicone of some type. I’m not the plastics expert of the company. I don’t know all the right terms. You need a knee replacement or a hip replacement. Guess what those “parts” are made of…PLASTIC!

My son had heart surgery at 2½ years old. I have a photo of him after surgery with tubes sticking out of him all over, all of which are made of some type of plastic. If the plastics industry started posting those types of images all over the internet to tear at the heartstrings of human nature, how do you think people would feel about plastics then? Would plastic still have this stigma that it does now?

We keep hearing in the media that plastic bags are bad. Plastic straws are bad. Any kind of single-use plastics are bad for the environment. But is cutting down trees to make paper bags and paper straws good for the environment? I imagine that there are some chemicals that aren’t good for the environment used in this process, as well. And what about those reusable bags the grocery stores are always pushing us to buy in order to be more environmentally friendly. I wonder, do people realize that in the material content of those reusable bags is, you guessed it, PLASTIC! It’s kind of hypocritical if you think about it.

I found out shortly after starting to work in the plastics industry that single-use plastic bags are, in fact, recyclable. Most people don’t know that. They may not break down quickly in our landfills, but they can be recycled. I never paid much attention that at our local grocery stores they have bins for you to dispose of your single-use plastic bags so they can be RECYCLED. Does anyone utilize this?

It is my opinion that if you make it easier for people to recycle, they will do it. If it isn’t simple, they won’t.

Where I live, we have single stream recycling. It’s easy, I don’t have to separate anything. I can put glass, paper, plastic, or cardboard all in one bin and the recycling company comes every other week to pick it up. I recycle because it’s easy for me and doesn’t cause me any extra effort to throw it in the recycling bin versus the trash bin. However, I have visited different parts of the country and I am shocked to hear that they don’t recycle at all. They don’t recycle because it’s not easy for them. They would have to separate everything and physically bring it to the recycling center which isn’t on their way anywhere. So, they just throw it all away. This baffles my mind. Recycling is just a normal thing here in New England. If we all did our part to recycle regularly, would plastics be so bad? End rant!

Articles that inspired this piece.
Plastic Straw Ban: Whole Foods Joins List in Banning Plastic Straws
https://www.nasdaq.com/article/plastic-straw-ban-whole-foods-joins-list-in-banning-plastic-straws-cm1151982

Lessons from a plastic bag stuck in a tree in Ohio
https://www.plasticsnews.com/article/20190521/BLOG07/190529982/lessons-from-a-plastic-bag-stuck-in-a-tree-in-ohio

The post Is it a plastics problem or a recycling problem? appeared first on MBS Advisors Recruiting.

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FLORENCE, MASSACHUSETTS, April 29, 2019 – Compensation of professionals in the plastics industry posted another healthy gain last year, according to the 2019 Plastics Salary Survey conducted jointly by SPE-Inspiring Plastics Professionals and MBS Advisors.

This year’s participants reported their base salaries at an average of $106,354 and their total compensation (including performance incentives) as $134,229. Those numbers are greater than 5% and 12% respectively from the previous year’s survey result. A total of 1,439 plastics industry participants contributed their income information to comprise this year’s survey.

“This year’s survey is eye-opening. While pointing to the recurring correlation between growth in the plastics industry and growth in compensation, there are other compelling trends which are equally significant,” said Patrick Farrey, CEO, SPE. “Demographic variables such as gender play a key role when looking at pay. This year’s survey indicates that women in the industry were more likely than men to have received a significant raise in 2018. This is relevant data when we discuss the gender pay gap in the plastics industry and is a trend we will explore more deeply in future studies.”

The survey shows a significant increase in performance pay, also known as commission, bonus, and profit sharing. “Aggressive business growth in the plastics industry over the past two years paid out for employees last year, in the form of salary increases and significant incentive pay,” surmised Dennis Gros, president of the Recruiting division of MBS Advisors. The average performance compensation is $27,875 in this year’s survey. That’s an increase of 50% compared to last year.

The 2019 survey generates the following additional data for the year ending last December:

  • C-level executives, whose titles usually begin with the word Chief, earned total cash compensation of $224,165. The sample size was 154.
  • Work in the finance department paid out second, at $201,190; however, only three people comprised the sample.
  • Human Resources came in third, at $162,341. The sample size was 16.
  • In the Engineering department, compensation averaged $109,997 with 435 participants.
  • Sales generated an income of $143,253 according to 273 participants.
  • Product Development paid a healthy $131,758 with a sample size of 260.

“The ownership risk/reward pendulum swung in favor of owners,” Gros noticed. “As a group, they paid themselves a salary of $145,714, and their incentive pay—which, for an owner, is profit—added $208,143. These are likely smaller companies, but the total of $353,857 surpasses the overall compensation reported by Chief Executive Officers of typically larger companies,” he continued, “who reported an average overall compensation of $331,945.”

What drives compensation? Demand, according to Gros. “Plastics manufacturers need employees. Employees are scarce. Compensation goes up. 2018 was the year of the raise.”

SPE-Inspiring Plastics Professionals is 84 countries and 22,500+ members strong, SPE unites plastics professionals worldwide–helping them succeed and strengthening their skills through networking, events, training, and knowledge sharing.

No matter where you work in the plastics industry value chain-whether you’re a scientist, engineer, technical personnel or a senior executive-nor what your background is, education, gender, culture or age-SPE is here to serve you. www.4spe.org

MBS Advisors is an employment recruiter serving companies in plastics, packaging, molding, and machinery. The firm identifies and places approximately 100 middle and upper-level professionals every year. Cumulative first-year compensation totals more than $200,000 million over the firm’s history. MBS also provides M&A advisory and investment banking services for injection molders, plastics processors, and engineered component manufacturers. www.mbsadvisors.com

Click here to read a short article that Plastics News wrote about our recent survey.

The post 2019 PLASTICS SALARY SURVEY RESULTS ARE IN appeared first on MBS Advisors Recruiting.

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The juxtaposition of two seemingly unrelated news stories caught my eye. My newsfeed list presented an article about the FASTEST DISAPPEARING JOBS just above GIG WORKERS ARE NOT EMPLOYEES. In my opinion, these stories are related.

The first article lists postmasters, telephone operators, and watch repair technicians in the vulnerable list. I would add taxi drivers, fast food cashiers, and travel agents. Oh, sorry, travel agents are already extinct.

The second news piece addresses the case of people who accept short-term work through sites like TaskRabbit, Handy or Angie’s List. The Labor Department calls these people contractors, not employees. That’s good news for Angie’s List, and likely it’s good news for the gig workers, who, by definition, shun the responsibility of full-time employment.

Some segments of the workforce would prefer to earn money one gig at a time, setting their own hours and often, their own work location. The pace of change in the job market serves as an excuse to check out of the traditional career scene and bump along from one project to the next.

Employers also utilize this short-term mentality when they hire temporary workers to cover a busy month or a busy season.

When is the last time you asked yourself, “When will I be replaced by technology?” This is not the time to become lethargic or comfortable in any job at any level. Excuse me, please, I must get a watch repaired before the last technician is gone.

From your perspective, what jobs are on the road to extinction in plastics or packaging? Click to my LinkedIn feed and comment. https://www.linkedin.com/in/dennisgros/

Sources:

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/news/fastest-disappearing-jobs-in-the-us-4652836/

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/news/us-says-gig-workers-not-employees-4654236/

https://www.taskrabbit.com/

https://www.handy.com

https://www.angieslist.com/

The post Gig me here, gig me there appeared first on MBS Advisors Recruiting.

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At the point of an offer, employers and candidates have a huge investment at stake. Interviews, time, travel, staff time, productivity, and more. So now candidates want offers and employers want the new employee. Here are the major considerations we hear from candidates who respond, “I’ll give you an answer tomorrow.”

  • How was I treated during the interview? Was the hiring system reasonable? Did I understand the reason behind each interview step? Or does the employer appear disorganized?
  • Does the financial package meet my reasonable expectations? Will I make more money? Really?
  • What is the financial stability of this employer?
  • What’s the word on the street – or the internet – about this employer?
  • How will this job enhance my career? Will I respect my new peers and leaders?
  • Should I look to my current employer for a counteroffer? (p.s. – usually a BAD IDEA)
  • Conversely, does the deal seem too good to be true? Should I trust?
  • Gut check—do I feel optimistic about this decision?
  • Am I comfortable with the corporate culture? Would I enjoy working with these people?
  • Can I handle the commuting distance and time?
  • Do I have any other prospective offers?

Employment offers and acceptances are major decisions, sure to elicit anxiety for both parties. At MBS Advisors, we provide guidance throughout the entire process. Call us today! 413-362-7555.

The post I’ll give you an answer tomorrow. appeared first on MBS Advisors Recruiting.

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Once again, MBS Advisors has teamed up with the Institute of Packaging Professionals to offer you the opportunity to participate in the 2019 salary survey dedicated strictly to packaging professionals. Click here to participate in the survey.

The post IoPP 2019 Packaging Salary Survey Now Open appeared first on MBS Advisors Recruiting.

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I once took a job at a manufacturing company after one interview with the president of the company. Shame on me for not doing much research on the company or the corporate culture ahead of time. Never in a million years could I have imagined the drama this company had within its walls. Don’t get me wrong, the company was great at what it did and produced a quality product. However, the behind the scenes drama was much more than I would have ever signed up for. Does this sound familiar?

Have you been in a situation in which your new dream job quickly morphed into a nightmare?

Adept hiring managers also want to preclude this situation. Employers want to find the person who “fits” their culture; not merely someone who can do the job.

Honorable employers want to know during the interview whether you share their ethics and values. They want to know you will adhere to their corporate values. They want to know that you will treat your new colleagues with respect and gratitude. Employers are learning that it is important for them to know more about who you are as a person and not just that you have the skills to perform the job.

Is it okay for a candidate to ask about corporate culture during an interview? ABSOLUTELY, YES! But don’t stop there. Tune into your senses and feel the vibe. Employees who exemplify the corporate culture are more likely to be happier and more productive employees.

Read more about corporate culture in this article by Larry Alton, Why Corporate Culture is becoming Even More Important.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/larryalton/2017/02/17/why-corporate-culture-is-becoming-even-more-important/#61471ffd69da

The post Corporate Culture: Is it a fit? appeared first on MBS Advisors Recruiting.

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