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Gretchen's lesson with 9 and 10 year olds.


Today is probably my last post. I've made 890 posts beginning in 2012 and had 266,00 views.

 It is may last teaching day at Island Bay School. I want this blog to be used by people looking for lessons to take with kids so I have written a website which links to all these lessons. Thank you Island Bay kids, your enthusiasm  has been inspiring.


I took a very similar lesson yesterday.
Today's squash books were just as challenging to make. The children were completely absorbed by the lesson. Their graffiti pages in Keith Haring's style were unique. 


I streamlined the folding process as time was short. Rather than measuring then scoring before each of the four folds, they folded the card in half, opened it, then folded in half the other way. Then they scored before folding the two diagonals. The diagonal folds need to be accurate and are trickier to do. It worked. And was quicker.













Making covered ends for the squash book.





 Everyone had their own way putting their images together. Some were very ordered. Others put thought into how they drew their images before cutting. They all work.

A completed folded squash book.



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Gretchen's lesson with 9 and 10 year olds.


I challenged the children by making squash books today. They are tricky to put together. They involve accurate measuring, geometry and origami folding.
We added an awesome piece of graffiti art, styled on Keith Haring's work. 

Practicing some of the images Keith uses. 
Filling a page with Keith styled characters.



Careful consideration of negative spaces.


Adding primary and secondary colour.

Cutting out squares





Accurate scoring on the four lines on each card.


Folding the card after scoring.

Gluing the cut up graffiti into place.



The piece of art folds up like an accordion, with a card on top and bottom. The children added a little tie. 


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Gretchen's lesson with 5 year olds.



I gave each child a shell to draw. Their efforts are fabulous. They have details, varied shades and shell like shapes.


I asked the children to tell me all they knew about really old trains. They offered great ideas. I showed them a photo of an old steam engine which prompted more ideas. They offered; the thing out the front to push stuff away (cow catchers), spokes, coal carriage, a steam pipe (chimney stack) and the best..."piston rods".
I suggested they begin their black crayon drawing with the railway tracks. 




They added colour with plastic jovis.











After morning tea they drew the engine with kebab sticks which they dipped into Indian ink. This is a little tricky but the varied line they created is lovely. They needed paint shirts, just in case.



Our final piece today was made in three parts. Firstly, the children used little rubbing boards and covered the page with wax crayon patterns. Secondly they drew their train, which they knew well now, with marker pen. Finally they used water colour paint.













 


This art is on display in the classroom.
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 Gretchen's lesson with 6,7 & 8 year olds



Malou lent us her bike for the day. The children drew it, including details...everything they could see. Someone asked me how many gears the bike had because they couldn't see them That was an ideal opportunity for me to emphasis to only draw what they saw.


Checking out other children's work.



They redrew the bike with a pen. They broke the background up into four sections and added a different colour to each part.













I gave the children a large piece of paper to draw the bike on, using a black crayon. The bike image was well imbedded in their minds by now. They found it very easy to draw the bike again. They cut them out and we lined them up, ready for display.





The middle of the day was interrupted, but the children managed to make this final piece of art with an extremely messy medium, chalk. 



















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Gretchen's lesson with 5 year olds.
Collaborative work at its best

I gave the children little plastic animals that are sometimes part of a circus. They drew the animals, cut them out and glued them to a coloured background. All of which use their cutting, observation and gluing skills.



We discussed circus's and clowns. They told me the oddities around clowns, their over sized shoes, funny wigs, make up, big pants etc. Each time they drew a few examples on a large sheet of paper. They used these ideas when they drew their clowns with black crayons on black paper. They did a great job, keeping the clown large.



















Next came the circus. I asked the children to choose a partner to work with. They did this brilliantly. After a discussion about what they might see at the circus, they started drawing with markers. These are great to study. I'm still seeing interesting things in their art. They used watercolour paint and two different sized brushed to add colour.















Finally today, the children made a little clown with pen and coloured pencil. These were done on card with little holes at the top for the string to hang them with. 




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Gretchen's lesson with 7 & 8 year olds.


This proved to be a very difficult medium to use. The children have done an excellent job.





The children made an observational drawing of a lighthouse, using their developing skills. Many of them had noticed the shadow down the side of the lighthouse.


They moved on to make a strip of blended coloured chalk in preparation for their major piece of art. This was a challenge for some as the chalk is quite messy.




 The drew their lighthouse using black wax crayon. This would stay on place while they added coloured chalk, as opposed to black chalk pastel.




 I asked them to challenge themselves by blending colours as they saw fit.




































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Gretchen's lesson with 5 & 6 year olds.


Drawing a seal
Drawing a snow tiger

The children began by making observational drawings of little plastic animals that are sometimes in the circus.


I gave each child a huge page and a black crayon. We had a discussion about clowns. They were aware of how different clowns can be. We talked about their shoes, then they drew two or three different sorts of shoes a clown might wear. We moved on to their pants and they drew two or three different sorts of pants a clown might wear. We did this with their hair and make up as well.


With all this knowledge, the children drew a clown with pencil.






I punched holes at the top of a stiff piece of card. The children threaded a little string through and attempted to tie it in a knot. I tied quite a few knots.


The children drew their clown using kebab sticks and indian ink on the card.


They dried quite quickly and the children added colour with coloured pencils.




On a very large piece of paper the children made a circus tent full of circus stuff. They are such interesting pictures to look at. They decided weather they wanted to work with others, or alone.








The clowns










The circus's.












The art is hanging in the school hall and corridor. I have also squirrelled a few clowns away to hang at Art Splash at the Michael Fowler centre in a few weeks.
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I have spent an entire evening trying to find out how to restore the 'comments' setting on Blogger. It disappeared. I can't!
Therefore, if someone adds a comment, I can't publish it as I have lost the means.  I'll continue to persevere as I love getting comments.
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 Gretchen's lesson with 6 & 7 year olds


The children made several pieces of art based on a single sunflower. The observational drawing they made at the beginning of the day was beautiful. The second drawing was a repeat of the first but with their non drawing hand.



 They moved on to making a large black crayon sunflower.



















They prepared themselves for colouring, by making a blending strip in oil pastels. Then they went on to adding the colour to their sunflowers.

Blending practice strips.














Some of this lovely art will be on display in our hall.




Our additional pen and coloured pencil sunflower.

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Gretchen's lesson with 7 and 8 year olds


We had an art day with a twist today. Sally, a hospice nurse came to share the delivery of a lesson on diversity and dealing with "tough stuff".

Sally read the children a fabulous book about a new immigrant, who used a blanket from her homeland as a comfort when life was challenging.

We had a discussion about tough situations and how we deal with them.



 As a class, the children made a blanket which had a "tree of Life" on it. All the children contributed text written on fabric, to different parts of the tree...roots, trunk and branches. They stitched them in to place, to create the tree.


 The observational drawing the children made at the beginning of the day (a leaf) was used as reference when they made leaves to attach to the tree.








The children worked in groups to create their own 'Tree of Life" on paper. Sally worked closely with each group so they understood the relationship of the roots, trunk and branches with our lives.
Capes from other cultures










 The cape will be on displayed at Mary Potter Hospice.

Our trees, beautifully embellished.

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